Detection of Chlamydia pneumoniae but not cytomegalovirus in occluded saphenous vein coronary artery bypass grafts. (1/38768)

BACKGROUND: A causal relation between atherosclerosis and chronic infection with Chlamydia pneumoniae and/or cytomegalovirus (CMV) has been suggested. Whether the unresolved problem of venous coronary artery bypass graft occlusion is related to infection with C pneumoniae and/or CMV has not been addressed. METHODS AND RESUTLS: Thirty-eight occluded coronary artery vein grafts and 20 native saphenous veins were examined. Detection of C pneumoniae DNA was performed by use of nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Homogenisates from the specimen were cultured for identification of viable C pneumoniae. Both conventional PCR and quantitative PCR for detection of CMV DNA were applied. Differential pathological changes (degree of inflammation, smooth muscle cell proliferation [MIB-1]) were determined and correlated to the detection of both microorganisms. C pneumoniae DNA could be detected in 25% of occluded vein grafts. Viable C pneumoniae was recovered from 16% of occluded vein grafts. Except for 1 native saphenous vein, all control vessels were negative for both C pneumoniae detection and culture. All pathological and control specimens were negative for CMV DNA detection. Pathological changes did not correlate with C pneumoniae detection. CONCLUSIONS: Occluded aorto-coronary venous grafts harbor C pneumoniae but not CMV. The detection of C pneumoniae in occluded vein grafts warrants further investigation.  (+info)

Acinetobacter bacteremia in Hong Kong: prospective study and review. (2/38768)

The epidemiological characteristics of 18 patients with acinetobacter bacteremia were analyzed. Patients (mean age, 55.5 years) developed bacteremia after an average of 14.1 days of hospitalization. Fifteen of 16 patients survived bacteremia caused by Acinetobacter baumannii. Cultures of blood from the remaining two patients yielded Acinetobacter lwoffii. Most patients (78%) resided in the general ward, while four patients (22%) were under intensive care. Genotyping by arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction analysis and the temporal sequence of isolation were more useful than phenotyping by antimicrobial susceptibility in the determination of the source of bacteremia, and the intravascular catheter was the leading infection source (39% of cases). The possibility of an association of glucose with the pathogenesis of acinetobacter infection was raised.  (+info)

Legionnaires' disease on a cruise ship linked to the water supply system: clinical and public health implications. (3/38768)

The occurrence of legionnaires' disease has been described previously in passengers of cruise ships, but determination of the source has been rare. A 67-year-old, male cigarette smoker with heart disease contracted legionnaires' disease during a cruise in September 1995 and died 9 days after disembarking. Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 was isolated from the patient's sputum and the ship's water supply. Samples from the air-conditioning system were negative. L. pneumophila serogroup 1 isolates from the water supply matched the patient's isolate, by both monoclonal antibody subtyping and genomic fingerprinting. None of 116 crew members had significant antibody titers to L. pneumophila serogroup 1. One clinically suspected case of legionnaires' disease and one confirmed case were subsequently diagnosed among passengers cruising on the same ship in November 1995 and October 1996, respectively. This is the first documented evidence of the involvement of a water supply system in the transmission of legionella infection on ships. These cases were identified because of the presence of a unique international system of surveillance and collaboration between public health authorities.  (+info)

Classification of thermophilic streptomycetes, including the description of Streptomyces thermoalcalitolerans sp. nov. (4/38768)

A polyphasic taxonomic study was undertaken to clarify relationships within and between representative thermophilic alkalitolerant streptomycetes isolated from soil and appropriate marker strains. The resultant data, notably those from DNA-DNA relatedness studies, support the taxonomic integrity of the validly described species Streptomyces thermodiastaticus, Streptomyces thermoviolaceus and Streptomyces thermovulgaris. However, the genotypic and phenotypic data clearly show that Streptomyces thermonitrificans Desai and Dhala 1967 and S. thermovulgaris (Henssen 1957) Goodfellow et al. 1987 represent a single species. On the basis of priority, S. thermonitrificans is a later subjective synonym of S. thermovulgaris. Similarly, 10 out of the 11 representative thermophilic alkalitolerant isolates had a combination of properties consistent with their classification as S. thermovulgaris. The remaining thermophilic alkalitolerant isolate, Streptomyces strain TA56, merited species status. The name Streptomyces thermoalcalitolerans sp. nov. is proposed for this strain. A neutrophilic thermophilic isolate, Streptomyces strain NAR85, was identified as S. thermodiastaticus.  (+info)

Burkholderia cocovenenans (van Damme et al. 1960) Gillis et al. 1995 and Burkholderia vandii Urakami et al. 1994 are junior synonyms of Burkholderia gladioli (Severini 1913) Yabuuchi et al. 1993 and Burkholderia plantarii (Azegami et al. 1987) Urakami et al. 1994, respectively. (5/38768)

Reference strains of Burkholderia cocovenenans and Burkholderia vandii were compared with strains of other Burkholderia species using SDS-PAGE of whole-cell proteins, DNA-DNA hybridization and extensive biochemical characterization. Burkholderia gladioli and B. cocovenenans were indistinguishable in the chemotaxonomic and biochemical analyses. Burkholderia plantarii and B. vandii had indistinguishable whole-cell protein patterns but the B. vandii type strain differed from B. plantarii strains in several biochemical tests. The DNA-DNA binding levels (higher than 70%) indicated that (i) B. gladioli and B. cocovenenans, and (ii) B. plantarii and B. vandii each represent a single species. It is concluded that B. cocovenenans and B. vandii are junior synonyms of B. gladioli and B. plantarii, respectively.  (+info)

Taxonomic relationships of the [Pasteurella] haemolytica complex as evaluated by DNA-DNA hybridizations and 16S rRNA sequencing with proposal of Mannheimia haemolytica gen. nov., comb. nov., Mannheimia granulomatis comb. nov., Mannheimia glucosida sp. nov., Mannheimia ruminalis sp. nov. and Mannheimia varigena sp. nov. (6/38768)

The present paper presents the conclusions of a polyphasic investigation of the taxonomy of the trehalose-negative [Pasteurella] haemolytica complex. Clusters previously identified by ribotyping and multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MEE) have been evaluated by 16S rRNA sequencing and DNA-DNA hybridizations. Results obtained by the different techniques were highly related and indicated that the [P.] haemolytica complex contains distinct genetic and phenotypic groups. At least seven species were outlined, five of which were named. We refrained in formal naming of more groups until additional strains are characterized. Five 16S rRNA clusters were identified corresponding to distinct lineages previously outlined by MEE. Within 16S rRNA cluster I two distinct genotypic groups have been outlined in addition to [P.] haemolytica sensu stricto (biogroup 1). Each of the clusters II, III, IV and V represent at least one new species. The investigations underline that [P.] haemolytica sensu stricto only contains strains that do not ferment L-arabinose even though they are referred to as 'biotype A' of [P.] haemolytica. The five 16S rRNA clusters identified had a common root relative to the other species within the family Pasteurellaceae, and the overall sequence similarity among these five clusters was higher than what is observed within the existing genera of the family. The allocation of the trehalose-negative [P.] haemolytica complex to a new genus seems to be indicated. Based on the polyphasic investigation performed a new genus Mannheimia is proposed for the trehalose-negative [P.] haemolytica complex. At the present stage two previously named species are transferred to this new genus and three new species are described. [P.] haemolytica is reclassified as Mannheimia haemolytica comb. nov., whereas Pasteurella granulomatis, Bisgaard taxon 20 and [P.] haemolytica biovar 3J are reclassified and combined in the species Mannheimia granulomatis comb. nov. Mannheimia glucosida sp. nov. corresponds to [P.] haemolytica biogroups 3A-3H and the beta-glucosidase and meso-inositol-positive strains of [P.] haemolytica biogroup 9. All typable strains within M. glucosida belong to serotype 11. Mannheimia ruminalis sp. nov. consists of strains previously classified as Bisgaard taxon 18 and [P.] haemolytica biogroup 8D. Finally, Mannheimia varigena sp. nov. includes [P.] haemolytica biogroup 6 as well as Bisgaard taxon 15 and Bisgaard taxon 36. The type strains are NCTC 9380T (M. haemolytica), ATCC 49244T (M. granulomatis), CCUG 38457T = P925T (M. glucosida), CCUG 38470T = HPA92T (M. ruminalis) and CCUG 38462T = 177T (M. varigena).  (+info)

