Tissue and Organ Procurement: The administrative procedures involved with acquiring TISSUES or organs for TRANSPLANTATION through various programs, systems, or organizations. These procedures include obtaining consent from TISSUE DONORS and arranging for transportation of donated tissues and organs, after TISSUE HARVESTING, to HOSPITALS for processing and transplantation.Organ Transplantation: Transference of an organ between individuals of the same species or between individuals of different species.Multiple Organ Failure: A progressive condition usually characterized by combined failure of several organs such as the lungs, liver, kidney, along with some clotting mechanisms, usually postinjury or postoperative.Organ Size: The measurement of an organ in volume, mass, or heaviness.Organ of Corti: The spiral EPITHELIUM containing sensory AUDITORY HAIR CELLS and supporting cells in the cochlea. Organ of Corti, situated on the BASILAR MEMBRANE and overlaid by a gelatinous TECTORIAL MEMBRANE, converts sound-induced mechanical waves to neural impulses to the brain.Organ Specificity: Characteristic restricted to a particular organ of the body, such as a cell type, metabolic response or expression of a particular protein or antigen.Vomeronasal Organ: An accessory chemoreceptor organ that is separated from the main OLFACTORY MUCOSA. It is situated at the base of nasal septum close to the VOMER and NASAL BONES. It forwards chemical signals (such as PHEROMONES) to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, thus influencing reproductive and social behavior. In humans, most of its structures except the vomeronasal duct undergo regression after birth.Subfornical Organ: A structure, situated close to the intraventricular foramen, which induces DRINKING BEHAVIOR after stimulation with ANGIOTENSIN II.Pelvic Organ Prolapse: Abnormal descent of a pelvic organ resulting in the protrusion of the organ beyond its normal anatomical confines. Symptoms often include vaginal discomfort, DYSPAREUNIA; URINARY STRESS INCONTINENCE; and FECAL INCONTINENCE.Tissue Donors: Individuals supplying living tissue, organs, cells, blood or blood components for transfer or transplantation to histocompatible recipients.Tissue and Organ Harvesting: The procedure of removing TISSUES, organs, or specimens from DONORS for reuse, such as TRANSPLANTATION.Brain Death: A state of prolonged irreversible cessation of all brain activity, including lower brain stem function with the complete absence of voluntary movements, responses to stimuli, brain stem reflexes, and spontaneous respirations. Reversible conditions which mimic this clinical state (e.g., sedative overdose, hypothermia, etc.) are excluded prior to making the determination of brain death. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp348-9)Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.Tissue Distribution: Accumulation of a drug or chemical substance in various organs (including those not relevant to its pharmacologic or therapeutic action). This distribution depends on the blood flow or perfusion rate of the organ, the ability of the drug to penetrate organ membranes, tissue specificity, protein binding. The distribution is usually expressed as tissue to plasma ratios.Enamel Organ: Epithelial cells surrounding the dental papilla and differentiated into three layers: the inner enamel epithelium, consisting of ameloblasts which eventually form the enamel, and the enamel pulp and external enamel epithelium, both of which atrophy and disappear before and upon eruption of the tooth, respectively.Kidney: Body organ that filters blood for the secretion of URINE and that regulates ion concentrations.Animal Structures: Organs and other anatomical structures of non-human vertebrate and invertebrate animals.Spleen: An encapsulated lymphatic organ through which venous blood filters.Subcommissural Organ: Ependymal derivative located at the junction of the THIRD VENTRICLE and the CEREBRAL AQUEDUCT; and the SOMATOSTATIN SECRETING CELLS.Organs at Risk: Organs which might be damaged during exposure to a toxin or to some form of therapy. It most frequently refers to healthy organs located in the radiation field during radiation therapy.Transplants: Organs, tissues, or cells taken from the body for grafting into another area of the same body or into another individual.Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action during the developmental stages of an organism.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Mice, Inbred C57BLLymphoid Tissue: Specialized tissues that are components of the lymphatic system. They provide fixed locations within the body where a variety of LYMPHOCYTES can form, mature and multiply. The lymphoid tissues are connected by a network of LYMPHATIC VESSELS.Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Presumed Consent: An institutional policy of granting authority to health personnel to perform procedures on patients or to remove organs from cadavers for transplantation unless an objection is registered by family members or by the patient prior to death. This also includes emergency care of minors without prior parental consent.Organogenesis: Formation of differentiated cells and complicated tissue organization to provide specialized functions.Bioartificial Organs: Artificial organs that are composites of biomaterials and cells. The biomaterial can act as a membrane (container) as in BIOARTIFICIAL LIVER or a scaffold as in bioartificial skin.Viscera: Any of the large interior organs in any one of the three great cavities of the body, especially in the abdomen.Transplantation: Transference of a tissue or organ from either an alive or deceased donor, within an individual, between individuals of the same species, or between individuals of different species.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Gene Expression Regulation, Plant: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in plants.Liver Transplantation: The transference of a part of or an entire liver from one human or animal to another.Genitalia, Male: The male reproductive organs. They are divided into the external organs (PENIS; SCROTUM;and URETHRA) and the internal organs (TESTIS; EPIDIDYMIS; VAS DEFERENS; SEMINAL VESICLES; EJACULATORY DUCTS; PROSTATE; and BULBOURETHRAL GLANDS).Kidney Transplantation: The transference of a kidney from one human or animal to another.Organ Preservation Solutions: Solutions used to store organs and minimize tissue damage, particularly while awaiting implantation.Arabidopsis: A plant genus of the family BRASSICACEAE that contains ARABIDOPSIS PROTEINS and MADS DOMAIN PROTEINS. The species A. thaliana is used for experiments in classical plant genetics as well as molecular genetic studies in plant physiology, biochemistry, and development.In Situ Hybridization: A technique that localizes specific nucleic acid sequences within intact chromosomes, eukaryotic cells, or bacterial cells through the use of specific nucleic acid-labeled probes.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Morphogenesis: The development of anatomical structures to create the form of a single- or multi-cell organism. Morphogenesis provides form changes of a part, parts, or the whole organism.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Cadaver: A dead body, usually a human body.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Thymus Gland: A single, unpaired primary lymphoid organ situated in the MEDIASTINUM, extending superiorly into the neck to the lower edge of the THYROID GLAND and inferiorly to the fourth costal cartilage. It is necessary for normal development of immunologic function early in life. By puberty, it begins to involute and much of the tissue is replaced by fat.