Tears: The fluid secreted by the lacrimal glands. This fluid moistens the CONJUNCTIVA and CORNEA.Rotator Cuff: The musculotendinous sheath formed by the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis, and teres minor muscles. These help stabilize the head of the HUMERUS in the glenoid fossa and allow for rotation of the SHOULDER JOINT about its longitudinal axis.Tendon Injuries: Injuries to the fibrous cords of connective tissue which attach muscles to bones or other structures.Arthroscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy and surgery of the joint.Menisci, Tibial: The interarticular fibrocartilages of the superior surface of the tibia.Knee Injuries: Injuries to the knee or the knee joint.Lacrimal Apparatus: The tear-forming and tear-conducting system which includes the lacrimal glands, eyelid margins, conjunctival sac, and the tear drainage system.Shoulder Joint: The articulation between the head of the HUMERUS and the glenoid cavity of the SCAPULA.Dry Eye Syndromes: Corneal and conjunctival dryness due to deficient tear production, predominantly in menopausal and post-menopausal women. Filamentary keratitis or erosion of the conjunctival and corneal epithelium may be caused by these disorders. Sensation of the presence of a foreign body in the eye and burning of the eyes may occur.Lipocalin 1: A lipocalin that was orignally characterized from human TEARS. It is expressed primarily in the LACRIMAL GLAND and the VON EBNER GLANDS. Lipocalin 1 may play a role in olfactory transduction by concentrating and delivering odorants to the ODORANT RECEPTORS.Suture Anchors: Implants used in arthroscopic surgery and other orthopedic procedures to attach soft tissue to bone. One end of a suture is tied to soft tissue and the other end to the implant. The anchors are made of a variety of materials including titanium, stainless steel, or absorbable polymers.Lacerations: Torn, ragged, mangled wounds.Ophthalmic Solutions: Sterile solutions that are intended for instillation into the eye. It does not include solutions for cleaning eyeglasses or CONTACT LENS SOLUTIONS.Hip Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the hip.Ligaments, Articular: Fibrous cords of CONNECTIVE TISSUE that attach bones to each other and hold together the many types of joints in the body. Articular ligaments are strong, elastic, and allow movement in only specific directions, depending on the individual joint.Shoulder: Part of the body in humans and primates where the arms connect to the trunk. The shoulder has five joints; ACROMIOCLAVICULAR joint, CORACOCLAVICULAR joint, GLENOHUMERAL joint, scapulathoracic joint, and STERNOCLAVICULAR joint.Anterior Cruciate Ligament: A strong ligament of the knee that originates from the posteromedial portion of the lateral condyle of the femur, passes anteriorly and inferiorly between the condyles, and attaches to the depression in front of the intercondylar eminence of the tibia.Retinal Perforations: Perforations through the whole thickness of the retina including the macula as the result of inflammation, trauma, degeneration, etc. The concept includes retinal breaks, tears, dialyses, and holes.Tenodesis: Fixation of the end of a tendon to a bone, often by suturing.Conjunctiva: The mucous membrane that covers the posterior surface of the eyelids and the anterior pericorneal surface of the eyeball.Range of Motion, Articular: The distance and direction to which a bone joint can be extended. Range of motion is a function of the condition of the joints, muscles, and connective tissues involved. Joint flexibility can be improved through appropriate MUSCLE STRETCHING EXERCISES.Acromion: The lateral extension of the spine of the SCAPULA and the highest point of the SHOULDER.Triangular Fibrocartilage: Fibrocartilage that makes up the triangular fibrocartilage complex which is found in the WRIST JOINT.Episiotomy: An incision of the posterior vaginal wall and a portion of the pudenda which enlarges the vaginal introitus to facilitate delivery and prevent lacerations.Shoulder Pain: Unilateral or bilateral pain of the shoulder. It is often caused by physical activities such as work or sports participation, but may also be pathologic in origin.Tendon Transfer: Surgical procedure by which a tendon is incised at its insertion and placed at an anatomical site distant from the original insertion. The tendon remains attached at the point of origin and takes over the function of a muscle inactivated by trauma or disease.Conjunctivitis, Allergic: Conjunctivitis due to hypersensitivity to various allergens.Arthrography: Roentgenography of a joint, usually after injection of either positive or negative contrast medium.Immunoglobulin A, Secretory: The principle immunoglobulin in exocrine secretions such as milk, respiratory and intestinal mucin, saliva and tears. The complete molecule (around 400 kD) is composed of two four-chain units of IMMUNOGLOBULIN A, one SECRETORY COMPONENT and one J chain (IMMUNOGLOBULIN J-CHAINS).Retinal Detachment: Separation of the inner layers of the retina (neural retina) from the pigment epithelium. Retinal detachment occurs more commonly in men than in women, in eyes with degenerative myopia, in aging and in aphakia. It may occur after an uncomplicated cataract extraction, but it is seen more often if vitreous humor has been lost during surgery. (Dorland, 27th ed; Newell, Ophthalmology: Principles and Concepts, 7th ed, p310-12).Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Eye ProteinsSuture Techniques: Techniques for securing together the edges of a wound, with loops of thread or similar materials (SUTURES).Obstetric Labor Complications: Medical problems associated with OBSTETRIC LABOR, such as BREECH PRESENTATION; PREMATURE OBSTETRIC LABOR; HEMORRHAGE; or others. These complications can affect the well-being of the mother, the FETUS, or both.Sprains and Strains: A collective term for muscle and ligament injuries without dislocation or fracture. A sprain is a joint injury in which some of the fibers of a supporting ligament are ruptured but the continuity of the ligament remains intact. A strain is an overstretching or overexertion of some part of the musculature.Perineum: The body region lying between the genital area and the ANUS on the surface of the trunk, and to the shallow compartment lying deep to this area that is inferior to the PELVIC DIAPHRAGM. The surface area is between the VULVA and the anus in the female, and between the SCROTUM and the anus in the male.Orthopedic Procedures: Procedures used to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM, its articulations, and associated structures.Cartilage Diseases: Pathological processes involving the chondral tissue (CARTILAGE).Meibomian Glands: The sebaceous glands situated on the inner surface of the eyelids between the tarsal plates and CONJUNCTIVA.Cornea: The transparent anterior portion of the fibrous coat of the eye consisting of five layers: stratified squamous CORNEAL EPITHELIUM; BOWMAN MEMBRANE; CORNEAL STROMA; DESCEMET MEMBRANE; and mesenchymal CORNEAL ENDOTHELIUM. It serves as the first refracting medium of the eye. It is structurally continuous with the SCLERA, avascular, receiving its nourishment by permeation through spaces between the lamellae, and is innervated by the ophthalmic division of the TRIGEMINAL NERVE via the ciliary nerves and those of the surrounding conjunctiva which together form plexuses. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Tendons: Fibrous bands or cords of CONNECTIVE TISSUE at the ends of SKELETAL MUSCLE FIBERS that serve to attach the MUSCLES to bones and other structures.Epithelium, Corneal: Stratified squamous epithelium that covers the outer surface of the CORNEA. It is smooth and contains many free nerve endings.Athletic Injuries: Injuries incurred during participation in competitive or non-competitive sports.Contact Lenses: Lenses designed to be worn on the front surface of the eyeball. (UMDNS, 1999)Baseball: A competitive nine-member team sport including softball.Joint DiseasesJoint Instability: Lack of stability of a joint or joint prosthesis. Factors involved are intra-articular disease and integrity of extra-articular structures such as joint capsule, ligaments, and muscles.Fractures, Cartilage: Breaks in CARTILAGE.Anal Canal: The terminal segment of the LARGE INTESTINE, beginning from the ampulla of the RECTUM and ending at the anus.Lactoferrin: An iron-binding protein that was originally characterized as a milk protein. It is widely distributed in secretory fluids and is found in the neutrophilic granules of LEUKOCYTES. The N-terminal part of lactoferrin possesses a serine protease which functions to inactivate the TYPE III SECRETION SYSTEM used by bacteria to export virulence proteins for host cell invasion.Injury Severity Score: An anatomic severity scale based on the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) and developed specifically to score multiple traumatic injuries. It has been used as a predictor of mortality.Tenotomy: Surgical division of a tendon for relief of a deformity that is caused by congenital or acquired shortening of a muscle (Stedman, 27th ed). Tenotomy is performed in order to lengthen a muscle that has developed improperly, or become shortened and is resistant to stretching.Xerophthalmia: Dryness of the eye surfaces caused by deficiency of tears or conjunctival secretions. It may be associated with vitamin A deficiency, trauma, or any condition in which the eyelids do not close completely.Saliva: The clear, viscous fluid secreted by the SALIVARY GLANDS and mucous glands of the mouth. It contains MUCINS, water, organic salts, and ptylin.Reconstructive Surgical Procedures: Procedures used to reconstruct, restore, or improve defective, damaged, or missing structures.Wrist Injuries: Injuries to the wrist or the wrist joint.Blinking: Brief closing of the eyelids by involuntary normal periodic closing, as a protective measure, or by voluntary action.ConjunctivitisShoulder