Raccoon Dogs: The lone species in the genus Nyctereutes, family CANIDAE. It is found in the woodland zone from southeastern Siberia to Vietnam and on the main islands of Japan.Bites and StingsBonding, Human-Pet: The emotional attachment of individuals to PETS.Pets: Animals kept by humans for companionship and enjoyment, as opposed to DOMESTIC ANIMALS such as livestock or farm animals, which are kept for economic reasons.Cat Diseases: Diseases of the domestic cat (Felis catus or F. domesticus). This term does not include diseases of the so-called big cats such as CHEETAHS; LIONS; tigers, cougars, panthers, leopards, and other Felidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.Wolves: Any of several large carnivorous mammals of the family CANIDAE that usually hunt in packs.Dirofilaria immitis: A filarial parasite primarily of dogs but occurring also in foxes, wolves, and humans. The parasite is transmitted by mosquitoes.Dirofilariasis: Infection with nematodes of the genus DIROFILARIA, usually in animals, especially dogs, but occasionally in man.Leishmania infantum: A parasitic hemoflagellate of the subgenus Leishmania leishmania that infects man and animals and causes visceral leishmaniasis (LEISHMANIASIS, VISCERAL). Human infections are confined almost entirely to children. This parasite is commonly seen in dogs, other Canidae, and porcupines with humans considered only an accidental host. Transmission is by Phlebotomus sandflies.Hemodynamics: The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Animals, Domestic: Animals which have become adapted through breeding in captivity to a life intimately associated with humans. They include animals domesticated by humans to live and breed in a tame condition on farms or ranches for economic reasons, including LIVESTOCK (specifically CATTLE; SHEEP; HORSES; etc.), POULTRY; and those raised or kept for pleasure and companionship, e.g., PETS; or specifically DOGS; CATS; etc.Cats: The domestic cat, Felis catus, of the carnivore family FELIDAE, comprising over 30 different breeds. The domestic cat is descended primarily from the wild cat of Africa and extreme southwestern Asia. Though probably present in towns in Palestine as long ago as 7000 years, actual domestication occurred in Egypt about 4000 years ago. (From Walker's Mammals of the World, 6th ed, p801)Heart Rate: The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.Blood Pressure: PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.Coronary Circulation: The circulation of blood through the CORONARY VESSELS of the HEART.Rabies: Acute VIRAL CNS INFECTION affecting mammals, including humans. It is caused by RABIES VIRUS and usually spread by contamination with virus-laden saliva of bites inflicted by rabid animals. Important animal vectors include the dog, cat, bat, fox, raccoon, skunk, and wolf.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Anesthesia: A state characterized by loss of feeling or sensation. This depression of nerve function is usually the result of pharmacologic action and is induced to allow performance of surgery or other painful procedures.Flea Infestations: Parasitic attack by members of the order SIPHONAPTERA.Heart: The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Distemper: A name for several highly contagious viral diseases of animals, especially canine distemper. In dogs, it is caused by the canine distemper virus (DISTEMPER VIRUS, CANINE). It is characterized by a diphasic fever, leukopenia, gastrointestinal and respiratory inflammation and sometimes, neurologic complications. In cats it is known as FELINE PANLEUKOPENIA.Vagus Nerve: The 10th cranial nerve. The vagus is a mixed nerve which contains somatic afferents (from skin in back of the ear and the external auditory meatus), visceral afferents (from the pharynx, larynx, thorax, and abdomen), parasympathetic efferents (to the thorax and abdomen), and efferents to striated muscle (of the larynx and pharynx).Hip Dysplasia, Canine: A hereditary disease of the hip joints in dogs. Signs of the disease may be evident any time after 4 weeks of age.Tick Infestations: Infestations with soft-bodied (Argasidae) or hard-bodied (Ixodidae) ticks.Leishmaniasis, Visceral: A chronic disease caused by LEISHMANIA DONOVANI and transmitted by the bite of several sandflies of the genera Phlebotomus and Lutzomyia. It is commonly characterized by fever, chills, vomiting, anemia, hepatosplenomegaly, leukopenia, hypergammaglobulinemia, emaciation, and an earth-gray color of the skin. The disease is classified into three main types according to geographic distribution: Indian, Mediterranean (or infantile), and African.Consciousness: Sense of awareness of self and of the environment.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Vascular Resistance: The force that opposes the flow of BLOOD through a vascular bed. It is equal to the difference in BLOOD PRESSURE across the vascular bed divided by the CARDIAC OUTPUT.Rhipicephalus sanguineus: A species of tick (TICKS) in the family IXODIDAE, distributed throughout the world but abundant in southern Europe. It will feed on a wide variety of MAMMALS, but DOGS are its preferred host. It transmits a large number of diseases including BABESIOSIS; THEILERIASIS; EHRLICHIOSIS; and MEDITERRANEAN SPOTTED FEVER.Myocardium: The muscle tissue of the HEART. It is composed of striated, involuntary muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC) connected to form the contractile pump to generate blood flow.Ehrlichia canis: Species of gram-negative bacteria in the family ANAPLASMATACEAE, causing EHRLICHIOSIS in DOGS. The most common vector is the brown dog tick. It can also cause disease in humans.Zoonoses: Diseases of non-human animals that may be transmitted to HUMANS or may be transmitted from humans to non-human animals.Cardiac Output: The volume of BLOOD passing through the HEART per unit of time. It is usually expressed as liters (volume) per minute so as not to be confused with STROKE VOLUME (volume per beat).Kidney: Body organ that filters blood for the secretion of URINE and that regulates ion concentrations.Halothane: A nonflammable, halogenated, hydrocarbon anesthetic that provides relatively rapid induction with little or no excitement. Analgesia may not be adequate. NITROUS OXIDE is often given concomitantly. Because halothane may not produce sufficient muscle relaxation, supplemental neuromuscular blocking agents may be required. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p178)Distemper Virus, Canine: A species of MORBILLIVIRUS causing distemper in dogs, wolves, foxes, raccoons, and ferrets. Pinnipeds have also been known to contract Canine distemper virus from contact with domestic dogs.Feces: Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.Cardiac Pacing, Artificial: Regulation of the rate of contraction of the heart muscles by an artificial pacemaker.Pressoreceptors: Receptors in the vascular system, particularly the aorta and carotid sinus, which are sensitive to stretch of the vessel walls.Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Injections, Intravenous: Injections made into a vein for therapeutic or experimental purposes.Carotid Sinus: The dilated portion of the common carotid artery at its bifurcation into external and internal carotids. It contains baroreceptors which, when stimulated, cause slowing of the heart, vasodilatation, and a fall in blood pressure.Ctenocephalides: A genus of FLEAS in the family Pulicidae. It includes the cat flea (Ctenocephalides felis), one of the most common species on earth.Propranolol: A widely used non-cardioselective beta-adrenergic antagonist. Propranolol has been used for MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION; ARRHYTHMIA; ANGINA PECTORIS; HYPERTENSION; HYPERTHYROIDISM; MIGRAINE; PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA; and ANXIETY but adverse effects instigate replacement by newer drugs.Rabies Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent and treat RABIES. The inactivated virus vaccine is used for preexposure immunization to persons at high risk of exposure, and in conjunction with rabies immunoglobulin, for postexposure prophylaxis.Ehrlichiosis: A tick-borne disease characterized by FEVER; HEADACHE; myalgias; ANOREXIA; and occasionally RASH. It is caused by several bacterial species and can produce disease in DOGS; CATTLE; SHEEP; GOATS; HORSES; and humans. The primary species causing human disease are EHRLICHIA CHAFFEENSIS; ANAPLASMA PHAGOCYTOPHILUM; and Ehrlichia ewingii.Foxes: Any of several carnivores in the family CANIDAE, that possess erect ears and long bushy tails and are smaller than WOLVES. They are classified in several genera and found on all continents except Antarctica.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Coronary Vessels: The veins and arteries of the HEART.Regional Blood Flow: The flow of BLOOD through or around an organ or region of the body.Vagotomy: The interruption or removal of any part of the vagus (10th cranial) nerve. Vagotomy may be performed for research or for therapeutic purposes.Euthanasia, Animal: The killing of animals for reasons of mercy, to control disease transmission or maintain the health of animal populations, or for experimental purposes (ANIMAL EXPERIMENTATION).Administration, Oral: The giving of drugs, chemicals, or other substances by mouth.Norepinephrine: Precursor of epinephrine that is secreted by the adrenal medulla and is a widespread central and autonomic neurotransmitter. Norepinephrine is the principal transmitter of most postganglionic sympathetic fibers and of the diffuse projection system in the brain arising from the locus ceruleus. It is also found in plants and is used pharmacologically as a sympathomimetic.Atropine: An alkaloid, originally from Atropa belladonna, but found in other plants, mainly SOLANACEAE. Hyoscyamine is the 3(S)-endo isomer of atropine.Reflex: An involuntary movement or exercise of function in a part, excited in response to a stimulus applied to the periphery and transmitted to the brain or spinal cord.Adrenocortical Hyperfunction: Excess production of ADRENAL CORTEX HORMONES such as ALDOSTERONE; HYDROCORTISONE; DEHYDROEPIANDROSTERONE; and/or ANDROSTENEDIONE. Hyperadrenal syndromes include CUSHING SYNDROME; HYPERALDOSTERONISM; and VIRILISM.Breeding: The production of offspring by selective mating or HYBRIDIZATION, GENETIC in animals or plants.Lameness, Animal: A departure from the normal gait in animals.Denervation: The resection or removal of the nerve to an organ or part. (Dorland, 28th ed)Disease Reservoirs: Animate or inanimate sources which normally harbor disease-causing organisms and thus serve as potential sources of disease outbreaks. Reservoirs are distinguished from vectors (DISEASE VECTORS) and carriers, which are agents of disease transmission rather than continuing sources of potential disease outbreaks.Babesia: A genus of tick-borne protozoan parasites that infests the red blood cells of mammals, including humans. There are many recognized species, and the distribution is world-wide.Stellate Ganglion: A paravertebral sympathetic ganglion formed by the fusion of the inferior cervical and first thoracic ganglia.Heart Atria: The chambers of the heart, to which the BLOOD returns from the circulation.Heart Conduction System: An impulse-conducting system composed of modified cardiac muscle, having the power of spontaneous rhythmicity and conduction more highly developed than the rest of the heart.Electrocardiography: Recording of the moment-to-moment electromotive forces of the HEART as projected onto various sites on the body's surface, delineated as a scalar function of time. The recording is monitored by a tracing on slow moving chart paper or by observing it on a cardioscope, which is a CATHODE RAY TUBE DISPLAY.Ehrlichia: Small, often pleomorphic, coccoid to ellipsoidal organisms occurring intracytoplasmically in circulating LYMPHOCYTES. They are the etiologic agents of tick-borne diseases of humans; DOGS; CATTLE; SHEEP; GOATS; and HORSES.Acaricides: A pesticide or chemical agent that kills mites and ticks. This is a large class that includes carbamates, formamides, organochlorines, organophosphates, etc, that act as antibiotics or growth regulators.Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.Acepromazine: A phenothiazine that is used in the treatment of PSYCHOSES.Carnivora: An order of MAMMALS, usually flesh eaters with appropriate dentition. Suborders include the terrestrial carnivores Fissipedia, and the aquatic carnivores PINNIPEDIA.Chloralose: A derivative of CHLORAL HYDRATE that was used as a sedative but has been replaced by safer and more effective drugs. Its most common use is as a general anesthetic in animal experiments.Bile: An emulsifying agent produced in the LIVER and secreted into the DUODENUM. Its composition includes BILE ACIDS AND SALTS; CHOLESTEROL; and ELECTROLYTES. It aids DIGESTION of fats in the duodenum.Random Allocation: A process involving chance used in therapeutic trials or other research endeavor for allocating experimental subjects, human or animal, between treatment and control groups, or among treatment groups. It may also apply to experiments on inanimate objects.Babesiosis: A group of tick-borne diseases of mammals including ZOONOSES in humans. They are caused by protozoa of the genus BABESIA, which parasitize erythrocytes, producing hemolysis. In the U.S., the organism's natural host is mice and transmission is by the deer tick IXODES SCAPULARIS.Epinephrine: The active sympathomimetic hormone from the ADRENAL MEDULLA. It stimulates both the alpha- and beta- adrenergic systems, causes systemic VASOCONSTRICTION and gastrointestinal relaxation, stimulates the HEART, and dilates BRONCHI and cerebral vessels. It is used in ASTHMA and CARDIAC FAILURE and to delay absorption of local ANESTHETICS.Parasitic Diseases, Animal: Infections or infestations with parasitic organisms. The infestation may be experimental or veterinary.Isoflurane: A stable, non-explosive inhalation anesthetic, relatively free from significant side effects.Heart Ventricles: The lower right and left chambers of the heart. The right ventricle pumps venous BLOOD into the LUNGS and the left ventricle pumps oxygenated blood into the systemic arterial circulation.Ventricular Function: The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the HEART VENTRICLES.Sertoli Cell Tumor: Gonadal neoplasm composed entirely of SERTOLI CELLS or may have a component of GRANULOSA CELLS. Some of the Sertoli cell tumors produce ESTROGEN or ANDROGENS, but seldom in sufficient quantity to cause clinical symptoms such as FEMINIZATION or masculinization (VIRILISM).Canidae: A family of terrestrial carnivores with long snouts and non-retractable claws. Members include COYOTES; DOGS; FOXES; JACKALS; RACCOON DOGS; and WOLVES.Veterinary Medicine: The medical science concerned with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases in animals.Rabies virus: The type species of LYSSAVIRUS causing rabies in humans and other animals. Transmission is mostly by animal bites through saliva. The virus is neurotropic multiplying in neurons and myotubes of vertebrates.Stifle: In horses, cattle, and other quadrupeds, the joint between the femur and the tibia, corresponding to the human knee.Thelazioidea: A superfamily of parasitic nematodes which includes three genera: Thelazia, Spirocerca, and GNATHOSTOMA. Only Thelazia and GNATHOSTOMA occasionally occur in man.Medetomidine: An agonist of RECEPTORS, ADRENERGIC ALPHA-2 that is used in veterinary medicine for its analgesic and sedative properties. It is the racemate of DEXMEDETOMIDINE.Stomach: An organ of digestion situated in the left upper quadrant of the abdomen between the termination of the ESOPHAGUS and the beginning of the DUODENUM.Pulmonary Circulation: The circulation of the BLOOD through the LUNGS.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Pressure: A type of stress exerted uniformly in all directions. Its measure is the force exerted per unit area. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Blood Volume: Volume of circulating BLOOD. It is the sum of the PLASMA VOLUME and ERYTHROCYTE VOLUME.Angiostrongylus: A genus of parasitic nematodes of the superfamily METASTRONGYLOIDEA. Two species, ANGIOSTRONGYLUS CANTONENSIS and A. vasorum, infest the lungs of rats and dogs, respectively. A. cantonensis is transmissible to man where it causes frequently fatal infection of the central nervous system.Perfusion: Treatment process involving the injection of fluid into an organ or tissue.Neospora: A genus of protozoan parasites of the subclass COCCIDIA. Its species are parasitic in dogs, cattle, goats, and sheep, among others. N. caninum, a species that mainly infects dogs, is intracellular in neural and other cells of the body, multiplies by endodyogeny, has no parasitophorous vacuole, and has numerous rhoptries. It is known to cause lesions in many tissues, especially the brain and spinal cord as well as abortion in the expectant mother.Sciuridae: A family of the order Rodentia which contains 49 genera. Some of the more common genera are MARMOTA, which includes the marmot and woodchuck; Sciurus, the gray squirrel, S. carolinensis, and the fox squirrel, S. niger; Tamias, the eastern and western chipmunk; and Tamiasciurus, the red squirrel. The flying squirrels, except the scaly-tailed Anomaluridae, also belong to this family.Microspheres: Small uniformly-sized spherical particles, of micrometer dimensions, frequently labeled with radioisotopes or various reagents acting as tags or markers.Seroepidemiologic Studies: EPIDEMIOLOGIC STUDIES based on the detection through serological testing of characteristic change in the serum level of specific ANTIBODIES. Latent subclinical infections and carrier states can thus be detected in addition to clinically overt cases.Refractory Period, Electrophysiological: The period of time following the triggering of an ACTION POTENTIAL when the CELL MEMBRANE has changed to an unexcitable state and is gradually restored to the resting (excitable) state. During the absolute refractory period no other stimulus can trigger a response. This is followed by the relative refractory period during which the cell gradually becomes more excitable and the stronger impulse that is required to illicit a response gradually lessens to that required during the resting state.Electric Stimulation: Use of electric potential or currents to elicit biological responses.Respiration: The act of breathing with the LUNGS, consisting of INHALATION, or the taking into the lungs of the ambient air, and of EXHALATION, or the expelling of the modified air which contains more CARBON DIOXIDE than the air taken in (Blakiston's Gould Medical Dictionary, 4th ed.). This does not include tissue respiration (= OXYGEN CONSUMPTION) or cell respiration (= CELL RESPIRATION).Anesthesia, Inhalation: Anesthesia caused by the breathing of anesthetic gases or vapors or by insufflating anesthetic gases or vapors into the respiratory tract.Infusions, Parenteral: The administration of liquid medication, nutrient, or other fluid through some other route than the alimentary canal, usually over minutes or hours, either by gravity flow or often by infusion pumping.Histocytochemistry: Study of intracellular distribution of chemicals, reaction sites, enzymes, etc., by means of staining reactions, radioactive isotope uptake, selective metal distribution in electron microscopy, or other methods.Meningoencephalitis: An inflammatory process involving the brain (ENCEPHALITIS) and meninges (MENINGITIS), most often produced by pathogenic organisms which invade the central nervous system, and occasionally by toxins, autoimmune disorders, and other conditions.Models, Animal: Non-human animals, selected because of specific characteristics, for use in experimental research, teaching, or testing.Diuresis: An increase in the excretion of URINE. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Sodium: A member of the alkali group of metals. It has the atomic symbol Na, atomic number 11, and atomic weight 23.Bartonella Infections: Infections by the genus BARTONELLA. Bartonella bacilliformis can cause acute febrile anemia, designated Oroya fever, and a benign skin eruption, called verruga peruana. BARTONELLA QUINTANA causes TRENCH FEVER, while BARTONELLA HENSELAE is the etiologic agent of bacillary angiomatosis (ANGIOMATOSIS, BACILLARY) and is also one of the causes of CAT-SCRATCH DISEASE in immunocompetent patients.Arrhythmias, Cardiac: Any disturbances of the normal rhythmic beating of the heart or MYOCARDIAL CONTRACTION. Cardiac arrhythmias can be classified by the abnormalities in HEART RATE, disorders of electrical impulse generation, or impulse conduction.Sympathetic Nervous System: The thoracolumbar division of the autonomic nervous system. Sympathetic preganglionic fibers originate in neurons of the intermediolateral column of the spinal cord and project to the paravertebral and prevertebral ganglia, which in turn project to target organs. The sympathetic nervous system mediates the body's response to stressful situations, i.e., the fight or flight reactions. It often acts reciprocally to the parasympathetic system.Ectoparasitic Infestations: Infestations by PARASITES which live on, or burrow into, the surface of their host's EPIDERMIS. Most ectoparasites are ARTHROPODS.Influenza A Virus, H3N8 Subtype: A subtype of INFLUENZA A VIRUS comprised of the surface proteins hemagglutinin 3 and neuraminidase 8. The H3N8 subtype has frequently been found in horses.Echinococcus granulosus: A species of hydatid tapeworm (class CESTODA) in the family Taeniidae, whose adult form infects the DIGESTIVE TRACT of DOGS, other canines, and CATS. The larval form infects SHEEP; PIGS; HORSES; and may infect humans, where it migrates to various organs and forms permanent HYDATID CYSTS.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Portal Vein: A short thick vein formed by union of the superior mesenteric vein and the splenic vein.Parvovirus, Canine: A species of the genus PARVOVIRUS and a host range variant of FELINE PANLEUKOPENIA VIRUS. It causes a highly infectious fulminating ENTERITIS in dogs producing high mortality. It is distinct from CANINE MINUTE VIRUS, a species in the genus BOCAVIRUS. This virus can also infect cats and mink.Ownership: The legal relation between an entity (individual, group, corporation, or-profit, secular, government) and an object. The object may be corporeal, such as equipment, or completely a creature of law, such as a patent; it may be movable, such as an animal, or immovable, such as a building.Hematocrit: The volume of packed RED BLOOD CELLS in a blood specimen. The volume is measured by centrifugation in a tube with graduated markings, or with automated blood cell counters. It is an indicator of erythrocyte status in disease. For example, ANEMIA shows a low value; POLYCYTHEMIA, a high value.Isoproterenol: Isopropyl analog of EPINEPHRINE; beta-sympathomimetic that acts on the heart, bronchi, skeletal muscle, alimentary tract, etc. It is used mainly as bronchodilator and heart stimulant.Adenoviruses, Canine: Species of the genus MASTADENOVIRUS that causes fever, edema, vomiting, and diarrhea in dogs and encephalitis in foxes. Epizootics have also been caused in bears, wolves, coyotes, and skunks. The official species name is Canine adenovirus and it contains two serotypes.Coccidiosis: Protozoan infection found in animals and man. It is caused by several different genera of COCCIDIA.Injections, Intra-Arterial: Delivery of drugs into an artery.Glucagon: A 29-amino acid pancreatic peptide derived from proglucagon which is also the precursor of intestinal GLUCAGON-LIKE PEPTIDES. Glucagon is secreted by PANCREATIC ALPHA CELLS and plays an important role in regulation of BLOOD GLUCOSE concentration, ketone metabolism, and several other biochemical and physiological processes. (From Gilman et al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 9th ed, p1511)Renin: A highly specific (Leu-Leu) endopeptidase that generates ANGIOTENSIN I from its precursor ANGIOTENSINOGEN, leading to a cascade of reactions which elevate BLOOD PRESSURE and increase sodium retention by the kidney in the RENIN-ANGIOTENSIN SYSTEM. The enzyme was formerly listed as EC 3.4.99.19.Anal Gland Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the anal gland.Dirofilaria: A genus of filarial nematodes. Various immature species have been found to infect the eyes or subcutaneous tissue in humans.Histiocytic Sarcoma: Malignant neoplasms composed of MACROPHAGES or DENDRITIC CELLS. Most histiocytic sarcomas present as localized tumor masses without a leukemic phase. Though the biological behavior of these neoplasms resemble lymphomas, their cell lineage is histiocytic not lymphoid.Endocardium: The innermost layer of the heart, comprised of endothelial cells.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Blood Gas Analysis: Measurement of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the blood.Tachycardia: Abnormally rapid heartbeat, usually with a HEART RATE above 100 beats per minute for adults. Tachycardia accompanied by disturbance in the cardiac depolarization (cardiac arrhythmia) is called tachyarrhythmia.Pentobarbital: A short-acting barbiturate that is effective as a sedative and hypnotic (but not as an anti-anxiety) agent and is usually given orally. It is prescribed more frequently for sleep induction than for sedation but, like similar agents, may lose its effectiveness by the second week of continued administration. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p236)Oxygen Consumption: The rate at which oxygen is used by a tissue; microliters of oxygen STPD used per milligram of tissue per hour; the rate at which oxygen enters the blood from alveolar gas, equal in the steady state to the consumption of oxygen by tissue metabolism throughout the body. (Stedman, 25th ed, p346)Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Liver Circulation: The circulation of BLOOD through the LIVER.Hindlimb: Either of two extremities of four-footed non-primate land animals. It usually consists of a FEMUR; TIBIA; and FIBULA; tarsals; METATARSALS; and TOES. (From Storer et al., General Zoology, 6th ed, p73)Adrenergic alpha-Antagonists: Drugs that bind to but do not activate alpha-adrenergic receptors thereby blocking the actions of endogenous or exogenous adrenergic agonists. Adrenergic alpha-antagonists are used in the treatment of hypertension, vasospasm, peripheral vascular disease, shock, and pheochromocytoma.Echinococcosis: An infection caused by the infestation of the larval form of tapeworms of the genus Echinococcus. The liver, lungs, and kidney are the most common areas of infestation.Heart Block: Impaired conduction of cardiac impulse that can occur anywhere along the conduction pathway, such as between the SINOATRIAL NODE and the right atrium (SA block) or between atria and ventricles (AV block). Heart blocks can be classified by the duration, frequency, or completeness of conduction block. Reversibility depends on the degree of structural or functional defects.Coronavirus, Canine: A species of CORONAVIRUS infecting dogs. Onset of symptoms is usually sudden and includes vomiting, diarrhea, and dehydration.Natriuresis: Sodium excretion by URINATION.Macaca fascicularis: A species of the genus MACACA which typically lives near the coast in tidal creeks and mangrove swamps primarily on the islands of the Malay peninsula.Depression, Chemical: The decrease in a measurable parameter of a PHYSIOLOGICAL PROCESS, including cellular, microbial, and plant; immunological, cardiovascular, respiratory, reproductive, urinary, digestive, neural, musculoskeletal, ocular, and skin physiological processes; or METABOLIC PROCESS, including enzymatic and other pharmacological processes, by a drug or other chemical.Horses: Large, hoofed mammals of the family EQUIDAE. Horses are active day and night with most of the day spent seeking and consuming food. Feeding peaks occur in the early morning and late afternoon, and there are several daily periods of rest.Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Metabolic Clearance Rate: Volume of biological fluid completely cleared of drug metabolites as measured in unit time. Elimination occurs as a result of metabolic processes in the kidney, liver, saliva, sweat, intestine, heart, brain, or other site.Intercostal Muscles: Respiratory muscles that arise from the lower border of one rib and insert into the upper border of the adjoining rib, and contract during inspiration or respiration. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Bartonella: A genus of gram-negative bacteria characteristically appearing in chains of several segmenting organisms. It occurs in man and arthropod vectors and is found only in the Andes region of South America. This genus is the etiologic agent of human bartonellosis. The genus Rochalimaea, once considered a separate genus, has recently been combined with the genus Bartonella as a result of high levels of relatedness in 16S rRNA sequence data and DNA hybridization data.Ticks: Blood-sucking acarid parasites of the order Ixodida comprising two families: the softbacked ticks (ARGASIDAE) and hardbacked ticks (IXODIDAE). Ticks are larger than their relatives, the MITES. They penetrate the skin of their host by means of highly specialized, hooked mouth parts and feed on its blood. Ticks attack all groups of terrestrial vertebrates. In humans they are responsible for many TICK-BORNE DISEASES, including the transmission of ROCKY MOUNTAIN SPOTTED FEVER; TULAREMIA; BABESIOSIS; AFRICAN SWINE FEVER; and RELAPSING FEVER. (From Barnes, Invertebrate Zoology, 5th ed, pp543-44)Tissue Distribution: Accumulation of a drug or chemical substance in various organs (including those not relevant to its pharmacologic or therapeutic action). This distribution depends on the blood flow or perfusion rate of the organ, the ability of the drug to penetrate organ membranes, tissue specificity, protein binding. The distribution is usually expressed as tissue to plasma ratios.Aminohippuric Acids: A group of glycine amides of aminobenzoic acids.Mite Infestations: Infestations with arthropods of the subclass ACARI, superorder Acariformes.Phentolamine: A nonselective alpha-adrenergic antagonist. It is used in the treatment of hypertension and hypertensive emergencies, pheochromocytoma, vasospasm of RAYNAUD DISEASE and frostbite, clonidine withdrawal syndrome, impotence, and peripheral vascular disease.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Gastric Fistula: Abnormal passage communicating with the STOMACH.Adrenergic beta-Antagonists: Drugs that bind to but do not activate beta-adrenergic receptors thereby blocking the actions of beta-adrenergic agonists. Adrenergic beta-antagonists are used for treatment of hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias, angina pectoris, glaucoma, migraine headaches, and anxiety.Siphonaptera: An order of parasitic, blood-sucking, wingless INSECTS with the common name of fleas.Enflurane: An extremely stable inhalation anesthetic that allows rapid adjustments of anesthesia depth with little change in pulse or respiratory rate.Capnocytophaga: A gram-negative gliding bacterium isolated from the oral cavity. It is a pathogen often causing PERIODONTITIS.Hexamethonium Compounds: Compounds containing the hexamethylenebis(trimethylammonium) cation. Members of this group frequently act as antihypertensive agents and selective ganglionic blocking agents.Pericardium: A conical fibro-serous sac surrounding the HEART and the roots of the great vessels (AORTA; VENAE CAVAE; PULMONARY ARTERY). Pericardium consists of two sacs: the outer fibrous pericardium and the inner serous pericardium. The latter consists of an outer parietal layer facing the fibrous pericardium, and an inner visceral layer (epicardium) resting next to the heart, and a pericardial cavity between these two layers.Leishmaniasis: A disease caused by any of a number of species of protozoa in the genus LEISHMANIA. There are four major clinical types of this infection: cutaneous (Old and New World) (LEISHMANIASIS, CUTANEOUS), diffuse cutaneous (LEISHMANIASIS, DIFFUSE CUTANEOUS), mucocutaneous (LEISHMANIASIS, MUCOCUTANEOUS), and visceral (LEISHMANIASIS, VISCERAL).Animals, Wild: Animals considered to be wild or feral or not adapted for domestic use. It does not include wild animals in zoos for which ANIMALS, ZOO is available.Catecholamines: A general class of ortho-dihydroxyphenylalkylamines derived from tyrosine.Nitroglycerin: A volatile vasodilator which relieves ANGINA PECTORIS by stimulating GUANYLATE CYCLASE and lowering cytosolic calcium. It is also sometimes used for TOCOLYSIS and explosives.Adenosine: A nucleoside that is composed of ADENINE and D-RIBOSE. Adenosine or adenosine derivatives play many important biological roles in addition to being components of DNA and RNA. Adenosine itself is a neurotransmitter.Pancreas: A nodular organ in the ABDOMEN that contains a mixture of ENDOCRINE GLANDS and EXOCRINE GLANDS. The small endocrine portion consists of the ISLETS OF LANGERHANS secreting a number of hormones into the blood stream. The large exocrine portion (EXOCRINE PANCREAS) is a compound acinar gland that secretes several digestive enzymes into the pancreatic ductal system that empties into the DUODENUM.Toxocariasis: Infection by round worms of the genus TOXOCARA, usually found in wild and domesticated cats and dogs and foxes, except for the larvae, which may produce visceral and ocular larva migrans in man.Ventricular Function, Left: The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the left HEART VENTRICLE. Its measurement is an important aspect of the clinical evaluation of patients with heart disease to determine the effects of the disease on cardiac performance.Antibodies, Protozoan: Immunoglobulins produced in a response to PROTOZOAN ANTIGENS.Duodenum: The shortest and widest portion of the SMALL INTESTINE adjacent to the PYLORUS of the STOMACH. It is named for having the length equal to about the width of 12 fingers.Ventricular Fibrillation: A potentially lethal cardiac arrhythmia that is characterized by uncoordinated extremely rapid firing of electrical impulses (400-600/min) in HEART VENTRICLES. Such asynchronous ventricular quivering or fibrillation prevents any effective cardiac output and results in unconsciousness (SYNCOPE). It is one of the major electrocardiographic patterns seen with CARDIAC ARREST.Anal Sacs: A pair of anal glands or sacs, located on either side of the ANUS, that produce and store a dark, foul-smelling fluid in carnivorous animals such as MEPHITIDAE and DOGS. The expelled fluid is used as a defensive repellent (in skunks) or a material to mark territory (in dogs).Renal Circulation: The circulation of the BLOOD through the vessels of the KIDNEY.Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay: An immunoassay utilizing an antibody labeled with an enzyme marker such as horseradish peroxidase. While either the enzyme or the antibody is bound to an immunosorbent substrate, they both retain their biologic activity; the change in enzyme activity as a result of the enzyme-antibody-antigen reaction is proportional to the concentration of the antigen and can be measured spectrophotometrically or with the naked eye. Many variations of the method have been developed.VeratrineConstriction: The act of constricting.Physical Exertion: Expenditure of energy during PHYSICAL ACTIVITY. Intensity of exertion may be measured by rate of OXYGEN CONSUMPTION; HEAT produced, or HEART RATE. Perceived exertion, a psychological measure of exertion, is included.Sinoatrial Node: The small mass of modified cardiac muscle fibers located at the junction of the superior vena cava (VENA CAVA, SUPERIOR) and right atrium. Contraction impulses probably start in this node, spread over the atrium (HEART ATRIUM) and are then transmitted by the atrioventricular bundle (BUNDLE OF HIS) to the ventricle (HEART VENTRICLE).Hospitals, AnimalHalf-Life: The time it takes for a substance (drug, radioactive nuclide, or other) to lose half of its pharmacologic, physiologic, or radiologic activity.Secretin: A peptide hormone of about 27 amino acids from the duodenal mucosa that activates pancreatic secretion and lowers the blood sugar level. (USAN and the USP Dictionary of Drug Names, 1994, p597)Gastrointestinal Motility: The motor activity of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.Radioisotopes: Isotopes that exhibit radioactivity and undergo radioactive decay. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed & McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Arteries: The vessels carrying blood away from the heart.Anti-Arrhythmia Agents: Agents used for the treatment or prevention of cardiac arrhythmias. They may affect the polarization-repolarization phase of the action potential, its excitability or refractoriness, or impulse conduction or membrane responsiveness within cardiac fibers. Anti-arrhythmia agents are often classed into four main groups according to their mechanism of action: sodium channel blockade, beta-adrenergic blockade, repolarization prolongation, or calcium channel blockade.Nitro Compounds: Compounds having the nitro group, -NO2, attached to carbon. When attached to nitrogen they are nitramines and attached to oxygen they are NITRATES.Phenoxybenzamine: An alpha-adrenergic antagonist with long duration of action. It has been used to treat hypertension and as a peripheral vasodilator.Drug Evaluation, Preclinical: Preclinical testing of drugs in experimental animals or in vitro for their biological and toxic effects and potential clinical applications.Gangliosidosis, GM1: An autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder caused by the absence or deficiency of BETA-GALACTOSIDASE. It is characterized by intralysosomal accumulation of G(M1) GANGLIOSIDE and oligosaccharides, primarily in neurons of the central nervous system. The infantile form is characterized by MUSCLE HYPOTONIA, poor psychomotor development, HIRSUTISM, hepatosplenomegaly, and facial abnormalities. The juvenile form features HYPERACUSIS; SEIZURES; and psychomotor retardation. The adult form features progressive DEMENTIA; ATAXIA; and MUSCLE SPASTICITY. (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, pp96-7)Oxygen: An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight [15.99903; 15.99977]. It is the most abundant element on earth and essential for respiration.Infusions, Intravenous: The long-term (minutes to hours) administration of a fluid into the vein through venipuncture, either by letting the fluid flow by gravity or by pumping it.Blood Flow Velocity: A value equal to the total volume flow divided by the cross-sectional area of the vascular bed.Raccoons: Carnivores of the genus Procyon of the family PROCYONIDAE. Two subgenera and seven species are currently recognized. They range from southern Canada to Panama and are found in several of the Caribbean Islands.Gastric Dilatation: Abnormal distention of the STOMACH due to accumulation of gastric contents that may reach 10 to 15 liters. Gastric dilatation may be the result of GASTRIC OUTLET OBSTRUCTION; ILEUS; GASTROPARESIS; or denervation.Microscopy, Electron: Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.Spirurida Infections: Infections with nematodes of the order SPIRURIDA.Motilin: A peptide of about 22-amino acids isolated from the DUODENUM. At low pH it inhibits gastric motor activity, whereas at high pH it has a stimulating effect.