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Digestive System: A group of organs stretching from the MOUTH to the ANUS, serving to breakdown foods, assimilate nutrients, and eliminate waste. In humans, the digestive system includes the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT and the accessory glands (LIVER; BILIARY TRACT; PANCREAS).RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Arabidopsis Proteins: Proteins that originate from plants species belonging to the genus ARABIDOPSIS. The most intensely studied species of Arabidopsis, Arabidopsis thaliana, is commonly used in laboratory experiments.Radiation Dosage: The amount of radiation energy that is deposited in a unit mass of material, such as tissues of plants or animal. In RADIOTHERAPY, radiation dosage is expressed in gray units (Gy). In RADIOLOGIC HEALTH, the dosage is expressed by the product of absorbed dose (Gy) and quality factor (a function of linear energy transfer), and is called radiation dose equivalent in sievert units (Sv).Cell Differentiation: Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.Sepsis: Systemic inflammatory response syndrome with a proven or suspected infectious etiology. When sepsis is associated with organ dysfunction distant from the site of infection, it is called severe sepsis. When sepsis is accompanied by HYPOTENSION despite adequate fluid infusion, it is called SEPTIC SHOCK.Radiometry: The measurement of radiation by photography, as in x-ray film and film badge, by Geiger-Mueller tube, and by SCINTILLATION COUNTING.Heart Transplantation: The transference of a heart from one human or animal to another.Mice, Knockout: Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Mice, Transgenic: Laboratory mice that have been produced from a genetically manipulated EGG or EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.Microscopy, Electron, Scanning: Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.Genes, Plant: The functional hereditary units of PLANTS.Graft Rejection: An immune response with both cellular and humoral components, directed against an allogeneic transplant, whose tissue antigens are not compatible with those of the recipient.Plant Structures: The parts of plants, including SEEDS.Intestines: The section of the alimentary canal from the STOMACH to the ANAL CANAL. It includes the LARGE INTESTINE and SMALL INTESTINE.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Plant Leaves: Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)Graft Survival: The survival of a graft in a host, the factors responsible for the survival and the changes occurring within the graft during growth in the host.Mice, Inbred BALB CBase Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Plant Proteins: Proteins found in plants (flowers, herbs, shrubs, trees, etc.). The concept does not include proteins found in vegetables for which VEGETABLE PROTEINS is available.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Uterine Prolapse: Downward displacement of the UTERUS. It is classified in various degrees: in the first degree the UTERINE CERVIX is within the vaginal orifice; in the second degree the cervix is outside the orifice; in the third degree the entire uterus is outside the orifice.Pancreas: A nodular organ in the ABDOMEN that contains a mixture of ENDOCRINE GLANDS and EXOCRINE GLANDS. The small endocrine portion consists of the ISLETS OF LANGERHANS secreting a number of hormones into the blood stream. The large exocrine portion (EXOCRINE PANCREAS) is a compound acinar gland that secretes several digestive enzymes into the pancreatic ductal system that empties into the DUODENUM.Whole-Body Counting: Measurement of radioactivity in the entire human body.Epithelium: One or more layers of EPITHELIAL CELLS, supported by the basal lamina, which covers the inner or outer surfaces of the body.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Testis: The male gonad containing two functional parts: the SEMINIFEROUS TUBULES for the production and transport of male germ cells (SPERMATOGENESIS) and the interstitial compartment containing LEYDIG CELLS that produce ANDROGENS.Death: Irreversible cessation of all bodily functions, manifested by absence of spontaneous breathing and total loss of cardiovascular and cerebral functions.Transcription Factors: Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.Waiting Lists: Prospective patient listings for appointments or treatments.Lymph Nodes: They are oval or bean shaped bodies (1 - 30 mm in diameter) located along the lymphatic system.Immunosuppressive Agents: Agents that suppress immune function by one of several mechanisms of action. Classical cytotoxic immunosuppressants act by inhibiting DNA synthesis. Others may act through activation of T-CELLS or by inhibiting the activation of HELPER CELLS. While immunosuppression has been brought about in the past primarily to prevent rejection of transplanted organs, new applications involving mediation of the effects of INTERLEUKINS and other CYTOKINES are emerging.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Body Patterning: The processes occurring in early development that direct morphogenesis. They specify the body plan ensuring that cells will proceed to differentiate, grow, and diversify in size and shape at the correct relative positions. Included are axial patterning, segmentation, compartment specification, limb position, organ boundary patterning, blood vessel patterning, etc.Donor Selection: The procedure established to evaluate the health status and risk factors of the potential DONORS of biological materials. Donors are selected based on the principles that their health will not be compromised in the process, and the donated materials, such as TISSUES or organs, are safe for reuse in the recipients.Hair Cells, Auditory: Sensory cells in the organ of Corti, characterized by their apical stereocilia (hair-like projections). The inner and outer hair cells, as defined by their proximity to the core of spongy bone (the modiolus), change morphologically along the COCHLEA. Towards the cochlear apex, the length of hair cell bodies and their apical STEREOCILIA increase, allowing differential responses to various frequencies of sound.Rats, Wistar: A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.Gene Expression: The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Drosophila Proteins: Proteins that originate from insect species belonging to the genus DROSOPHILA. The proteins from the most intensely studied species of Drosophila, DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER, are the subject of much interest in the area of MORPHOGENESIS and development.Fetus: The unborn young of a viviparous mammal, in the postembryonic period, after the major structures have been outlined. In humans, the unborn young from the end of the eighth week after CONCEPTION until BIRTH, as distinguished from the earlier EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.Body Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Homeodomain Proteins: Proteins encoded by homeobox genes (GENES, HOMEOBOX) that exhibit structural similarity to certain prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA-binding proteins. Homeodomain proteins are involved in the control of gene expression during morphogenesis and development (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION, DEVELOPMENTAL).Transplantation Immunology: A general term for the complex phenomena involved in allo- and xenograft rejection by a host and graft vs host reaction. Although the reactions involved in transplantation immunology are primarily thymus-dependent phenomena of cellular immunity, humoral factors also play a part in late rejection.Lung Transplantation: The transference of either one or both of the lungs from one human or animal to another.Ear, Inner: The essential part of the hearing organ consists of two labyrinthine compartments: the bony labyrinthine and the membranous labyrinth. The bony labyrinth is a complex of three interconnecting cavities or spaces (COCHLEA; VESTIBULAR LABYRINTH; and SEMICIRCULAR CANALS) in the TEMPORAL BONE. Within the bony labyrinth lies the membranous labyrinth which is a complex of sacs and tubules (COCHLEAR DUCT; SACCULE AND UTRICLE; and SEMICIRCULAR DUCTS) forming a continuous space enclosed by EPITHELIUM and connective tissue. These spaces are filled with LABYRINTHINE FLUIDS of various compositions.Skin: The outer covering of the body that protects it from the environment. It is composed of the DERMIS and the EPIDERMIS.Plant Roots: The usually underground portions of a plant that serve as support, store food, and through which water and mineral nutrients enter the plant. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982; Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Plants, Genetically Modified: PLANTS, or their progeny, whose GENOME has been altered by GENETIC ENGINEERING.Cochlea: The part of the inner ear (LABYRINTH) that is concerned with hearing. It forms the anterior part of the labyrinth, as a snail-like structure that is situated almost horizontally anterior to the VESTIBULAR LABYRINTH.Human Body: The human being as a non-anatomical and non-zoological entity. The emphasis is on the philosophical or artistic treatment of the human being, and includes lay and social attitudes toward the body in history. (From J. Cassedy, NLM History of Medicine Division)Living Donors: Non-cadaveric providers of organs for transplant to related or non-related recipients.Torpedo: A genus of the Torpedinidae family consisting of several species. Members of this family have powerful electric organs and are commonly called electric rays.Cell Movement: The movement of cells from one location to another. Distinguish from CYTOKINESIS which is the process of dividing the CYTOPLASM of a cell.Mechanoreceptors: Cells specialized to transduce mechanical stimuli and relay that information centrally in the nervous system. Mechanoreceptor cells include the INNER EAR hair cells, which mediate hearing and balance, and the various somatosensory receptors, often with non-neural accessory structures.Zebrafish: An exotic species of the family CYPRINIDAE, originally from Asia, that has been introduced in North America. They are used in embryological studies and to study the effects of certain chemicals on development.Drosophila: A genus of small, two-winged flies containing approximately 900 described species. These organisms are the most extensively studied of all genera from the standpoint of genetics and cytology.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Genitalia, Female: The female reproductive organs. The external organs include the VULVA; BARTHOLIN'S GLANDS; and CLITORIS. The internal organs include the VAGINA; UTERUS; OVARY; and FALLOPIAN TUBES.Pancreas Transplantation: The transference of a pancreas from one human or animal to another.Heart: The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.Larva: Wormlike or grublike stage, following the egg in the life cycle of insects, worms, and other metamorphosing animals.Gene Expression Regulation: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Seminal Vesicles: A saclike, glandular diverticulum on each ductus deferens in male vertebrates. It is united with the excretory duct and serves for temporary storage of semen. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Altruism: Consideration and concern for others, as opposed to self-love or egoism, which can be a motivating influence.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.T-Lymphocytes: Lymphocytes responsible for cell-mediated immunity. Two types have been identified - cytotoxic (T-LYMPHOCYTES, CYTOTOXIC) and helper T-lymphocytes (T-LYMPHOCYTES, HELPER-INDUCER). They are formed when lymphocytes circulate through the THYMUS GLAND and differentiate to thymocytes. When exposed to an antigen, they divide rapidly and produce large numbers of new T cells sensitized to that antigen.Shock, Hemorrhagic: Acute hemorrhage or excessive fluid loss resulting in HYPOVOLEMIA.Gene Expression Profiling: The determination of the pattern of genes expressed at the level of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION, under specific circumstances or in a specific cell.Organ Trafficking: Criminal activity that occurs in three broad categories. Firstly, cases where traffickers force or deceive the victims into giving up an organ. Secondly, there are cases where victims formally or informally agree to sell an organ and are cheated because they are not paid for the organ or are paid less than the promised price. Thirdly, vulnerable persons are treated for an ailment, which may or may not exist and thereupon organs are removed without the victim's knowledge.Models, Animal: Non-human animals, selected because of specific characteristics, for use in experimental research, teaching, or testing.Animals, Newborn: Refers to animals in the period of time just after birth.Liver Diseases: Pathological processes of the LIVER.Regeneration: The physiological renewal, repair, or replacement of tissue.Mice, Inbred Strains: Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations, or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. All animals within an inbred strain trace back to a common ancestor in the twentieth generation.Myocardium: The muscle tissue of the HEART. It is composed of striated, involuntary muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC) connected to form the contractile pump to generate blood flow.Cell Proliferation: All of the processes involved in increasing CELL NUMBER including CELL DIVISION.Pineal Gland: A light-sensitive neuroendocrine organ attached to the roof of the THIRD VENTRICLE of the brain. The pineal gland secretes MELATONIN, other BIOGENIC AMINES and NEUROPEPTIDES.Intestine, Small: The portion of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT between the PYLORUS of the STOMACH and the ILEOCECAL VALVE of the LARGE INTESTINE. It is divisible into three portions: the DUODENUM, the JEJUNUM, and the ILEUM.Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome: A systemic inflammatory response to a variety of clinical insults, characterized by two or more of the following conditions: (1) fever >38 degrees C or HYPOTHERMIA 90 beat/minute; (3) tachypnea >24 breaths/minute; (4) LEUKOCYTOSIS >12,000 cells/cubic mm or 10% immature forms. While usually related to infection, SIRS can also be associated with noninfectious insults such as TRAUMA; BURNS; or PANCREATITIS. If infection is involved, a patient with SIRS is said to have SEPSIS.Immunosuppression: Deliberate prevention or diminution of the host's immune response. It may be nonspecific as in the administration of immunosuppressive agents (drugs or radiation) or by lymphocyte depletion or may be specific as in desensitization or the simultaneous administration of antigen and immunosuppressive drugs.Urogenital System: All the organs involved in reproduction and the formation and release of URINE. It includes the kidneys, ureters, BLADDER; URETHRA, and the organs of reproduction - ovaries, UTERUS; FALLOPIAN TUBES; VAGINA; and CLITORIS in women and the testes; SEMINAL VESICLES; PROSTATE; seminal ducts; and PENIS in men.Stem Cells: Relatively undifferentiated cells that retain the ability to divide and proliferate throughout postnatal life to provide progenitor