Phylogenetic structures of the genus Acinetobacter based on gyrB sequences: comparison with the grouping by DNA-DNA hybridization. (7/38768)

The phylogenetic relationships of 49 Acinetobacter strains, 46 of which have previously been classified into 18 genomic species by DNA-DNA hybridization studies, were investigated using the nucleotide sequence of gyrB, the structural gene for the DNA gyrase B subunit. The phylogenetic tree showed linkages between genomic species 1 (Acinetobacter calcoaceticus), 2 (Acinetobacter baumannii), 3 and TU13; genomic species 6, BJ15, BJ16 and BJ17; genomic species 5, BJ13 (synonym of TU14) and BJ14; genomic species 7 (Acinetobacter johnsonii), 10 and 11; and genomic species 8 and 9. The phylogenetic grouping of Acinetobacter strains based on gyrB genes was almost congruent with that based on DNA-DNA hybridization studies. Consequently, gyrB sequence comparison can be used to resolve the taxonomic positions of bacterial strains at the level of genomic species. However, minor discrepancies existed in the grouping of strains of genomic species 8, 9 and BJ17. The phylogenetic tree for these strains was reconstructed from the sequence of rpoD, the structural gene for the RNA polymerase sigma 70 factor. The latter tree was 100% congruent with the grouping based on DNA-DNA hybridization. The reliability of DNA-DNA hybridization may be superior to that of sequence comparison of a single protein-encoding gene in resolving closely related organisms since the former method measures the homologies between the nucleotide sequences of total genomic DNAs. Three strains that have not been characterized previously by DNA-DNA hybridization seem to belong to two new genomic species, one including strain ATCC 33308 and the other including strains ATCC 31012 and MBIC 1332.  (+info)

Roseovarius tolerans gen. nov., sp. nov., a budding bacterium with variable bacteriochlorophyll a production from hypersaline Ekho Lake. (8/38768)

Eight Gram-negative, aerobic, pointed and budding bacteria were isolated from various depths of the hypersaline, heliothermal and meromictic Ekho Lake (Vestfold Hills, East Antarctica). The cells contained storage granules and daughter cells could be motile. Bacteriochlorophyll a was sometimes produced, but production was repressed by constant dim light. The strains tolerated a wide range of temperature, pH, concentrations of artificial seawater and NaCl, but had an absolute requirement for sodium ions. Glutamate was metabolized with and without an additional source of combined nitrogen. The dominant fatty acid was C18:1; other characteristic fatty acids were C18:2, C12:0 2-OH, C12:1 3-OH, C16:1, C16:0 and C18:0. The main polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylcholine. The DNA G+C base composition was 62-64 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons showed that the isolates were phylogenetically close to the genera Antarctobacter, 'Marinosulfonomonas', Octadecabacter, Sagittula, Sulfitobacter and Roseobacter. Morphological, physiological and genotypic differences to these previously described and distinct genera support the description of a new genus and a new species, Roseovarius tolerans gen. nov., sp. nov. The type strain is EL-172T (= DSM 11457T).  (+info)