Dislocation: Displacement of the HUMERUS from the SCAPULA.Secretory Component: The extracellular moiety of the POLYMERIC IMMUNOGLOBULIN RECEPTOR found alone or complexed with IGA or IGM, in a variety of external secretions (tears, bile, colostrum.) Secretory component is derived by proteolytic cleavage of the receptor during transcytosis. When immunoglobulins IgA and IgM are bound to the receptor, during their transcytosis secretory component becomes covalently attached to them generating SECRETORY IMMUNOGLOBULIN A or secretory IMMUNOGLOBULIN M.Humeral Head: The portion of the upper rounded extremity fitting into the glenoid cavity of the SCAPULA. (from Stedman, 27th ed)Dacryocystitis: Inflammation of the lacrimal sac. (Dorland, 27th ed)Debridement: The removal of foreign material and devitalized or contaminated tissue from or adjacent to a traumatic or infected lesion until surrounding healthy tissue is exposed. (Dorland, 27th ed)Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Knee Joint: A synovial hinge connection formed between the bones of the FEMUR; TIBIA; and PATELLA.Tendinopathy: Clinical syndrome describing overuse tendon injuries characterized by a combination of PAIN, diffuse or localized swelling, and impaired performance. Distinguishing tendinosis from tendinitis is clinically difficult and can be made only after histopathological examination.
  • 50 years with a degenerative rotator cuff tear there is no difference in clinical effectiveness or cost-effectiveness between open repair and arthroscopic repair at 2 years for the primary outcome (OSS) and all other prespecified secondary outcomes. (nihr.ac.uk)
  • A tear in the labrum of the hip can result from traumatic injury, such as a motor vehicle accident or from participating in sports such as football, soccer, basketball, and skiing. (longislandhipandknee.com)
  • The rate of re-tear was not significantly different across the randomised groups (46.4% and 38.6% for arthroscopic and open surgery, respectively). (nihr.ac.uk)
  • In the wake of the largest outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in West Africa from 2014 to 2016, and with the improvements seen in supportive care delivery in field settings, there are now many EVD survivors, including those experiencing sequelae of the disease. (cdc.gov)
  • These disease outbreaks also have occurred as extreme coral bleaching in 2016 and 2017 killed or badly damaged about half of the corals on the Great Barrier Reef. (yale.edu)
  • When you suffer a common sports injury, such as a traumatic torn ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) or a painful overuse injury such as tendonitis, you have plenty of options for care. (wakehealth.edu)
  • Tear Support with MaquiBright ® is a unique oral supplement that supports eye health from the inside out for systemic, continuous comfort. (lifeextension.com)
  • Some systemic diseases such as leukemia, sarcoidosis, and juvenile idiopathic arthritis can present with the chief symptom of a red eye. (medscape.com)
  • American scientists have discovered that tears may hold clues to whether someone has Parkinson's disease, according to a preliminary study that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 70th Annual Meeting in Los Angeles, April 21 to 27, 2018. (com.pk)
  • Lyme Disease: Medical Myopia and the Hidden Global Pandemic (Hammersmith Books) features expert insights and opinions from around the world looking at the current state of Lyme Disease, future predictions, offers ways to stay safe, treat and prevent Lyme Disease, considers the problems with diagnosis and disparities in treatments. (parentingwithouttears.com)
  • There are steps that can be taken to prevent Lyme Disease, such as removing clothes after playing outside and having an adult check for ticks, but there is a real lack of awareness of the profound impact Lyme Disease can have if left untreated. (parentingwithouttears.com)
  • According to a study in the American Journal of Medicine , long-term Lyme Disease patients that were not treated early on are often as impaired as those in congestive heart failure. (parentingwithouttears.com)
  • Lyme disease may be more prevalent in parts of central, eastern and northern Europe (including Scandinavia) and parts of Asia, the US and Canada. (parentingwithouttears.com)
  • Most cases of Lyme Disease occur in late spring and early summer. (parentingwithouttears.com)
  • Lyme Disease by Dr Bernard Raxlen with Allie Cashel is published by Hammersmith Health Books. (parentingwithouttears.com)
  • The emergence of the Chronic Lyme Disease movement shows us how medical narratives are constructed and by who, and the detrimental effects these stories can have on our health. (grubaughlab.com)
  • Chronic Lyme Disease is one of many cases of misguided medicine, all of which lack a scientific basis and instead are perpetuated by false narratives. (grubaughlab.com)