cells that can differentiate into specialized cells.Histocytochemistry: Study of intracellular distribution of chemicals, reaction sites, enzymes, etc., by means of staining reactions, radioactive isotope uptake, selective metal distribution in electron microscopy, or other methods.Cloning, Molecular: The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.Inflammation: A pathological process characterized by injury or destruction of tissues caused by a variety of cytologic and chemical reactions. It is usually manifested by typical signs of pain, heat, redness, swelling, and loss of function.Animals, Genetically Modified: ANIMALS whose GENOME has been altered by GENETIC ENGINEERING, or their offspring.Gift Giving: The bestowing of tangible or intangible benefits, voluntarily and usually without expectation of anything in return. However, gift giving may be motivated by feelings of ALTRUISM or gratitude, by a sense of obligation, or by the hope of receiving something in return.Nasal Septum: The partition separating the two NASAL CAVITIES in the midplane. It is formed by the SEPTAL NASAL CARTILAGE, parts of skull bones (ETHMOID BONE; VOMER), and membranous parts.Indoleacetic Acids: Acetic acid derivatives of the heterocyclic compound indole. (Merck Index, 11th ed)Sequence Homology, Amino Acid: The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.Embryo, Nonmammalian: The developmental entity of a fertilized egg (ZYGOTE) in animal species other than MAMMALS. For chickens, use CHICK EMBRYO.Toxicity Tests: An array of tests used to determine the toxicity of a substance to living systems. These include tests on clinical drugs, foods, and environmental pollutants.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Mesoderm: The middle germ layer of an embryo derived from three paired mesenchymal aggregates along the neural tube.DNA, Complementary: Single-stranded complementary DNA synthesized from an RNA template by the action of RNA-dependent DNA polymerase. cDNA (i.e., complementary DNA, not circular DNA, not C-DNA) is used in a variety of molecular cloning experiments as well as serving as a specific hybridization probe.Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Microscopy, Electron: Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.Phantoms, Imaging: Devices or objects in various imaging techniques used to visualize or enhance visualization by simulating conditions encountered in the procedure. Phantoms are used very often in procedures employing or measuring x-irradiation or radioactive material to evaluate performance. Phantoms often have properties similar to human tissue. Water demonstrates absorbing properties similar to normal tissue, hence water-filled phantoms are used to map radiation levels. Phantoms are used also as teaching aids to simulate real conditions with x-ray or ultrasonic machines. (From Iturralde, Dictionary and Handbook of Nuclear Medicine and Clinical Imaging, 1990)Shock, Septic: Sepsis associated with HYPOTENSION or hypoperfusion despite adequate fluid resuscitation. Perfusion abnormalities may include, but are not limited to LACTIC ACIDOSIS; OLIGURIA; or acute alteration in mental status.Reperfusion Injury: Adverse functional, metabolic, or structural changes in ischemic tissues resulting from the restoration of blood flow to the tissue (REPERFUSION), including swelling; HEMORRHAGE; NECROSIS; and damage from FREE RADICALS. The most common instance is MYOCARDIAL REPERFUSION INJURY.Body Burden: The total amount of a chemical, metal or radioactive substance present at any time after absorption in the body of man or animal.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Epithelial Cells: Cells that line the inner and outer surfaces of the body by forming cellular layers (EPITHELIUM) or masses. Epithelial cells lining the SKIN; the MOUTH; the NOSE; and the ANAL CANAL derive from ectoderm; those lining the RESPIRATORY SYSTEM and the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM derive from endoderm; others (CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM and LYMPHATIC SYSTEM) derive from mesoderm. Epithelial cells can be classified mainly by cell shape and function into squamous, glandular and transitional epithelial cells.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Antibodies, Monoclonal: Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Embryonic and Fetal Development: Morphological and physiological development of EMBRYOS or FETUSES.Cell Division: The fission of a CELL. It includes CYTOKINESIS, when the CYTOPLASM of a cell is divided, and CELL NUCLEUS DIVISION.Cotyledon: A part of the embryo in a seed plant. The number of cotyledons is an important feature in classifying plants. In seeds without an endosperm, they store food which is used in germination. In some plants, they emerge above the soil surface and become the first photosynthetic leaves. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)DNA Primers: Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.Aging: The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.Prostate: A gland in males that surrounds the neck of the URINARY BLADDER and the URETHRA. It secretes a substance that liquefies coagulated semen. It is situated in the pelvic cavity behind the lower part of the PUBIC SYMPHYSIS, above the deep layer of the triangular ligament, and rests upon the RECTUM.Genitalia: The external and internal organs related to reproduction.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Fishes: A group of cold-blooded, aquatic vertebrates having gills, fins, a cartilaginous or bony endoskeleton, and elongated bodies covered with scales.Membrane Proteins: Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.Mice, Inbred ICRLabyrinth Supporting Cells: Cells forming a framework supporting the sensory AUDITORY HAIR CELLS in the organ of Corti. Lateral to the medial inner hair cells, there are inner pillar cells, outer pillar cells, Deiters cells, Hensens cells, Claudius cells, Boettchers cells, and others.Gymnotiformes: An order of neotropical electric fish found chiefly in the waters of South America. They continually emit weak electric discharges, which they use in object location and communication. A most popular species of research interest is the electric eel, ELECTROPHORUS electricus.Mice, Mutant Strains: Mice bearing mutant genes which are phenotypically expressed in the animals.Embryo, Mammalian: The entity of a developing mammal (MAMMALS), generally from the cleavage of a ZYGOTE to the end of embryonic differentiation of basic structures. For the human embryo, this represents the first two months of intrauterine development preceding the stages of the FETUS.Cytokines: Non-antibody proteins secreted by inflammatory leukocytes and some non-leukocytic cells, that act as intercellular mediators. They differ from classical hormones in that they are produced by a number of tissue or cell types rather than by specialized glands. They generally act locally in a paracrine or autocrine rather than endocrine manner.Salivary Glands: Glands that secrete SALIVA in the MOUTH. There are three pairs of salivary glands (PAROTID GLAND; SUBLINGUAL GLAND; SUBMANDIBULAR GLAND).Plant Components, Aerial: The above-ground plant without the roots.Rats, Inbred Strains: Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. This also includes animals with a long history of closed colony breeding.Transplantation, Heterologous: Transplantation between animals of different species.Stomach: An organ of digestion situated in the left upper quadrant of the abdomen between the termination of the ESOPHAGUS and the beginning of the DUODENUM.Religion and Medicine: The interrelationship of medicine and religion.Cell Lineage: The developmental history of specific differentiated cell types as traced back to the original STEM CELLS in the embryo.Liver Failure: Severe inability of the LIVER to perform its normal metabolic functions, as evidenced by severe JAUNDICE and abnormal serum levels of AMMONIA; BILIRUBIN; ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE; ASPARTATE AMINOTRANSFERASE; LACTATE DEHYDROGENASES; and albumin/globulin ratio. (Blakiston's Gould Medical Dictionary, 4th ed)Radiotherapy Planning, Computer-Assisted: Computer-assisted mathematical calculations of beam angles, intensities of radiation, and duration of irradiation in radiotherapy.Intensive Care Units: Hospital units providing continuous surveillance and care to acutely ill patients.Urinary Bladder: A musculomembranous sac along the URINARY TRACT. URINE flows from the KIDNEYS into the bladder via the ureters (URETER), and is held there until URINATION.Radioisotopes: Isotopes that exhibit radioactivity and undergo radioactive decay. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed & McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)AGAMOUS Protein, Arabidopsis: A plant homeotic protein involved in the development of stamens and carpels of Arabidopsis thaliana. It is a DNA-binding protein that contains the MADS-box domain. It is one of the four founder proteins that structurally define the superfamily of MADS DOMAIN PROTEINS.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Pelvic Floor: Soft tissue formed mainly by the pelvic diaphragm, which is composed of the two levator ani and two coccygeus muscles. The pelvic diaphragm lies just below the pelvic aperture (outlet) and separates the pelvic cavity from the PERINEUM. It extends between the PUBIC BONE anteriorly and the COCCYX posteriorly.Transplantation Tolerance: An induced state of non-reactivity to grafted tissue from a donor organism that would ordinarily trigger a cell-mediated or humoral immune response.Ovary: The reproductive organ (GONADS) in female animals. In vertebrates, the ovary contains two functional parts: the OVARIAN FOLLICLE for the production of female germ cells (OOGENESIS); and the endocrine cells (GRANULOSA CELLS; THECA CELLS; and LUTEAL CELLS) for the production of ESTROGENS and PROGESTERONE.Pancreatitis: INFLAMMATION of the PANCREAS. Pancreatitis is classified as acute unless there are computed tomographic or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatographic findings of CHRONIC PANCREATITIS (International Symposium on Acute Pancreatitis, Atlanta, 1992). The two most common forms of acute pancreatitis are ALCOHOLIC PANCREATITIS and gallstone pancreatitis.Third-Party Consent: Informed consent given by someone other than the patient or research subject.Hearing: The ability or act of sensing and transducing ACOUSTIC STIMULATION to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. It is also called audition.Drosophila melanogaster: A species of fruit fly much used in genetics because of the large size of its chromosomes.Tissue Transplantation: Transference of tissue within an individual, between individuals of the same species, or between individuals of different species.Saccule and Utricle: Two membranous sacs within the vestibular labyrinth of the INNER EAR. The saccule communicates with COCHLEAR DUCT through the ductus reuniens, and communicates with utricle through the utriculosaccular duct from which the ENDOLYMPHATIC DUCT arises. The utricle and saccule have sensory areas (acoustic maculae) which are innervated by the VESTIBULAR NERVE.Whole Body Imaging: The creation of a visual display of the inside of the entire body of a human or animal for the purposes of diagnostic evaluation. This is most commonly achieved by using MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING; or POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY.
"United Network for Organ Sharing". United Network for Organ Sharing. "Donate Life". Lifebanc. "American Association For The ... Previously, he was Chair of the UNOS (United Network for Organ Sharing) Donation Committee; Chair of the Ohio Solid Organ ... Transplant Consortium; Chair of the Lifebanc (Northeast Ohio organ procurement organization) Board of Trustees; and a member of ...
The church sits on land that was donated in 1855. The church building underwent a major renovation in 1898. Its Gothic revival ... Subsequent additions include a backlighted painting of Jesus; an organ, piano, and chimes; a parsonage and Sunday school built ...
"Donate organs? No, grow them from scratch". CNET. CBS Interactive. Retrieved 27 May 2016. Herro, Alana (30 September 2011). " ...
The Estey company donated an organ. Boston Smith, who was initially aboard Evangel, had been provided with a letter from ... Kuntz then donated $25,000 to fund a Barney & Smith built steel chapel car in 1912 named St. Peter. At the time it was built, ... Donated by the Conaway family in memory of their daughter, Grace, it was also built by the Barney & Smith factory in 1915, at a ... Still others were donated by the various Baptist organizations; the car's furnishings were a gift from the women of the First ...
Some donated organs are taken from non-heart-beating donors. Organs from brain deaths, however, have a better success rate, and ... It states that organ donors must be dead before removing the organs, and removing the organs is not the cause of death. This ... "organ recovery". Many organs can be extracted, and many lives can be saved by one body. The bodies are generally those of organ ... Other organs in the body do not have this capability and need the brain to be functioning to send signals to the organs to ...
"In hospital awaiting her third liver transplant, Lucia decided to become crusader for organ donation and 'Live Loudly Donate ... She started the Live Loudly Donate Proudly campaign. "Triple transplant teenager campaigns for organ donation". The Irish News ... "Organ donor campaigner, 18, on honours list". 29 December 2017. Retrieved 30 December 2017 - via www.bbc.co.uk. Fixers UK (10 ... Lucia Quinney Mee BEM (born c. 1999) is a Northern Irish campaigner for organ donation, having had three liver transplants ...
A new organ was donated in 1959. The interior of the church was also repainted by Ash and Nephew, and Brisbane Lead Light ... A new organ was purchased, a memorial side pulpit was built, and three memorial chairs and a carved timber flower stand was ... The southern portions of both transepts are integrated with the body of the church and contain pews, and a pipe organ is ...
His organs were donated. "The racing career of Gustavo Sondermann - in detail". driverdb.com. Retrieved 2011-04-04. Honorio, ...
Henze donated his organs. After he died, his heart, his liver and both of his kidneys were transplanted into seriously ill ... Olivia Blair (18 August 2016). "German canoe slalom coach Stefan Henze who died in Rio saves four lives through organ ...
In the following year the townsfolk of Aue donated a new altar table. Its first organ was installed around 1654. When the old ... After the parish of Aue had donated 27,500 marks (ℳ) in 1885 for the new St. Nicholas' Church and after protracted negotiations ...
He has also signed relevant documents, civilly known as 'LIVING WILL', expressing his will to donate his vital organs and body ... Jerry has donated his O-Rh Negative Blood 189 times till March, 2017. Having crossed the highest possible number of blood ... for human organ donations; MANITHAM, for political analysis and action; IGFA (Ignatian Family), for cosmic Ignatian ... organ donation. This book has also appeared in English titled, " A PRESENT FOR THE FUTURE ". A WEBSITE, http://www.dhanam.org ...