... bacterial DNA binding proteins were thought to help stabilize bacterial DNA. Currently, many more functions of bacteria DNA ... Research suggests that bacterial DNA binding protein has an important role during DNA replication; the protein is involved in ... The functions of bacterial DNA-binding proteins are not limited to DNA replication. Researchers have been investigating other ... These proteins participate in all DNA-dependent functions; in these processes, bacterial DNA binding proteins have an ...
... some of the donor's chromosomal DNA may also be transferred with the plasmid DNA. The amount of chromosomal DNA that is ... Bacterial conjugation is the transfer of genetic material between bacterial cells by direct cell-to-cell contact or by a bridge ... Heinemann JA, Sprague GF (July 1989). "Bacterial conjugative plasmids mobilize DNA transfer between bacteria and yeast". Nature ... Classical E. coli bacterial conjugation is often regarded as the bacterial equivalent of sexual reproduction or mating since it ...
Bacterial DNA is placed into the bacteriophage genome via bacterial transduction. In bacterial conjugation, DNA is transferred ... Bacterial recombination is a type of genetic recombination in bacteria characterized by DNA transfer from one organism called ... Base pairs attached to the DNA strands go through an exchange at a Holliday junction. In the second step of bacterial ... Natural transformation is common among pathogenic bacterial species. In some cases, the DNA repair capability provided by ...
The gene used was the 16S ribosomal DNA. The names have been changed to reflect more current nomenclature used by molecular ... Branching order of bacterial phyla (Rappe and Giovanoni, 2003) Branching order of bacterial phyla after ARB Silva Living Tree ... Branching order of bacterial phyla (Battistuzzi et al.,2004) Branching order of bacterial phyla (Gupta, 2001) Branching order ... There are several models of the Branching order of bacterial phyla, one of these was proposed in 1987 paper by Carl Woese. The ...
... is the process in which a segment of bacterial DNA is copied into a newly synthesized strand of ... RNA polymerase moves down the DNA rapidly at approximately 40 bases per second. Due to the quick nature of this process, DNA is ... RNA polymerase has lower fidelity (accuracy) and speed than DNA polymerase. DNA polymerase has a very different proofreading ... Bacterial RNA polymerase is made up of four subunits and when a fifth subunit attaches, called the σ-factor, the polymerase can ...
Natural transformation is a bacterial adaptation for DNA transfer between two cells through the intervening medium. The uptake ... The process involves creating recombinant DNA molecules through manipulating a DNA sequence. That DNA created is then in ... Bacterial conjugation is the transfer of genetic material between bacterial cells by direct cell-to-cell contact or by a bridge ... Chen I, Dubnau D (2004). "DNA uptake during bacterial transformation". Nature Reviews Microbiology. 2 (3): 241-9. doi:10.1038/ ...
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Watford S, Warrington SJ (2018). "Bacterial DNA Mutations". StatPearls. StatPearls Publishing. PMID 29083710. Retrieved 21 ... Phages destroy bacterial cell walls and membrane through the use of lytic proteins which kill bacteria by making many holes ... For example, a ribosomal mutation may protect a bacterial cell by changing the binding site of an antibiotic but may result in ... Recent advances in high-throughput DNA sequencing as a result of the Human Genome Project have resulted in the ability to ...
Other NAD-dependent enzymes include bacterial DNA ligases, which join two DNA ends by using NAD+ as a substrate to donate an ... Wilkinson A, Day J, Bowater R (2001). "Bacterial DNA ligases". Mol. Microbiol. 40 (6): 1241-8. doi:10.1046/j.1365-2958.2001. ... This contrasts with eukaryotic DNA ligases, which use ATP to form the DNA-AMP intermediate. Li et al. have found that NAD+ ... as well as acting as a substrate for bacterial DNA ligases and a group of enzymes called sirtuins that use NAD+ to remove ...
Chromids, formerly (and less specifically) secondary chromosomes, are a class of bacterial replicons (replicating DNA molecules ... Overall, bacterial genome sequencing indicates that roughly 10% of bacterial species have a chromid. It has also been found ... In the bacterial genus Vibrio, the main chromosome varies between 3.0-3.3 Mb whereas the chromid varies between 0.8-2.4 Mb in ... Bacterial genomes divided between a main chromosome and one or more chromids (and / or megaplasmids) are said to be divided or ...
... but is widespread in bacterial genomes, as part of the restriction modification or DNA repair systems. In Escherichia coli, ... If Dam is targeted to a specific known DNA locus, distal sites brought into proximity due to the 3D configuration of the DNA ... In transient transfection experiments, the DNA of those plasmids is recovered along with the DNA of the transfected cells, ... DamID identifies binding sites by expressing the proposed DNA-binding protein as a fusion protein with DNA methyltransferase. ...
specifically identified bacterial DNA as the underlying component of the lysate that elicited the response. Then, in 1995 Krieg ... Bauer S, Wagner H (2002). "Bacterial CpG-DNA licenses TLR9". Toll-Like Receptor Family Members and Their Ligands. Current ... demonstrated that the CpG motif within bacterial DNA was responsible for the immunostimulatory effects and developed synthetic ... "CpG motifs in bacterial DNA trigger direct B-cell activation". Nature. 374 (6522): 546-9. Bibcode:1995Natur.374..546K. doi: ...
Natural transformation is a common bacterial adaptation for DNA transfer that employs numerous bacterial gene products. For a ... Chen I, Dubnau D (2004). "DNA uptake during bacterial transformation". Nat. Rev. Microbiol. 2 (3): 241-9. doi:10.1038/ ... The DNA-uptake process of naturally competent V. cholerae involves an extended competence-induced pilus and a DNA-binding ... V. cholerae has been used in discoveries of many bacterial small RNAs. Using sRNA-Seq and Northern blot candidate sRNAs were ...
The nonfunctional DNA in bacterial genomes is mostly located in the intergenic fraction of non-coding DNA but in eukaryotic ... Non-coding DNA (ncDNA) sequences are components of an organism's DNA that do not encode protein sequences. Some non-coding DNA ... These are regions of the genome where the DNA replication machinery is assembled and the DNA is unwound to begin DNA synthesis ... This is why these length differences are used extensively in DNA fingerprinting. Junk DNA is DNA that has no biologically ...
DNA alone cannot create a viable cell: proteins and RNAs are needed to read the DNA, and lipid membranes are required to ... First Minimal Synthetic Bacterial Cell. Astrobiology Web. March 24, 2016. Yong, Ed (March 24, 2016). "The Mysterious Thing ... These messages did not use the standard genetic code, in which sequences of 3 DNA bases encode amino acids, but a new code ... The 4 watermarks (shown in Figure S1 in the supplementary material of the paper) are coded messages written into the DNA, of ...
Chen I, Dubnau D (March 2004). "DNA uptake during bacterial transformation". Nature Reviews. Microbiology. 2 (3): 241-9. doi: ... up-taken DNA can either integrate with the genome or exist as extrachromosomal DNA. DNA is generally inserted into animal cells ... "Simian virus 40 DNA sequences in DNA of healthy adult mice derived from preimplantation blastocysts injected with viral DNA". ... The first recombinant DNA molecule was made by Paul Berg in 1972 by combining DNA from the monkey virus SV40 with the lambda ...
With the help of recombinant DNA techniques, the genes encoded for viral or bacterial antigens could be genetically transcribed ... Chen I, Dubnau D (March 2004). "DNA uptake during bacterial transformation". Nature Reviews. Microbiology. 2 (3): 241-9. doi: ... "Biochemical Method for Inserting New Genetic Information into DNA of Simian Virus 40: Circular SV40 DNA Molecules Containing ... The discovery of DNA and the improvement of genetic technology in the 20th century played a crucial role in the development of ...
Bacterial genomic DNA is not recognized by these restriction enzymes. The methylation of native DNA acts as a sort of primitive ... Ancient DNA methylation reconstruction, a method to reconstruct high-resolution DNA methylation from ancient DNA samples. The ... relying on DNA methylation MethBase DNA Methylation database hosted on the UCSC Genome Browser MethDB DNA Methylation database ... a large proportion of carcinogenic gene silencing is a result of altered DNA methylation (see DNA methylation in cancer). DNA ...