Myocardial uptake of digoxin in chronically digitalized dogs. (1/32296)

1 The time course of myocardial uptake of digoxin, increase in contractility and changes in myocardial potassium concentration was studied for 90 min following an intravenous digoxin dose to long-term digitalized dogs. 2 Nineteen dogs were investigated by the use of a biopsy technique which allowed sampling before and after administration of digoxin. 3 Ten minutes after administration of digoxin the myocardial concentration increased from 60 to 306 nmol/kg tissue, the myocardial concentration of digoxin was significantly lower (250 nmol/kg tissue) after 30 min and then increased again. 4 The transmural myocardial distribution of digoxin was uniform before and 90 min after administration of digoxin in long-term digitalized dogs but at 10 min after administration, both the subepicardial and the subendocardial concentration of digoxin were significantly lower than that of the mesocardial layer. 5 During the first 10 min the dp/dtmax increased to 135% of the control level. The increase remained unchanged during the rest of the study. 6 Myocardial potassium decreased throughout the study. 7 The M-configuration of the myocardial uptake curve and the non-uniformity of myocardial distribution of digoxin observed at 10 min after administrating digoxin to long-term digitalized dogs indicate that the distribution of myocardial blood flow may be changed during chronic digitalization.  (+info)

Some leptospira agglutinins detected in domestic animals in British Columbia. (2/32296)

During a period of six years 7,555 bovine sera, 421 canine sera, 251 porcine sera and 135 equine sera were tested for agglutinins to Leptospira interrogans serotypes canicola, grippotyphosa, hardjo, icterohemorrhagiae, pomona and sejroe. The bovine sera reacted predominantly with hardjo and/or sejroe at a rate of 15% compared to 3.5% with pomona. Breeding or abortion problems were associated with pomona but not with sejroe/hardjo agglutinins. The canine sera reacted to canicola (9.9%y and icterohemorrhagiae (5.4%), tcted predominantly with canicola (8.9%) and icterohemorrhagiae (8.1%).  (+info)

The bioavailability, dispostion kinetics and dosage of sulphadimethoxine in dogs. (3/32296)

The disposition kinetics of sulphadimethoxine were studied in six normal beagle dogs after intravenous injection of a single dose (55 mg/kg). The median (range) distribution and elimination half times of the drug were 2.36 (2.06-3.35) hours and 13.10 (9.71-16.50) hours, respectively. Total body clearance of the drug had a median value of 21.7 ml/kg/h and a mean value of 21.4 ml/kg/h. While the overall tissue to plasma level ratio (k12/k21) of the drug was 0.55 after distribution equilibrium had been attained, analogue computer simulated curves showed that at 24 hours the fractions (percentage) of the dose in the central and tissue compartments were 12 and 11%, respectively. The drug was shown, by equilibrium dialysis method, to be highly bound to plasma proteins (greater than 75%) within the usual therapeutic range (50 to 150 mug/ml) of plasma levels. The systemic availability of sulphadimethoxine from the oral suspension was 32.8% (22.5-80.0). Since the absorption half time, 1.87 (0.86-3.22) hours, was considerably shorter than the half-life, 13.10 (9.71-16.50) hours, of the drug, the rate of absorption would have little influence on the dosage regimen. Based on the experimental data obtained, a satisfactory dosage regimen might consist of a priming dose of 55 mg/kg by the intravenous route and maintenance doses of either 27.5 mg/kg of sulphadimethoxine injection given intravenously or 55 mg/kg of the oral suspension administered at 24 hour intervals. The adequacy and duration of therapy will depend upon the clinical response obtained.  (+info)

Phasic right coronary artery blood flow in conscious dogs with normal and elevated right ventricular pressures. (4/32296)

We studied phasic right coronary blood flow in well trained normal dogs and dogs with pulmonic stenosis. We installed electromagnetic flow transducers and pressure tubes under anesthesia to monitor right coronary blood flow, cardiac output, central aortic blood pressure, and right ventribular pressure. In normotensive dogs, systolic flow amplitude equaled early diastolic flow levels. The ratio of systolic to diastolic flow at rest was substantially greater in the right coronary bed (36+/-1.3%) than in the left circumflex bed (13+/-3.6%). Right diastolid flow runoff, including the cove late in diastole, resembled left circumflex runoff. Blood flow to the normotensive right (37+/-1.1 ml/min 100(-1) g) and the left (35+/-1.0 ml/min(-1) g) ventricular myocardium indicated equal perfusion of both cardiac walls. Throttling of systolic flow was related directly to the right ventricular systolic pressure level in the dogs with pulmonic stenosis. Retrograde systolic flow occurred in severe right ventricular hypertension. The late diastolic runoff pattern in dogs with pulmonic stenosis appeared the same as for the normotensive dogs. We obtained systolic to diastolic flow ratios of 1/3 the value of normotensive hearts in high and severe pulmonic hypertension. Electrocardiograms and studies of pathology suggested restricted blood flow to the inner layers of the right myocardium in the dogs with severe and high right ventricular hypertension. Normotensive and hypertensive peak hyperemic flow responses were similar, except for an increased magnitude of diastolic flow, with proportionately less systolic flow in hypertensive states.  (+info)

Ventricular pressure-volume curve indices change with end-diastolic pressure. (5/32296)

Many indices have been proposed to describee the diastolic pressure-volume curve mathematically and permit quantification of the elastic properties of the myocardium itself in hopes that changes in the muscle caused by disease would b.e reflected in the diastolic pressure-volume curve. To date, none of the proposed indices has been shown convincingly to discriminate one group of patients from another. While this situation in part arises from the relatively large amount of noise introduced by the technical difficulties of measuring synchronous pressures and volumes during diastole in man, ther is a more fundamental difficulty. In practice, one can measure only a short segment of the entire pressure-volume curve, and the values of all diastolic pressure-volume curve parameters investigated change significantly when one uses different segments of the same pressure-volume curve to compute them. These results were derived from relatively noise-free pressure-volume curves obtained by filling nine excised dog left ventricles at a known rate and monitoring pressure-volume curve used to compute the parameter. Merely increasing measurement fidelity will not resolve this problem, because none of these parameters accurately characterizes the entire diastolic pressure-volume curbe from a segment like that which one can reasonably expect to obtain from humans.  (+info)

Quantification of baroreceptor influence on arterial pressure changes seen in primary angiotension-induced hypertension in dogs. (6/32296)

We studied the role of the sino-aortic baroreceptors in the gradual development of hypertension induced by prolonged administration of small amounts of angiotensin II (A II) in intact dogs and dogs with denervated sino-aortic baroreceptors. Short-term 1-hour infusions of A II(1.0-100 ng/kg per min) showed that conscious denervated dogs had twice the pressor sensitivity of intact dogs. Long-term infusions of A II at 5.0 ng/kg per min (2-3 weeks) with continuous 24-hour recordings of arterial pressure showed that intact dogs required 28 hours to reach the same level of pressure attained by denervated dogs during the 1st hour of infusion. At the 28th hour the pressure in both groups was 70% of the maximum value attained by the 7th day of infusion. Both intact and denervated dogs reached nearly the same plateau level of pressure, the magnitude being directly related both the the A II infusion rate and the daily sodium intake. Cardiac output in intact dogs initially decreased after the onset of A II infusion, but by the 5th day of infusion it was 38% above control, whereas blood volume was unchanged. Heart rate returned to normal after a reduction during the 1st day of infusion in intact dogs. Plasma renin activity could not be detected after 24 hours of A II infusion in either intact or denervated dogs. The data indicate that about 35% of the hypertensive effect of A II results from its acute pressor action, and an additional 35% of the gradual increase in arterial pressure is in large measure a result of baroreceptor resetting. We conclude that the final 30% increase in pressure seems to result from increased cardiac output, the cause of which may be decreased vascular compliance. since the blood volume remains unaltered.  (+info)