Since then, she promoted organ donation and later in 2009, donated 60% of her liver to a Malaysian teenage girl, Lee An Qi, at ... appointed one of the Organ Donation Ambassadors to promote organ donation in Malaysia which registers only about 200,000 people ... In 2009, she came to prominence when she donated part of her liver to a stranger. Chew's parents divorced when she was 5 years ... After reading an article in a book called Life's Great Gifts about an eleven-year-old girl who pledged her organs, she was ...
A new lychgate, reredos and altar were installed in 1913; all were donated to the church as memorials. Another new organ ... which was donated by the owner of Wakehurst Place. This extension, made in 1944, prevented the ancient gravestones in the ... and the rector bought the church its first proper organ, built by a Brighton-based firm for £133 (£11,000 in 2018). This was in ... turn replaced with a new organ, which cost £1,100 (£112,000 in 2018), in 1887, during the main period of restoration ; the ...
Its pipe organ was donated by Andrew Carnegie. The church is also well known for its large stained glass windows, designed by ... Initially, he donated a site at the corner of Church and Third Streets for the church. But, he later purchased a site from C.B ...
Andrew Carnegie donated the pipe organ for $8,000. Pope John Paul II decreed on September 9, 1996 that St. Michael's Church was ... The three bells in the tower were donated by Mr. and Mrs. Charles Schwab, Mr. and Mrs. John Schwab and the Rev. Ferdinand ...
The pipe organ was donated by Mr. Darling. The Bible and hymn books were donated by Mr. and Mrs. Throp. At that time, the land ... Except for £11.10s which was donated by sponsors from Leeds, the rest of the funds came out of profits of the printing press. ... The architect of the building was J H Stephen, who also donated the circular glass over the door. The communion table, pulpit, ... The marble floor of the chancel was donated in the memory of Mrs. Vanes. An anonymous donor contributed towards the church bell ...
The baroque pipe organ was donated in 1986. In 1974, Robert S. and Ellen B. Trower donated the adjacent land upon which the ...
"Tamluk MP Satyagopal Misra's organ, skin donated to hospital". Sumati Yengkhom. The Times of India. 31 May 2013. Retrieved 4 ...
The choir contains an organ built by the Austrian firm of Gebrüder Rieger. The organ was donated around 1910 by King Ferdinand ...
"Israel to donate equipment to help Taiwan burn patients". China Times. Central News Agency (Republic of China). 26 July 2015. ... On 30 June ROC's Organ Registry and Sharing Center called for urgent donations of cadaver skin, since there were just 115 rolls ... "Citing need for skin, organ center calls for donations". Focus Taiwan. 2015-06-30. Retrieved 2015-07-12. Sun, Hsin-hsuan (July ... while another suicidal man donated his skin to the victims. New Taipei City's mayor Eric Chu ordered an immediate shutdown of ...
In 1879 an organ chamber and vestry were added. The local historian W. G. Hoskings did not care for Rolle's restoration of the ... Rolle also donated the marble and alabaster pulpit. A memorial cross erected by the parishioners in his memory stands in the ...
When a decision was made to purchase a larger and more suitable organ, Lars Wahlberg received the contract to build an organ ... The carved wood baptismal font was donated by the ship builder Gilbert Sheldon. The church silver is preserved in a massive ... Wahlberg's organ was replaced in 1905 by one built by Åkerman & Lund Orgelbyggeri in Stockholm; it was reconstructed in 1982-87 ... The church's first organ came from Hedvig Eleonora Church. ...
Xenotransplants could save thousands of patients waiting for donated organs. The animal organ, probably from a pig or baboon ... A worldwide shortage of organs for clinical implantation causes about 20-35% of patients who need replacement organs to die on ... Extensive research is required to determine whether animal organs can replace the physiological functions of human organs. Many ... tissues or organs from one species to another.[3] Such cells, tissues or organs are called xenografts or xenotransplants. It is ...
"It's now legal to donate HIV-positive organs in California". Gay Star News. May 27, 2016.. ... This law is also in-line with the federal HIV Organ Policy Equity Act, which reversed the federal ban on this procedure back in ... Surgeons who transplant organs from HIV-positive donors into HIV-positive patients are also protected from liability and from ... The law protects organ donation and transplantation between HIV-positive people in the state of California. ...
... to donate an organ and/or tissue; to receive prophylactic immunization; to discuss a problem other than a disease or injury; ... Diseases of the blood and blood-forming organs and certain disorders involving the immune mechanism ...
Friston KJ, Stephan KE, Montague R, Dolan RJ (2014). "Computational psychiatry: the brain as a phantastic organ". Lancet ...
The endothelium can be replaced by transplanting allogeneic tissue; however, access to donated tissue is limited worldwide ... Future developments in organ preservation may significantly improve transplant outcomes. Our novel analysis forms the basis of ... Tissue damage at the time of organ transplantation has a negative impact on the subsequent success of the procedure, both in ... Tolerance induction after organ transplantation, "delayed tolerance," via the mixed chimerism approach. Yamada, Yohei; Benichou ...
... occurs when a pelvic organ-such as your bladder-drops (prolapses) from its normal place in your lower ... This can happen when the muscles that hold your pelvic organs in place get weak or stretched from childbirth or... ... Pelvic Organ Prolapse. Topic Overview. What is pelvic organ prolapse?. Pelvic organ prolapse occurs when a pelvic organ-such as ... Organs that can be involved when you have pelvic prolapse include the:. *Bladder. This is the most common kind of pelvic organ ...
They treated donated organs outside the body with drugs and captured fat that was washed out of the liver through a filter on a ... Since it can easily infect an organ recipient, those organs are usually discarded despite the urgent need. ... Many of those organs are going to waste. For example, last year less than 4% of hepatitis C positive donors in the United ... It could also significantly cut down on wasted donor organs. The technique used in Toronto, known as ex vivo lung perfusion, ...
We have thousands of promotional, cool and Donate Organ Buttons for every occasion. Buy your own button or pin today online or ... The best Donate Organ Buttons, pins, and badges on the Internet. ... Dress your lapel to impress with fun Donate Organ Buttons. At ... Green For Son Organ Donor Donation Mini Button On sale for $1.75, ... PEACE LOVE DONATE LIFE (L1) Mini Button On sale for $1.75,. The ... Green For Wife Organ Donor Donation Mini Button On sale for $1.75, ...
