A family of structurally related collagens that form the characteristic collagen fibril bundles seen in CONNECTIVE TISSUE.
A polypeptide substance comprising about one third of the total protein in mammalian organisms. It is the main constituent of SKIN; CONNECTIVE TISSUE; and the organic substance of bones (BONE AND BONES) and teeth (TOOTH).
The most common form of fibrillar collagen. It is a major constituent of bone (BONE AND BONES) and SKIN and consists of a heterotrimer of two alpha1(I) and one alpha2(I) chains.
A fibrillar collagen found widely distributed as a minor component in tissues that contain COLLAGEN TYPE I and COLLAGEN TYPE III. It is a heterotrimeric molecule composed of alpha1(V), alpha2(V) and alpha3(V) subunits. Several forms of collagen type V exist depending upon the composition of the subunits that form the trimer.
A biosynthetic precursor of collagen containing additional amino acid sequences at the amino-terminal and carboxyl-terminal ends of the polypeptide chains.
A fibrillar collagen consisting of three identical alpha1(III) chains that is widely distributed in many tissues containing COLLAGEN TYPE I. It is particularly abundant in BLOOD VESSELS and may play a role in tissues with elastic characteristics.
Collagen receptors are cell surface receptors that modulate signal transduction between cells and the EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX. They are found in many cell types and are involved in the maintenance and regulation of cell shape and behavior, including PLATELET ACTIVATION and aggregation, through many different signaling pathways and differences in their affinities for collagen isoforms. Collagen receptors include discoidin domain receptors, INTEGRINS, and glycoprotein VI.
A fibrillar collagen found primarily in interstitial CARTILAGE. Collagen type XI is heterotrimer containing alpha1(XI), alpha2(XI) and alpha3(XI) subunits.
A meshwork-like substance found within the extracellular space and in association with the basement membrane of the cell surface. It promotes cellular proliferation and provides a supporting structure to which cells or cell lysates in culture dishes adhere.
A fibrillar collagen found predominantly in CARTILAGE and vitreous humor. It consists of three identical alpha1(II) chains.
An integrin found on fibroblasts, platelets, endothelial and epithelial cells, and lymphocytes where it functions as a receptor for COLLAGEN and LAMININ. Although originally referred to as the collagen receptor, it is one of several receptors for collagen. Ligand binding to integrin alpha2beta1 triggers a cascade of intracellular signaling, including activation of p38 MAP kinase.
Glycoprotein molecules on the surface of B- and T-lymphocytes, that react with molecules of antilymphocyte sera, lectins, and other agents which induce blast transformation of lymphocytes.
A non-fibrillar collagen found in the structure of BASEMENT MEMBRANE. Collagen type IV molecules assemble to form a sheet-like network which is involved in maintaining the structural integrity of basement membranes. The predominant form of the protein is comprised of two alpha1(IV) subunits and one alpha2(IV) subunit, however, at least six different alpha subunits can be incorporated into the heterotrimer.
A bone morphogenetic protein family member that includes an active tolloid-like metalloproteinase domain. The metalloproteinase activity of bone morphogenetic protein 1 is specific for the removal of the C-propeptide of PROCOLLAGEN and may act as a regulator of EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX deposition. Alternative splicing of MRNA for bone morphogenetic protein 1 results in the production of several PROTEIN ISOFORMS.
Connective tissue cells which secrete an extracellular matrix rich in collagen and other macromolecules.
Macromolecular organic compounds that contain carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and usually, sulfur. These macromolecules (proteins) form an intricate meshwork in which cells are embedded to construct tissues. Variations in the relative types of macromolecules and their organization determine the type of extracellular matrix, each adapted to the functional requirements of the tissue. The two main classes of macromolecules that form the extracellular matrix are: glycosaminoglycans, usually linked to proteins (proteoglycans), and fibrous proteins (e.g., COLLAGEN; ELASTIN; FIBRONECTINS; and LAMININ).
The process whereby PLATELETS adhere to something other than platelets, e.g., COLLAGEN; BASEMENT MEMBRANE; MICROFIBRILS; or other "foreign" surfaces.
Non-collagenous, calcium-binding glycoprotein of developing bone. It links collagen to mineral in the bone matrix. In the synonym SPARC glycoprotein, the acronym stands for Secreted Protein, Acidic and Rich in Cysteine.
Enzymes that catalyze the degradation of collagen by acting on the peptide bonds.
Microscopy using polarized light in which phenomena due to the preferential orientation of optical properties with respect to the vibration plane of the polarized light are made visible and correlated parameters are made measurable.
A hydroxylated form of the imino acid proline. A deficiency in ASCORBIC ACID can result in impaired hydroxyproline formation.
A small leucine-rich proteoglycan that interacts with FIBRILLAR COLLAGENS and modifies the EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX structure of CONNECTIVE TISSUE. Decorin has also been shown to play additional roles in the regulation of cellular responses to GROWTH FACTORS. The protein contains a single glycosaminoglycan chain and is similar in structure to BIGLYCAN.
A family of zinc-dependent metalloendopeptidases that is involved in the degradation of EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX components.
Heart failure caused by abnormal myocardial relaxation during DIASTOLE leading to defective cardiac filling.
Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.
A non-fibrillar collagen that forms a network of MICROFIBRILS within the EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX of CONNECTIVE TISSUE. The alpha subunits of collagen type VI assemble into antiparallel, overlapping dimers which then align to form tetramers.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
Fibrous bands or cords of CONNECTIVE TISSUE at the ends of SKELETAL MUSCLE FIBERS that serve to attach the MUSCLES to bones and other structures.
Any pathological condition where fibrous connective tissue invades any organ, usually as a consequence of inflammation or other injury.
Glycoproteins which have a very high polysaccharide content.
An extracellular endopeptidase which excises a block of peptides at the amino terminal, nonhelical region of the procollagen molecule with the formation of collagen. Absence or deficiency of the enzyme causes accumulation of procollagen which results in the inherited connective tissue disorder--dermatosparaxis. EC 3.4.24.14.
The phylum of sponges which are sessile, suspension-feeding, multicellular animals that utilize flagellated cells called choanocytes to circulate water. Most are hermaphroditic. They are probably an early evolutionary side branch that gave rise to no other group of animals. Except for about 150 freshwater species, sponges are marine animals. They are a source of ALKALOIDS; STEROLS; and other complex molecules useful in medicine and biological research.