Acute and chronic dose-response relationships for angiotensin, aldosterone, and arterial pressure at varying levels of sodium intake. (7/32296)

We examined the acute and chronic dose-response relationships between intravenously infused angiotensin II (A II) and the resulting changes in arterial pressure and plasma aldosterone concentration at varying levels of sodium intake. Sequential analysis of plasma aldosterone at each A II infusion rate resulted in an acute dose-related increase in plasma aldosterone which was markedly attenuated after the first 24 hours of infusion, the final level being directly related to the dose of A II and inversely related to sodium intake. A II infused at 5,15, and 23 ng/kg per min was associated with an initial increase (2nd to 8th hour) in plasma aldosterone to 2,6, and 9 times control values, respectively, in dogs receiving 40 mEq Na+/day. But, after the 1st day, aldosterone averaged only 1, 1.7, and 3 times control values for the next 2 weeks at the same rates of A II infusion. Dogs receiving 120 mEq Na+/day during A II infusion exhibited only a transient increase in plasma aldosterone during the 1st day. Sustained hypertension developed over a period of a week at all doses of A II at normal and high sodium intake, but did not occur at any dose of A II in sodium-depleted dogs. Increasing sodium intake from 40 to 120 mEq/day resulted in higher levels of hypertension, 125% compared to 140% of ocntrol values for dogs infused with A II, 5.0 ng/kg per min. We conclude that primary angiotensin-induced hypertension need not be associated with increased levels of plasma aldosterone, which appears to remain elevated only with amounts of A II greater than those required to sustain a significant degree of hypertension.  (+info)

The effect of cardiac contraction on collateral resistance in the canine heart. (8/32296)

We determined whether the coronary collateral vessels develop an increased resistance to blood flow during systole as does the cognate vascular bed. Collateral resistance was estimated by measuring retrograde flow rate from a distal branch of the left anterior descending coronary artery while the main left coronary artery was perfused at a constant pressure. Retrograde flow rate was measured before and during vagal arrest. We found that in 10 dogs the prolonged diastole experienced when the heart was stopped caused no significant change in the retrograde flow rate, which indicated that systole has little effect on the collateral resistance. However, when left ventricular end-diastolic pressure was altered by changing afterload or contractility, a direct relationship between end-diastolic pressure and collateral resistance was noted.  (+info)

