Disease Resistance: The capacity of an organism to defend itself against pathological processes or the agents of those processes. This most often involves innate immunity whereby the organism responds to pathogens in a generic way. The term disease resistance is used most frequently when referring to plants.Plant Diseases: Diseases of plants.Salicylic Acid: A compound obtained from the bark of the white willow and wintergreen leaves. It has bacteriostatic, fungicidal, and keratolytic actions.Immunity, Innate: The capacity of a normal organism to remain unaffected by microorganisms and their toxins. It results from the presence of naturally occurring ANTI-INFECTIVE AGENTS, constitutional factors such as BODY TEMPERATURE and immediate acting immune cells such as NATURAL KILLER CELLS.Plant Proteins: Proteins found in plants (flowers, herbs, shrubs, trees, etc.). The concept does not include proteins found in vegetables for which VEGETABLE PROTEINS is available.Genes, Plant: The functional hereditary units of PLANTS.Pseudomonas syringae: A species of gram-negative, fluorescent, phytopathogenic bacteria in the genus PSEUDOMONAS. It is differentiated into approximately 50 pathovars with different plant pathogenicities and host specificities.Plants, Genetically Modified: PLANTS, or their progeny, whose GENOME has been altered by GENETIC ENGINEERING.Arabidopsis: A plant genus of the family BRASSICACEAE that contains ARABIDOPSIS PROTEINS and MADS DOMAIN PROTEINS. The species A. thaliana is used for experiments in classical plant genetics as well as molecular genetic studies in plant physiology, biochemistry, and development.Oomycetes: Eukaryotes in the group STRAMENOPILES, formerly considered FUNGI, whose exact taxonomic level is unsettled. Many consider Oomycetes (Oomycota) a phylum in the kingdom Stramenopila, or alternatively, as Pseudofungi in the phylum Heterokonta of the kingdom Chromista. They are morphologically similar to fungi but have no close phylogenetic relationship to them. Oomycetes are found in both fresh and salt water as well as in terrestrial environments. (Alexopoulos et al., Introductory Mycology, 4th ed, pp683-4). They produce flagellated, actively motile spores (zoospores) that are pathogenic to many crop plants and FISHES.Plant Immunity: The inherent or induced capacity of plants to withstand or ward off biological attack by pathogens.Drug Resistance: Diminished or failed response of an organism, disease or tissue to the intended effectiveness of a chemical or drug. It should be differentiated from DRUG TOLERANCE which is the progressive diminution of the susceptibility of a human or animal to the effects of a drug, as a result of continued administration.Gene Expression Regulation, Plant: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in plants.Peronospora: A genus of OOMYCETES in the family Peronosporaceae. Most species are obligatory parasites and many are plant pathogens.Arabidopsis Proteins: Proteins that originate from plants species belonging to the genus ARABIDOPSIS. The most intensely studied species of Arabidopsis, Arabidopsis thaliana, is commonly used in laboratory experiments.Drug Resistance, Microbial: The ability of microorganisms, especially bacteria, to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antimicrobial agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).Drug Resistance, Bacterial: The ability of bacteria to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antimicrobial agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).Oryza sativa: Annual cereal grass of the family POACEAE and its edible starchy grain, rice, which is the staple food of roughly one-half of the world's population.Magnaporthe: A genus of FUNGI, in the family Magnaporthaceae of uncertain position (incertae sedis). It is best known for its species, M. grisea, which is one of the most popular experimental organisms of all fungal plant pathogens. Its anamorph is PYRICULARIA GRISEA.Plant Leaves: Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)Cladosporium: A mitosporic Loculoascomycetes fungal genus including some economically important plant parasites. Teleomorphs include Mycosphaerella and Venturia.Lycopersicon esculentum: A plant species of the family SOLANACEAE, native of South America, widely cultivated for their edible, fleshy, usually red fruit.Ascomycota: A phylum of fungi which have cross-walls or septa in the mycelium. The perfect state is characterized by the formation of a saclike cell (ascus) containing ascospores. Most pathogenic fungi with a known perfect state belong to this phylum.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Pseudomonas: A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria widely distributed in nature. Some species are pathogenic for humans, animals, and plants.Drug Resistance, Neoplasm: Resistance or diminished response of a neoplasm to an antineoplastic agent in humans, animals, or cell or tissue cultures.Tobacco: A plant genus of the family SOLANACEAE. Members contain NICOTINE and other biologically active chemicals; its dried leaves are used for SMOKING.Phytophthora: A genus of destructive parasitic OOMYCETES in the family Peronosporaceae, order Peronosporales, affecting numerous fruit, vegetable, and other crops. Differentiation of zoospores usually takes place in the sporangium and no vesicle is formed. It was previously considered a fungus.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.DNA, Plant: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of plants.Xanthomonas: A genus in the family XANTHOMONADACEAE whose cells produce a yellow pigment (Gr. xanthos - yellow). It is pathogenic to plants.Oxylipins: Eighteen-carbon cyclopentyl polyunsaturated fatty acids derived from ALPHA-LINOLENIC ACID via an oxidative pathway analogous to the EICOSANOIDS in animals. Biosynthesis is inhibited by SALICYLATES. A key member, jasmonic acid of PLANTS, plays a similar role to ARACHIDONIC ACID in animals.Drug Resistance, Multiple: Simultaneous resistance to several structurally and functionally distinct drugs.Cyclopentanes: A group of alicyclic hydrocarbons with the general formula R-C5H9.Hordeum: A plant genus of the family POACEAE. The EDIBLE GRAIN, barley, is widely used as food.Botrytis: A mitosporic Leotiales fungal genus of plant pathogens. It has teleomorphs in the genus Botryotina.Vascular Resistance: The force that opposes the flow of BLOOD through a vascular bed. It is equal to the difference in BLOOD PRESSURE across the vascular bed divided by the CARDIAC OUTPUT.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Basidiomycota: A phylum of fungi that produce their sexual spores (basidiospores) on the outside of the basidium. It includes forms commonly known as mushrooms, boletes, puffballs, earthstars, stinkhorns, bird's-nest fungi, jelly fungi, bracket or shelf fungi, and rust and smut fungi.Drug Resistance, Viral: The ability of viruses to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents or antiviral agents. This resistance is acquired through gene mutation.Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial: The ability of bacteria to resist or to become tolerant to several structurally and functionally distinct drugs simultaneously. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).Solanum: A plant genus of the family SOLANACEAE. Members contain SOLANACEOUS ALKALOIDS. Some species in this genus are called deadly nightshade which is also a common name for ATROPA BELLADONNA.Quantitative Trait Loci: Genetic loci associated with a QUANTITATIVE TRAIT.Capsicum: A plant genus of the family SOLANACEAE. The hot peppers yield CAPSAICIN, which activates VANILLOID RECEPTORS. Several varieties have sweet or pungent edible fruits that are used as vegetables when fresh and spices when the pods are dried.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Solanum tuberosum: A plant species of the genus SOLANUM, family SOLANACEAE. The starchy roots are used as food. SOLANINE is found in green parts.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Phytophthora infestans: A species of parasitic OOMYCETES in the family Peronosporaceae that is the causative agent of late blight of potato.Fusarium: A mitosporic Hypocreales fungal genus, various species of which are important parasitic pathogens of plants and a variety of vertebrates. Teleomorphs include GIBBERELLA.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Host-Pathogen Interactions: The interactions between a host and a pathogen, usually resulting in disease.Chromosomes, Plant: Complex nucleoprotein structures which contain the genomic DNA and are part of the CELL NUCLEUS of PLANTS.Chromosome Mapping: Any method used for determining the location of and relative distances between genes on a chromosome.Pterocarpans: A group of compounds which can be described as benzo-pyrano-furano-benzenes which can be formed from ISOFLAVONES by internal coupling of the B ring to the 4-ketone position. Members include medicarpin, phaseolin, and pisatin which are found in FABACEAE.