A member of the metalloproteinase family of enzymes that is principally responsible for cleaving FIBRILLAR COLLAGEN. It can degrade interstitial collagens, types I, II and III.
The outer covering of the body that protects it from the environment. It is composed of the DERMIS and the EPIDERMIS.
The lamellated connective tissue constituting the thickest layer of the cornea between the Bowman and Descemet membranes.
Non-nucleated disk-shaped cells formed in the megakaryocyte and found in the blood of all mammals. They are mainly involved in blood coagulation.
ENDOPEPTIDASES which use a metal such as ZINC in the catalytic mechanism.
Basic glycoprotein members of the SERPIN SUPERFAMILY that function as COLLAGEN-specific MOLECULAR CHAPERONES in the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM.
Adherence of cells to surfaces or to other cells.
RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.
Tissue that supports and binds other tissues. It consists of CONNECTIVE TISSUE CELLS embedded in a large amount of EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX.
A non-vascular form of connective tissue composed of CHONDROCYTES embedded in a matrix that includes CHONDROITIN SULFATE and various types of FIBRILLAR COLLAGEN. There are three major types: HYALINE CARTILAGE; FIBROCARTILAGE; and ELASTIC CARTILAGE.
A heterogeneous group of autosomally inherited COLLAGEN DISEASES caused by defects in the synthesis or structure of FIBRILLAR COLLAGEN. There are numerous subtypes: classical, hypermobility, vascular, and others. Common clinical features include hyperextensible skin and joints, skin fragility and reduced wound healing capability.
Historically, a heterogeneous group of acute and chronic diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, progressive systemic sclerosis, dermatomyositis, etc. This classification was based on the notion that "collagen" was equivalent to "connective tissue", but with the present recognition of the different types of collagen and the aggregates derived from them as distinct entities, the term "collagen diseases" now pertains exclusively to those inherited conditions in which the primary defect is at the gene level and affects collagen biosynthesis, post-translational modification, or extracellular processing directly. (From Cecil Textbook of Medicine, 19th ed, p1494)
Glycoproteins found on the surfaces of cells, particularly in fibrillar structures. The proteins are lost or reduced when these cells undergo viral or chemical transformation. They are highly susceptible to proteolysis and are substrates for activated blood coagulation factor VIII. The forms present in plasma are called cold-insoluble globulins.
A family of secreted protease inhibitory proteins that regulates the activity of SECRETED MATRIX METALLOENDOPEPTIDASES. They play an important role in modulating the proteolysis of EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX, most notably during tissue remodeling and inflammatory processes.
A family of transmembrane glycoproteins (MEMBRANE GLYCOPROTEINS) consisting of noncovalent heterodimers. They interact with a wide variety of ligands including EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX PROTEINS; COMPLEMENT, and other cells, while their intracellular domains interact with the CYTOSKELETON. The integrins consist of at least three identified families: the cytoadhesin receptors(RECEPTORS, CYTOADHESIN), the leukocyte adhesion receptors (RECEPTORS, LEUKOCYTE ADHESION), and the VERY LATE ANTIGEN RECEPTORS. Each family contains a common beta-subunit (INTEGRIN BETA CHAINS) combined with one or more distinct alpha-subunits (INTEGRIN ALPHA CHAINS). These receptors participate in cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesion in many physiologically important processes, including embryological development; HEMOSTASIS; THROMBOSIS; WOUND HEALING; immune and nonimmune defense mechanisms; and oncogenic transformation.
The muscle tissue of the HEART. It is composed of striated, involuntary muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC) connected to form the contractile pump to generate blood flow.
A high-molecular-weight plasma protein, produced by endothelial cells and megakaryocytes, that is part of the factor VIII/von Willebrand factor complex. The von Willebrand factor has receptors for collagen, platelets, and ristocetin activity as well as the immunologically distinct antigenic determinants. It functions in adhesion of platelets to collagen and hemostatic plug formation. The prolonged bleeding time in VON WILLEBRAND DISEASES is due to the deficiency of this factor.
A non-fibrillar collagen found in BASEMENT MEMBRANE. The C-terminal end of the alpha1 chain of collagen type XVIII contains the ENDOSTATIN peptide, which can be released by proteolytic cleavage.
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
The transparent anterior portion of the fibrous coat of the eye consisting of five layers: stratified squamous CORNEAL EPITHELIUM; BOWMAN MEMBRANE; CORNEAL STROMA; DESCEMET MEMBRANE; and mesenchymal CORNEAL ENDOTHELIUM. It serves as the first refracting medium of the eye. It is structurally continuous with the SCLERA, avascular, receiving its nourishment by permeation through spaces between the lamellae, and is innervated by the ophthalmic division of the TRIGEMINAL NERVE via the ciliary nerves and those of the surrounding conjunctiva which together form plexuses. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)
Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.
The order Actiniaria, in the class ANTHOZOA, comprised of large, solitary polyps. All species are carnivorous.
The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.
The attachment of PLATELETS to one another. This clumping together can be induced by a number of agents (e.g., THROMBIN; COLLAGEN) and is part of the mechanism leading to the formation of a THROMBUS.
The geometric and structural changes that the HEART VENTRICLES undergo, usually following MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION. It comprises expansion of the infarct and dilatation of the healthy ventricle segments. While most prevalent in the left ventricle, it can also occur in the right ventricle.
Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.
Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.
The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.
Integrin beta-1 chains which are expressed as heterodimers that are noncovalently associated with specific alpha-chains of the CD49 family (CD49a-f). CD29 is expressed on resting and activated leukocytes and is a marker for all of the very late activation antigens on cells. (from: Barclay et al., The Leukocyte Antigen FactsBook, 1993, p164)
A member of the family of TISSUE INHIBITOR OF METALLOPROTEINASES. It is a N-glycosylated protein, molecular weight 28 kD, produced by a vast range of cell types and found in a variety of tissues and body fluids. It has been shown to suppress metastasis and inhibit tumor invasion in vitro.