  • Maybe it's those similarities that lead many people connect so well with dogs, but it's definitely why scientists are studying the effects in dogs, of a promising molecular chemotherapy drug that targets brain cancer cells, but leaves healthy brain tissue undamaged. (wvtf.org)
  • A treatment being tested for brain cancer in dogs may one day help humans with the same disease. (wvtf.org)
  • Dr. John Rossmeisl at the Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg explains, "It's a type of brain tumor in dogs that are also what most people know as glioblastoma in humans. (wvtf.org)
  • Dogs and humans are very similar," Rossmeisl explains. (wvtf.org)
  • Fact: 100% of transplant procedures performed on humans were tested on dogs first. (save-an-angel.org)
  • People complain of being cold, and dogs usually mimick humans. (save-an-angel.org)
  • In the last six years, dogs suffering from lymphoma have become eligible to receive the same type of medical treatment as their human counterparts at various hospitals around the country. (save-an-angel.org)
  • All dogs are vulnerable to temperature extremes-especially short-haired breeds, puppies and older dogs, and those that are sick or fragile. (rover.com)
  • Different dog breeds have different grooming needs. (bellaonline.com)
  • the silky coat of the Yorkshire terrier may be 2 ft (61 cm) long, while a few breeds of dog (such as the Mexican hairless) are entirely without hair. (infoplease.com)
  • An excellent all round food for dogs of all breeds and ages. (angelfire.com)
  • Although many people who were new to the dog world saw the pairings of different breeds as a 20th century fad that was worth noting, avid breeders had been crossing purebreds for centuries. (care2.com)
  • Some of our most recognized and entrenched breeds started out as designer dogs. (care2.com)
  • There are currently over 500 "designer" breeds recognized by the Designer Dogs Kennel Club, and some breeders take their programs very seriously. (care2.com)
  • What truly defines the differences between breeds of dogs, what motivates dogs to be protective or helpful to us, what causes aggressive behavior by dogs toward human beings, why dogs started hanging around us in the first place-when it comes to dogs, almost nothing is what it seems. (theatlantic.com)
  • The dog project will cost a few million dollars, with a lot of the funding coming from private breed clubs that want to develop genetic tests for inborn diseases that their particular breeds are susceptible to. (theatlantic.com)
  • Using voluntarily donated saliva, blood and tumor samples from many breeds of privately owned dogs, researchers hope that by studying canine cancers they can pinpoint the causes of human cancers. (redorbit.com)
  • The researchers then compared the genetic sequences from the Altai specimen with gene sequences from 72 modern dogs of 70 different breeds, 30 wolves, four coyotes and 35 prehistoric canid species from the Americas. (yahoo.com)
  • And could you give me the list of other dog breeds that are more powerful than doberman. (yahoo.com)
  • A breeder who breeds their dog more often than she should be will end up causing her to have pups more inclined to have nasty little tempers. (yahoo.com)
  • According to The Kennel Club, dogs breeds that don't shed include Lagotto Romagnolos, Irish Water Spaniels, Spanish Water Dogs and Bouvier des Flandres. (reference.com)
  • Herding dogs, livestock-guardian breeds, and vermin-control dogs such as Jack Russell terriers all have their special place on a well-run farm or ranch. (motherearthnews.com)
  • Heather Houlahan, who breeds and trains shepherds for search-and-rescue operations as well as for helping on her small homestead, says, "These general-purpose dogs can bring in the goats, kill a groundhog and keep the rooster under control. (motherearthnews.com)
  • There are other herding breeds, such as Australian Shepherds and Kelpies, but it's much harder to find a good working dog from those breeds, because for a long time so many in this country have not been bred specifically for working. (motherearthnews.com)
  • 24/7 Wall Street has compiled a list of the most popular tiny dog breeds in the U.S., working off data from the American Kennel Club (AKC), which registers dog breeds. (usatoday.com)
  • Dog breeds are especially good for genetic studies because they are effectively closed populations. (psychologytoday.com)
  • Some breeds, such as the Saluki and the Afghan hound , were developed to chase game by sight over long distances, and these dogs can see well enough to detect any movement far on the horizon. (britannica.com)
  • Dogs come in a wide variety of colours, but in many breeds colour selection is an important consideration, as is the colour distribution on the dog. (britannica.com)
  • Variety of Nutrient Requirements Amongst Breeds of Dog dictate the unique ingredients used within our diets. (amazonaws.com)
  • Sporting dogs, or mixed breeds with sporting bloodlines, should have names to. (bhg.com)
  • In combination with medications, Hernandez says the dog has helped his symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder. (cnn.com)
  • Dogs naturally suffer complex diseases, including mental disorders that are similar to those in humans. (tufts.edu)
  • No previously recorded study in humans or dogs has addressed the factors that drive severity in OCD and CCD. (tufts.edu)
  • Comparative genomics is a particularly attractive approach to reveal the molecular underpinnings of disease in inbred animals with the hope of gaining new insights into these diseases in dogs and humans," says Ginns. (tufts.edu)
  • Additionally, 2013 MRI research from Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University and McLean Imaging Center at McLean Hospital showed that the structural brain abnormalities of Doberman pinschers afflicted with canine compulsive disorder (CCD) were similar to those of humans with OCD. (tufts.edu)
  • If the canine construct is fully accepted by other OCD researchers, this spontaneously-occurring model of the condition in humans, right down to the biological pathways involved, could help point the way to novel and more effective treatments for such a debilitating condition," Dodman says. (tufts.edu)
  • Like humans, dogs are only guests in the aquatic environment and thus prone to some preventable conditions. (google.com)
  • Humans and dogs react very differently to medications, which is why veterinarians caution dog owners against making independent decisions about how to medicate their animals. (akc.org)
  • Dr John Bradshaw explained if dogs are trained to interact with humans, they can then find it difficult when they don't have that interaction during the working day. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • He explained: "Dogs have a very powerful link to humans. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • Although dogs possess hearing abilities far superior to humans', their acute sense of smell is probably the sense most utilized. (infoplease.com)
  • Rare diseases in humans also show up in dogs. (redorbit.com)
  • Comparing data between humans and dogs has the potential to significantly advance understanding of this cancer. (redorbit.com)
  • Dogs have developed the strongest ability of all animals on Earth to form affectionate bonds with humans," says Dr. Frank McMillan D.V.M., director of well-being studies at Best Friends Animal Society, an organization helping adopters find loving companions . (treehugger.com)
  • Dogs and humans were buried together in Germany about 14,000 years ago, a strong hint of domestication, but genetic studies have pinpointed the origin of dog domestication in both China and the Middle East. (yahoo.com)
  • Can Dogs Help Humans Heal? (psychologytoday.com)
  • Dogs laugh, but they do not emit the same sound as humans when they laugh. (reference.com)
  • Humans may even be able to imitate the sound to calm their own dogs. (reference.com)
  • Dogs pant and let their tongues hang out of their mouth to regulate their body temperature, because they have fewer sweat glands than humans. (reference.com)
  • Dogs have the same five senses as humans. (britannica.com)
  • Dogs' sense of smell is by far the most acute and is immeasurably better than that of humans. (britannica.com)
  • Dogs are used for such tasks as tracking missing persons, digging underground, and tracing toxic substances, such as gases, that are undetectable by humans. (britannica.com)
  • Dogs are able to register sounds of 35,000 vibrations per second (compared with 20,000 per second in humans), and they also can shut off their inner ear in order to filter out distracting sounds. (britannica.com)
  • Dogs can generally see better in poor light than humans but not as well in bright light. (britannica.com)
  • There is much debate about which dogs attack humans the most. (bmj.com)
  • In December 2018 , the airline became the first transportation company to win the Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering category at the Innovation Time Awards for its international prize-winning 'Aeroflot Sulimov Dogs' project. (prnewswire.com)
  • By providing your dog with routine veterinary care and following the Healthy People tips , you are less likely to get sick from touching or interacting with a dog. (cdc.gov)
  • And most importantly, if your dog exhibits any of the symptoms described above after spending time in the water, seek immediate veterinary care. (google.com)
  • Every dog in our care has space to run freely, eats high quality food, gets heartworm and flea medications monthly, and regular veterinary care, including immunizations and well dog checks. (google.com)
  • Americans spend more than $5 billion a year on dog food and $7 billion on canine veterinary care. (theatlantic.com)
  • The benefits include assistance with veterinary care, travel benefits associated with obtaining and training a dog, and the provision, maintenance, and replacement of hardware required for the dog to perform the tasks necessary to assist such veterans. (federalregister.gov)
  • The number one pet most likely to require veterinary care is "man's best friend" the dog, despite an Animal Pet Products Association National Pet Owners Survey revealing a higher number of total cats than dogs as pets. (prweb.com)
  • Learn about dog adoption, pet health, the best foods for your canine, and even products to keep your pooch stylish! (marthastewart.com)
  • If your dog is always in your lap, leaning against you or following you room to room, it's clear your pooch is attached to you. (treehugger.com)
  • It's not unusual for dogs to delight in positive attention from virtually anyone, but just because your pooch loves on everyone, doesn't mean he doesn't love you most. (treehugger.com)
  • Man's best friend already has been shown capable of sniffing out certain cancer cells, and dogs have long been put to work in the hunt for illegal drugs and explosives. (reuters.com)
  • This dog is serious about keeping the title of 'man's best friend. (treehugger.com)
  • Dogs have lived alongside us for thousands of years, earning the reputation as 'man's best friend' for good reason. (treehugger.com)
  • The point at which wolves went from wild to man's best friend is hotly contested, though dogs were well-established in human societies by about 10,000 years ago. (yahoo.com)
  • but when does one man's choice to let his dog bark all night begin to impinge upon another man's right to sleep? (lulu.com)
  • Although dogs can be beneficial to the health and wellbeing of their owners, people should be aware that dogs of any age, including puppies, can sometimes carry harmful germs that can make people sick. (cdc.gov)
  • Dogs and puppies infected with Campylobacter might show no signs of infection or they can have diarrhea. (cdc.gov)
  • In extreme cold, it's best to keep dogs inside, particularly if they're puppies, and older dogs, or have health issues. (rover.com)
  • Dogs Trust also manages microchipping and neutering schemes in the United Kingdom and abroad, in order to reduce the number of unwanted litters of puppies and stray dogs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dogs for the Disabled selects puppies at around 6 weeks of age. (reference.com)
  • The NCDL campaigned against vivisection , unnecessary muzzling and prolonged chaining, as well as providing care for stray dogs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Italy has pledged to crack down on the half a million stray dogs roaming the country after two serious attacks in a few days, including the mauling to death of a young boy. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • On Sunday a 10-year-old boy was killed after being pulled from his bicycle by a pack of stray dogs in the same area. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • There are around 450,000 stray dogs in Italy, mostly in the south of the country, according to the Association for the Defence of Animals and the Environment. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • Authorities believe multiple stray dogs attacked her in the driveway of her home. (freerepublic.com)
  • Please remember that if the diarrhea does not subside in a day or two-if your dog is a young puppy or if your dog is lethargic-call your veterinarian. (ardmoreah.com)
  • From pet photographer Amanda Jones comes a coffee table book featuring pairs of photographs of dogs, one taken as a puppy and again as an older dog. (kottke.org)
  • For some people, the term conjures images of little dogs traveling in their little designer totes, which are perched on the shoulders of their high-fashion, globe trotting "puppy-mammas. (care2.com)
  • Who can resist puppy-dog eyes? (sheknows.com)
  • Often, those big, adorable, puppy-dog eyes are a clever tactic to get treats, but dog's eyes say much more. (sheknows.com)
  • About that time, I was also a volunteer puppy raiser for Guide Dogs for the Blind and I was raising a very high-energy puppy. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • Learning where to touch a dog is an important part in either stimulating or relaxing it and is useful in training a puppy or bonding with an adult dog. (britannica.com)
  • The best diet for your dog is one he/she does well on-gives him/her a good, healthy coat and body condition.Overfeeding can have a significant effect on your dog's health. (ardmoreah.com)
  • In some cases, like glaucoma , giving your dog Benadryl can actually worsen your dog's condition. (akc.org)
  • Researchers ask each owner 100 questions about their dog's behavior and personality using short questionnaires on the Darwin's Dogs site. (scientificamerican.com)
  • I tracked them down on the Internet and contacted Lisa Spector, co-founder of Through a Dog's Ear to find out more about this classical canine music. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • The results inspired us to launch Through a Dog's Ear, which currently consists of a book and a music series for dogs. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • Through a Dog's Ear is an inexpensive sound therapy for dogs. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • So it's wonderful that the music of Through a Dog's Ear benefits both two-legged and four-legged family members -- calming both canine and human nervous systems. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • She wrote: "I opened my first school in January 2012 and have Through a Dog's Ear playing during all of my classes, not just Cranky Canine classes for reactive dogs. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • If your dog's diet needs a nutritional boost, consider adding a multivitamin made just for dogs. (orlandosentinel.com)
  • Return the dog and receive a refund plus reimbursement for veterinary expenses related to certifying the dog's illness, up to the price of the dog including sales tax. (consumeraffairs.com)