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Microbial Sensitivity Tests: Any tests that demonstrate the relative efficacy of different chemotherapeutic agents against specific microorganisms (i.e., bacteria, fungi, viruses).DNA Shuffling: The use of DNA recombination (RECOMBINATION, GENETIC) to prepare a large gene library of novel, chimeric genes from a population of randomly fragmented DNA from related gene sequences.Multigene Family: A set of genes descended by duplication and variation from some ancestral gene. Such genes may be clustered together on the same chromosome or dispersed on different chromosomes. Examples of multigene families include those that encode the hemoglobins, immunoglobulins, histocompatibility antigens, actins, tubulins, keratins, collagens, heat shock proteins, salivary glue proteins, chorion proteins, cuticle proteins, yolk proteins, and phaseolins, as well as histones, ribosomal RNA, and transfer RNA genes. The latter three are examples of reiterated genes, where hundreds of identical genes are present in a tandem array. (King & Stanfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Parasitic Diseases, Animal: Infections or infestations with parasitic organisms. The infestation may be experimental or veterinary.Crops, Agricultural: Cultivated plants or agricultural produce such as grain, vegetables, or fruit. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982)Ethylenes: Derivatives of ethylene, a simple organic gas of biological origin with many industrial and biological use.Genome, Plant: The genetic complement of a plant (PLANTS) as represented in its DNA.Sequence Homology, Amino Acid: The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.Fish Diseases: Diseases of freshwater, marine, hatchery or aquarium fish. This term includes diseases of both teleosts (true fish) and elasmobranchs (sharks, rays and skates).Soybeans: An annual legume. The SEEDS of this plant are edible and used to produce a variety of SOY FOODS.Triticum: A plant genus of the family POACEAE that is the source of EDIBLE GRAIN. A hybrid with rye (SECALE CEREALE) is called TRITICALE. The seed is ground into FLOUR and used to make BREAD, and is the source of WHEAT GERM AGGLUTININS.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.ThiadiazolesColletotrichum: A genus of mitosporic Phyllachoraceae fungi which contains at least 40 species of plant parasites. They have teleomorphs in the genus Glomerella (see PHYLLACHORALES).Alternaria: A mitosporic Loculoascomycetes fungal genus including several plant pathogens and at least one species which produces a highly phytotoxic antibiotic. Its teleomorph is Lewia.Fungi: A kingdom of eukaryotic, heterotrophic organisms that live parasitically as saprobes, including MUSHROOMS; YEASTS; smuts, molds, etc. They reproduce either sexually or asexually, and have life cycles that range from simple to complex. Filamentous fungi, commonly known as molds, refer to those that grow as multicellular colonies.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Cloning, Molecular: The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.Phaseolus: A plant genus in the family FABACEAE which is the source of edible beans and the lectin PHYTOHEMAGGLUTININS.Alleles: Variant forms of the same gene, occupying the same locus on homologous CHROMOSOMES, and governing the variants in production of the same gene product.Genetic Variation: Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.Solanaceae: A plant family of the order Solanales, subclass Asteridae. Among the most important are POTATOES; TOMATOES; CAPSICUM (green and red peppers); TOBACCO; and BELLADONNA.Tetracycline Resistance: Nonsusceptibility of bacteria to the action of TETRACYCLINE which inhibits aminoacyl-tRNA binding to the 30S ribosomal subunit during protein synthesis.Plants: Multicellular, eukaryotic life forms of kingdom Plantae (sensu lato), comprising the VIRIDIPLANTAE; RHODOPHYTA; and GLAUCOPHYTA; all of which acquired chloroplasts by direct endosymbiosis of CYANOBACTERIA. They are characterized by a mainly photosynthetic mode of nutrition; essentially unlimited growth at localized regions of cell divisions (MERISTEMS); cellulose within cells providing rigidity; the absence of organs of locomotion; absence of nervous and sensory systems; and an alternation of haploid and diploid generations.Tobacco Mosaic Virus: The type species of TOBAMOVIRUS which causes mosaic disease of tobacco. Transmission occurs by mechanical inoculation.DNA Primers: Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.Selection, Genetic: Differential and non-random reproduction of different genotypes, operating to alter the gene frequencies within a population.Rhizoctonia: A mitosporic Ceratobasidiaceae fungal genus that is an important plant pathogen affecting potatoes and other plants. There are numerous teleomorphs.Myxobolus: The largest genus in the family Myxobolidae, class MYXOSPOREA, containing over 400 species.RNA, Plant: Ribonucleic acid in plants having regulatory and catalytic roles as well as involvement in protein synthesis.Virulence: The degree of pathogenicity within a group or species of microorganisms or viruses as indicated by case fatality rates and/or the ability of the organism to invade the tissues of the host. The pathogenic capacity of an organism is determined by its VIRULENCE FACTORS.Petroselinum: A plant genus of the family APIACEAE used for flavoring food.Plants, Toxic: Plants or plant parts which are harmful to man or other animals.Verticillium: A mitosporic fungal genus commonly isolated from soil. Some species are the cause of wilt diseases in many different plants.Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Penicillin Resistance: Nonsusceptibility of an organism to the action of penicillins.Potexvirus: A genus of plant viruses in the family FLEXIVIRIDAE, that cause mosaic and ringspot symptoms. Transmission occurs mechanically. Potato virus X is the type species.Cell Death: The termination of the cell's ability to carry out vital functions such as metabolism, growth, reproduction, responsiveness, and adaptability.Xanthomonas axonopodis: A species of gram-negative bacteria in the genus XANTHOMONAS, which causes citrus cankers and black rot in plants.Genetic Markers: A phenotypically recognizable genetic trait which can be used to identify a genetic locus, a linkage group, or a recombination event.Crosses, Genetic: Deliberate breeding of two different individuals that results in offspring that carry part of the genetic material of each parent. The parent organisms must be genetically compatible and may be from different varieties or closely related species.Transformation, Genetic: Change brought about to an organisms genetic composition by unidirectional transfer (TRANSFECTION; TRANSDUCTION, GENETIC; CONJUGATION, GENETIC, etc.) and incorporation of foreign DNA into prokaryotic or eukaryotic cells by recombination of part or all of that DNA into the cell's genome.Fenthion: Potent cholinesterase inhibitor used as an insecticide and acaricide.Zea mays: A plant species of the family POACEAE. It is a tall grass grown for its EDIBLE GRAIN, corn, used as food and animal FODDER.Drug Resistance, Fungal: The ability of fungi to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antifungal agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation.Helminthosporium: A mitosporic fungal genus including both saprophytes and plant parasites.Xanthomonas campestris: A species of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria that is pathogenic for plants.Airway Resistance: Physiologically, the opposition to flow of air caused by the forces of friction. As a part of pulmonary function testing, it is the ratio of driving pressure to the rate of air flow.Carlavirus: A genus of RNA plant viruses in the family FLEXIVIRIDAE, containing slightly flexuous filaments, often transmitted by aphids in a non-persistent manner. Carnation latent virus is the type species.Breeding: The production of offspring by selective mating or HYBRIDIZATION, GENETIC in animals or plants.Scopoletin: Plant growth factor derived from the root of Scopolia carniolica or Scopolia japonica.Sequence Alignment: The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.Lupinus: A plant genus of the family FABACEAE that is a source of SPARTEINE, lupanine and other lupin alkaloids.Gene Silencing: Interruption or suppression of the expression of a gene at transcriptional or translational levels.Gossypium: A plant genus of the family MALVACEAE. It is the source of COTTON FIBER; COTTONSEED OIL, which is used for cooking, and GOSSYPOL. The economically important cotton crop is a major user of agricultural PESTICIDES.Flax: A plant genus of the family LINACEAE that is cultivated for its fiber (manufactured into linen cloth). It contains a trypsin inhibitor and the seed is the source of LINSEED OIL.Seedling: Very young plant after GERMINATION of SEEDS.