  • Before we explore the underlying constructs that led to the popularization of this diagnosis we must first establish one thing: Chronic Lyme Disease has no basis in science. (grubaughlab.com)
  • Lyme Disease is a tick born illness caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi and causes more than 30,000 infections annually in the United States . (grubaughlab.com)
  • Dr Selvey said Lyme disease (from ticks), for example, was likely to be spreading in North America because of climate change. (abc.net.au)
  • We believe our research is the first to show that tears may be a reliable, inexpensive and noninvasive biological marker of the Parkinson's disease," said the paper's author Mark Lew from the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California in Los Angeles. (com.pk)
  • Given that Parkinson's can affect nerve function of the brain, the research team hypothesized that any change in nerve function may be seen in the protein levels in tears, Lew said. (com.pk)
  • They got tear samples from 55 people with Parkinson's and compared with tear samples from 27 people who did not have Parkinson's but who were the same age and gender. (com.pk)
  • Researchers found differences in the levels of a particular protein, alpha-synuclein, in the tears of people with Parkinson's compared to controls. (com.pk)
  • Knowing that something as simple as tears could help neurologists differentiate between people who have Parkinson's disease and those who don't in a noninvasive manner is exciting," said Lew. (com.pk)
  • My husband will be 81 years old next month and was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease 13 months ago. (com.pk)
  • A new way to diagnose a "sly" incurable neurodegenerative disease, that of Parkinson's, aspires to open up a new American scientific research. (theweeklyobserver.com)
  • The researchers, led by Dr. Michael Liu, of the University of Southern California Medical School, who made the announcement at the annual conference of the American Academy of Neurology in Los Angeles, compared tears of 55 patients with Parkinson's the tears of 27 healthy people of the same age and sex. (theweeklyobserver.com)
  • Our research is the first to show that tears can be a reliable, cheap and non-invasive biomarker for Parkinson's disease," Liu said. (theweeklyobserver.com)
  • Because the disease can affect nerve function in general, in addition to nerve brain cells, any change in the nerves can also cause changes in the levels of tear proteins, which is "evidence" of Parkinson's. (theweeklyobserver.com)
  • Something as simple as tears can help neurologists distinguish people with Parkinson's. (theweeklyobserver.com)
  • In a preliminary study by the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, researchers found that determining protein levels released with tears could be a marker for Parkinson's disease. (visiblebody.com)
  • With this study we intend to develop a treatment module for anxiety in patients with Parkinson's disease based on cognitive behavioral therapy methods and assess its efficacy in reducing anxiety symptom. (michaeljfox.org)
  • There is a critical need for treatments that address depression and barriers to care among the approximately 5 million people living with Parkinson's disease (PD) worldwide. (michaeljfox.org)
  • Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an established treatment for patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). (michaeljfox.org)
  • Sjögren syndrome (SS) is characterized by the combination of aqueous tear deficiency (ATD) and dry mouth (xerostomia). (medscape.com)
  • Tears are secreted by the lacrimal gland and after being distributed over the entire surface of the eye they are collected with the lacrimal canaliculi and carried by the nasolacrimal duct into the nasal cavity. (steadyhealth.com)
  • Blocked tear duct usually affects infants. (steadyhealth.com)
  • Initially, parents are taught how to perform a massage of the blocked tear duct. (steadyhealth.com)
  • The goal of the massage is to pop the membrane blocking the tear duct. (steadyhealth.com)
  • Prior to probing the doctor will examine the affected eye and rule out other conditions that might resemble tear duct obstruction. (steadyhealth.com)
  • Once this is done, a thin and blunt metal wire is gently inserted into the tear duct and passed until it reaches the nasal cavity. (steadyhealth.com)
  • The doctor uses a silicone tube and by inserting it into the tear duct keeps the passage wide open. (steadyhealth.com)
  • The tube is left in the tear duct for approximately 6 month. (steadyhealth.com)
  • A balloon gets inserted through the tear duct and is then inflated with a sterile solution. (steadyhealth.com)
  • My concern is that when she wakes from her naps she has a green discharge coming from her right eye, could this be caused by the sniffles or could it be a blocked tear duct, if so how should I treat it? (health24.com)
  • As this has just happened now it is unlikely that she has a blocked tear duct. (health24.com)