  • Grooming the coat enhances the dog's beauty and well-being and gives the owner the chance to evaluate the general health of the dog. (britannica.com)
  • The picture of a dog crouched low to the ground licking the lips of another dog's lips is often viewed as a soft and friendly appeasement gesture. (amazonaws.com)
  • Effective crate training techniques when your dog is first obtained should decrease the dog's anxiety when it is left alone in its crate (s. (amazonaws.com)
  • Visit the Healthy People section to learn about staying healthy around dogs. (cdc.gov)
  • These bacteria do not make dogs or cats sick, but very rarely, they can spread to people. (cdc.gov)
  • Rarely, Capnocytophaga can spread to people through bites, scratches, or close contact with a dog or cat that is infected. (cdc.gov)
  • Most people who have contact with dogs and cats do not become sick. (cdc.gov)
  • Tips, stories, and reviews for people who love dogs, powered by Rover.com , the world's largest network of 5-star pet sitters and dog walkers. (rover.com)
  • NORTH GRAFTON, Mass. - Research led by investigators in veterinary and human medicine has identified genetic pathways that exacerbate severity of canine compulsive disorder in Doberman pinschers, a discovery that could lead to better therapies for obsessive compulsive disorder in people. (tufts.edu)
  • None people can be applied to generico the way in the range of criteria, prednisone tablets for dogs or taken greatly. (gastro-service-info.de)
  • To prevent these people while you are code stopping dose with this prednisone, vestibular syndrome dogs prednisone your depression may reduce your art just. (genericpharmashop.com)
  • This video -- with music by Emmy-winning singer-songwriter Parry Gripp -- features real dogs who detect cancer and Parkinson's in fun research settings, and dogs who alert people to seizures and diabetic lows or highs and other life-threatening physical ailments. (youtube.com)
  • For more on these dogs and the people whose lives they save, pick up a copy of the book, Doctor Dogs: How Our Best Friends Are Becoming Our Best Medicine, by New York Times bestselling author Maria Goodavage. (youtube.com)
  • There are different types of assistance dogs providing a wide range of support to older and disabled people. (tfl.gov.uk)
  • As for the LA Times article, here are a few of the pithier quotes that will perhaps jog your memory: --Everywhere you go, dogs and people are doing things that a few years ago would have seemed bizarre and sometimes downright rude. (google.com)
  • The Labrador, recognized for its excellent guiding abilities, and the Poodle, known for its intelligence, trainability and very low shedding, were paired to fill a need for disabled people who had allergies to dog dander. (care2.com)
  • Finding genes that cause this or that ailment is what most people think of when they think about gene mapping and genetic research, and pinpointing the causes of inborn diseases is certainly one of the obvious and direct payoffs that will come from a better understanding of the dog genome. (theatlantic.com)
  • The Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) and the Van Andel Research Institute (VARI) have created the Canine Hereditary Cancer Consortium, a program designed to study naturally occurring cancers in dogs to better understand why both pets and people get sick. (redorbit.com)
  • By studying the DNA of canines, we expect to more quickly discover the genomic causes of disease and more quickly find ways to better treat dogs, and people,'' said Dr. Mark Neff, director of the new TGen-VARI Program for Canine Health and Performance. (redorbit.com)
  • In addition to cancer, TGen and VARI eventually will study neurological and behavioral disorders as well as hearing loss and other debilitative conditions in dogs that could relate to people. (redorbit.com)
  • We're proud to be part of such an innovative approach that fully supports our mission of providing total lifetime care for pets, and one that will offer hope to people and dogs who are suffering from these illnesses," said Phil Francis, Executive Chairman of PetSmart. (redorbit.com)
  • Neil Thompson, President and CEO of Hill's Pet Nutrition, said support of cancer research in dogs "goes hand-in-hand with the company's mission of enriching and lengthening the special relationships between people and their pets. (redorbit.com)
  • Pursuant to 38 U.S.C. 1714 (b) and (c), VA may provide to veterans enrolled under 38 U.S.C. 1705 guide dogs trained for the aid of people who are blind and service dogs trained for the aid of the hearing impaired or persons with a spinal cord injury or dysfunction or other chronic impairment that substantially limits mobility. (federalregister.gov)
  • The non-dog-people in the world often scoff, but anyone who owns a dog knows they've seen that familiar reaction: head down, eyes staring remorsefully in your direction. (sheknows.com)
  • Most people are usually skeptical at first that music can actually relieve their dogs suffering. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • Unlike guide dogs for people with more obvious physical disabilities, there's a lot of gray area regarding who gets to have a dog accompany them to places -- from restaurants to stores to airplanes -- where animals are usually not allowed. (cnn.com)
  • These are individually, intensely trained dogs for people with mental disabilities. (cnn.com)
  • Then there are emotional support dogs, which provide comfort and motivation to people with disabilities. (cnn.com)
  • Allen said most people think a dog hospice would be a sad place. (cnn.com)
  • Researchers have even found that not only are dogs more likely to yawn after watching familiar people yawn, but also that dogs will yawn when hearing only the sound of a loved one's yawn. (treehugger.com)
  • Pay attention to how your dog acts when in a room full of people. (treehugger.com)
  • It's more about hating dog-lovers, or hating the dog-lovingness of people. (news24.com)
  • Nor of the obvious toll on the environment to produce their food, toys, special blankies, bejeweled collars and other crap you (I've started using you because I'm assuming you, dear reader, are not one of the 2 other people I know who think dogs are a blight on the planet) use to decorate your pet. (news24.com)
  • Dogs and cats provide love and companionship to millions of people and should not be slaughtered and sold as food," Buchanan said. (usatoday.com)
  • However, individuals in most states can kill and eat a dog or cat or sell the meat to other people. (usatoday.com)
  • It seems a pity that with dogs of war being such a good model for the study of PTSD in people, that funding has not been forthcoming in this direction. (psychologytoday.com)
  • Every year 250 000 people who have been bitten by dogs attend minor injuries and emergency units in the United Kingdom, 1 and some of them are admitted to hospital for surgical debridement or intravenous antibiotics. (bmj.com)
  • Of the estimated 740 people per 100 000 population bitten by dogs annually, 4 a minority seek medical attention. (bmj.com)
  • Train your dog to be well behaved and stop jumping at you and other people with advice from Battersea Dogs and Cats Home in London. (amazonaws.com)
  • One of the side effects of Benadryl is drowsiness, which helps to calm anxious dogs. (akc.org)
  • I began to wonder if the psychoacoustic principles I learned from Joshua would also benefit dogs, so I approached him with the idea of collaborating on creating music recordings to calm canines and relieve anxiety issues. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • And the dog pulls him away from conflicts and jumps on him during anxiety attacks to calm him down. (cnn.com)
  • When his servant brought his horse to him there, it was with the intelligence that his dog, Prince, was in a strange state, had killed the cat, almost killed another dog, and had tried to bite some of the servants. (upenn.edu)
  • Increasingly, dog bites are the subject of litigation because bite wounds are still being sutured when they should be left open and because of incorrect antimicrobial prophylaxis. (bmj.com)
  • Why do dogs bite? (bmj.com)
  • As he was born in 1946, Trump, who has been accused of having more bark than bite, is a dog under the Chinese zodiac a trait which he shares with his predecessors George W. Bush and. (freerepublic.com)
  • If you are thinking about breeding your dog, consult your breeder for advice. (angelfire.com)
  • The official presentation of the dogs took place at Sheremetyevo International Airport's Terminal B and was attended by the breeder of the Shalaika dogs, Klim Sulimov , and members of the cynology community. (prnewswire.com)
  • For this reason I would suggest trying to find a breeder with lots of experience or one who has a dog with a first litter. (yahoo.com)
  • A breeder is a person or entity that sold, transferred or gave away part of three or more litters or 20 individual dogs in the previous 12 months. (consumeraffairs.com)
  • Just because you¿re buying a pedigree dog, this doesn¿t mean that the person you¿re buying from is a responsible breeder . (rspca.org.uk)
  • Possible health intention revealed low restlessness and complete amet cure to prednisone allergies dogs be human peers of delivery common food, and there were no few usual corticosteroids that modified this muscle. (pizzalaprovencale.com)
  • Canine compulsive disorder shares behavioral hallmarks, pharmacological responsiveness, and brain structural homology with human OCD, and thus is expected to be an important animal model. (tufts.edu)
  • They have also created an animal sanctuary where selected dogs unable to be rehomed can live together free from excessive human contact. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, some human medications are safe for use with dogs, as long as they are used appropriately. (akc.org)
  • While you should always consult with your veterinarian before giving your dog a human medication, here is what you need to know about using Benadryl for dogs. (akc.org)
  • Related to the stories about binding books with human skin from earlier in the week, apparently architect Le Corbusier bound one of his favorite books (Don Quixote) with the hide from one of his favorite dogs (Pinceau) . (kottke.org)
  • If some advertiser or political consultant could figure out just what it is in human psychology that makes us willing to believe that dogs are loyal, trustworthy, selfless, loving, courageous, noble, and obedient, he could retire to his own island in the Caribbean in about a week with what he would make peddling that secret. (theatlantic.com)
  • Dogs have not quite reached that point in their parasitism of human society. (theatlantic.com)
  • In the past couple of years new scientific evidence has started to confirm just how weird the relationship between dogs and human beings is-and how different it is from what we tend to think it is. (theatlantic.com)
  • They could provide the DNA keys to findings new treatments for rare cancers and other diseases in both dogs and human patients. (redorbit.com)
  • Dr. Meltzer and his colleagues will use gene expression profiling to identify genes involved in osteosarcoma to determine if the same genetic markers, alterations, and targets found are also found in human osteosarcoma, and in dogs. (redorbit.com)
  • Many rare human cancers are very common in dogs. (redorbit.com)
  • There is artistic interpretation in the details, such as Laika's dreams, her life as a somewhat-stray dog before her science career, and details about her relationships with her human handlers before going into space. (metafilter.com)
  • A new study entitled "Canine Filamentous Dermatitis Associated with Borrelia Infection" reveals that a condition similar to human Morgellons disease can occur in dogs. (prweb.com)
  • Further analysis of the canine skin fibers showed that they were made of the same proteins as human Morgellons disease fibers. (prweb.com)
  • In those cases, we do not have evidence of contact transmission from human to animal or animal to human," says Dr. Stricker, "it may be that both owner and dog were exposed to the same disease vector. (prweb.com)
  • We provide evidence that in the domestic dog oxytocin enhances social motivation to approach and affiliate with conspecifics and human partners, which constitutes the basis for the formation of any stable social bond. (pnas.org)
  • In this study we provide behavioral evidence that exogenous OT promotes positive social behaviors in the domestic dog toward not only conspecifics but also human partners. (pnas.org)
  • Q. Can I give a dog human multivitamins? (orlandosentinel.com)
  • This is why the attachment bond a dog feels for his human is one of deep devotion and is, as has been often stated, unconditional. (treehugger.com)
  • When scientists at Japan's Azabu University took urine samples from dogs and their owners before and after 30 minutes of interacting, they found that the pairs that spent the most time gazing into each others' eyes showed significantly higher levels of the hormone oxytocin, the same hormonal response that bonds us to human infants. (treehugger.com)
  • It's an incredible finding that suggests that dogs have hijacked the human bonding system,' Hare told Science . (treehugger.com)
  • There is a common folk belief that animal saliva, especially that of dogs, has healing properties for human wounds. (psychologytoday.com)
  • What would happen if a dog were to breed with a human? (reference.com)
  • With any type, you'll need to commit time and effort to developing the mutual understanding and affection that is the foundation of a successful dog-human partnership. (motherearthnews.com)
  • The bipartisan bill by Florida Reps. Vern Buchanan, a Republican, and Alcee Hastings, a Democrat, would amend the federal Animal Welfare Act to ban the slaughter of dogs and cats for human consumption in the United States. (usatoday.com)
  • The bill makes it illegal to knowingly slaughter, transport, possess, buy, sell or donate dogs or cats or their parts for human consumption. (usatoday.com)
  • Taiwan last year became the first Asian government to outlaw the slaughter of dogs and cats for human consumption. (usatoday.com)
  • Novel (but safe) treatments applied first to dogs with PTSD would provide pilot data on which human clinical trials could be based. (psychologytoday.com)
  • Dogs are sensitive to touch , the fifth sense, and use this sense to communicate with one another and with their human counterparts. (britannica.com)
  • Soon, we found that our major mission became mostly one of offering sanctuary to the many dogs who never found permanent homes through adoption. (google.com)
  • We continue to rescue also, and use adoption sites and events to try to find homes for these dogs. (google.com)
  • If it's so cold outside that you're uncomfortable, your dog, even with a thick coat of fur , probably feels the same way. (rover.com)
  • When placed in uncomfortable environments, some canines are known to give strangers the "whale eye," where you can sometimes see the whites of their eyes. (sheknows.com)
  • OCD is often characterized by distressing thoughts and time-consuming, repetitive behaviors, while canine compulsions may include repetitive tail chasing, excessive grooming and flank and blanket sucking. (tufts.edu)
  • Researchers will study saliva samples from many dogs to look for differences in DNA connected to particular personality traits or behaviors. (scientificamerican.com)
  • Specifically, when sprayed with OT, dogs showed higher social orientation and affiliation toward their owners and higher affiliation and approach behaviors toward dog partners than when sprayed with placebo. (pnas.org)
  • Additionally, the exchange of socio-positive behaviors with dog partners triggered the release of endogenous OT, highlighting the involvement of OT in the development of social relationships in the domestic dog. (pnas.org)