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Genes, vpr: DNA sequences that form the coding region for a trans-activator protein that specifies rapid growth in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). vpr is short for viral protein R, where R is undefined.Flavobacteriaceae Infections: Infections with bacteria of the family FLAVOBACTERIACEAE.Gene Expression Profiling: The determination of the pattern of genes expressed at the level of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION, under specific circumstances or in a specific cell.Evolution, Molecular: The process of cumulative change at the level of DNA; RNA; and PROTEINS, over successive generations.Carrier Proteins: Transport proteins that carry specific substances in the blood or across cell membranes.beta-Lactam Resistance: Nonsusceptibility of bacteria to the action of the beta-lactam antibiotics. Mechanisms responsible for beta-lactam resistance may be degradation of antibiotics by BETA-LACTAMASES, failure of antibiotics to penetrate, or low-affinity binding of antibiotics to targets.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Carboxylic Ester Hydrolases: Enzymes which catalyze the hydrolysis of carboxylic acid esters with the formation of an alcohol and a carboxylic acid anion.Pectobacterium carotovorum: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that causes rotting, particularly of storage tissues, of a wide variety of plants and causes a vascular disease in CARROTS; and POTATO plants.Plant Roots: The usually underground portions of a plant that serve as support, store food, and through which water and mineral nutrients enter the plant. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982; Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Resistance Training: A type of strength-building exercise program that requires the body muscle to exert a force against some form of resistance, such as weight, stretch bands, water, or immovable objects. Resistance exercise is a combination of static and dynamic contractions involving shortening and lengthening of skeletal muscles.Phenylalanine Ammonia-Lyase: An enzyme that catalyzes the deamination of PHENYLALANINE to form trans-cinnamate and ammonia.Arachis hypogaea: A plant species of the family FABACEAE that yields edible seeds, the familiar peanuts, which contain protein, oil and lectins.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Vitis: A plant genus in the family VITACEAE, order Rhamnales, subclass Rosidae. It is a woody vine cultivated worldwide. It is best known for grapes, the edible fruit and used to make WINE and raisins.Parasitic Diseases: Infections or infestations with parasitic organisms. They are often contracted through contact with an intermediate vector, but may occur as the result of direct exposure.SesquiterpenesPlant Growth Regulators: Any of the hormones produced naturally in plants and active in controlling growth and other functions. There are three primary classes: auxins, cytokinins, and gibberellins.Aeromonas hydrophila: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that may be pathogenic for frogs, fish, and mammals, including man. In humans, cellulitis and diarrhea can result from infection with this organism.Catfishes: Common name of the order Siluriformes. This order contains many families and over 2,000 species, including venomous species. Heteropneustes and Plotosus genera have dangerous stings and are aggressive. Most species are passive stingers.Anti-Infective Agents: Substances that prevent infectious agents or organisms from spreading or kill infectious agents in order to prevent the spread of infection.Isoptera: An order of insects, restricted mostly to the tropics, containing at least eight families. A few species occur in temperate regions of North America.Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.Transcription Factors: Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.R Factors: A class of plasmids that transfer antibiotic resistance from one bacterium to another by conjugation.Salicylates: The salts or esters of salicylic acids, or salicylate esters of an organic acid. Some of these have analgesic, antipyretic, and anti-inflammatory activities by inhibiting prostaglandin synthesis.Genetic Complementation Test: A test used to determine whether or not complementation (compensation in the form of dominance) will occur in a cell with a given mutant phenotype when another mutant genome, encoding the same mutant phenotype, is introduced into that cell.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Mutagenesis, Insertional: Mutagenesis where the mutation is caused by the introduction of foreign DNA sequences into a gene or extragenic sequence. This may occur spontaneously in vivo or be experimentally induced in vivo or in vitro. Proviral DNA insertions into or adjacent to a cellular proto-oncogene can interrupt GENETIC TRANSLATION of the coding sequences or interfere with recognition of regulatory elements and cause unregulated expression of the proto-oncogene resulting in tumor formation.Nematoda: A class of unsegmented helminths with fundamental bilateral symmetry and secondary triradiate symmetry of the oral and esophageal structures. Many species are parasites.Host-Parasite Interactions: The relationship between an invertebrate and another organism (the host), one of which lives at the expense of the other. Traditionally excluded from definition of parasites are pathogenic BACTERIA; FUNGI; VIRUSES; and PLANTS; though they may live parasitically.Inbreeding: The mating of plants or non-human animals which are closely related genetically.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Gene Duplication: Processes occurring in various organisms by which new genes are copied. Gene duplication may result in a MULTIGENE FAMILY; supergenes or PSEUDOGENES.Genetic Linkage: The co-inheritance of two or more non-allelic GENES due to their being located more or less closely on the same CHROMOSOME.Hypocreales: An order of fungi in the phylum ASCOMYCOTA that includes a number of species which are parasitic on higher plants, insects, or fungi. Other species are saprotrophic.Models, Genetic: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of genetic processes or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Two-Hybrid System Techniques: Screening techniques first developed in yeast to identify genes encoding interacting proteins. Variations are used to evaluate interplay between proteins and other molecules. Two-hybrid techniques refer to analysis for protein-protein interactions, one-hybrid for DNA-protein interactions, three-hybrid interactions for RNA-protein interactions or ligand-based interactions. Reverse n-hybrid techniques refer to analysis for mutations or other small molecules that dissociate known interactions.Malus: A plant genus in the family ROSACEAE, order Rosales, subclass Rosidae. It is best known as a source of the edible fruit (apple) and is cultivated in temperate climates worldwide.P-Glycoprotein: A 170-kDa transmembrane glycoprotein from the superfamily of ATP-BINDING CASSETTE TRANSPORTERS. It serves as an ATP-dependent efflux pump for a variety of chemicals, including many ANTINEOPLASTIC AGENTS. Overexpression of this glycoprotein is associated with multidrug resistance (see DRUG RESISTANCE, MULTIPLE).Escherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.Ampicillin Resistance: Nonsusceptibility of a microbe to the action of ampicillin, a penicillin derivative that interferes with cell wall synthesis.Disease Susceptibility: A constitution or condition of the body which makes the tissues react in special ways to certain extrinsic stimuli and thus tends to make the individual more than usually susceptible to certain diseases.Chloramphenicol Resistance: Nonsusceptibility of bacteria to the action of CHLORAMPHENICOL, a potent inhibitor of protein synthesis in the 50S ribosomal subunit where amino acids are added to nascent bacterial polypeptides.Agrobacterium tumefaciens: A species of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria isolated from soil and the stems, leafs, and roots of plants. Some biotypes are pathogenic and cause the formation of PLANT TUMORS in a wide variety of higher plants. The species is a major research tool in biotechnology.Hybridization, Genetic: The genetic process of crossbreeding between genetically dissimilar parents to produce a hybrid.Expressed Sequence Tags: Partial cDNA (DNA, COMPLEMENTARY) sequences that are unique to the cDNAs from which they were derived.Polymorphism, Genetic: The regular and simultaneous occurrence in a single interbreeding population of two or more discontinuous genotypes. The concept includes differences in genotypes ranging in size from a single nucleotide site (POLYMORPHISM, SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE) to large nucleotide sequences visible at a chromosomal level.Bacteria: One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.Conserved Sequence: A sequence of amino acids in a polypeptide or of nucleotides in DNA or RNA that is similar across multiple species. A known set of conserved sequences is represented by a CONSENSUS SEQUENCE. AMINO ACID MOTIFS are often composed of conserved sequences.Gene Expression: The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.Lettuce: Any of the various plants of the genus Lactuca, especially L. sativa, cultivated for its edible leaves. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)Sorghum: A plant genus of the family POACEAE. The grain is used for FOOD and for ANIMAL FEED. This should not be confused with KAFFIR LIME or with KEFIR milk product.Cucurbitaceae: The gourd plant family of the order Violales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida. It is sometimes placed in its own order, Cucurbitales. 'Melon' generally refers to CUCUMIS; CITRULLUS; or MOMORDICA.Avena sativa: A plant species of the family POACEAE that is widely cultivated for its edible seeds.Chromosomes, Artificial, Bacterial: DNA constructs that are composed of, at least, a REPLICATION ORIGIN, for successful replication, propagation to and maintenance as an extra chromosome in bacteria. In addition, they can carry large amounts (about 200 kilobases) of other sequence for a variety of bioengineering purposes.Glucans: Polysaccharides composed of repeating glucose units. They can consist of branched or unbranched chains in any linkages.Tetracycline: A naphthacene antibiotic that inhibits AMINO ACYL TRNA binding during protein synthesis.Physical Chromosome Mapping: Mapping of the linear order of genes on a chromosome with units indicating their distances by using methods other than genetic recombination. These methods include nucleotide sequencing, overlapping deletions in polytene chromosomes, and electron micrography of heteroduplex DNA. (From King & Stansfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 5th ed)Droughts: Prolonged dry periods in natural climate cycle. They are slow-onset phenomena caused by rainfall deficit combined with other predisposing factors.Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis: The detection of RESTRICTION FRAGMENT LENGTH POLYMORPHISMS by selective PCR amplification of restriction fragments derived from genomic DNA followed by electrophoretic analysis of the amplified restriction fragments.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Plasmids: Extrachromosomal, usually CIRCULAR DNA molecules that are self-replicating and transferable from one organism to another. They are found in a variety of bacterial, archaeal, fungal, algal, and plant species. They are used in GENETIC ENGINEERING as CLONING VECTORS.Plant Viruses: Viruses parasitic on plants higher than bacteria.Serratia Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus SERRATIA.Oncorhynchus mykiss: A large stout-bodied, sometimes anadromous, TROUT found in still and flowing waters of the Pacific coast from southern California to Alaska. It has a greenish back, a whitish belly, and pink, red, or lavender stripes on the sides, with usually a sprinkling of black dots. It is highly regarded as a sport and food fish. Its former name was Salmo gairdneri. The sea-run rainbow trouts are often called steelheads. Redband trouts refer to interior populations of rainbows.DNA, Complementary: Single-stranded complementary DNA synthesized from an RNA template by the action of RNA-dependent DNA polymerase. cDNA (i.e., complementary DNA, not circular DNA, not C-DNA) is used in a variety of molecular cloning experiments as well as serving as a specific hybridization probe.Apoptosis: One of the mechanisms by which CELL DEATH occurs (compare with NECROSIS and AUTOPHAGOCYTOSIS). Apoptosis is the mechanism responsible for the physiological deletion of cells and appears to be intrinsically programmed. It is characterized by distinctive morphologic changes in the nucleus and cytoplasm, chromatin cleavage at regularly spaced sites, and the endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA; (DNA FRAGMENTATION); at internucleosomal sites. This mode of cell death serves as a balance to mitosis in regulating the size of animal tissues and in mediating pathologic processes associated with tumor growth.Hydrogen Peroxide: A strong oxidizing agent used in aqueous solution as a ripening agent, bleach, and topical anti-infective. It is relatively unstable and solutions deteriorate over time unless stabilized by the addition of acetanilide or similar organic materials.Genes, Bacterial: The functional hereditary units of BACTERIA.Respiratory Burst: A large increase in oxygen uptake by neutrophils and most types of tissue macrophages through activation of an NADPH-cytochrome b-dependent oxidase that reduces oxygen to a superoxide. Individuals with an inherited defect in which the oxidase that reduces oxygen to superoxide is decreased or absent (GRANULOMATOUS DISEASE, CHRONIC) often die as a result of recurrent bacterial infections.Genetic Loci: Specific regions that are mapped within a GENOME. Genetic loci are usually identified with a shorthand notation that indicates the chromosome number and the position of a specific band along the P or Q arm of the chromosome where they are found. For example the locus 6p21 is found within band 21 of the P-arm of CHROMOSOME 6. Many well known genetic loci are also known by common names that are associated with a genetic function or HEREDITARY DISEASE.Protein Structure, Tertiary: The level of protein structure in which combinations of secondary protein structures (alpha helices, beta sheets, loop regions, and motifs) pack together to form folded shapes called domains. Disulfide bridges between cysteines in two different parts of the polypeptide chain along with other interactions between the chains play a role in the formation and stabilization of tertiary structure. Small proteins usually consist of only one domain but larger proteins may contain a number of domains connected by segments of polypeptide chain which lack regular secondary structure.Conjugation, Genetic: A parasexual process in BACTERIA; ALGAE; FUNGI; and ciliate EUKARYOTA for achieving exchange of chromosome material during fusion of two cells. In bacteria, this is a uni-directional transfer of genetic material; in protozoa it is a bi-directional exchange. In algae and fungi, it is a form of sexual reproduction, with the union of male and female gametes.Methicillin Resistance: Non-susceptibility of a microbe to the action of METHICILLIN, a semi-synthetic penicillin derivative.ChitinaseSerratia marcescens: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria found in soil, water, food, and clinical specimens. It is a prominent opportunistic pathogen for hospitalized patients.Fungal Proteins: Proteins found in any species of fungus.Salmo salar: A commercially important species of SALMON in the family SALMONIDAE, order SALMONIFORMES, which occurs in the North Atlantic.Transgenes: Genes that are introduced into an organism using GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUES.Repetitive Sequences, Amino Acid: A sequential pattern of amino acids occurring more than once in the same protein sequence.Insulin: A 51-amino acid pancreatic hormone that plays a major role in the regulation of glucose metabolism, directly by suppressing endogenous glucose production (GLYCOGENOLYSIS; GLUCONEOGENESIS) and indirectly by suppressing GLUCAGON secretion and LIPOLYSIS. Native insulin is a globular protein comprised of a zinc-coordinated hexamer. Each insulin monomer containing two chains, A (21 residues) and B (30 residues), linked by two disulfide bonds. Insulin is used as a drug to control insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (DIABETES MELLITUS, TYPE 1).Microsatellite Repeats: A variety of simple repeat sequences that are distributed throughout the GENOME. They are characterized by a short repeat unit of 2-8 basepairs that is repeated up to 100 times. They are also known as short tandem repeats (STRs).Synteny: The presence of two or more genetic loci on the same chromosome. Extensions of this original definition refer to the similarity in content and organization between chromosomes, of different species for example.Reactive Oxygen Species: Molecules or ions formed by the incomplete one-electron reduction of oxygen. These reactive oxygen intermediates include SINGLET OXYGEN; SUPEROXIDES; PEROXIDES; HYDROXYL RADICAL; and HYPOCHLOROUS ACID. They contribute to the microbicidal activity of PHAGOCYTES, regulation of signal transduction and gene expression, and the oxidative damage to NUCLEIC ACIDS; PROTEINS; and LIPIDS.Cephalosporin Resistance: Non-susceptibility of an organism to the action of the cephalosporins.Genomics: The systematic study of the complete DNA sequences (GENOME) of organisms.