The level of protein structure in which combinations of secondary protein structures (alpha helices, beta sheets, loop regions, and motifs) pack together to form folded shapes called domains. Disulfide bridges between cysteines in two different parts of the polypeptide chain along with other interactions between the chains play a role in the formation and stabilization of tertiary structure. Small proteins usually consist of only one domain but larger proteins may contain a number of domains connected by segments of polypeptide chain which lack regular secondary structure.
The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.
Enlargement of the HEART, usually indicated by a cardiothoracic ratio above 0.50. Heart enlargement may involve the right, the left, or both HEART VENTRICLES or HEART ATRIA. Cardiomegaly is a nonspecific symptom seen in patients with chronic systolic heart failure (HEART FAILURE) or several forms of CARDIOMYOPATHIES.
Surface glycoproteins on platelets which have a key role in hemostasis and thrombosis such as platelet adhesion and aggregation. Many of these are receptors.
A hydroxylated derivative of the amino acid LYSINE that is present in certain collagens.
The movement of cells from one location to another. Distinguish from CYTOKINESIS which is the process of dividing the CYTOPLASM of a cell.
The developmental entity of a fertilized chicken egg (ZYGOTE). The developmental process begins about 24 h before the egg is laid at the BLASTODISC, a small whitish spot on the surface of the EGG YOLK. After 21 days of incubation, the embryo is fully developed before hatching.
A category of nucleic acid sequences that function as units of heredity and which code for the basic instructions for the development, reproduction, and maintenance of organisms.
The parts of a transcript of a split GENE remaining after the INTRONS are removed. They are spliced together to become a MESSENGER RNA or other functional RNA.
Colloids with a solid continuous phase and liquid as the dispersed phase; gels may be unstable when, due to temperature or other cause, the solid phase liquefies; the resulting colloid is called a sol.
A family of non-fibrillar collagens that interact with FIBRILLAR COLLAGENS. They contain short triple helical domains interrupted by short non-helical domains and do not form into collagen fibrils.
A darkly stained mat-like EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX (ECM) that separates cell layers, such as EPITHELIUM from ENDOTHELIUM or a layer of CONNECTIVE TISSUE. The ECM layer that supports an overlying EPITHELIUM or ENDOTHELIUM is called basal lamina. Basement membrane (BM) can be formed by the fusion of either two adjacent basal laminae or a basal lamina with an adjacent reticular lamina of connective tissue. BM, composed mainly of TYPE IV COLLAGEN; glycoprotein LAMININ; and PROTEOGLYCAN, provides barriers as well as channels between interacting cell layers.
A non-fibrillar collagen found primarily in terminally differentiated hypertrophic CHONDROCYTES. It is a homotrimer of three identical alpha1(X) subunits.
Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.
Partial proteins formed by partial hydrolysis of complete proteins or generated through PROTEIN ENGINEERING techniques.
Formation and development of a thrombus or blood clot in the blood vessel.
A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).
Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.
A quiescent state of cells during G1 PHASE.
The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.
Members of the class of compounds composed of AMINO ACIDS joined together by peptide bonds between adjacent amino acids into linear, branched or cyclical structures. OLIGOPEPTIDES are composed of approximately 2-12 amino acids. Polypeptides are composed of approximately 13 or more amino acids. PROTEINS are linear polypeptides that are normally synthesized on RIBOSOMES.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.
The sequential correspondence of nucleotides in one nucleic acid molecule with those of another nucleic acid molecule. Sequence homology is an indication of the genetic relatedness of different organisms and gene function.
A technique that localizes specific nucleic acid sequences within intact chromosomes, eukaryotic cells, or bacterial cells through the use of specific nucleic acid-labeled probes.
A secreted matrix metalloproteinase that plays a physiological role in the degradation of extracellular matrix found in skeletal tissues. It is synthesized as an inactive precursor that is activated by the proteolytic cleavage of its N-terminal propeptide.
A fibril-associated collagen found in many tissues bearing high tensile stress, such as TENDONS and LIGAMENTS. It is comprised of a trimer of three identical alpha1(XII) chains.
A metalloproteinase which degrades helical regions of native collagen to small fragments. Preferred cleavage is -Gly in the sequence -Pro-Xaa-Gly-Pro-. Six forms (or 2 classes) have been isolated from Clostridium histolyticum that are immunologically cross-reactive but possess different sequences and different specificities. Other variants have been isolated from Bacillus cereus, Empedobacter collagenolyticum, Pseudomonas marinoglutinosa, and species of Vibrio and Streptomyces. EC 3.4.24.3.
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.
Animals having a vertebral column, members of the phylum Chordata, subphylum Craniata comprising mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and fishes.
A non-fibrillar collagen involved in anchoring the epidermal BASEMENT MEMBRANE to underlying tissue. It is a homotrimer comprised of C-terminal and N-terminal globular domains connected by a central triple-helical region.
Single-stranded complementary DNA synthesized from an RNA template by the action of RNA-dependent DNA polymerase. cDNA (i.e., complementary DNA, not circular DNA, not C-DNA) is used in a variety of molecular cloning experiments as well as serving as a specific hybridization probe.
The characteristic 3-dimensional shape of a protein, including the secondary, supersecondary (motifs), tertiary (domains) and quaternary structure of the peptide chain. PROTEIN STRUCTURE, QUATERNARY describes the conformation assumed by multimeric proteins (aggregates of more than one polypeptide chain).
Widely used technique which exploits the ability of complementary sequences in single-stranded DNAs or RNAs to pair with each other to form a double helix. Hybridization can take place between two complimentary DNA sequences, between a single-stranded DNA and a complementary RNA, or between two RNA sequences. The technique is used to detect and isolate specific sequences, measure homology, or define other characteristics of one or both strands. (Kendrew, Encyclopedia of Molecular Biology, 1994, p503)
A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.
Formed from pig pepsinogen by cleavage of one peptide bond. The enzyme is a single polypeptide chain and is inhibited by methyl 2-diaazoacetamidohexanoate. It cleaves peptides preferentially at the carbonyl linkages of phenylalanine or leucine and acts as the principal digestive enzyme of gastric juice.
Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.
The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.
A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.
Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.
The nonstriated involuntary muscle tissue of blood vessels.