  • Tear duct and glands, also called lachrymal, or lacrimal, duct and glands, structures that produce and distribute the watery component of the tear film. (britannica.com)
  • If your doctor suspects a blocked tear duct, he or she may have you undergo other tests to find the location of the blockage. (mayoclinic.org)
  • You may have a blocked tear duct if after five minutes most of the dye is still on the surface of your eye. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Your treatment depends on what's causing the blocked tear duct. (mayoclinic.org)
  • If a tumor is causing your blocked tear duct, treatment will focus on the cause of the tumor. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Babies born with a blocked tear duct often get better without any treatment. (mayoclinic.org)
  • If your baby's blocked tear duct isn't improving, his or her doctor may teach you a special massage technique to help open the membrane. (mayoclinic.org)
  • For adults with partially narrowed puncta, your doctor may dilate the puncta with a small probe and then flush (irrigate) the tear duct. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Then the doctor threads through the tear duct blockage in the nose a tube (catheter) with a deflated balloon on the tip. (mayoclinic.org)
  • While the optimal treatment of neuropathic ocular pain is not established, published options include local therapies (e.g., autologous serum tears), adjuvant therapies (e.g., transcutaneous electrical stimulation, botulinum toxin injections) and oral agents (e.g., pregabalin, gabapentin, nortriptyline). (aao.org)
  • According to Mr. Thornhill, the root cause of dry eye is Meibomian Gland Dysfunction (MGD), which is a blockage or some other abnormality of the meibomian glands, causing them to not secrete enough oil to cover the tear film. (biotuesdays.com)
  • Meanwhile, researchers and divers in Florida, where the disease was first spotted in 2014, are also removing coral samples and shipping them to places as far-flung as Kansas and Oklahoma, in a last-ditch effort to save the 20 species or more thought to be susceptible to what has been dubbed Stony Coral Tissue Loss Disease. (reuters.com)
  • Stony Coral Tissue Loss Disease tmsnrt.rs/2nfybsM has been identified in seven other Caribbean localities, according to the Florida Sea Grant, a university-based program funded by the federal government. (reuters.com)
  • Unlike the more well-known coral bleaching phenomenon, coral typically cannot recover from Stony Coral Tissue Loss Disease. (reuters.com)
  • Marilyn Brandt, a research associate professor at the University of the Virgin Islands' Center for Marine and Environmental Studies, applies an antibiotic paste to corals being killed by Stony Coral Tissue Loss Disease (SCTLD) near the University of the Virgin Islands campus in St Thomas in the U.S. Virgin Islands, May 14, 2019. (reuters.com)
  • A research diver looks for signs of stony coral tissue loss disease in Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. (yale.edu)
  • Stony coral tissue loss disease progresses rapidly, taking just weeks to severely damage a coral once it is infected. (yale.edu)
  • Researchers have found that diseases were more prevalent in areas where corals were damaged by fishing and other human activity, as wounded coral provides an entry point for pathogens and bacteria. (yale.edu)
  • Because people blink less while using computers, tablets and smartphones, for example, meibomian glands are not activated to secrete enough oil onto the tear film," Mr. Thornhill suggests. (biotuesdays.com)
  • Although no significant, EGF levels positively correlated with Schirmer and tear lysozime levels and negatively with fluorescein and Rose Bengal staining. (arvojournals.org)
  • Juba, 6 September 2017 - South Sudan's disease burden is rising rapidly in the midst of a protracted conflict that is causing widespread displacement and a major food crisis. (who.int)
  • 2019 AWARD WINNER This video discusses the relevant basic science and anatomy associated with Dupuytren disease. (aaos.org)
  • Does exercise prevent cardiovascular disease? (sweatandtearstraining.com)
  • In today's topic, I want to cover a subject that people have been raising question to for quite some time, does exercise prevent cardiovascular disease? (sweatandtearstraining.com)
  • and I would like to get down to the bottom line on this subject because cardiovascular disease has claimed the lives of far too many people, I can't change what everyone is doing and I can't change statistics, but if I can just help a few people in making some life changing decisions, I will surely be happy to know that I have done something in combating this known killer. (sweatandtearstraining.com)
  • Currently, only autopsy is able to confirm the diagnosis with a 100% certainty, therefore, biomarkers from body fluids obtained by non-invasive means provide an attractive alternative for the diagnosis of Alzheimer`s disease. (jpt.com)