Trichothecenes in cereal grains. (1/759)

Trichothecenes are sesquiterpenoid mycotoxins associated with fusarium head blight (FHB) of cereals, with worldwide economic and health impacts. While various management strategies have been proposed to reduce the mycotoxin risk, breeding towards FHB-resistance appears to be the most effective means to manage the disease, and reduce trichothecene contamination of cereal-based food products. This review provides a brief summary of the trichothecene synthesis in Fusarium species, their toxicity in plants and humans, followed by the current methods of screening and breeding for resistance to FHB and trichothecene accumulation.  (+info)

Calcium signaling during the plant-plant interaction of parasitic Cuscuta reflexa with its hosts. (2/759)

 (+info)

A single dominant locus, ren4, confers rapid non-race-specific resistance to grapevine powdery mildew. (3/759)

 (+info)

Development of a host-induced RNAi system in the wheat stripe rust fungus Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici. (4/759)

 (+info)

The genetic basis of resistance to downy mildew in Cucumis spp.--latest developments and prospects. (5/759)

 (+info)

Molecular cloning of ATR5(Emoy2) from Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis, an avirulence determinant that triggers RPP5-mediated defense in Arabidopsis. (6/759)

 (+info)

Resistance to Tomato yellow leaf curl virus accumulation in the tomato wild relative Solanum habrochaites associated with the C4 viral protein. (7/759)

 (+info)

Population genetics of malaria resistance in humans. (8/759)

 (+info)