A protective layer of firm, flexible cartilage over the articulating ends of bones. It provides a smooth surface for joint movement, protecting the ends of long bones from wear at points of contact.
A family of structurally-related short-chain collagens that do not form large fibril bundles.
The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.
A non-fibrillar collagen originally found in DESCEMET MEMBRANE. It is expressed in endothelial cell layers and in tissues undergoing active remodeling. It is heterotrimer comprised of alpha1(VIII) and alpha2(VIII) chains.
The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.
Large, noncollagenous glycoprotein with antigenic properties. It is localized in the basement membrane lamina lucida and functions to bind epithelial cells to the basement membrane. Evidence suggests that the protein plays a role in tumor invasion.
All of the processes involved in increasing CELL NUMBER including CELL DIVISION.
The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.
COLLAGEN DISEASES characterized by brittle, osteoporotic, and easily fractured bones. It may also present with blue sclerae, loose joints, and imperfect dentin formation. Most types are autosomal dominant and are associated with mutations in COLLAGEN TYPE I.
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action during the developmental stages of an organism.
A mixed-function oxygenase that catalyzes the hydroxylation of peptidyllysine, usually in protocollagen, to peptidylhydroxylysine. The enzyme utilizes molecular oxygen with concomitant oxidative decarboxylation of the cosubstrate 2-oxoglutarate to succinate. EC 1.14.11.4.
A non-essential amino acid that is synthesized from GLUTAMIC ACID. It is an essential component of COLLAGEN and is important for proper functioning of joints and tendons.
Reagent used as an intermediate in the manufacture of beta-alanine and pantothenic acid.
Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.
The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.
A factor synthesized in a wide variety of tissues. It acts synergistically with TGF-alpha in inducing phenotypic transformation and can also act as a negative autocrine growth factor. TGF-beta has a potential role in embryonal development, cellular differentiation, hormone secretion, and immune function. TGF-beta is found mostly as homodimer forms of separate gene products TGF-beta1, TGF-beta2 or TGF-beta3. Heterodimers composed of TGF-beta1 and 2 (TGF-beta1.2) or of TGF-beta2 and 3 (TGF-beta2.3) have been isolated. The TGF-beta proteins are synthesized as precursor proteins.
A non-fibrillar collagen found as a ubiquitously expressed membrane- associated protein. Type XIII collagen contains both collagenous and non-collagenous domains along with a transmembrane domain within its N-terminal region.
Integrin alpha1beta1 functions as a receptor for LAMININ and COLLAGEN. It is widely expressed during development, but in the adult is the predominant laminin receptor (RECEPTORS, LAMININ) in mature SMOOTH MUSCLE CELLS, where it is important for maintenance of the differentiated phenotype of these cells. Integrin alpha1beta1 is also found in LYMPHOCYTES and microvascular endothelial cells, and may play a role in angiogenesis. In SCHWANN CELLS and neural crest cells, it is involved in cell migration. Integrin alpha1beta1 is also known as VLA-1 and CD49a-CD29.
Polymorphic cells that form cartilage.
Restoration of integrity to traumatized tissue.
The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.
Weber KT (June 1989). "Cardiac interstitium in health and disease: the fibrillar collagen network". Journal of the American ... Regulation of fibrillar collagen mRNAs and expression of early transcription factors". Circulation Research. 69 (2): 483-90. ... Bonnin CM, Sparrow MP, Taylor RR (November 1981). "Collagen synthesis and content in right ventricular hypertrophy in the dog ... Additionally, in vitro study of human fibroblasts demonstrates that cenderitide reduces TGF-beta 1 induced collagen production ...
... deficient storage pool disease present a prolonged bleeding time due to impaired aggregation response to fibrillar collagen.[ ... 2015 William B. Coleman; Gregory J. Tsongalis (2009). Molecular pathology: the molecular basis of human disease. Academic Press ... Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) - an NCATS Program". rarediseases.info.nih.gov. Retrieved 2017-10-28. ... Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases. 5 (1). doi:10.1186/1750-1172-5-23. ISSN 1750-1172. "Why Perform Platelet Aggregation?". ...
This regulation is dynamic and involves changes in fibrillar collagens through increased deposition as well as inhibition of ... This is often seen in valvular heart disease and high-output heart failure. Neither of these situations constitutes a diastolic ... Though there is typically an increased amount of collagen observed in these patients it is usually not dramatically different ... This ischemia may be secondary to coronary artery disease, or a result of the previously described changes in microvasculature ...
"Mutations in fibrillar collagens (types I, II, III, and XI), fibril-associated collagen (type IX), and network-forming collagen ... Kuivaniemi H, Tromp G, Prockop DJ (1991). "Mutations in collagen genes: causes of rare and some common diseases in humans". ... This gene encodes one of the chains for type I collagen, the fibrillar collagen found in most connective tissues. Mutations in ... Type-I collagen Collagen GRCh38: Ensembl release 89: ENSG00000164692 - Ensembl, May 2017 GRCm38: Ensembl release 89: ...
"Mutations in fibrillar collagens (types I, II, III, and XI), fibril-associated collagen (type IX), and network-forming collagen ... Type III collagen could also be important in several other human diseases. Increased amounts of type III collagen are found in ... Type III collagen is one of the fibrillar collagens whose proteins have a long, inflexible, triple-helical domain. Type III ... type III collagen is also an important regulator of the diameter of type I and II collagen fibrils. Type III collagen is also ...
"Mutations in fibrillar collagens (types I, II, III, and XI), fibril-associated collagen (type IX), and network-forming collagen ... Kuivaniemi H, Tromp G, Prockop DJ (1991). "Mutations in collagen genes: causes of rare and some common diseases in humans". ... COL1A1 encodes the major component of type I collagen, the fibrillar collagen found in most connective tissues, including ... Collagen, type I, alpha 1, also known as alpha-1 type I collagen, is a protein that in humans is encoded by the COL1A1 gene. ...
"Mutations in fibrillar collagens (types I, II, III, and XI), fibril-associated collagen (type IX), and network-forming collagen ... This is theorised as the SNP in the HLA molecule was found to be very strongly associated with these diseases with evidence for ... This gene encodes one of the two alpha chains of type XI collagen, a minor fibrillar collagen. It is located on chromosome 6 ... collagen (COL11A2) chain. Molecular cloning of cDNA and genomic DNA reveals characteristics of a fibrillar collagen with ...
