The capacity of an organism to defend itself against pathological processes or the agents of those processes. This most often involves innate immunity whereby the organism responds to pathogens in a generic way. The term disease resistance is used most frequently when referring to plants.
Diseases of plants.
A compound obtained from the bark of the white willow and wintergreen leaves. It has bacteriostatic, fungicidal, and keratolytic actions.
The capacity of a normal organism to remain unaffected by microorganisms and their toxins. It results from the presence of naturally occurring ANTI-INFECTIVE AGENTS, constitutional factors such as BODY TEMPERATURE and immediate acting immune cells such as NATURAL KILLER CELLS.
Proteins found in plants (flowers, herbs, shrubs, trees, etc.). The concept does not include proteins found in vegetables for which VEGETABLE PROTEINS is available.
The functional hereditary units of PLANTS.
A species of gram-negative, fluorescent, phytopathogenic bacteria in the genus PSEUDOMONAS. It is differentiated into approximately 50 pathovars with different plant pathogenicities and host specificities.
PLANTS, or their progeny, whose GENOME has been altered by GENETIC ENGINEERING.
A plant genus of the family BRASSICACEAE that contains ARABIDOPSIS PROTEINS and MADS DOMAIN PROTEINS. The species A. thaliana is used for experiments in classical plant genetics as well as molecular genetic studies in plant physiology, biochemistry, and development.
Eukaryotes in the group STRAMENOPILES, formerly considered FUNGI, whose exact taxonomic level is unsettled. Many consider Oomycetes (Oomycota) a phylum in the kingdom Stramenopila, or alternatively, as Pseudofungi in the phylum Heterokonta of the kingdom Chromista. They are morphologically similar to fungi but have no close phylogenetic relationship to them. Oomycetes are found in both fresh and salt water as well as in terrestrial environments. (Alexopoulos et al., Introductory Mycology, 4th ed, pp683-4). They produce flagellated, actively motile spores (zoospores) that are pathogenic to many crop plants and FISHES.
The inherent or induced capacity of plants to withstand or ward off biological attack by pathogens.
Diminished or failed response of an organism, disease or tissue to the intended effectiveness of a chemical or drug. It should be differentiated from DRUG TOLERANCE which is the progressive diminution of the susceptibility of a human or animal to the effects of a drug, as a result of continued administration.
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in plants.
A genus of OOMYCETES in the family Peronosporaceae. Most species are obligatory parasites and many are plant pathogens.
Proteins that originate from plants species belonging to the genus ARABIDOPSIS. The most intensely studied species of Arabidopsis, Arabidopsis thaliana, is commonly used in laboratory experiments.
The ability of microorganisms, especially bacteria, to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antimicrobial agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).
The ability of bacteria to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antimicrobial agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).
Annual cereal grass of the family POACEAE and its edible starchy grain, rice, which is the staple food of roughly one-half of the world's population.
A genus of FUNGI, in the family Magnaporthaceae of uncertain position (incertae sedis). It is best known for its species, M. grisea, which is one of the most popular experimental organisms of all fungal plant pathogens. Its anamorph is PYRICULARIA GRISEA.
Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)
A mitosporic Loculoascomycetes fungal genus including some economically important plant parasites. Teleomorphs include Mycosphaerella and Venturia.
A plant species of the family SOLANACEAE, native of South America, widely cultivated for their edible, fleshy, usually red fruit.
A phylum of fungi which have cross-walls or septa in the mycelium. The perfect state is characterized by the formation of a saclike cell (ascus) containing ascospores. Most pathogenic fungi with a known perfect state belong to this phylum.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria widely distributed in nature. Some species are pathogenic for humans, animals, and plants.
Resistance or diminished response of a neoplasm to an antineoplastic agent in humans, animals, or cell or tissue cultures.
A plant genus of the family SOLANACEAE. Members contain NICOTINE and other biologically active chemicals; its dried leaves are used for SMOKING.
A genus of destructive parasitic OOMYCETES in the family Peronosporaceae, order Peronosporales, affecting numerous fruit, vegetable, and other crops. Differentiation of zoospores usually takes place in the sporangium and no vesicle is formed. It was previously considered a fungus.
Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of plants.
A genus in the family XANTHOMONADACEAE whose cells produce a yellow pigment (Gr. xanthos - yellow). It is pathogenic to plants.