  • Its septoria rating of 7, which is based on at least two genes, will be a big attraction, while its other disease scores are good and it has OWBM resistance. (fwi.co.uk)
  • A $3.6 million grant from the National Science Foundation will support a new research project aimed at pinpointing the genes that confer disease resistance in cacao. (psu.edu)
  • Because of the longer life cycle of perennial crops - particularly long-lived tree crops - finding resistance genes is more difficult and time consuming than it is in short-rotation annual crops," Guiltinan said. (psu.edu)
  • This project will explore the plant immune system via a comprehensive study of the genes important for resistance to key pathogens of cacao, which is the source of chocolate and an important cash crop for millions of farmers in developing countries," he said. (psu.edu)
  • Functional analysis of these genes will test their role in resistance and set the stage for future translation of these basic findings to guide more efficient breeding programs utilizing a wider array of genetic diversity. (psu.edu)
  • The method involves assays for a genetic differences in the NRAMP1 gene of the animal which is associated with superior disease resistance. (iastate.edu)
  • Guiltinan said the interdisciplinary team, which includes plant evolutionary biologists and functional genomicists, will study 24 cacao varieties divided into three genetic groups, each containing eight plants - four that are susceptible to disease and four that are resistant. (psu.edu)
  • Damage to host plants caused by microbial organisms is of particular importance in agriculture where plant diseases are a major cause of crop losses. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Strong disease resistance, consistent performance and good grain quality are key attributes looked for by winter wheat growers and these are highlighted in Limagrain's five varieties looking for official recommendation this year. (fwi.co.uk)
  • It also has the pod shatter resistance that will be found in all of our forthcoming hybrid varieties," he says. (fwi.co.uk)
  • The ultimate goal of the four-year study is to develop a new approach that plant scientists and breeders can use to identify the genetic basis for disease resistance in a variety of perennial crops, according to lead researcher Mark Guiltinan , professor of plant molecular biology in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences . (psu.edu)
  • A conventional, a hybrid and a clubroot resistant variety are in the winter oilseed rape line-up from Limagrain - all of which bring better disease resistance ratings. (fwi.co.uk)
  • Our research focuses on the identification of biomarkers for natural disease resistance, including research on monitoring of specific treatments and effects on the innate immune system such as natural antibodies and investigations of trained immunity. (wur.nl)
  • A method for determining improved innate immunity, disease resistance or performance in animals is disclosed. (iastate.edu)
  • A National Science Foundation grant will enable researchers to study the genetic basis of disease resistance in cacao. (psu.edu)
  • A treated yield of 102% is backed up by a very high untreated yield of 90%, which is reflected in its disease resistance ratings of 8 for yellow rust, 9 for brown rust, 6 for mildew and 5 for septoria. (fwi.co.uk)
  • It has a very strong disease resistance package, which includes a 6 for septoria," he says. (fwi.co.uk)
  • A major constraint to increased food production is crop losses due to microbial plant diseases, which destroy about 15 percent of the world's total crop production every year," he said. (psu.edu)
  • Antibiotics are medicines used to kill the bacteria that cause disease. (cdc.gov)
  • Plants have an immune system that resists infection, yet 10% of the world's agricultural production is lost annually to diseases caused by bacteria, fungi, and viruses. (science20.com)
  • This practice encourages bacterial resistance and could lead to the evolution of resistant strains of bacteria in animals and humans as well as the fish themselves. (eurekalert.org)
  • Some of those mutations can make the bacteria resistance to drug treatment. (nih.gov)
  • With these bacteria, the use of other antibiotics (e.g., penicillins, macrolides, and cephalosporins) appears to drive chloramphenicol (and other) resistance, which is often a part of gene clusters that encode for multidrug resistance. (cdc.gov)
  • Studies conducted by the ARLG include clinical testing of new drugs to treat multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, evaluating diagnostic devices in clinical settings, evaluating the effectiveness of new antibacterial stewardship programs, and optimizing treatment regimens to reduce the emergence of resistance. (nih.gov)
  • Using genetic sequencing and developing new laboratory tests to identify and understand specific mutations associated with antifungal resistance. (cdc.gov)
  • These were taken forward in a BBSRC HAPI project where new onion populations segregating for FOC resistance were developed by Hazera Seeds for genetic analysis and development of a marker assisted breeding program. (warwick.ac.uk)
  • Fungal Disease Resistance in Plants: Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, and Genetic Engineering presents the latest developments in crop protection from fungal infection. (routledge.com)
  • Classical genetic analysis and molecular genetic-mapping of the landraces showed that a major dominant gene confers this resistance. (springer.com)
  • Breeding for plant disease resistance generally has involved finding suitable genetic material amongst existing stocks or in the wild, which is then incorporated into commercial varieties. (wikipedia.org)
  • A rare genetic disease, while depleting patients of infection-fighting antibodies, may actually protect them from certain severe or recurrent viral infections, reports a National Institutes of Health (NIH) study. (medindia.net)
  • The genetic defect of the disease disrupts glycosylation, or the process of attaching sugars to proteins. (medindia.net)
  • Farber disease is a genetic disease characterised by the deficiency of ceramidase. (medindia.net)
  • Pompe disease or Glycogen Storage Disease is a rare genetic disease caused by the buildup of a sugar called glycogen in the body s cells. (medindia.net)
  • However, while this success story is now decades old, the genetic basis for the resistance remained unknown, and Race 1 strains have now spread around the world. (wur.nl)
  • Genetic mapping of Fusarium wilt resistance in a wild banana Musa acuminata ssp. (wur.nl)
  • There is a slightly higher prevalence of this disease in males than in females, and it is often associated with genetic disorders, such as Li-Fraumeni familiar cancer syndrome and neurofibromatosis type 1 2 . (nature.com)
  • In a prior study led by Anderson and LoVerde, genetic crosses between sensitive and resistant parasites identified a single region of the parasite genome that is strongly linked to PZQ resistance. (eurekalert.org)
  • Farmed Atlantic salmon production could be boosted by the discovery of a genetic marker associated with resistance to a potentially devastating virus. (ed.ac.uk)
  • They found that half of the observed variation in resistance to the disease could be explained by genetic factors that are passed from one generation to the next. (ed.ac.uk)
  • We are now performing genetic analyses which will help us understand how valuable traits such as disease resistance , malting quality and nitrogen use are inherited. (phys.org)
  • Genetic Variation in Resistance to Inflammation and Infectious Disease, Inflammatory Diseases Mahin Khatami, IntechOpen, DOI: 10.5772/26969. (intechopen.com)
  • Genome editing technologies have progressed rapidly and become one of the most important genetic tools in the implementation of pathogen resistance in plants. (frontiersin.org)
  • Researchers with the USDA Agricultural Research Service have identified genetic markers that have the potential to be used for the selection of breeder lines of chickens with improved genetic resistance to Marek's disease. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • Use of genetic markers conferring MD resistance in breeding programmes to augment current control methods for MD is a logical and attractive alternative strategy, say Drs Zhang and Heidari. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • It was hoped that the identified SNP(s) will eventually be used in marker-assisted selection to improve genetic resistance in breeder lines of chickens. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • Using these findings, Zhang and Heidari concluded that primary breeding companies may choose to use these markers in the selection process to improve the genetic resistance to MD in commercial chicken lines. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • Genetic maps can provide essential knowledge for understanding genetic disease resistance as well as local adaptation to changing climates. (fed.us)
  • New research has identified the genetic basis of resistance to ash dieback in UK trees, opening up new avenues for conservation. (phys.org)
  • Our new findings of the genetic basis of natural resistance found in a small minority of British ash trees help us to predict how ash populations will evolve under ash dieback. (phys.org)
  • Risk for both early- and late-onset Alzheimer's disease is affected by genetic factors. (brightsurf.com)
  • Genome editing offers new opportunities to livestock breeding for disease resistance as it can take input not only from breeding programmes but also other genetic and laboratory research. (allaboutfeed.net)
  • After finding a correlation between disease resistance and larger spleen size in rainbow trout, Mr Wiens and geneticist Yniv Palti searched for common genetic regions that influence both spleen size and disease resistance. (thefishsite.com)
  • This is the first study to identify a genetic link between a physical trait-spleen size-and specific disease resistance in fish," Mr Wiens said. (thefishsite.com)
  • Researchers at the Queen Mary University of London and the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew have identified the genetic basis of resistance to ash dieback in UK trees . (isaaa.org)
  • The world's first mass-cultivated banana cultivar Gros Michel was lost in the 1920s to Panama disease caused by the fungus Fusarium oxysporum. (wikipedia.org)
  • The soilborne fungus Fusarium oxysporum affects many different crops worldwide and causes some of the most devastating diseases in horticulture. (warwick.ac.uk)