Shop Organ Donate Stickers from CafePress. Find great designs on durable stickers or create your own custom stickers to express ... Shop for Organ Donate Stickers in thousands of beautiful designs and sizes. You can stick them on almost anything from laptops ...
Each donated organ can change someones life, but it is running the risk of becoming ruined, if a simple freezer fails. ... Reliable temperature monitoring and alarms can save thousands of invaluable organs. ... 119,053 people in the United States were awaiting organ donation. ... In 2017, 119,053 people in the United States were awaiting organ donation. Each donated organ can change someones life, but it ...
Create healthcare diagrams like this example called Organs That Can Be Donated - Heart in minutes with SmartDraw. SmartDraw ... Organs That Can Be Donated - Heart. Create healthcare diagrams like this example called Organs That Can Be Donated - Heart in ... Organs That Can Be Donated: Heart. Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Decision: Donation, organdonor.gov. ...
Indiana woman who donated kidney weds organ… Share this:. *Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window) ... AP) - A central Indiana woman who promised to donate one of her kidneys to a man she barely knew has married him three years ... Chelsea was a stranger to Kyle when she offered to donate one of her kidneys to him in 2009. (AP Photo/The Indianapolis Star, ... Chelsea was a stranger to Kyle when she offered to donate one of her kidneys to him in 2009. (AP Photo/The Indianapolis Star, ...
Its the future of organ donation, but its here right now. ... Cancer Patient Effectively Donates A Life-Saving Organ-To ... who find it harder to match donor organs due to reduced sizes and generally lower availability of organs. And more than all ... Though similar stem-cell-seeded trachea have been transplanted before, this is the first time a compete organ has been grown ... Right before the operation, the newly engineered organ was removed from the reactor, prepped and then surgically inserted into ...
Family donate schoolgirls organs to help others on ITV News, videos, stories and all the latest Calendar news ... Family donate schoolgirls organs to help others. The family of an 11-year-old girl, who died after being hit by a wheel from a ... say her organs have been donated to try to help others. ...
... of Americans said that upon their death they would like their organs transplanted into a patient who needed them, according to ... If you were killed in an accident, would you want your organs taken out and transplanted into a living patient who needed them ... The latest WSJ Online/Harris Interactive Health-Care Poll, conducted in September, sampled the publics views on organ donation ...
... but still lags behind when it comes to organ transplants. Experts say family ... ... Mum donated 4 of sons organs so he could live on. Singapore has one of the best healthcare systems in the world, but still ... For 20 years, Mdm Tan wasnt sure if she had made the right decision to donate her sons organs. But when she eventually saw ... Mdm Tan was persuaded by the doctor to donate her sons organs to four patients. ...
The donated organs of Kim Pham, the 23-year-old woman who was beaten outside of a Santa Ana, Calif., nightclub last Saturday, ... 5 Lives Saved From Donated Organs of Beating Victim Kim Phams heart, lungs, kidneys, pancreas, and liver were donated, as were ... The donated organs of Kim Pham, the 23-year-old woman who was beaten outside of a Santa Ana, Calif., nightclub last Saturday, ... Her heart, lungs, kidneys, pancreas, and liver were donated. Pham also donated tissues that could help heal more people. ...
Lifesharers and other organ sharing networks, in which members promise to donate organs upon their death and give priority to ... either by not registering as an organ donor during their lives, or electing not to donate the organs of their next of kin. ... show that the annual deceased organ-donation rate increased from 7.8 organs per million people in 2010 to 11.4 organs per ... A change of law in 2010 that prioritizes patients with a history of donation-if a family member donated his or her organs or ...
... boy who was said to be brain-dead defied odds when he regained consciousness after his parents had signed papers to donate his ... His mother ultimately decided to sign papers to donate Trentons organs that would benefit five children who needed transplants ... Boy regains consciousness after parents sign papers to donate his organs. By Katherine Lam, Fox News ... "Five kids needed organs that matched him," Reindl said. "It was unfair to keep bringing him back, because it was just damaging ...
Doomed child killer asks to donate organs Condemned Ohio child killer asks that organs be donated to help mother, sister, ... Phillips also would be willing to donate organs to other individuals if its not possible to help his relatives, his attorneys ... COLUMBUS - A condemned child killer who has abandoned his remaining appeals asked Monday for the chance to donate his organs to ... An Ohio State surgeon who has closely studied lethal injection says donated organs typically come from people who are brain ...
Donate Life America manages and promotes the national brand for donation, Donate Life, and assists Donate Life State Teams and ... And with iOS 10, Medical ID offers the ability to register as an organ, eye and tissue donor with Donate Life America. ... All registrations submitted from iPhone are sent directly to the National Donate Life Registry managed by Donate Life America. ... CEO of Donate Life America. "By working with Apple to bring the National Donate Life Registry to the Health app on iPhone, ...
... donated organs. Fungs team delivered antisense DNA which specifically blocks the activity of the Fas gene to mice five days ... Organs suffer damage when they are removed from a donors body and prepared for transplantation. Temporary loss of blood flow ... Fung s team plans to test whether the anti-Fas therapy works when the organ is actually transplanted from one mouse to another. ...
AP) - A central Indiana woman who promised to donate one of her kidneys to a man she barely knew has married him three years ... woman who donated kidney weds organ recipient. Saturday. Oct 26, 2013 at 3:15 AM ... AP) - A central Indiana woman who promised to donate one of her kidneys to a man she barely knew has married him three years ... Three years ago, she donated one of her kidneys to Froelich.. The Indianapolis Star reports (http://indy.st/1cEjsbm ) that the ...
People who lack health insurance are about 20 times more likely to donate their liver or a kidney for a lifesaving transplant ... The Uninsured Often Donate Organs, but Rarely Receive Them. CHICAGO - People who lack health insurance are about 20 times more ... The authors emphasize that the asymmetry of who donates organs and who receives them does not reflect "the values or intentions ... Among organ donors, however, insurance coverage was much less extensive. Private insurance was the most common source of ...
The Kerala government on Thursday permitted prisoners in the state jails to donate organs to their close relatives.The decision ... Read more about Kerala Govt permits prisoners to donate organs on Business Standard. ... Kerala Govt permits prisoners to donate organs ANI , Thiruvananthapuram (Kerala) [India]. Last Updated at January 11, 2018 22: ... Kerala govt permits prisoners to donate organs to close Union minister likens Pinarayi Vijayan to Kim Jong HC rejects petition ...