  • Adopt Rescue Dogs/Legacy Ranch is a 501 (c)(3) non-profit animal welfare organization. (google.com)
  • The charity has 17 rescue dogs at various stages of training that will be paired up with diabetic owners, many of them children. (reuters.com)
  • Some rescue dogs are trained to follow a scent on the ground, and others are trained to scent the air. (britannica.com)
  • No one's saying dogs don't feel, they're simply questioning whether dogs actually feel complex emotions like guilt. (sheknows.com)
  • All the dogs and cats he had bitten were killed by Mr. Buxton himself, knowing that for such a painful business it was wiser to trust to no one's resolution and humanity but his own. (upenn.edu)
  • Owners will also mail a saliva sample from their dog using a kit that the researchers provide. (scientificamerican.com)
  • Strays have become master psychologists, says Andrei Poyarkov, 54, the dean of Moscow's stray-dog researchers. (kottke.org)
  • At around the same time, the first hard evidence was being gathered by researchers down the road at Amersham Hospital that dogs could identify bladder cancer from chemicals in urine. (reuters.com)
  • The dog study was partially funded by the Charles E. Holman Morgellons Disease Foundation (CEHMDF) and was conducted by an international team of researchers, including Calgary microbiologist Marianne Middelveen , San Francisco Internist Dr. Raphael Stricker, molecular biologists Dr. Eva Sapi and Dr. Jennie Burke, and Calgary veterinarians Dr. Gheorghe Rotaru and Dr. Jody McMurray. (prweb.com)
  • That means that the Altai canid was an ancient dog, not an ancient wolf - though it had likely diverged from the wolf line relatively recently, the researchers report today (March 6) in the journal PLOS ONE . (yahoo.com)
  • And facebook is cvs a nervous prednisone to dogs allergies prednisone diaphragm trainer. (pizzalaprovencale.com)
  • You can also become a fan on Facebook , and see more of her pictures of shaking dogs by clicking here . (huffingtonpost.com)
  • The airline's 'Sulimov Dogs' Facebook project also took the awards for Travel and Tourism, Digital Media Relations and Community Engagement at the IPRA Golden World Awards. (prnewswire.com)
  • I'll even admit some of them are my friends, but today, after a particularly lengthy flurry of cute Facebook pictures of homeless dogs and quotes extolling the eternal virtues of dog, I feel I have to object. (news24.com)
  • The reason for this is that a mother dog should only have pups like once a year (i think don't quote me on this, you should ask a vet for specific details) but anyways if the female is bred too soon after her last set of pups, her body will be unable to produce the amount of necessary nutrients for these next pups. (yahoo.com)
  • This often will cause the pups to have deficiencies and if done too many times (3rd and 4th litters) can turn out to be moodier dogs. (yahoo.com)
  • Veterinarians use Benadryl for dogs on a regular basis to treat allergies , travel anxiety , and motion sickness. (akc.org)
  • Almost all canine anxiety issues originate in stress and music gets to the heart of the issue, as the individual pieces have been selected and/or rearranged to gradually reduce the heart rate. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • The study builds on more than a decade of research from Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine and the University of Massachusetts Medical School that in 2010 initially found the neural cadherin (CDH2) gene on canine chromosome 7 appeared to coincide with an increased risk of OCD. (tufts.edu)
  • This study is the first to show a long-term cure for diabetes in a large animal using gene therapy," says Fàtima Bosch, who treated the dogs at the Autonomous University of Barcelona, Spain . (newscientist.com)
  • Your dog can ingest rocksalt, as well as antifreeze and other dangerous chemicals from asphalt and concrete surfaces, when licking his paws. (rover.com)
  • Dogs that work or play in the ocean and ingest too much salt water can develop 'salt poisoning', i.e. serum hypernatremia. (google.com)
  • Dogs that retrieve in the ocean will inevitably ingest more salt water than dogs that are simply swimming. (google.com)
  • The China aster (Callistephus chinensis) does not pose a danger to dogs who ingest it. (ehow.com)
  • Photographer Christian Vieler, 48, has been documenting pooches, with their eyes bulging, mouths wide open and looks of love on their faces, in his studio as part of the project "Dogs Catching Treats" since 2013. (yahoo.com)
  • In other words, if you want to give your dog a total of one cup of food he/she will receive 1/3 cup chicken mixed with 2/3 cup of rice. (ardmoreah.com)
  • Each day, (as long as the movements are normal) increase the amount of dog food and decrease the amount of bland food until you have reached the point where your dog is on 100% dog food. (ardmoreah.com)
  • Family groups (a male, a few females, and their young) inhabit burrows and cooperate to share food, chase off other prairie dogs, and groom one another. (nationalgeographic.com)
  • Back in the lean Soviet era, restaurants and the now-ubiquitous fast-food kiosks were scarce, so dogs were less likely to beg and more likely to forage through garbage, the zoologists say. (kottke.org)
  • High quality dog food that uses only the finest ingredients and is made without artificial additives, preservatives and flavourings. (angelfire.com)
  • To purchase a bag of this high-quality, natural dog food, you can order it online or stop by one of the retail locations listed in the Wellness Store Locator. (amazonaws.com)
  • You can also find powdered and liquid dog multivitamins, which are designed to be mixed with food. (orlandosentinel.com)
  • A. Not every dog will necessarily benefit from multivitamins since commercial dog food contains a blend of vitamins and minerals already - if you feed your pet a high-quality commercial food, they should be getting all the nutrients they need. (orlandosentinel.com)
  • Dogs don't just love us - they need us, but not just for food and physical care. (treehugger.com)
  • Austin, TX has a mobile food truck for dogs. (msnbc.com)
  • USA spend on dog food alone is 20 billion a year. (news24.com)
  • The House has passed legislation to outlaw the slaughter of dogs and cats for food - a practice that, although rare, is still legal in 44 states. (usatoday.com)
  • A bipartisan bill passed by the House this week would outlaw the slaughter of dogs and cats for food in the United States. (usatoday.com)
  • WASHINGTON - The House has passed legislation that would outlaw the slaughter of dogs and cats for food - a practice that, although rare, is still legal in 44 states. (usatoday.com)
  • This brings to prednisone allergies dogs an medication the biopsy of the patients that are results used in the cancer of sle. (pizzalaprovencale.com)
  • In forgotten chills, it is dogs for tablets prednisone immune to sale constrain cortisone to ' visitors on the osteonecrosis of usual risk based on our dramatic medication of the amet of these substances in didn' following:drugs. (gastro-service-info.de)
  • While a delivery weight may then provide heavy it', some optics do get medication questions in prednisone of the vestibular syndrome dogs prednisone susceptible dystrophy of a poor corticosteroids:if. (genericpharmashop.com)
  • Benadryl is a great medication for use in dogs with mild-to-moderate allergies. (akc.org)
  • Allen says someone is always cooking, doing laundry, walking dogs or preparing medication. (cnn.com)
  • Medication was the only solution to this dogs problems. (psychologytoday.com)
  • If you plan to breed or show your dog, you will want to find a knowledgeable person in the breed to show you the ropes. (angelfire.com)
  • Look for books to find specific information on how your particular breed of dog should be groomed. (bellaonline.com)
  • A new bird dog would find it challenging to match that history and experience. (investopedia.com)
  • That said, if you are interested in becoming a bird dog, it may be wise to find a kindly real estate investor or a seasoned bird dog to learn from. (investopedia.com)
  • In fact, returning to Australia, we find that one of the most popular designer dogs, the Labradoodle, originated there in the 1970s, and even this breed began as a working dog. (care2.com)
  • Just make sure you do plenty of research and you will find the right dog for you! (yahoo.com)
  • Instead of worries, concerns, and surprises, you will find dog ownership to be one of the most delightful experiences in your life! (lulu.com)
  • Your have a new girl dog -- now it's time to find the perfect name for your. (bhg.com)
  • If you want to find a fitting name for your Asian dog breed, check out these 5. (bhg.com)
  • Certainly all dogs do not need fancy haircuts or expensive baths with hot oil treatments, but failing to groom the dog is akin to neglecting to comb a child´s hair and wash behind his ears. (bellaonline.com)
  • If you have a dog with floppy ears, you´ve probably had a lesson of two in ear cleaning from your veteranarian. (bellaonline.com)
  • Under a cloak or below the ears of dogs are great places to look for these tiny vampires. (selfgrowth.com)
  • I didn't realize dogs could get yeast infections in their ears. (tcnj.edu)
  • Dogs living in warm climates all year long rarely grow hair coats as thick as those living in colder areas, although this will affect the body coat and the amount of protective undercoat more than the topcoat or the length of furnishings on the belly, ears, and tail. (britannica.com)
  • Make potential you ask the artery or dark to vestibular syndrome dogs prednisone go over the effects on the susceptibility perhaps in offer trioxide you don' cancer understand. (genericpharmashop.com)
  • If your K9 partner is a high-drive working dog, their intensity will not disappear in the water, where their high drive can mask fatigue and make matters worse very quickly. (google.com)
  • If your female dog goes into heat/season, make sure to keep her properly secured. (angelfire.com)
  • The difference was that earlier hybrids were intended for work purposes to make better hunting or shepherding dogs, in many cases. (care2.com)
  • If you fly off the handle when you come home to a mess your dog created, he may learn, not that it's bad to make a mess, but that messes are inherently bad. (sheknows.com)
  • Cattle Dogs Ornaments make for brilliantly simple gifts in the present, and promise to be meaningful keepsakes for memories in the years to come. (cafepress.com)
  • However, dogs on a raw or home-cooked diet may benefit from a multivitamin to make sure you're covering all the nutritional bases. (orlandosentinel.com)
  • A cuddly canine can make the day a little better. (treehugger.com)
  • All of these qualities make them good guard dogs, *if* that is what they are trained to do. (yahoo.com)
  • The dogs were having a good time, and we all managed to make it back home, thanks to a freezing wind in my faced that helped counteract the Ambien. (tcnj.edu)
  • A working dog might make a great addition to your homestead. (motherearthnews.com)
  • With a sharp knife, make a few shallow slashes in each hot dog. (bhg.com)
  • Also, to make things more healthy I substituted a turkey dog for the beef and opted out of the potato chips. (bhg.com)
  • With 'Critical Equation,' Dr. Dog got exactly what they wanted and more: to make music that they loved with their friends and to have fun doing it. (spotify.com)
  • Disqualification - Blue eyes in a dog of coat color other than merle. (akc.org)
  • Analysis performed by five different laboratories detected the corkscrew-shaped agent of Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi, in canine skin tissue by special staining and DNA analysis. (prweb.com)
  • dog, carnivorous, domesticated wolf ( Canis lupus familiaris ) of the family Canidae, to which the jackal and fox also belong. (infoplease.com)
  • Dogs are that one member of the family who are always 'there' for you. (amazonaws.com)
  • e.g. in a fight with another dog or protecting the family they belong to. (yahoo.com)
  • While on a trail run, a family of runners were attacked by dogs and lived to tell the tale. (runnersworld.com)
  • Dogs resent being disturbed while eating and dislike being threatened or feeling that their territory is being invaded, and they can be jealous of attention given to other family members. (bmj.com)
  • When the officer shot at the family dog in the same room. (freerepublic.com)
  • FALMOUTH MA (AP) - Police say a father stabbed his family s dog to death after it started mauling his one-year-old daughter. (freerepublic.com)
  • Many adopters do not want elderly or sick dogs, and with our policy of no-kill, our number of dogs kept growing. (google.com)
  • Most dogs infected with brucellosis show no signs of illness. (cdc.gov)
  • Numbers shown below are registered as labeling or manufacturing signs of cheapest prednisone through the vestibular syndrome dogs prednisone fda. (genericpharmashop.com)
  • Monitor your dogs for signs of fatigue, and don't let them overdo it. (google.com)
  • Some dysplastic dogs may move normally with no outward signs of a problem but still should not be bred. (angelfire.com)
  • Dogs showing classic signs of cushings with a normal range acth but a positive sex hormone we still treat with the same drugs as cushings like trilostane etc. (medhelp.org)
  • Each time, the dog exhibited signs of guilt - even if they were, in fact, innocent. (sheknows.com)
  • None of the dogs who (allegedly) didn't eat the treat exhibited signs of guilt, even if they were. (sheknows.com)
  • The center is continuing work to perfect dogs' ability in spotting signs of cancer. (reuters.com)
  • Dogs showing signs had to have been present in a war situation, exposed to one or more notably traumatic events and then to show all the signs mention above, including inability to perform their normal duties. (psychologytoday.com)
  • Is a cross between an American pit bull terrier and a golden retriever a pit bull-type dog or a golden retriever-type dog? (metafilter.com)
  • For instance, Ensminger's dog Chloe is a therapy dog, and he voluntarily takes her to hospitals to comfort patients. (cnn.com)
  • You can see how much the dogs have changed in just under 100 years, in some cases for the worse. (kottke.org)
  • Successful bird dogs do exist, but they have likely spent years or decades in the real estate business and have a history of successful deals with a network of private investors. (investopedia.com)
  • Nearly half of all dogs 10 years and older die from cancer. (redorbit.com)
  • Michele Allen has had many dogs over the years. (cnn.com)
  • The findings could indicate that dogs were domesticated around 33,000 years ago. (yahoo.com)
  • Another possible domestic dog fossil, this one dated to approximately 36,000 years ago, was found in Goyet Cave, in Belgium. (yahoo.com)
  • If the Altai dog was really domesticated, it would push back the origin of today's house pets more than 15,000 years and move the earliest domestication out of the Middle East or East Asia, as previous studies have suggested. (yahoo.com)
  • Angie Meroshnekoff, who has bred and worked with Great Pyrenees dogs for 40 years, says, "For the first couple of months you need to be extra-involved with the dog. (motherearthnews.com)
  • The first case I saw, many years ago, was a dog that was shot by a Boston policeman who thought the dog was attacking him. (psychologytoday.com)
  • Dogs are sexually mature between 6 months and 1 year but are not socially mature until they are about 2 years of age. (britannica.com)
  • and her new best friend over the next five years, as they explore the ups and downs of dog ownership through a child's eyes. (lulu.com)
  • He is the 10th canine-meat farmer to accept such an offer in three years. (freerepublic.com)