"Mutations in fibrillar collagens (types I, II, III, and XI), fibril-associated collagen (type IX), and network-forming collagen ... type X) cause a spectrum of diseases of bone, cartilage, and blood vessels". Hum. Mutat. 9 (4): 300-15. doi:10.1002/(SICI)1098- ... Unlike type VIII collagen, the other short chain collagen, type X collagen is a homotrimer. Type X collagen has a short triple ... Collagen alpha-1(X) chain is a protein that in humans is a member of the collagen family encoded by the COL10A1 gene. This gene ...
The role of MMP-13 is cleaving fibrillar collagen at neutral pH and higher mRNA levels of MMP-13 is detected in breast ... It showed good disease stability and tolerance in Phase I solid tumor trials and good tolerance in advanced cancer in ... Its effects on diseases like periodontitis and cancer has been investigated. Doxycycline is nearly completely absorbed with a ... In the design of these inhibitors, the basic protein backbone of collagen is maintained but the amide bond is replaced with a ...
Structural components of the dermis are collagen, elastic fibers, and ground substance also called extra fibrillar matrix. ... Diseases of the skin include skin infections and skin neoplasms (including skin cancer). In 1572, Geronimo Mercuriali of Forlì ... Conditions of the human integumentary system constitute a broad spectrum of diseases, also known as dermatoses, as well as many ... 2006). Andrews' Diseases of the Skin: Clinical Dermatology. Saunders Elsevier. ISBN 0-7216-2921-0. Elsevier, Dorland's ...
... interacting domains found in several non-fibrillar collagens and in other extracellular matrix proteins". Matrix. 13 (4): 297- ... A number of human diseases arise from mutations in VWA domains. The domain is named after the von Willebrand factor (VWF) type ... Collagen, type I, alpha 1 (COL1A1) Collagen, type II, alpha 1 (COL2A1) Collagen, type III, alpha 1 (COL3A1) Collagen, type V, ... Its occurrence in collagen types VI, VII, XII and XIV, the integrins and other proteins by averaged structure predictions". J. ...
Polymorphisms of the LOXL1 gene are associated with pseudoexfoliation syndrome, a disease where the extracellular matrix ... an extracellular copper-dependent amine oxidase that catalyses the first step in the formation of crosslinks in collagens and ... contains abnormal amounts of cross-linked, amyloid-like fibrillar material and glycoproteins. When this happens in the eye, ...
... a type of collagen), a network of collagen type II fibrils with glycosaminoglycan, hyaluronan, opticin, and a wide array of ... Central vitreous liquefies, fibrillar degeneration occurs, and the tracts break up (syneresis).[citation needed] Coarse strands ... but the sudden onset of recurring floaters may signify a posterior vitreous detachment or other diseases of the eye. Posterior ... It is surrounded by a layer of collagen called vitreous membrane separating it from the rest of the eye. it makes up four- ...
Anchoring fibrils are thought to form a structural link between the epidermal basement membrane and the fibrillar collagens in ... "Butterfly child" is the colloquial name for a child born with the disease, as their skin is seen to be as delicate and fragile ... DEB is caused by genetic defects (or mutations) within the human COL7A1 gene encoding the protein type VII collagen (collagen ... Collagen VII is a very large molecule (300 kDa) that dimerizes to form a semicircular looping structure: the anchoring fibril. ...
The extracellular matrix acts as scaffolding for the fibrillar collagen to form. The fibrillar collagen is the main constitute ... Coronary heart disease, also known as coronary artery disease, is one of the most common causes of myocardial damage, affecting ... In Coronary heart disease the coronary arteries narrow due to the buildup of atheroma or fatty deposits on the vessel walls. ... After several days, collagen accumulation at the site of injury begins to occur. As part of the extra cellular matrix, ...
They function as receptors for different collagen types, they recognize many fibrillar collagens and they are capable of ... Collagen-receptor signaling in health and disease. European Journal of Dermatology 11, 506-514. White, D.J., Puranen, S., ... Binds fibril-forming collagens, collagen of types I, II, III and X. A specific binding site in collagen II has been identified ... It preferentially binds collagens IV, VI and type XIII collagen, but also fibril-forming collagens. Specific binding sites in ...
14 has also been shown to cleave fibrillar collagen, and there is evidence that No. 2 is capable of collagenolysis. In MeSH, ... It is used clinically for the treatment of periodontal disease and is the only MMP inhibitor that is widely available ... The collagenases are capable of degrading triple-helical fibrillar collagens into distinctive 3/4 and 1/4 fragments. These ... The main substrates of the gelatinases are type IV collagen and gelatin, and these enzymes are distinguished by the presence of ...
With type I collagen and possibly all fibrillar collagens, if not all collagens, each triple-helix associates into a right- ... Type I collagen gives bone its tensile strength. Collagen-related diseases most commonly arise from genetic defects or ... or fibrillar) collagens and non-fibril-forming (non-fibrillar) collagens - which are further divided into 28 different types ( ... Fibrillar (Type I, II, III, V, XI) Non-fibrillar FACIT (Fibril Associated Collagens with Interrupted Triple Helices) (Type IX, ...
With type I collagen and possibly all fibrillar collagens, if not all collagens, each triple-helix associates into a right- ... DiseasesEdit. One thousand mutations have been identified in 12 out of more than 20 types of collagen. These mutations can lead ... Fibrillar (Type I, II, III, V, XI). *Non-fibrillar *FACIT (Fibril Associated Collagens with Interrupted Triple Helices) (Type ... Cortisol stimulates degradation of (skin) collagen into amino acids.[33]. Collagen I formationEdit. Most collagen forms in a ...
Among the many types of collagens, only the fibrillar and the basement membrane (type IV) collagens have been found in the ... Naidu, Akhilender (2003). "Vitamin C in human health and disease is still a mystery ? An overview". Nutrition Journal. 2 (7): 7 ... Studies have focused on the origin of fibrillar collagen molecules. In Sponges, there exist three clades of fibrillar molecules ... In mammals, the fibrillar collagens involved in the formation of cross-striated fibrils are types I-III, V, and XI. Type II and ...
