Hemangiosarcoma: A rare malignant neoplasm characterized by rapidly proliferating, extensively infiltrating, anaplastic cells derived from blood vessels and lining irregular blood-filled or lumpy spaces. (Stedman, 25th ed)Dog Diseases: Diseases of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris). This term does not include diseases of wild dogs, WOLVES; FOXES; and other Canidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.Splenic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the SPLEEN.Lymphangiosarcoma: A malignant tumor originating from the endothelial cells of lymphatic vessels. Most lymphangiosarcomas arise in an arm secondary to radical mastectomy but they sometimes complicate idiopathic lymphedema. The lymphedema has usually been present for 6 to 10 years before malignant changes develop. (From Dorland, 27th ed; Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1866)HemosiderinHemangioma: A vascular anomaly due to proliferation of BLOOD VESSELS that forms a tumor-like mass. The common types involve CAPILLARIES and VEINS. It can occur anywhere in the body but is most frequently noticed in the SKIN and SUBCUTANEOUS TISSUE. (from Stedman, 27th ed, 2000)Ethylene Glycols: An ethylene compound with two hydroxy groups (-OH) located on adjacent carbons. They are viscous and colorless liquids. Some are used as anesthetics or hypnotics. However, the class is best known for their use as a coolant or antifreeze.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Neoplasms, Vascular Tissue: Neoplasms composed of vascular tissue. This concept does not refer to neoplasms located in blood vessels.Hemosiderosis: Conditions in which there is a generalized increase in the iron stores of body tissues, particularly of liver and the MONONUCLEAR PHAGOCYTE SYSTEM, without demonstrable tissue damage. The name refers to the presence of stainable iron in the tissue in the form of hemosiderin.Histiocytic Disorders, Malignant: Distinctive neoplastic disorders of histiocytes. Included are malignant neoplasms of MACROPHAGES and DENDRITIC CELLS.Carcinogenicity Tests: Tests to experimentally measure the tumor-producing/cancer cell-producing potency of an agent by administering the agent (e.g., benzanthracenes) and observing the quantity of tumors or the cell transformation developed over a given period of time. The carcinogenicity value is usually measured as milligrams of agent administered per tumor developed. Though this test differs from the DNA-repair and bacterial microsome MUTAGENICITY TESTS, researchers often attempt to correlate the finding of carcinogenicity values and mutagenicity values.Cat Diseases: Diseases of the domestic cat (Felis catus or F. domesticus). This term does not include diseases of the so-called big cats such as CHEETAHS; LIONS; tigers, cougars, panthers, leopards, and other Felidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Horse Diseases: Diseases of domestic and wild horses of the species Equus caballus.Carcinogens: Substances that increase the risk of NEOPLASMS in humans or animals. Both genotoxic chemicals, which affect DNA directly, and nongenotoxic chemicals, which induce neoplasms by other mechanism, are included.
A vascular tissue neoplasm is a tumor arising from endothelial cells, the cells that line the wall of blood vessels and lymphatic vessels, as well as the heart. Vascular tissue neoplasms is a group containing tumors with the same tissue origin; in other words, it denotes histological classification, rather than anatomic (i.e. where in the body the neoplasm is found) or clinical one. They can occur everywhere in the body where vessels are to be found. Vascular tissue neoplasms, like neoplasms of all tissues, are classified to benign and malignant ones, according to their biological behavior. Hemangioma Lymphangioma Most malignant vascular tumors are considered sarcomas, a major histological group of tumors, arising from transformed cells of mesenchymal origin. Hemangiosarcoma Hemangiopericytoma Kaposi's Sarcoma Hemangioblastoma Lymphangiosarcoma Wen, Victoria W.; MacKenzie, Karen L. (September 2013). "Modeling human endothelial cell ...
Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM-1) also known as cluster of differentiation 31 (CD31) is a protein that in humans is encoded by the PECAM1 gene found on chromosome 17. PECAM-1 plays a key role in removing aged neutrophils from the body. PECAM-1 is found on the surface of platelets, monocytes, neutrophils, and some types of T-cells, and makes up a large portion of endothelial cell intercellular junctions. The encoded protein is a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily and is likely involved in leukocyte transmigration, angiogenesis, and integrin activation. CD31 is normally found on endothelial cells, platelets, macrophages and Kupffer cells, granulocytes, lymphocytes (T cells, B cells, and NK cells), megakaryocytes, and osteoclasts. CD31 is also expressed in certain tumors, including epithelioid hemangioendothelioma, epithelioid sarcoma-like hemangioendothelioma, other vascular tumors, histiocytic malignancies, and plasmacytomas. It is rarely found in some sarcomas, such as ...