These DNA fragments may then become integrated into the chromosomes of nearby bacterial cells to undergo mutagenesis. This ... Exogenous DNA is DNA originating outside the organism of concern or study. Exogenous DNA can be found naturally in the form of ... The cell surface and the incoming DNA are both negatively charged, so the DNA is coated with lipids. By shielding the DNA and ... Chen, Inês; Dubnau, David (2004). "DNA uptake during bacterial transformation". Nature Reviews Microbiology. 2 (3): 241-249. ...
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TRNA, Cloned Human DNA and E. Coli Sequences, Histone Genes and Restriction Enzyme Recognition Sequences. IRL Press. 1989. TRNA ... ISBN 978-0-471-16067-0. Wiedmann, Martin; Zhang, Wei (4 February 2011). Genomics of Foodborne Bacterial Pathogens. Springer ... ISBN 978-1-881299-24-0. Hather, Gregory James (2008). Statistical Analysis of DNA Sequence Motifs and Microarray Data. ... Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo; Gresshoff, Peter M. (16 September 1997). DNA Markers: Protocols, Applications, and Overviews. Wiley. ...
Chen I, Dubnau D (March 2004). "DNA uptake during bacterial transformation". Nature Reviews. Microbiology. 2 (3): 241-9. doi: ... "Simian virus 40 DNA sequences in DNA of healthy adult mice derived from preimplantation blastocysts injected with viral DNA". ... In 1972, Paul Berg created the first recombinant DNA molecule when he combined DNA from a monkey virus with that of the lambda ... Bacteria can be induced to take up foreign DNA, usually by exposed heat shock or electroporation. DNA is generally inserted ...
... the process in which bacterial DNA is moved from one bacterium to another by a virus (a bacteriophage, or phage). Bacterial ... Natural transformation is a bacterial adaptation for DNA transfer (HGT) that depends on the expression of numerous bacterial ... Chen I, Dubnau D (March 2004). "DNA uptake during bacterial transformation". Nature Reviews. Microbiology. 2 (3): 241-9. doi: ... The frequency of recombination is increased by DNA damage induced by UV-irradiation and by DNA damaging chemicals. The ups ...
Eukaryotic DNA fragments which act as promoters for a plasmid gene. Nature 277:324-325. West, R.W., Jr., R.L. Neve and R.L. ... A bacterial clone synthesizing proinsulin. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 75( ... Eukaryotic DNA fragments which act as promoters for a plasmid gene. Nature 277:324-325. West, R.W., Jr. and R.L. Rodriguez. ... Recombinant DNA techniques: An introduction. Addison Wesley Publishing Co., Reading Mass. Huang, N., Sutliff, T.D., Litts, J.C ...
Bacterial DNA can be located in two places: Bacterial chromosome, located in the irregularly shaped region known as the ... the bacterial DNA is not enclosed inside of a membrane-bound nucleus but instead resides inside the bacterial cytoplasm. This ... Most bacterial chromosomes are circular although some examples of linear DNA exist (e.g. Borrelia burgdorferi). Usually a ... So plasmids can be described as extrachromosomal DNA in a bacterial cell. In most bacteria the most numerous intracellular ...
RecA has a central role in the repair of replication forks stalled by DNA damage and in the bacterial sexual process of natural ... UvsX is homologous to bacterial RecA. UvsX, like RecA, can facilitate the assimilation of linear single-stranded DNA into an ... Like Rad51, Dmc1 is homologous to bacterial RecA. Some DNA viruses encode a recombinase that facilitates homologous ... Bernstein C, Bernstein H (2001). DNA repair in bacteriophage. In: Nickoloff JA, Hoekstra MF (Eds.) DNA Damage and Repair, Vol.3 ...
UV light damages bacterial DNA and induces filamentation via the SOS response. Starvation can also cause bacterial ... DNA synthesis-inhibiting and DNA damaging antibiotics (e.g. metronidazole, mitomycin C, the fluoroquinolones, novobiocin) ... The SOS response inhibits septum formation until the DNA can be repaired, this delay stopping the transmission of damaged DNA ... Certain bacterial species, such as Paraburkholderia elongata, will also filament as a result of a tendency to accumulate ...
Lanka Erich, Wilkins Brian M (1995). "DNA Processing Reactions in Bacterial Conjugation." Annu. Rev. Biochem. 64: 141-69 Matson ... With human DNA ligase, this forms a crystallized complex. The complex, which has a DNA-adenylate intermediate, allows DNA ... At the end of the segment that DNA polymerase acts on, DNA ligase must repair the final segment of DNA backbone in order to ... The nicks allow the DNA to take on a circular shape. Nicked DNA can be the result of DNA damage or purposeful, regulated ...
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... bacterial DNA binding proteins were thought to help stabilize bacterial DNA. Currently, many more functions of bacteria DNA ... Research suggests that bacterial DNA binding protein has an important role during DNA replication; the protein is involved in ... The functions of bacterial DNA-binding proteins are not limited to DNA replication. Researchers have been investigating other ... These proteins participate in all DNA-dependent functions; in these processes, bacterial DNA binding proteins have an ...
Inside Science) -- An enzyme in the bacterium E. coli made more errors copying synthetic DNA when exposed to zero gravity than ... A Bacterial Enzyme That Copies DNA Might Make More Mistakes in Zero Gravity, Study Finds The results could warrant further ... He studies DNA polymerases, a class of enzymes that copy DNA and repair damage. Polymerases read the order in which the four ... "It gives us an idea that enzymes, like polymerases or others that are involved in maintaining the integrity of our DNA, may be ...
... Publication , Journal ... Wilson, K. H. "Detection of culture-resistant bacterial pathogens by amplification and sequencing of ribosomal DNA." Clin ... Wilson, K. H. "Detection of culture-resistant bacterial pathogens by amplification and sequencing of ribosomal DNA." Clin ... Wilson, K. H. (1994). Detection of culture-resistant bacterial pathogens by amplification and sequencing of ribosomal DNA. Clin ...
... we report a method for the direct detection and quantification of these pro-inflammatory bacterial genes by PCR and qPCR in DNA ... Direct detection of specific genes in stool could prove useful toward screening for the presence of pro-inflammatory bacterial ... DNA Extraction. Bacterial DNA was extracted from 41 human stool samples using the QIAamp® DNA Stool Mini Kit (QIAGEN). ... The DNA size markers used for samples 1 - 24 is 1kb Opti-DNA Marker from ABM band for sample 25 - 41 the 100 bp Opti-DNA Marker ...
However, correlating the sensitivity of DNA extracted from bacterial culture to DNA extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin- ... We used genomic DNA extracted from M. tuberculosis strain H37rv as positive controls, and DNA extracted from a paraffin- ... We also provide DNA sequence evidence for novel mycobacteria in patient 15. Although most DNA sequences from the study patients ... Before PCR amplification, to ensure that the extracted DNA was of proper quality, we used PCR to verify that DNA sequences ...
RNA/DNA/Protein Purification. , DNA Purification. , Genomic DNA Purification Kits. , Bacterial Genomic DNA Isolation Kit - ... Bacterial Genomic DNA Isolation Kit - 17900. Isolate genomic DNA from all types of bacteria (both Gram-positive and Gram- ... Milk Bacteria DNA Isolation Kit - 21550. 50 Preps. £229. P4-0390. Direct DNA Extraction Kit (Bacteria) - 61500. 50 Preps. £108 ... This kit is designed for the rapid spin column Preparation of Genomic DNA from 2 x 109 viable bacterial cells (between 0.5 and ...
We tested the impacts of bioaerosols on the surface water microbial diversity and the primary and bacterial production rates in ... Total DNA was extracted from the filters using the phenol chloroform method [32]. Total DNA was also extracted from the ... bacterial abundance (3.5 × 105 ± 15 × 104 cell/mL), bacterial production (1.41 ± 0.08 μg C L−1 h−1), primary production (0.60 ... bacterial production per bacterial abundance) was previously observed in a mesocosm study in the southeastern MS [13]. We ...
Making sense of bacterial DNA data 9 November 2021. 3D-Beacons Network: protein structure data, all in one place 14 September ... Mini DNA sequencer tests true 12 October 2015. Finding links and missing genes 1 October 2015. Clearing a path for cancer ... refget v2.0 links the hidden dictionaries of DNA 18 July 2023. Pathogens Portal: The new gateway to public pathogen data 5 July ... The web meets genomics: a DNA search engine for microbes 4 February 2019. Classifying disease-relevant genomic features 28 ...