Enhanced deposition of predominantly type I collagen in myocardial disease. J Mol Cell Cardiol. 1990;22:1157-1165 Table 11-2 in ... "The Non-Fibrillar Side of Fibrosis: Contribution of the Basement Membrane, Proteoglycans, and Glycoproteins to Myocardial ... Anonymous (March 1979). "Nomenclature and criteria for diagnosis of ischemic heart disease. Report of the Joint International ... "Radial artery versus femoral artery approach for performing coronary catheter procedures in people with coronary artery disease ...
Collagen is highly conserved across species and comprises about 90% of organic bone compounds. Fibrillar collagens, of which ... Immune response proteins have illuminated the presence of infections and diseases in multiple studies of mummified human ... Collagen has also been found to survive much longer than other non-collagenous proteins in fossilized specimens, and the ... Though type I collagen is the longest lived protein identified in fossilized bone specimens, the identification and sequencing ...
... an increase in total fibrillar collagens, fibronectins, proteoglycans, and tenascin C are distinctive of the desmoplastic ... Metastasis is an example of a disease state in which a breach of the basement membrane barrier occurs. Cancer begins as cells ... The newly secreted collagen is similar to that of collagen in scar formation - acting as a scaffold for infiltration of cells ... El-Torkey, M; Giltman, LI; Dabbous, M (1985). "Collagens in scar carcinoma of the lung". The American Journal of Pathology. 121 ...
Structural components of the dermis are collagen, elastic fibers, and ground substance also called extra fibrillar matrix.[24] ... 2006). Andrews' Diseases of the Skin: Clinical Dermatology. Saunders Elsevier. ISBN 0-7216-2921-0. .. ... In 1572, Geronimo Mercuriali of Forlì, Italy, completed De morbis cutaneis (translated "On the diseases of the skin"). It is ... Diseases of the skin[edit]. For a comprehensive list, see List of cutaneous conditions. ...
In the body, fibrillar collagens have over 50 known binding partners. The cell accounts for the variety of binding partners ... as an understanding of the regulators of the process would allow for a better understanding of diseases that affect collagen ... In the body, collagen fibrils are composed of several types of collagen as well as macromolecules. Type I collagen is the most ... It is not known how collagen survives within the tissues in order to yield itself to the formation of collagen fibrils. A ...
This implies that the cartilage is fibrillar-collagen-based. The Sepia officinalis embryo expresses hh, whose presence causes ... Some common diseases that affect the cartilage are listed below. Osteoarthritis: Osteoarthritis is a disease of the whole joint ... The collagen, mostly collagen type II, constrains the proteoglycans. The ECM responds to tensile and compressive forces that ... Several diseases can affect cartilage. Chondrodystrophies are a group of diseases, characterized by the disturbance of growth ...
Chronic kidney disease Crohn's disease (intestine) Dupuytren's contracture (hands, fingers) Keloid (skin) Mediastinal fibrosis ... Chute, Michael; Aujla, Preetinder; Jana, Sayantan; Kassiri, Zamaneh (2019). "The Non-Fibrillar Side of Fibrosis: Contribution ... such as the collagen is produced by fibroblasts, leading to the formation of a permanent fibrotic scar. In response to injury, ... Wynn, Thomas A. (2004). "Fibrotic disease and the TH1/TH2 paradigm". Nature Reviews. Immunology. Springer Science and Business ...
Colombatti A, Bonaldo P, Doliana R (1993). "Type A modules: interacting domains found in several non-fibrillar collagens and in ... A number of human diseases arise from mutations in vWA domains. Secondary structure prediction from 75 aligned vWA sequences ... Its occurrence in collagen types VI, VII, XII and XIV, the integrins and other proteins by averaged structure predictions". J. ... collagen types VI, VII, XII and XIV; and other extracellular proteins. Although the majority of vWA-containing proteins are ...
It is evident from the known collagen assembly that the tensile strength is basically due to fibrillar arrangement of collagen ... "Wound Dressings in Diabetic Foot Disease". Clinical Infectious Diseases. 39 (Supplement 2): S100-S103. doi:10.1086/383270. Wu, ... laying down new collagen of the subtypes I and III. In the initial events of wound healing, collagen III predominates in the ... Diabetic foot disease is the leading cause of non-traumatic lower limb amputations. Stem cell therapy may represent a treatment ...
Increased fibrillar collagen maturity/organization in IPF lung tissues. To investigate the collagen structural remodelling in ... Fibrillar collagen structures (predominantly collagens I and III) can be visualized and quantified using second harmonic ... less is known about the structural changes that occur in collagens in this disease. Collagens undergo extensive post- ... Lysyl oxidases regulate fibrillar collagen remodelling in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Gavin Tjin, Eric S. White, Alen Faiz, ...
Liva Healthcare is an innovative digital health coaching platform for scalable lifestyle and disease management. In the Liva ... Collagen fibrils Different collagen types form larger fibrillar bundles with the help of several different classes of proteins ... Type V collagen and type XI collagen are minor components of tissue and occur as fibrils with type I and type II collagen ... Types of collagen More than 20 genetically distinct collagens exist in animal tissues. Collagen types I, II, III, V and XI self ...
Weber KT (June 1989). "Cardiac interstitium in health and disease: the fibrillar collagen network". Journal of the American ... Regulation of fibrillar collagen mRNAs and expression of early transcription factors". Circulation Research. 69 (2): 483-90. ... Bonnin CM, Sparrow MP, Taylor RR (November 1981). "Collagen synthesis and content in right ventricular hypertrophy in the dog ... Additionally, in vitro study of human fibroblasts demonstrates that cenderitide reduces TGF-beta 1 induced collagen production ...
The "central vein sign" in inflammatory demyelination: The role of fibrillar collagen type I. Annals of neurology. 2019 Jun 1; ... The "central vein sign" in inflammatory demyelination : The role of fibrillar collagen type I. / Absinta, Martina; Nair, Govind ... title = "The "central vein sign" in inflammatory demyelination: The role of fibrillar collagen type I", ... The "central vein sign" in inflammatory demyelination: The role of fibrillar collagen type I. ...