  • Using DNA barcode sequencing to identifying which species were inside leaves before, during, and after the disease, Amend and Zahn determined the beneficial fungus that was most likely responsible for protection from disease: the yeast Pseudozyma aphidis. (eurekalert.org)
  • Significant progress has been made in accelerating the development of banana varieties with resistance to the Fusarium fungus. (wur.nl)
  • As a result the Mycosphaerella fungus is genetically very flexible, which is a challenge for its control either by fungicides or resistance breeding. (farmprogress.com)
  • Stem and root rot caused by the fungus-like disease Phytophthora sojae (P. sojae) causes approximately $50 million of soybean yield loss in Canada every year. (gc.ca)
  • Using the new test, which uses direct molecular detection rather than culturing the fungus in a Petri dish, the team found that 55% of aspergillosis patients had telltale signs known as 'markers' that indicated they had developed resistance to azoles. (healthcanal.com)
  • The disease, caused by the invasive alien fungus Hymenoscyphus fraxineus, has spread throughout Europe's ash populations, and was first recorded in the UK in 2012. (phys.org)
  • Genomic basis of European ash tree resistance to ash dieback fungus, Nature Ecology & Evolution (2019). (phys.org)
  • BACKGROUND An increase in intrahepatic triglyceride (IHTG) is the hallmark feature of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and is decreased by weight loss. (jci.org)
  • We hypothesize that insulin resistance is characteristic of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease as compared to age, gender, non-diabetic BMI-matched control subjects, both healthy and those with non-cirrhotic, non-steatotic liver disease. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • To date, no case control study evaluating insulin resistance (IR) in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NALFD) has been published. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Time-dependent association between metabolic syndrome and risk of CKD in Korean men without hypertension or diabetes," American Journal of Kidney Diseases , vol. 53, no. 1, pp. 59-69, 2009. (hindawi.com)
  • Seventeen patients with pulmonary hypertension secondary to elevated left atrial pressure have been studied by the method of temporary unilateral pulmonary artery occlusion: Resistances calculated before and after occlusion showed no change in most cases. (ahajournals.org)
  • Hypertension can also be produced in normal rats when they are fed a fructose-enriched diet, an intervention that also leads to the development of insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • The development of hypertension in normal rats by an experimental manipulation known to induce insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia provides further support for the view that the relationship between the three variables may be a causal one. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • However, even if insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia are not involved in the etiology of hypertension, it is likely that the increased risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with hypertension and the fact that this risk if not reduced with antihypertensive treatment are due to the clustering of risk factors for CAD, in addition to high blood pressure, associated with insulin resistance. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Based on these considerations the possibility is raised that resistance to insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and hyperinsulinemia are involved in the etiology and clinical course of three major related diseases- NIDDM, hypertension, and CAD. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • It is clear that our DNA determines not only the emergence of catastrophic single-gene disorders, which affect millions of persons worldwide, but also interacts with environments to predispose individuals to cancer, allergy, hypertension, heart disease, diabetes, psychiatric disorders and even to some infectious diseases. (indigo.ca)
  • Obesity, diabetes, hypertriglyceridemia, hypertension, and coronary heart disease constitute a phenotype common to individuals with either the IR syndrome or NAFLD1-12. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The key intersection among the three diseases is insulin resistance, which has been classically described to occur in peripheral tissues in diabetes and obesity and has recently been shown to develop in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains. (frontiersin.org)
  • Alzheimer's disease (AD), type 2 diabetes (T2D), and obesity are among the most expensive and disabling disorders worldwide. (frontiersin.org)
  • In the last decades, we have witnessed a dramatic increase in the prevalence of obesity and obesity-associated diseases like type 2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome. (oreilly.com)
  • Weight loss decreased IHTG content, at least in part, by decreasing hepatic DNL.TRIAL REGISTRATION ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02706262.FUNDING This study was supported by NIH grants DK56341 (Nutrition Obesity Research Center), DK20579 (Diabetes Research Center), DK52574 (Digestive Disease Research Center), and RR024992 (Clinical and Translational Science Award), and by grants from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Foundation, the College of Natural Resources of UCB, and the Pershing Square Foundation. (jci.org)
  • Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become the most common chronic liver disease in Europe and the United States and a frequent side effect of obesity and type 2 diabetes. (eurekalert.org)
  • We are looking for an outstanding and highly motivated scientist with an expertise in research on metabolic diseases in general, and insulin resistance, obesity in particular. (aftercollege.com)
  • Occurring together, insulin resistance, high blood pressure, low HDL-C, high triglycerides and obesity are defined as the metabolic or insulin resistance syndrome, which Sinaiko and other researchers say may trigger type 2 diabetes and atherosclerosis. (emaxhealth.com)
  • In addition to the identification of additional clinical syndromes related to insulin resistance/hyperinsulinemia, a number of new risk factors have been recognized that would increase CVD risk in these individuals. (nih.gov)
  • Subsequent prospective studies were published demonstrating that insulin resistance and/or compensatory hyperinsulinemia as a surrogate estimate of insulin resistance predicted the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus, 9,10 providing the final evidence of the prescience of Himsworth's mechanistic concept of the clinical syndrome of diabetes mellitus. (ahajournals.org)
  • At approximately the same time that the importance of insulin resistance in the etiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus was becoming widely acknowledged, it seemed important to point out that frank hyperglycemia only developed in a relatively small proportion of individuals with that defect in insulin action. (ahajournals.org)
  • The insulin clamp is considered the gold standard to measure insulin resistance, a precursor to type 2 diabetes," Sinaiko said. (emaxhealth.com)
  • Type 2 diabetes is due to insulin resistance and accounts for 90 percent of all diabetes cases. (pennmedicine.org)
  • Elevated plasma concentrations of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) have been shown to be associated with increased CVD, and there is evidence of a significant relationship between PAI-1 and fibrinogen levels and both insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia. (nih.gov)
  • This recently resulted in the development of a biocontrol platform for high-throughput screening of libraries ofmicroorganisms/compounds able to trigger "induced systemic resistance (ISR)" in plants, as novel biocontrol tools for integrated pest management. (ugent.be)
  • Optimal threshold of homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance in an Iranian population: the implication of metabolic syndrome to detect insulin resistance," Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice , vol. 84, no. 3, pp. 279-287, 2009. (hindawi.com)
  • Resistance to insulin-stimulated glucose uptake is present in the majority of patients with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) or non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) and in ∼25% of nonobese individuals with normal oral glucose tolerance. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • In the course of these 3 presentations, 1-3 he provided evidence that "diabetes mellitus is a disease in which the essential lesion is a diminished ability of the tissue to utilize glucose. (ahajournals.org)
  • In combination with our observations from additional human and cell studies, these results indicate that increased DPP4 production by the liver is the cause rather than the consequence of a fatty liver and insulin resistance," says the head of the study, Annette Schürmann from the German Institute for Human Nutrition Research (DIfE), a partner of the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD). (eurekalert.org)
  • If we can prevent brain insulin resistance from occurring, or re-sensitize brain cells to insulin with any of the currently available insulin-sensitizing diabetes medicines, we may be able to slow down, prevent, or perhaps even improve cognitive decline. (pennmedicine.org)
  • The risk of developing Alzheimer's disease is increased by 50 percent in people with diabetes. (pennmedicine.org)
  • In tissue from people with Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment (MCI), researchers found that changes to a protein called insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1 pS636/639 and pS616) in brain cells were linked to the severity of memory impairments regardless of age, sex, diabetes history, or apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene status. (pennmedicine.org)
  • We designed this study in a way that defines inflammation with unprecedented precision using immunology and computational biology to get a better understanding of this disease,' said co- corresponding author Judy H. Cho, MD, Senior Associate Dean for Precision Medicine, Director of The Charles Bronfman Institute for Personalized Medicine, Ward-Coleman Professor of Translational Genetics, and Professor of Medicine, and Genetics and Genomic Sciences, at the Icahn School of Medicine. (news-medical.net)