Bacterial Agents. Anthrax. Bacillus anthracis is a large, aerobic, gram-positive, spore-forming, nonmotile bacillus. The ... These include genome sequencing that enabled publication of full genomes, recombinant DNA technology, reverse genetic ... The anthrax toxins, like many bacterial and plant toxins, possess the following two components: a cell-binding B-domain and an ... It disrupts cell defense mechanisms that lead to organ injury, uncontrolled bacterial growth, and death. [24] ...
Bacterial Protein Mimics DNA to Sabotage Cells Defenses. By American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology , October ... "These (bacterial proteins) function as a molecular pair of scissors, cutting up NF-kappaB transcription factors and thereby ... "So what I think this selectivity means is that (the bacterial proteins) are able to affect a particular arm of the immune ... The NF-kappaB transcription factors do their job of turning on immune system genes by binding to DNA at specific locations. The ...
Riboflavin binds to DNA and RNA to create cross-links when photoactivated. It appears to be effective in inactivating HIV and ... How prevalent are transfusion-transmitted bacterial infections (TTBIs)?. How are transfusion-transmitted bacterial infection ( ... Bacterial contamination of blood components. Clin Microbiol Rev. 2005 Jan. 18(1):195-204. [QxMD MEDLINE Link]. [Full Text]. ... Insufficient bacterial inocula that may result in a positive culture from the donor product or the recipient but that is not ...
Interventions such as improving oral hygiene may lead to decreased S. aureus carriage by reducing other bacterial species such ... DNA; Deoxyribonucleic acids; Risk analysis; Risk factors; Livestock; Animals; Animal husbandry workers; Animal handlers; Humans ... Staphylococcus aureus; Staphylococcus aureus infection; Infectious agents; Bacteria; Bacterial infections; Nasal cavity; ...
The targets of quinolone activity are the bacterial DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV, enzymes essential for DNA replication and ... Quinolones inhibit two enzymes that are required for bacterial DNA synthesis, i.e., DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV. Resistance ... Resistance to quinolones has been reported in a variety of important bacterial pathogens, including Escherichia coli, ...
DNA Fingerprinting, DNA, Bacterial/genetics, DNA, Ribosomal/genetics, Ethanol/metabolism, Fermentation, Fructose/metabolism, ... LR: 20140907; JID: 7605801; 0 (DNA, Bacterial); 0 (DNA, Ribosomal); 2968PHW8QP (Citric Acid); 30237-26-4 (Fructose); 33X04XA5AT ... ars protein, arsenic acid, bacterial protein, unclassified drug, amino acid sequence, article, bacterial genetics, bacterial ... DNA sequence homology analysis of ars genes in arsenic-resistant bacteria 2007 Kim, K.-W., Arsenic Geoenvironment Laboratory, ...
... is DNA contained in structures called mitochondria rather than the nucleus. Learn about genetic conditions related to mtDNA ... Common genetic changes in the MT-RNR1 gene can make the 12S RNA in human cells look similar to bacterial ribosomal RNA. As a ... This genetic material is known as mitochondrial DNA or mtDNA. In humans, mitochondrial DNA spans about 16,500 DNA building ... Mitochondrial DNA is prone to somatic mutations, which are a type of noninherited mutation. Somatic mutations occur in the DNA ...
Bacterial Capsules; Bacterial Proteins; Boron Compounds; Calcium; Calcium Signaling; Cell Line; Cytoplasm; DNA Fragmentation; ... Antigens, CD44, Apoptosis, Bacterial Capsules, Bacterial Proteins, Boron Compounds, Calcium, Calcium Signaling, Cell Line, ... Two bacterial virulence factors are required for effective induction of apoptosis by extracellular GAS: (i) hyaluronic acid ... Two bacterial virulence factors are required for effective induction of apoptosis by extracellular GAS: (i) hyaluronic acid ...
DNA sequencing between ampC and sugE at the 94.5 min region of the E. coli chromosome revealed an open reading frame specifying ... Chromosomes, Bacterial * DNA Primers * Escherichia coli / genetics* * Escherichia coli / growth & development * Escherichia ... DNA sequencing between ampC and sugE at the 94.5 min region of the E. coli chromosome revealed an open reading frame specifying ... The bacterial lipocalin (Blc) contained a short deletion of 7 amino acid residues corresponding to a hydrophobic surface loop ...
Periodontitis is caused by dysbiotic subgingival bacterial communities that may lead to increased bacterial invasion into ... Feel free to consult our experts at MR DNA is order to determine which 16s rRNA primer pair is best suited to meet your ... In short, shotgun metagenome sequencing is aptly named due to the fact that the goal of this DNA sequencing method is to ... But what is 16s rRNA sequencing? And why should you choose 16s sequencing methods over other DNA sequencing methods? ...
Cell culture protocol for testing cell lines for mycoplasma contamination using indirect DNA staining using Hoechst 33342. ... Bacterial/yeast/fungal contamination. • Too much debris in the background (as in the case of hybridoma cell lines). • Broken ... DNA stains such as Hoechst stain bind specifically to DNA. In all cultures cell nuclei will fluoresce. In theory uncontaminated ... DNA staining methods such as indirect Hoechst staining techniques are quick with results available within 72 hours which ...
Spatial organization of DNA sequences directs the assembly of bacterial chromatin by a nucleoid-associated protein. A. ... Influence of DNA Binding Dyes on Bare DNA Structure Studied with Atomic Force Microscopy. A. Japaridze; A. Benke; S. Renevey; C ... Tightening of DNA knots by supercoiling facilitates their unknotting by type II DNA topoisomerases. G. Witz; G. Dietler; A. ... The promotion of secondary structures in single-stranded DNA by drugs that bind to duplex DNA: an atomic force microscopy study ...
Current areas of study include evolutionary relationships based on DNA sequence data; bacterial, plasmid, and virus protein ... It subsumes the DNA@Home and SubsetSum@Home projects, and includes scientific crowdsourcing as well (volunteer brainpower as ...
... coli protein consisting of four identical monomers and selectively binded single-stranded DNA. ... Learn more about Agilents Single-Stranded DNA Binding Protein; a 75.6-kD helix-destabilizing E. ... OD600 to Bacterial Cell Number. Return to top Related Products. Promotions. Return to top Customers Also Viewed These Products ... Our single-stranded DNA binding standard is a helix-destabilizing E. coli protein. The 75.6-kD protein is essential for ...
Analysis of DNA ; Cloning and transformation with plasmid vectors ; Gateway recombinational cloning ; Working with bacterial ... Quantification of DNA and RNA by real-time polymerase chain reactions ; Nucleic acid platform technologies ; DNA sequencing ; ... They are augmented by 12 new chapters which show how DNA, RNA, and proteins should be prepared, evaluated, and manipulated, and ... v. 2: -- Part 2 : Analysis and manipulation of DNA and RNA. ... Analysis of labeled DNA, RNA, and oligonucleotide probes ; ...
A Bacterial Enzyme That Copies DNA Might Make More Mistakes in Zero Gravity, Study Finds ...
... and control DNA compaction. Architectural DNA-binding proteins play important roles in controlling processes such as DNA repair ... Bacterial responses to stress. When a bacterial pathogen infects a host, the host defends itself by producing toxic compounds ... Organization of genomic DNA. Genomic DNA is compacted to fit into cellular compartments. We are interested in architectural ... Panday, A., Gupta, A., Srinivasa, K., Xiao, L., Smith, M. D. and Grove, A. DNA damage regulates direct association of TOR ...
Life sciences/Microbiology/Bacteriology/Bacterial genetics/Bacterial DNA * /Life sciences/Microbiology/Bacteriology/Bacteria/ ... Kumar used a DNA deep sequencing methodology to obtain an unprecedented in-depth view of these microbial communities in their ... But the patterns became clear during the DNA analysis.. "The overarching goal here is to say, If youre healthy, are biofilms ... The DNA sequences represented 398 units overall, with an average of about 150 different species per person. ...
As well as the DNA that enables them to live and develop, bacteria also... ... Antimicrobial resistance: a small signal triggers bacterial conjugation via a hitchhiking mechanism ...