... s are dogs belonging to two breeds of the spaniel dog type: the American Cocker Spaniel and the English Cocker Spaniel, both of which are commonly called simply Cocker Spaniel in their countries of origin. In the early 20th century, Cocker Spaniels also included small hunting Spaniels. Cocker Spaniels were originally bred as hunting dogs in the United Kingdom, with the term cocker deriving from their use to hunt the Eurasian woodcock. When the breed was brought to the United States, it was bred to a different standard, which enabled it to specialize in hunting the American woodcock. Further physical changes were bred into the cocker in the United States during the early part of the 20th century. Spaniels were first mentioned in the 14th century by Gaston III of Foix-Béarn in his work the Livre de Chasse. The "cocking" or "cocker spaniel" was a type of field or land spaniel in the 19th century. Prior to 1901, Cocker Spaniels were only separated from Field ...
In the eighteenth century in Britain, only two types of terriers were recognized, long- and short-legged.[4] Today, terriers are often informally categorized by size or by function. Hunting-types are still used to find, track, or trail quarry, especially underground, and sometimes to bolt the quarry. Modern examples include the Jack Russell Terrier, Rat Terrier and the Patterdale Terrier. There are also the short-legged terriers such as the Cairn Terrier, Scottish Terrier, and West Highland White Terrier which were also used to kill small vermin. The original hunting terriers include the fell terrier-breeds developed in northern England to assist in the killing of foxes-and the hunt terrier-breeds developed in southern England to locate, kill or bolt foxes during a traditional mounted fox hunt. The various combinations of bulldog and terrier that were used for bull-baiting and dog-fighting in the late nineteenth century, were later refined into separate breeds that combined both terrier and ...
... " is a term coined for German Shepherd Dogs that exhibit a rare genetic mutation that causes white spotting the traditionally non-white marked breed of German Shepherd Dogs. This frequently debated color is often dismissed as a result of crossbreeding. However, new research has proven insightful of the true origin of this new marking. The first ever recorded Panda was a result of breeding two German Shepherd dogs by Cindy Whitaker. Brain vom Wölper Löwen SCHH III, the sire, was registered with the German Shepherd Club Of Germany. The dam, Cynthia Madchen Alspach, was registered with the American Kennel Club. Lewcinka's Franka von Phenom was born with white markings, and was the sole puppy in the litter to have such markings. Repeat breedings did not create any more panda puppies. Her breeder had the puppy DNA Tested to see if she was mixed bred. Surprisingly enough, her results came back as full offspring to both dam and sire. Her AKC DNA number is ...
The Basset Hound is a short-legged breed of dog of the hound family. The Basset is a scent hound that was originally bred for the purpose of hunting hare. Their sense of smell and ability to ground-scent is second only to that of the Bloodhound. Basset Hounds are one of 6 recognised basset-type breeds in France. The name Basset is derived from the French word bas, meaning "low", with the attenuating suffix -et, together meaning "rather low". Basset Hounds are usually bicolours or tricolours of standard hound colouration. Bassets are large, short, solid and long, with curved sabre tails held high over their long backs. An adult dog weighs between 20 and 35 kilograms (44 and 77 lb). This breed, relative to size, is heavier-boned than any other. This breed, like its ancestor the Bloodhound, has a hanging skin structure, which causes the face to occasionally look sad; this, for many people, adds to the breed's charm. The dewlap, seen as the loose, elastic skin around the neck, and the trailing ears ...
... s are two different breeds of the terrier dog type: the Smooth Fox Terrier and the Wire Fox Terrier. Both of these breeds originated in the 19th century from a handful of dogs who are descended from earlier varieties of British terriers, and are related to other modern white terrier breeds. In addition, a number of breeds have diverged from these two main types of fox terrier and have been recognised separately, including the Jack Russell Terrier, Miniature Fox Terrier and Rat Terrier. The Wire and Smooth Fox Terriers share similar characteristics, the main differences being in the coat and markings. They have been successful in conformation shows, more prominently in America than their homeland. Small dogs were observed by the Romans in England in 54 BC being used by hunters to chase quarry into burrows and dens, demonstrating the instinctive terrier behaviour of "going to earth". English physician John Caius described the English terrier type in his 1577 work English ...
The varieties of toy spaniel were occasionally used in hunting, as the Sportsman's Repository reported in 1830 of the Blenheim Spaniel: "Twenty years ago, His Grace the Duke of Marlborough was reputed to possess the smallest and best breed of cockers in Britain; they were invariably red-and-white, with very long ears, short noses, and black eyes."[22] During this period, the term "cocker" was not used to describe a Cocker Spaniel, but rather a type of small spaniel used to hunt woodcock. The Duke's residence, Blenheim Palace, gave its name to the Blenheim Spaniel. The Sportsman's Repository explains that toy spaniels are able to hunt, albeit not for a full day or in difficult terrain: "The very delicate and small, or 'carpet spaniels,' have exquisite nose, and will hunt truly and pleasantly, but are neither fit for a long day or thorny covert."[23] This idea was supported by Vero Shaw in his 1881 work The Illustrated Book of the Dog,[23] and by Thomas Brown in 1829 who wrote, "He is seldom used ...