  • Across large regions and many crop species, it is estimated that diseases typically reduce plant yields by 10% every year in more developed nations or agricultural systems, but yield loss to diseases often exceeds 20% in less developed settings. (wikipedia.org)
  • Disease control is achieved by use of plants that have been bred for good resistance to many diseases, and by plant cultivation approaches such as crop rotation, pathogen-free seed, appropriate planting date and plant density, control of field moisture, and pesticide use. (wikipedia.org)
  • But conventional approaches haven't been effective in controlling wheat blast, and once symptoms of the disease first appear, it can wipe out an entire crop in around 10 days. (edu.au)
  • Unfortunately once the disease is established, growers often have to burn the crop to the ground to reduce the risk of it spreading. (edu.au)
  • Even so, the disease takes a toll, causing some $210 million worth of crop losses annually. (utne.com)
  • the enhancement of plant resistance plays an important role in adjusting crop production to meet global population increases. (frontiersin.org)
  • Everyone-from CDC researchers and laboratorians to healthcare professionals to the general public-has a role to play in preventing fungal infections and reducing antifungal resistance. (cdc.gov)
  • The researchers used in vitro evolution trials in order to find out the correlation between the tolerance and the ensuing resistance capabilities of these eventual superbugs. (inquisitr.com)
  • By mapping out more than 100,000 immune cells in patients with Crohn's disease, Mount Sinai researchers have discovered a signature of cells that are involved in a type of the disease that does not respond to treatment, according to a study published in Cell in August. (news-medical.net)
  • Based on this study's results, researchers have already developed a clinical trial that will test whether it's possible to find the signature in a blood test when a patient is diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease. (news-medical.net)
  • Researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) have shown for the first time that a strong association exists between insulin resistance and peripheral arterial disease (PAD), a risk factor for heart attacks and stroke. (emaxhealth.com)
  • however, the role of insulin resistance in PAD is not well established, according to the researchers. (emaxhealth.com)
  • Researchers compared PAD incidence and insulin sensitivity using a model of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), a simple test derived from fasting glucose and insulin values. (emaxhealth.com)
  • The researchers then exposed these transgenic mice to prion isolates collected from sick animals, including classical and atypical strains of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (i.e., mad cow disease), sheep Scrapie, and deer Chronic Wasting Disease. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • In the study, the researchers diagnosed CDG-IIb in two siblings with severe development issues who were referred to the NIAID PID Clinic though the NIH Undiagnosed Diseases Program. (medindia.net)
  • Breeding for Disease Resistance and Nematodes Conference aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results on all aspects of Breeding for Disease Resistance and Nematodes Conference. (waset.org)
  • It also provides a premier interdisciplinary platform for researchers, practitioners, and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns as well as practical challenges encountered and solutions adopted in the fields of Breeding for Disease Resistance and Nematodes Conference. (waset.org)
  • PHILADELPHIA - Insulin resistance in the brain precedes and contributes to cognitive decline above and beyond other known causes of Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania . (pennmedicine.org)
  • At least two general classes of mutants with altered resistance to pathogen attack have been identified in Arabidopsis. (apsnet.org)
  • As regards the achievement of viral disease resistance, the main strategies employed in model species such as Arabidopsis and Nicotiana benthamiana , which include the integration of CRISPR-encoding sequences that target and interfere with the viral genome and the induction of a CRISPR-mediated targeted mutation in the host plant genome, will be discussed. (frontiersin.org)
  • We have used the naturally occurring plant-parasite system of Arabidopsis thaliana and its common parasite Peronospora parasitica (downy mildew) to study the evolution of resistance specificity in the host population. (genetics.org)
  • A protein has been identified by the Infectious disease specialists at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center, which regulates the body's immune response to cytomegalovirus. (medindia.net)
  • CONCLUSIONS: The EIDAR Research Area is responsive to military-relevant infectious disease threats that are also frequently global public health concerns. (medworm.com)
  • Our results take us closer to realising these benefits and specifically address the most important infectious disease problem for the pig industry worldwide. (ed.ac.uk)
  • However, the combination of insulin resistance and compensatory hyperinsulinemia increases the likelihood that an individual will be hypertensive, and have a dyslipidemia characterized by a high plasma triglyceride (TG) and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentration. (nih.gov)
  • In this study, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance and low adiponectin levels were not detected among our patients with Behçet's disease. (wiley.com)
  • Although this viral disease is still unknown in LA, its vector - the whitefly - has recently been found. (springer.com)
  • This grant funding further builds a vigorous research program on viral and parasitic diseases at Texas Biomed. (eurekalert.org)
  • Gene discoveries relating to a different viral disease - infectious pancreatic necrosis - are already saving the UK industry around £26 million each year. (ed.ac.uk)
  • This result furthers the case for the criticality of CD163 in PRRSv infection and demonstrates that a targeted removal of the viral interacting domain can confer resistance while the reminder of the protein is present. (ed.ac.uk)
  • These findings help elucidate the differences between neuronal types that successfully battle ALS and those that succumb to the disease. (nyu.edu)
  • There are quite a few plant species that only exist in the "purgatory" of managed greenhouses, and quickly succumb to disease when they are taken to the wild and away from their regular fungicide treatments. (eurekalert.org)
  • may not succumb to this disease, but may also be unacceptably short, ribby and low yielding. (wikipedia.org)
  • Work is already underway to validate our results on a much larger panel of UK trees, and to identify other compounds that contribute to ash dieback resistance. (warwick.ac.uk)
  • Antifungal resistance occurs when fungi no longer respond to antifungal drugs. (cdc.gov)
  • Only three types of antifungal drugs currently exist, so antifungal resistance can severely limit treatment options. (cdc.gov)
  • What causes antifungal resistance? (cdc.gov)
  • Some studies have indicated that antibiotics -which include antifungal drugs-may also contribute to antifungal resistance in Candida . (cdc.gov)
  • Antifungal resistance is a growing threat. (cdc.gov)
  • Tracking antifungal resistance in Candida infections at 10 sites across the country through the Emerging Infections Program (EIP) . (cdc.gov)
  • The investigators have used a new ultra-sensitive test that employs technology developed at UMDNJ that not only can better diagnose Aspergillus infections, but also can spot signs of antifungal resistance to azoles - the class of drugs used to treat patients with aspergillosis. (healthcanal.com)
  • Given the rapid increase in the number of clinical syndromes and abnormalities associated with insulin resistance/hyperinsulinemia, it seems reasonable to suggest that the cluster of these changes related to the defect in insulin action be subsumed under the term of the insulin resistance syndrome. (nih.gov)
  • It is obvious that the cluster of abnormalities associated with insulin resistance and compensatory hyperinsulinemia contains many well-recognized CVD risk factors, choosing which one, or ones, that are primarily responsible for the accelerated atherogenesis that characterizes this syndrome is not a simple task. (nih.gov)
  • Disproportionately high pulmonary artery pressures and pulmonary vascular resistance in acquired heart disease, particularly mitral stenosis, have been repeatedly observed. (ahajournals.org)
  • Getting enough omega 3 fatty acids is a good idea for anyone concerned about reducing their risks of heart disease. (endocrineweb.com)
  • Whether hyperinsulinaemia and insulin resistance are risk factors for coronary heart disease is still a matter of debate. (nih.gov)
  • The information from prospective population studies, in which the relationship between hyperinsulinaemia and coronary heart disease has been investigated, is summarized. (nih.gov)
  • The possibility that hyperinsulinaemia and insulin resistance increase the risk for coronary heart disease will be approached from two angles. (nih.gov)
  • Rabbits have long been considered immune to prion disease, but recently scientists have shown that they can - under certain circumstances - get transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (or TSE, the scientific term for the fatal brain disease caused by prions). (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • In addition, the scientists observed that human beings suffering from insulin resistance and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease have a greater amount of active DPP4 in their blood than healthy people. (eurekalert.org)
  • In collaboration with Brewlab and the University of Sunderland, the scientists discovered that Chevallier had valuable disease resistance that can prevent contamination of grain with mycotoxins , which are a concern in the malting industry. (phys.org)
  • Downy mildew of onion caused by Peronospora destructor is an extrememly damaging foliar disease of both salad and bulb onions with yield losses as high as 70% resulting from defoliation, poor bulb formation and storage. (warwick.ac.uk)
  • Until 2000, pneumococcal infections caused 60,000 cases of invasive disease each year. (cdc.gov)
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that approximately 820,000 new gonococcal infections occur in the United States each year. (apic.org)
  • The prevalence of resistance to fluoroquinolones in human infections acquired from animals through the food chain is increasing ( 2 , 4 ). (cdc.gov)