  • Upon further investigation, it was discovered that the amino acid composition of HU resembles that of eukaryotic histones, thus prompting further research into the exact function of bacterial DNA binding proteins and discoveries of other related proteins in bacteria. (wikipedia.org)
  • Currently, many more functions of bacteria DNA binding proteins have been discovered, including the regulation of gene expression by histone-like nucleoid-structuring protein, H-NS. (wikipedia.org)
  • H-NS is about 15.6 kDa and assists in the regulation of bacterial transcription in bacteria by repressing and activating certain genes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since the experiment uses a polymerase found in bacteria and the DNA was exposed to zero gravity for only 20 seconds, the research is "really far removed from what the astronauts are actually experiencing," she said. (insidescience.org)
  • Isolate genomic DNA from all types of bacteria (both Gram-positive and Gram-negative). (geneflow.co.uk)
  • Each of these means of acquiring new DNA contributes to the success of bacteria in undermining our attempts to control them. (bcm.edu)
  • By mutating their DNA, phage can evolve as quickly as bacteria. (bcm.edu)
  • A team of Swiss scientists has engineered bacteria that are capable of making indelible DNA accounts of the most abundant RNAs the cells produce, according to a report in Nature earlier this month (October 3). (the-scientist.com)
  • Others result from mobile genetic elements snippets of DNA that are able to move between bacteria. (cdc.gov)
  • This study determined the prevalence of bacterial contamination of mobile phones of health workers and the predisposing factors, in order to ascertain the risk of transmission of pathogenic bacteria through mobile phones. (bvsalud.org)
  • Bacterial DNA gyrase, a type II DNA topoisomerase found in all bacteria is a proven target for antibacterial chemotherapy. (bvsalud.org)
  • Patients older than 35 years with bacterial etiology require additional coverage for other gram-negative bacteria with a fluoroquinolone or trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. (medscape.com)
  • Inhibits protein synthesis and bacterial growth by binding to 30S and possibly 50S ribosomal subunits of susceptible bacteria. (medscape.com)
  • Clinical correlations have been established that link chronic bacterial infections and intestinal disorders. (scirp.org)
  • An important concept in the evaluation of data regarding transfusion-transmitted bacterial infections (TTBIs) is the definition of a case. (medscape.com)
  • Accumulating evidence suggests that chronic inflammation caused by oral bacterial infections may contribute to the development and progression of various types of cancer, including stomach cancer. (news-medical.net)
  • ceptible to urinary tract infections with The second phase of our study included multiresistant bacterial strains [ 7-9 ]. (who.int)
  • Scholars@Duke publication: Detection of culture-resistant bacterial pathogens by amplification and sequencing of ribosomal DNA. (duke.edu)
  • The labs develop and compare DNA patterns from bacterial pathogens submitted by state, Food and Drug Administration, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture laboratories from across the nation. (cdc.gov)
  • Compared with the control group, patients with precancerous lesions experienced higher prevalence of bleeding when probed (31.5 percent versus 22.4 percent), higher levels of two pathogens ( T. denticola and A. actinomycetemcomitans ), and less bacterial diversity in their saliva. (news-medical.net)
  • A further analysis, which took into account sociodemographic factors, oral health behaviors, and periodontal assessments, revealed additional predictors of precancerous lesions: elevated colonization of three pathogens ( T. forsythia , T. denticola , and A. actinomycetemcomitans ), decreased bacterial diversity in dental plaque, and not flossing regularly. (news-medical.net)
  • The researchers concluded that the colonization of periodontal pathogens and the alternated bacterial diversity in the oral cavity are important factors that, when at higher or lower levels respectively, may contribute to an increased risk of developing precancerous gastric lesions. (news-medical.net)
  • Combined bacterial and fungal targeted amplicon sequencing of respiratory samples: Does the DNA extraction method matter? (u-pec.fr)
  • It can be caused by a large variety of microorganisms, but has essentially two distinct etiologies: bacterial and fungal. (who.int)
  • In DNA replication at the lagging strand site, DNA polymerase III removes nucleotides individually from the DNA binding protein. (wikipedia.org)
  • HU is a small (10 kDa) bacterial DNA-binding protein, which structurally differs from a eukaryotic histone but functionally acts similarly to a histone by inducing negative supercoiling into circular DNA with the assistance of topoisomerase. (wikipedia.org)
  • In molecular biology, bacterial DNA binding proteins are a family of small, usually basic proteins of about 90 residues that bind DNA and are known as histone-like proteins. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since bacterial binding proteins have a diversity of functions, it has been difficult to develop a common function for all of them. (wikipedia.org)
  • Eukaryotic histones package DNA to help it to fit in the nucleus, and they are known to be the most conserved proteins in nature. (wikipedia.org)
  • These dinoflagellate histone-like proteins replace histone in some dinoflagellates and package DNA into a liquid-crystalline state. (wikipedia.org)
  • in these processes, bacterial DNA binding proteins have an architectural role, maintaining structural integrity as transcription, recombination, replication, or any other DNA-dependent process proceeds. (wikipedia.org)
  • Initially, bacterial DNA binding proteins were thought to help stabilize bacterial DNA. (wikipedia.org)
  • More than 100 such RT-Cas1 proteins exist in nature, though their role in bacterial defense, if any, is not entirely clear. (the-scientist.com)
  • Platt and colleagues tested all RT-Cas1 proteins they could identify before finding just one (from Fusicatenibacter saccharivorans ) that was capable of converting RNA snippets into DNA spacers when expressed in E coli . (the-scientist.com)
  • Until recently, scientists had suspected that certain proteins only bind to specific sites on the DNA strand, directing the cell's fate in the process. (phys.org)
  • Aspects of protein crystallography ranging from crystal growth, phase determination methods, density averaging to refinement, fiber diffraction of DNA and proteins. (washington.edu)
  • Arrests bacterial growth by binding to one or more penicillin-binding proteins. (medscape.com)
  • In this work, we report a method for the direct detection and quantification of these pro-inflammatory bacterial genes by PCR and qPCR in DNA extracted from human stool samples. (scirp.org)
  • Direct detection of specific genes in stool could prove useful toward screening for the presence of pro-inflammatory bacterial genes in individuals with inflammatory bowel diseases or colorectal cancer. (scirp.org)
  • Mitochondrial DNA contains 37 genes, all of which are essential for normal mitochondrial function. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The remaining genes provide instructions for making molecules called transfer RNA (tRNA) and ribosomal RNA (rRNA), which are chemical cousins of DNA. (medlineplus.gov)
  • In initial experiments, they used this to validate the findings of Record-seq, but they also showed that, after transient paraquat exposure, when culture conditions had returned to normal, Record-seq was able to retrieve the bacterial record of genes transiently upregulated by the herbicide, while RNA-seq could not. (the-scientist.com)
  • Research has shown that the ssDNA is stabilized by the interaction of SSB and the χ subunit of DNA polymerase III in E. coli, thus preparing for replication by maintaining the correct conformation that increases the binding affinity of enzymes to ssDNA. (wikipedia.org)
  • It gives us an idea that enzymes, like polymerases or others that are involved in maintaining the integrity of our DNA, may be influenced by spaceflight," said Susan Bailey, a radiation cancer biologist at Colorado State University in Fort Collins who has studied DNA damage caused by space radiation and did not contribute to the new paper. (insidescience.org)
  • He studies DNA polymerases, a class of enzymes that copy DNA and repair damage. (insidescience.org)
  • The targets of quinolone activity are the bacterial DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV, enzymes essential for DNA replication and transcription. (cdc.gov)