Her new years wish is to reconnect with some of the six people who got his organs. ... She decided to donate his organs and give other children another chance at life. ... She donated his heart, corneas, kidneys and liver. Bledsoe knows one boy who was able to graduate high school with Adams heart ... Now, she is desperately trying to find the other four people that got Adams organs and needs the communitys help. ...
Social Networks Could be an Effective Means to Seek Organ Donation. More number for organ failure patients who seek organs for ... Germany Aims To Increase Organ Donations With New Reforms. In a bid to increase the number of organ donors German parliament ... Facebook to Help Organ Donations. New Facebook tool allows users to share their organ donor status with their friends. ... Inspired by the work of the medical center, she pledged to donate all her organs after her death. Famous celebrities like ...
Woman, 20, donates organs after giving birth to twins. By Wang Jianfen (chinadaily.com.cn) Updated: 2016-04-17 13:18 ... "The doctor told us that by donating organs the life of my daughter could be resumed in other people. It feels like she were ... It is extremely difficult in China to get donated organs, according to Dr Wu Xiaoliang with the First Hospital of Zhejiang ... China has faced a severe shortage of donated organs because of traditional beliefs that many people cannot accept the idea of ...
... multi organ transplant coordinator at Deenanath Mangeshkar hospital, said the woman was a homemaker and is survived by her ... Brain dead woman donates multiple organs. Pratik Deshmukh, multi organ transplant coordinator at Deenanath Mangeshkar hospital ... This is the ninth organ donation conducted since May.. Pratik Deshmukh, multi organ transplant coordinator at Deenanath ... Both the kidneys were allocated to Jupiter hospital in Baner while the cornea were donated to Venumadhav Eyebank of Mangeshkar ...
  • Damage or stretching of these tissues allows the organs to move out of their normal positions. (lmh.org)
  • Other researchers are working with perfusion technology to improve the function of donated lungs, hearts and livers. (reuters.com)
  • Even in the little girl's short life, she'll be able to help two other children through organ donation.Rylei's heart valves were donated to two children and her lungs were given to a research hospital, People reported. (wesh.com)
  • Rylei's heart valves were donated to two children and her lungs were given to a research hospital, People reported. (wesh.com)
  • Last spring 10-year-old cystic fibrosis patient Sarah Murnaghan of Newtown Square gained national attention when her parents launched a crusade on social media to amend organ donor laws to allow their daughter to have access to adult donor lungs before age 12. (pottsmerc.com)
  • Hearts and lungs in particular need to be matched by size because of the limited space inside the chest, and also to ensure the two organs have comparable strength and do not overwhelm or underpower each other. (organdonation.nhs.uk)
  • More than 113,000 men, women, and children are on the national organ transplant waiting list, according to the U.S. Health Resources & Services Administration (HRSA). (cancer.net)
  • While an improvement over findings from a similar survey last year in which 50 percent reported the same, the statistic illustrates a critical need to continue to increase the level of support for organ donation to save the lives of the more than 105,000 adults and children on the transplant waiting list in the U.S., an average 18 of whom die each day waiting. (eurekalert.org)
  • Angie Scales, NHS Blood and Transplant Lead Nurse for Paediatric Donation, said: "For many children on the transplant waiting list, their only hope is the parent of another child saying 'yes' to organ donation at a time of terrible personal grief. (organdonation.nhs.uk)
  • With all this hope lingering for more than 123,000 people on the transplant waiting list, what is stopping so many of us from donating? (meramecmontage.com)
  • The organ transplant waiting list is blind to wealth and celebrity status. (nyp.org)
  • Help us save lives by learning about the importance of organ, eye and tissue donation, and register to be a donor. (donatelifenw.org)
  • NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital is teaming up with the New York Organ Donor Network to educate New Yorkers about the importance of organ donations and help raise the state's donor registration rate. (nyp.org)
  • I never imagined we'd be in this position, but I'm proud to use our tragedy to help others learn the importance of organ donation. (mcallen.net)
  • The organization works toward creating a more aware and educated population on the importance of organ, eye, and tissue donation through many different mediums. (wikipedia.org)
  • Researchers are testing different approaches to salvage infected organs. (reuters.com)
  • The researchers are planning another study combining perfusion with a photodynamic therapy, a type of light they believe could be more effective against the virus than ultraviolet because it can penetrate the organ as well as the solution. (reuters.com)
  • If the donor gave consent, non-transplantable organs can be donated to researchers at qualified medical research facilities. (cancer.net)
  • The Center for Organ Recovery & Education (CORE) is one of 58 federally designated not-for-profit organ procurement organizations (OPOs) in the United States. (core.org)
  • Two of the principles outlined by Pope John Paul II, the expectation that a potential donor is viewed as a fully human patient first, and the requirement that a donor of vital organs be dead before the organs are harvested, have long been cornerstones of transplant programs. (hli.org)
  • The proposed revision would have the effect of only giving OPOs credit for a procured organ if it is transplanted, thus incentivizing all viable organs to be transplanted and not discarded or used for other purposes. (foley.com)
  • The other reason is that they would like to donate any viable organs from their baby to other children that may need them. (growingyourbaby.com)
  • OPOs in the United States, each of which are and must be a non-profit organization, are responsible for the evaluation and procurement of organs for transplantations. (foley.com)
  • The proposed rule would revise the Conditions for Coverage of OPOs with goals of improving the quality of OPO services by increasing organs donated and of holding underperforming OPOs more accountable. (foley.com)
  • Currently, OPOs are given performance credit for organs procured for research or for other non-transplant reasons. (foley.com)
  • OPOs have asserted that the organ transplant rate depends on the transplant hospital's acceptance practices for organs and that OPOs should not be held responsible for the transplant hospital's decisions. (foley.com)
  • That is why there can be no sale of human organs: the prospect of financial profit would put pressure on the poor to sell their organs for subsistence. (hli.org)
  • Perhaps even more worrisome than the deplorable practice of buying and selling human organs are the trends emerging in mainstream medicine. (hli.org)
  • China Southern Airlines, China's first civil aviation company to open a "green passage" for transfer of donated human organs, will strictly perform its duties and realize fast customs clearance and priority over delivery of donated human organs, ensuring fast and safe transfer of donated human organs. (csair.com)
  • 3. Pack human organs with specially designed transport containers that meet the requirements, and mark "For Human Organ Transport" clearly on the container. (csair.com)
  • 5. The special containers containing human organs shall be subject to civil aviation baggage security check. (csair.com)
  • The container containing liquids necessary for the preservation of human organs, is not subject to the air transportation restrictions on liquids, but shall meet the safety requirements. (csair.com)