The misconception that the Miniature Pinscher is a "miniature Doberman" occurred because the Doberman Pinscher (a breed developed by Karl Friedrich Louis Dobermann around 1890) was introduced to the U.S. before the Miniature Pinscher. In 1919, the Miniature Pinscher was introduced to the AKC show ring. At the time, not knowing that it was referred to officially in Germany as the Zwergpinscher (little biter), the AKC referred to the breed as simply "Pinscher" and listed it in the miscellaneous category. When the Miniature Pinscher Club of America (MPCA) was created in 1929 (the year of the breed's official introduction into the AKC), they petitioned for Miniature Pinschers to be placed in the Toy group. The AKC's description, that the dog "must appear as a Doberman in miniature," led to the misconception common today that this breed is a "Miniature Doberman Pinscher." The original name for this breed in the U.S. was "Pinscher (Toy)" until 1972 when the name was officially ...
The Golden Retriever is a large-sized breed of dog bred as gun dogs to retrieve shot waterfowl such as ducks and upland game birds during hunting and shooting parties, and were named 'retriever' because of their ability to retrieve shot game undamaged. Golden Retrievers have an instinctive love of water, and are easy to train to basic or advanced obedience standards. They are a long-coated breed, with a dense inner coat that provides them with adequate warmth in the outdoors, and an outer coat that lies flat against their bodies and repels water. Golden Retrievers are well suited to residency in suburban or country environments. Although they need substantial outdoor exercise, they should be housed in a fenced area because of their instinctual tendency to roam. They shed copiously, particularly at the change of seasons, and require fairly regular grooming. The breed is a prominent participant in conformation shows for purebred dogs. The Golden Retriever is popular as a ...
... s are prone to many health problems (physiologic and psychologic) anyone considering adopting a bull terrier must be aware of these issues! Deafness occurs in both coloured and white Miniature Bull Terriers. Puppies can be born unilaterally deaf (deaf in one ear) or bilaterally deaf (deaf in both ears). Deaf dogs should not be bred due to deafness being hereditary.[1] BEAP (or BAER) testing is done on puppies prior to sale to discover which puppies have hearing problems. LAD or LETHAL ACRODERMATITIS in bull terriers. Is a LETHAL genetic degenerative disease. It starts appearing in puppies around the age of 4 weeks. The usual black color of affected puppies will start to appear diluted and turn liverish, due to a zinc deficiency which result in terrible skin condition, dysfunction of their overall system and eventually premature death. A new DNA test was released to test breeding stock and ensure LAD CLEAR puppies. ...
The Irish Wolfhound (Irish: Cú Faoil, Irish pronunciation: [ˈkuː ˈfˠiːlʲ]) is a breed of domestic dog (Canis lupus familiaris), specifically a very large sighthound from Ireland. The name originates from its purpose-wolf hunting with dogs-rather than from its appearance. Originally developed from war hounds to one used for hunting and guarding, Irish Wolfhounds can be an imposing sight due to their formidable size. The breed is very old; there are suggestions it may have been brought to Ireland as early as 7000 BC. These dogs are mentioned, as cú (variously translated as hound, Irish hound, war dog, wolf dog, etc.) in Irish laws and in Irish literature which dates from the 5th century or, in the case of the Sagas, from the old Irish period - AD 600-900. The word "Cu" often became an added respected prefix on the names of warriors as well as kings denoting that they were worthy of the respect and loyalty of a Cu. Ancient woodcuts[citation needed] and writings have placed them ...
The East European Shepherd (VEO) (in Russian: Восточно-европейская овчарка (ВЕО)) -is a breed of dog that was developed in the 1930-1950s based on German Shepherd Dogs to create a larger cold-resistant breed for military use, police work and border guard duties in the Soviet Union. VEOs are also used as guide dogs for the blind and there are VEO therapy dogs. This breed is popular in Russia where it entered a public culture and acquired a legendary status as an extremely smart and loyal dog devoted to their owners. The breed is well known in other ex-Soviet Union republics. In the West, the East-European Shepherd is a rare breed that is not well known: information about the breed on online sources, in English, is limited and often incorrect or distorted. The East European Shepherd is larger than a German Shepherd: males are 66-76 centimetres (26-30 inches) at the withers and weight 35-50 kg, females are 62-72 centimetres (24.5-28 inches) and weight 30-50 kg. ...

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