  • Quinolones inhibit two enzymes that are required for bacterial DNA synthesis, i.e. (cdc.gov)
  • Elevated pathogen colonization and a lack of bacterial diversity in the mouth were identified in people with precancerous lesions that could precede stomach cancer, finds a new study led by New York University College of Dentistry (NYU Dentistry) and New York University School of Medicine. (news-medical.net)
  • The process involved consists of either amplification or cloning of ribosomal DNA from a bacterial population, sequencing of this ribosomal DNA, and phylogenetic analysis of the sequences obtained. (duke.edu)
  • The estimated residual risk of contamination of blood products with bacterial agents is 1 in 5,000 for platelets and 1 in 30,000 for red blood cells. (medscape.com)
  • Also important is the duration of storage, which has a direct correlation with the likelihood of bacterial contamination. (medscape.com)
  • A meta-analysis of 22 studies of bacterial contamination rate estimates for apheresis (AP), platelet-rich plasma (PRP), and buffy coat (BC) collection methods found an overall mean contamination rate of 0.51 per 1000 components (95% confidence index [CI], 0.38-0.67). (medscape.com)
  • Probable contamination - The blood culture from the recipient is negative or could not be done, but there is definite bacterial growth in the donor blood product. (medscape.com)
  • However, please note that any extraneous DNA will also fluoresce e.g. cell debris - which is sometimes mistaken for mycoplasma contamination. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • The laboratory (18.8%, 21/112) and medical wards (16.1%, 18/112) had the highest bacterial contamination of mobile phones (p=0.041), and more bacterial species were isolated from smartphones (68.8%, n=77/112) than keypad phones (31.2%, n=35/112) (p=0.032). (bvsalud.org)
  • Two bacterial virulence factors are required for effective induction of apoptosis by extracellular GAS: (i) hyaluronic acid capsule that inhibits bacterial internalization and (ii) secreted cytolysin, streptolysin O (SLO), that forms. (lu.se)
  • Two bacterial virulence factors are required for effective induction of apoptosis by extracellular GAS: (i) hyaluronic acid capsule that inhibits bacterial internalization and (ii) secreted cytolysin, streptolysin O (SLO), that forms transmembrane pores that permit extracellular calcium influx into the cytosol. (lu.se)
  • Inhibits bacterial growth by inhibiting synthesis of dihydrofolic acid. (medscape.com)
  • Inhibits bacterial DNA synthesis and consequently growth. (medscape.com)
  • they inhibit bacterial DNA-dependent RNA polymerase, suppressing RNA synthesis. (msdmanuals.com)
  • by binding to the 50S subunit of the ribosome, they inhibit bacterial protein synthesis. (msdmanuals.com)
  • DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV. (cdc.gov)
  • Purified Genomic DNA is of an excellent quality and yield, and is fully compatible with restriction enzyme digestions, sequencing, PCR, qPCR and more. (geneflow.co.uk)
  • Bulla fluid and roof samples sent to CDC were positive by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) for orf virus DNA. (cdc.gov)
  • Tissue sent to CDC for parapoxvirus testing was positive for orf virus DNA by qPCR. (cdc.gov)
  • Swabs and body fluids contain DNA from host human or animal cells as well as microbial cells. (qiagen.com)
  • In metagenomic studies, total DNA is standardly isolated and analyzed, however, host human or animal DNA greatly outweighs the microbial DNA, which can hamper microbiome analysis. (qiagen.com)
  • Removal of host DNA increases the coverage of microbial reads in sequencing experiments. (qiagen.com)
  • the protein is involved in stabilizing the lagging strand as well as interacting with DNA polymerase III. (wikipedia.org)
  • The role of single-stranded DNA binding (SSB) protein during DNA replication in Escherichia coli cells has been studied, specifically the interactions between SSB and the χ subunit of DNA polymerase III in environments of varying salt concentrations. (wikipedia.org)
  • Furthermore, binding of SSB to DNA polymerase III at the replication fork prevents dissociation of SSB, consequently increasing the efficiency of DNA polymerase III to synthesize a new DNA strand. (wikipedia.org)
  • When H-NS is bound with RNA Polymerase to the promoter region, there are structural differences in the DNA that are accessible. (wikipedia.org)
  • When the plane reached zero gravity, Rosenstein used a clicker to prompt robotic instruments to inject a polymerase found in E. coli into a mixture holding synthetic single-stranded DNA. (insidescience.org)
  • The E. coli polymerase used in the experiment is part of a family of polymerases that account for only a few of the 14 known DNA polymerases humans have, Rosenstein said. (insidescience.org)
  • The emergence of certain bacterial strains resistant to antibiotics has become a major public health problem, hence the need to develop new antibiotic molecules. (bvsalud.org)
  • An unstable SSB/DNA system would result in rapid disintegration of the SSB, which stalls DNA replication. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some DNA differences result from the blunders during the DNA replication necessary for cell division. (cdc.gov)
  • In humans, mitochondrial DNA spans about 16,500 DNA building blocks (base pairs), representing a small fraction of the total DNA in cells. (medlineplus.gov)
  • In humans, orf manifests as an ulcerative skin lesion sometimes resembling bacterial infection or neoplasm. (cdc.gov)
  • A phylogenetic analysis of the composition of the human GI microbiota of 23 healthy adult subjects was performed from a pooled faecal bacterial DNA sample by combining genomic %G+C -based profiling and fractioning with 16S rRNA gene cloning and sequencing. (springer.com)
  • This kit is designed for the rapid spin column Preparation of Genomic DNA from 2 x 109 viable bacterial cells (between 0.5 and 1.0ml of culture). (geneflow.co.uk)
  • Interventions such as improving oral hygiene may lead to decreased S. aureus carriage by reducing other bacterial species such as Porphyomonas. (cdc.gov)
  • As a result, reactive oxygen species easily damage mitochondrial DNA, causing cells to malfunction and ultimately to die. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Bacterial DNA were recovered with higher representation compared to a solution without host DNA removal (see figure Effective host DNA removal enhances whole metagenome shotgun sequencing results. DNA isolated from buccal swabs using the QIAamp DNA Microbiome Kit or solutions from alternative suppliers was analyzed by whole metagenome shotgun sequencing on the Illumina MiSeq platform. [ A ] The percentage of human-derived reads was quantified and compared between the QIAamp DNA Microbiome Kit and alternative solutions with (Supplier B) and without (Supplier A) host DNA depletion protocols. Without host DNA removal, over 90% of reads mapped to the human genome. Compared to the kit from Supplier B, the effective removal of host DNA afforded by the QIAamp DNA Microbiome Kit resulted in over 90% reads for microbiome analysis. [ B ] To monitor recovery of bacterial species, buccal swab samples were spiked with an artificial sample of 6 bacterial species. Again, the effective host DNA removal achieved with the QIAamp DNA Microbiome Kit increases the coverage of bacterial species compared to a solution that affords no host DNA depletion (Supplier C). "> Effective host DNA removal enhances whole metagenome shotgun sequencing results ). (qiagen.com)
  • Doctors already tailor patients' treatments based on their bacterial strain's antibiotic susceptibility. (bcm.edu)
  • Bacterial orchitis or epididymo-orchitis requires appropriate antibiotic coverage for suspected infectious agents. (medscape.com)
  • He was prescribed cephalexin for presumed bacterial infection and discharged. (cdc.gov)
  • He was prescribed cephalexin for a presumed bacterial infection and advised to go to an ED for evaluation. (cdc.gov)
  • Our objective is designing novel DNA Gyrase inhibitors using Quantitative StructureActivity Relationships and Structure-Based Drug Design Approaches. (bvsalud.org)
  • The 3D crystal structure of DNA Gyrase was extracted from PDB (code: 4DHU) and we characterized the active site. (bvsalud.org)
  • Four molecules were chosen to be docked into DNA Gyrase active site using AutoDockTools. (bvsalud.org)