This finding suggests that axial elongation may be controlled by a remodeling mechanism that modulates the collagen fibril ... The estimated change in the crimp of scleral collagen fibrils is temporally associated with the change in axial elongation rate ... Disease Models, Animal * Fibrillar Collagens / physiology * Lens, Crystalline / physiology* * Myopia / physiopathology* * ... Purpose: To estimate two collagen-specific material properties (crimp angle and elastic modulus of collagen fibrils) of the ...
Fibrillar plaque deposits are present in non-demented individuals and levels of soluble Abeta correlate better with cognitive ... Recent evidence has suggested a role for soluble oligomeric Abeta species in the pathology of Alzheimers disease (AD). ... Fibrillar Collagens / cerebrospinal fluid * Fibrillar Collagens / metabolism* * Humans * Immunoblotting * Male * Protease ... Soluble fibrillar oligomer levels are elevated in Alzheimers disease brain and correlate with cognitive dysfunction Neurobiol ...
... and public health in pulmonary disease, critical illness, and sleep disorders. Founded in 1905 to combat TB, the ATS has grown ... Defective Fibrillar Collagen Organization by Fibroblasts Contributes to Airway Remodeling in Asthma ... Defective Fibrillar Collagen Organization by Fibroblasts Contributes to Airway Remodeling in Asthma ... to tackle asthma, COPD, lung cancer, sepsis, acute respiratory distress, and sleep apnea, among other diseases. ...
For example, the risk of dying from cardiovascular diseases and/or cancer steadily declines for... ... Weber KT (1989) Cardiac interstitium in health and disease: the fibrillar collagen network. J Am Coll Cardiol 13(7):1637-1652 ... Autoimmune diseases. Abnormal cell activation underlies autoimmune diseases (Tsukumo and Yasutomo 2004). One reason for ... These changes are in keeping with the observed increases in incidence with age of cardiovascular diseases, autoimmune diseases ...
Monitoring fibrillar collagen turnover in hypertensive heart disease. Cardiovasc. Res. 35: 202-205. Freslon, J. L. and J. F. ... Disease-a-Month 51:548-614. Chen, S. C., J. Z. Su, K. Wu, W. Y. Hu, D. G. Gardner and D. G. Chen. 1998. Early captopril ... Renin, angiotensin and aldosterone system in pathogenesis and management of hypertensive vascular disease. Am. J. Med. 52:633- ... Proteins found in garden pea may help fight high BP, kidney disease.. ...
Serum Markers of Fibrillar Collagen Metabolism in Cardiac Diseases.- Ultrasonic Characterization of the Myocardium.- The ... Academic > Health Sciences > Internal medicine > Specialties of internal medicine > Diseases of the circulatory (Cardiovascular ...
Often characterized by an increase in collagen content of the corresponding tissue, the samples are usually visualized by ... method of contrast in different tissues and in this paper phasor approach to FLIM is used to separate collagen I from collagen ... to obtain fingerprints of different collagens and then used these fingerprints to observe bone marrow fibrosis in the mouse ... Collagen V is known to be fibrillar, but only in the presence of collagen I. In a gel formed from the mixture of collagen I and ...
Fibrillar collagen and myocardial stiffness in the intact hypertrophied rat left ventricle. Circ. Res. 64:1041-1050. View this ... Thin collagen fibers showed green birefringence, and thick collagen fibers showed bright yellow/orange birefringence under ... In response to a disease stimulus (hypertension, ref. 18; valvular disease, ref. 17; sarcomeric mutations, ref. 19; and aging, ... Soy diet worsens heart disease in mice. Brian L. Stauffer,1,2 John P. Konhilas,2 Elizabeth D. Luczak,2 and Leslie A. Leinwand1, ...
Molecular insights into prolyl and lysyl hydroxylation of fibrillar collagens in health and disease. Crit. Rev. Biochem. Mol. ... Collagens: Molecular biology, diseases, and potentials for therapy. Annu. Rev. Biochem. 64, 403-434 (1995).. ... Caenorhabditis elegans exoskeleton collagen COL-19: An adult-specific marker for collagen modification and assembly, and the ... Several collagen-encoding non-dumpy genes, including col-17 and col-41, were suppressed (fig. S6B). Collagens are the main ...
Janicki, J. S., and Brower, G. L. (2002). The role of myocardial fibrillar collagen in ventricular remodeling and function. J. ... in both diseases, Cx43 is reduced in both ventricles in the early phase of the disease and an increase in non-phosphorylated ... congenital heart disease, lung diseases, diabetes, anemia, hyperthyroidism, and or arrhythmia/dysrhythmia can alter the ... analysis of fibrosis and fiber orientation can help to diagnose any of the above described diseases. Moreover, in all diseases ...
Rabbit polyclonal Collagen I antibody. Validated in ELISA, IHC, RIA, ICC/IF and tested in Fish. Cited in 6 publication(s). ... Belongs to the fibrillar collagen family.. Contains 1 fibrillar collagen NC1 domain.. Contains 1 VWFC domain. ... Involvement in disease. Defects in COL1A1 are the cause of Caffey disease (CAFFD) [MIM:114000]; also known as infantile ... Type I collagen is a member of group I collagen (fibrillar forming collagen). ...
... deficient storage pool disease present a prolonged bleeding time due to impaired aggregation response to fibrillar collagen.[ ... 2015 William B. Coleman; Gregory J. Tsongalis (2009). Molecular pathology: the molecular basis of human disease. Academic Press ... Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) - an NCATS Program". rarediseases.info.nih.gov. Retrieved 2017-10-28. ... Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases. 5 (1). doi:10.1186/1750-1172-5-23. ISSN 1750-1172. "Why Perform Platelet Aggregation?". ...
Type A modules: interacting domains found in several non-fibrillar collagens and in other extracellular matrix proteins. Matrix ... Malaria is a vector-borne disease that is considered to be one of the most serious public health problems due to its high ... The first is prevention of the spread of the disease within the community. The second is prevention of the spread of parasites ... Transmission blocking vaccines to control insect-borne diseases - A Review. Mem Inst Oswaldo Cruz 105: 1-12. ...
6 16 Purification and fibrillar formation of collagen type III were previously reported in detail.17 18 19 The fibrillar ... Patients with severe peripheral atherosclerotic disease who do not smoke show a collagen-induced platelet thrombus formation at ... Platelet-Collagen Adhesion. Abnormalities of platelet-collagen adhesion were not observed in any of the groups at the two shear ... Platelet-collagen adherence, fibrin deposition, and thrombus volume on the collagen surface were quantified by light microscopy ...
Although the collagen family is quite extensive, the fibrillar collagens I, II, and III are the most abundant. Collagens II and ... Thrombospondin 1 precedes and predicts the development of tubulointerstitial fibrosis in glomerular disease in the rat. Kidney ... Collagen II is the principal collagen of cartilage, whereas collagen I predominates in the bone and tendon (2). Collagens I and ... In the fibrillar collagen chains of humans, the N-terminal motif is fully conserved in all collagens, except for COL1A2, COL5A3 ...
... including fibrillar type I collagen. To determine how type I collagen influences cancer cell behavior, we developed approaches ... Similar trends were noted with [18F] FAZA-PET imaging of patients with advanced disease, with 5 of 20 patients demonstrating no ... and decreased fibrillar collagen organization. In depth histologic evaluation of KPC tumors revealed no effect on CD11b, CD8 ... col-GFP mice showed that cancer cells invaded on linear type I collagen.. Cross-linking and linearization of type I collagen by ...
Cardiac interstitium in health and disease: the fibrillar collagen network. J Am Coll Cardiol. 1989;13:1637-52 ... Cardiac fibrosis is a remodeling feature in hearts with ischemic heart disease. The fibrillar collagens, type I and type Ⅲ, are ... B collagen content in noninfarcted area and infarcted area. Note: Data presented as mean ± SD, n = 6. C collagen type Ⅰ/ Ⅲ ... Type I collagen increases and type Ⅲ collagen decreases, which improves myocardial stiffness, decreases myocardial compliance, ...
... open-source MATLAB software tool for quantifying fibrillar collagen... ... Their organization changes impact tissue function and are likely associated with the progression of many diseases ranging from ... Figure 2: Schematic workflow of quantification of a fibrillar collagen image. (A) SHG image to be analyzed by CT-FIRE and/or ... Quantifying Fibrillar Collagen Organization with Curvelet Transform-Based Tools. doi: 10.3791/61931 Published: November 11, ...
... cardiovascular disease, cancer, immune function, metabolism and neurodegeneration. The journal fills a significant void in ... K. T. Weber, R. Pick, M. A. Silver et al., "Fibrillar collagen and remodeling of dilated canine left ventricle," Circulation, ... Dysregulation of Histone Acetyltransferases and Deacetylases in Cardiovascular Diseases. Yonggang Wang,1,2 Xiao Miao,2,3 ... S. V. Lakshmi, S. M. Naushad, C. A. Reddy et al., "Oxidative stress in coronary artery disease: epigenetic perspective," ...
Molecular insights into prolyl and lysyl hydroxylation of fibrillar collagens in health and disease. Crit. Rev. Biochem. Mol. ... elegans cuticle collagens and the COLFI domain of mammalian fibrillar collagens, TMEM131 family proteins appear to have evolved ... HSP47 is a collagen-specific chaperone that recognizes collagen trimers in the ER and prevents their premature aggregation ... The exoskeleton cuticle of C. elegans is a complex collagen matrix that contains many distinct mature collagen proteins, ...
Regulation of myocardial fibrillar collagen by angiotensin II. A role in hypertensive heart disease? J Mol Cell Cardiol. 2002; ... For instance, the ability of Ang II to stimulate fibroblasts and alter the metabolism of fibrillar collagen may be mediated by ... activation of collagen biosynthetic pathways, and inhibition of collagen degradative pathways.5 On the other hand, more recent ... Regulation of cardiac collagen. angiotensin and cross-talk with local growth factors. Hypertension. 2001; 37: 841-844. ...
The fibrillar collagen network in tumor and normal tissues is different due to remodeling of the extracellular matrix during ... for the structural and mechanical properties of tissue and play an important role in wound healing and aging and in diseases ... for collagen was determined by: Eq. 4. d. 22. collagen. =. d. 22. Li. Nb. O. 3. (. I. 2. ω. collagen. I. 2. ω. Li. Nb. O. 3. ) ... collagen. −. 1. [. ∫. 0. t. s. exp. (. i. Δ. k. z. ). 1. +. i. z. ∕. z. R. d. z. ]. collagen. 2. }. 1. ∕. 2. ,. ...
The two major collagens of the vasculature and heart are type I and type III collagen [3]. Both are fibrillar collagens, with ... Resistance vessel growth and remodelling: cause or consequence in cardiovascular disease. J Hum Hypertens 1995; 9: 479-485.. * ... How could increased collagen type III deposition alter resistance vessel structure? What effect does collagen deposition have ... Collagen and hypertension. Deinum, Jaap. Author Information Department of Medicine, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The ...
Weber, K. T. Cardiac interstitium in health and disease: the fibrillar collagen network. J Am Coll Cardiol. 13, 1637-1652 (1989 ... Lopez, B., Querejeta, R., Gonzalez, A., Larman, M., Diez, J. Collagen cross-linking but not collagen amount associates with ... Schwarz, F., et al. Myocardial structure and function in patients with aortic valve disease and their relation to postoperative ... Krayenbuehl, H. P., et al. Left ventricular myocardial structure in aortic valve disease before, intermediate, and late after ...
In response to injury the composition of the ECM changes towards fibrillar collagen which promotes HSCs to transdifferentiate. ... an abnormal accumulation of collagens I and III is the most prominent pathological manifestation of the disease in the skin [ ... The regulation of matrix contraction by the collagen receptors α1β1 integrin along with α2β1 integrin in fibrotic disease ... 2009 Skin disease: a cardinal feature of systemic sclerosis. Rheumatology (Oxford) 48 (Suppl. 3), iii14-8. doi:10.1093/ ...
Novel methods to identify and replicate complex interactions in common disease. Hall, M. ... Therapies to Improve Cardiac and Skeletal Muscle O2 Supply-Demand Mismatch in Older Adults with Peripheral Arterial Disease. ... Fibrillar Collagens * Research Personnel * Animal Disease Models Nicotine dependence, reward sensitivity, and lapse behavior in ...

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