  • DNA staining methods such as indirect Hoechst staining techniques are quick with results available within 72 hours which compares favorably with 4 weeks for mycoplasma detection by culture isolation. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • As with detection by culture, DNA staining methods are suitable for the detection of mycoplasma from cell cultures or cell culture reagents. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • This genome, known as kinetoplast DNA (kDNA), is organized as a single, massive DNA network formed of interlocked DNA rings. (annualreviews.org)
  • The natural CRISPR-Cas system is a bacterial immune mechanism that inserts into the host genome short pieces of DNA (called spacers) cut from invading viruses. (the-scientist.com)
  • These particles move so fast that they break DNA apart or they cause mutations through all these different mechanisms. (insidescience.org)
  • As people age, mitochondrial DNA accumulates damaging mutations, including deletions and other changes. (medlineplus.gov)
  • CRISPR-based correction of your DNA to remove mutations that cause blindness is another example. (bcm.edu)
  • RESUME Nous avons étudié la résistance aux antimicrobiens et les profils plasmidiques des isolats d' Escherichia coli uropathogénique chez des malades hospitalisés et des malades externes à l'Hôpital universitaire jordanien en 2000 et 2001. (who.int)
  • This genetic material is known as mitochondrial DNA or mtDNA. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The following chromosomal conditions are associated with changes in the structure or number of copies of mitochondrial dna. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Changes in mitochondrial DNA are among the best-studied genetic factors associated with age-related hearing loss. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Mitochondrial DNA is especially vulnerable because it has a limited ability to repair itself. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Cells that have high energy demands, such as those in the inner ear that are critical for hearing, are particularly sensitive to the effects of mitochondrial DNA damage. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Some cases of cyclic vomiting syndrome, particularly those that begin in childhood, may be related to changes in mitochondrial DNA. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Some of the genetic changes alter single DNA building blocks (nucleotides), whereas others rearrange larger segments of mitochondrial DNA. (medlineplus.gov)
  • One of the most fascinating and unusual features of trypanosomatids, parasites that cause disease in many tropical countries, is their mitochondrial DNA. (annualreviews.org)
  • In these high salt concentrations, the eukaryotic histone protein is eluted from a DNA solution in which single stranded DNA is bound covalently to cellulose. (wikipedia.org)
  • The QIAamp DNA Microbiome Kit is intended for molecular biology applications. (qiagen.com)
  • Polymerases read the order in which the four types of nucleotide bases are arranged on the original strand of DNA and place the matching base on the corresponding section of the new strand. (insidescience.org)
  • Transcription factors bind to a section of DNA and control how strongly a gene in that section is activated. (phys.org)
  • Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics in Berlin have now discovered that the DNA segment to which a transcription factor binds can assume various spatial arrangements. (phys.org)
  • Neighbouring DNA segments have a significant impact on transcription factor shape, thus modulating the activity of the gene. (phys.org)
  • A team of scientists headed by Sebastiaan Meijsing at the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics have now come to a different conclusion: The researchers discovered that transcription factors can assume various shapes depending on which DNA segment they bind to. (phys.org)
  • In addition, adjacent DNA segments influence the activity of the bound transcription factors. (phys.org)
  • Many DNA variants associated with diseases belong to sequences that evidently control the activity of transcription factors. (phys.org)
  • By removing host DNA in a sample, the QIAamp DNA Microbiome Kit provides samples with enriched bacterial composition for whole metagenome shotgun sequencing. (qiagen.com)
  • The scientists found that the composition of DNA segments to which the receptors bind help determine how strongly a gene is activated. (phys.org)
  • 1977. Pesticide induced DNA damage and its repair in cultured human cells. (cdc.gov)
  • The QIAamp DNA Microbiome Kit efficiently removes host DNA by differential lysis of host cells and subsequent enzymatic digestion of host DNA. (qiagen.com)
  • Then, using a combination of mechanical and chemical lysis, intact cells are efficiently lysed and the released bacterial DNA is purified using proven QIAamp chemistry and decontaminated QIAamp UCP spin columns (see figure Purification procedure with integrated host DNA removal. Differential lysis and enzymatic treatment remove host DNA during the purification process, enabling enrichment of bacterial microbiome DNA. "> Purification procedure with integrated host DNA removal ). (qiagen.com)
  • Researchers create permanent DNA records directly from transient RNA transcripts within bacterial cells. (the-scientist.com)
  • By transfecting E. coli with a plasmid containing the F. saccharivorans RT-Cas1 gene and a DNA motif (a repeat sequence) used by the CRISPR-Cas machinery for spacer insertion, the team could in principle press record (induce RT-Cas1 expression), expose the cells to assorted environments, and then subsequently sequence the spacer-containing CRISPR locus to read the record of any RNAs expressed by the cell. (the-scientist.com)
  • Then one of those cells mutates through a DNA insertion, deletion, or point mutation, and suddenly a new pattern appears. (cdc.gov)
  • Nevertheless, the approach was sufficiently robust that the team was able to detect RNAs upregulated in a bacterial population as a result of stress-caused by treatment with hydrogen peroxide or acid-and transient exposure to the common herbicide paraquat. (the-scientist.com)
  • The closer and more tightly they bind to a gene on the DNA, the more active the gene was thought to be. (phys.org)
  • Following elution, the protein readily binds DNA, indicating the protein's high affinity for DNA. (wikipedia.org)
  • H-NS binds to DNA with an intrinsic curvature. (wikipedia.org)
  • This damage to DNA can potentially put astronauts at increased risk for cancer and degenerative diseases, said Bailey. (insidescience.org)
  • Although most DNA is packaged in chromosomes within the nucleus, mitochondria also have a small amount of their own DNA. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Inside Science) -- An enzyme in the bacterium E. coli made more errors copying synthetic DNA when exposed to zero gravity than the same enzyme did in normal gravity, a recent study finds. (insidescience.org)
  • they have identical or nearly identical patterns of DNA. (cdc.gov)
  • The bacterial groups most often detected in molecular studies of the healthy human GI tract are phyla Firmicutes (especially Clostridium clusters XIVa and IV), Bacteroidetes , Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Fusobacteria and Verrucomicrobia [ 3 ]. (springer.com)
  • Effective depletion of host DNA during the purification process maximizes bacterial DNA coverage in next generation sequencing analysis and allows highly sensitive 16S rDNA-based microbiome analysis and whole metagenome shotgun sequencing studies. (qiagen.com)
  • TAILOR can wield this evolution to develop the best bacterial killers quickly! (bcm.edu)
  • The QIAamp DNA Microbiome Kit is a dedicated solution for the purification and enrichment of bacterial microbiome DNA from swabs and body fluids. (qiagen.com)
  • The Solution is Bacterial Killers that Change! (bcm.edu)
  • Unsurprisingly, as bacterial resistance has increased, the number of companies developing new antibiotics has decreased. (bcm.edu)
  • This RT-Cas1 enzyme can thus both excise pieces of cellular RNAs and convert them into DNA. (the-scientist.com)
  • A comparison of reads from whole metagenome shotgun sequencing experiments was performed on DNA isolated from human buccal swabs, where samples were prepared with either the QIAamp DNA Microbiome Kit or solutions from 2 other suppliers. (qiagen.com)
  • Sequencing of samples prepared with the QIAamp DNA Microbiome Kit resulted in less than 5% human reads, greatly reduced compared to over 90% reads with a kit that does not include host DNA removal and 35% with a kit that does. (qiagen.com)