Eighteen-carbon cyclopentyl polyunsaturated fatty acids derived from ALPHA-LINOLENIC ACID via an oxidative pathway analogous to the EICOSANOIDS in animals. Biosynthesis is inhibited by SALICYLATES. A key member, jasmonic acid of PLANTS, plays a similar role to ARACHIDONIC ACID in animals.
Simultaneous resistance to several structurally and functionally distinct drugs.
A group of alicyclic hydrocarbons with the general formula R-C5H9.
A plant genus of the family POACEAE. The EDIBLE GRAIN, barley, is widely used as food.
A mitosporic Leotiales fungal genus of plant pathogens. It has teleomorphs in the genus Botryotina.
The force that opposes the flow of BLOOD through a vascular bed. It is equal to the difference in BLOOD PRESSURE across the vascular bed divided by the CARDIAC OUTPUT.
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
A phylum of fungi that produce their sexual spores (basidiospores) on the outside of the basidium. It includes forms commonly known as mushrooms, boletes, puffballs, earthstars, stinkhorns, bird's-nest fungi, jelly fungi, bracket or shelf fungi, and rust and smut fungi.
The ability of viruses to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents or antiviral agents. This resistance is acquired through gene mutation.
The ability of bacteria to resist or to become tolerant to several structurally and functionally distinct drugs simultaneously. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).
A plant genus of the family SOLANACEAE. Members contain SOLANACEOUS ALKALOIDS. Some species in this genus are called deadly nightshade which is also a common name for ATROPA BELLADONNA.
Genetic loci associated with a QUANTITATIVE TRAIT.
A plant genus of the family SOLANACEAE. The hot peppers yield CAPSAICIN, which activates VANILLOID RECEPTORS. Several varieties have sweet or pungent edible fruits that are used as vegetables when fresh and spices when the pods are dried.
The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.
A plant species of the genus SOLANUM, family SOLANACEAE. The starchy roots are used as food. SOLANINE is found in green parts.
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
A species of parasitic OOMYCETES in the family Peronosporaceae that is the causative agent of late blight of potato.
A mitosporic Hypocreales fungal genus, various species of which are important parasitic pathogens of plants and a variety of vertebrates. Teleomorphs include GIBBERELLA.
Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.
The interactions between a host and a pathogen, usually resulting in disease.
Complex nucleoprotein structures which contain the genomic DNA and are part of the CELL NUCLEUS of PLANTS.
Any method used for determining the location of and relative distances between genes on a chromosome.
A group of compounds which can be described as benzo-pyrano-furano-benzenes which can be formed from ISOFLAVONES by internal coupling of the B ring to the 4-ketone position. Members include medicarpin, phaseolin, and pisatin which are found in FABACEAE.
A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.
Any tests that demonstrate the relative efficacy of different chemotherapeutic agents against specific microorganisms (i.e., bacteria, fungi, viruses).
The use of DNA recombination (RECOMBINATION, GENETIC) to prepare a large gene library of novel, chimeric genes from a population of randomly fragmented DNA from related gene sequences.
A set of genes descended by duplication and variation from some ancestral gene. Such genes may be clustered together on the same chromosome or dispersed on different chromosomes. Examples of multigene families include those that encode the hemoglobins, immunoglobulins, histocompatibility antigens, actins, tubulins, keratins, collagens, heat shock proteins, salivary glue proteins, chorion proteins, cuticle proteins, yolk proteins, and phaseolins, as well as histones, ribosomal RNA, and transfer RNA genes. The latter three are examples of reiterated genes, where hundreds of identical genes are present in a tandem array. (King & Stanfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)
Infections or infestations with parasitic organisms. The infestation may be experimental or veterinary.
Cultivated plants or agricultural produce such as grain, vegetables, or fruit. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982)
Derivatives of ethylene, a simple organic gas of biological origin with many industrial and biological use.
The genetic complement of a plant (PLANTS) as represented in its DNA.
The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.
Diseases of freshwater, marine, hatchery or aquarium fish. This term includes diseases of both teleosts (true fish) and elasmobranchs (sharks, rays and skates).
An annual legume. The SEEDS of this plant are edible and used to produce a variety of SOY FOODS.
A plant genus of the family POACEAE that is the source of EDIBLE GRAIN. A hybrid with rye (SECALE CEREALE) is called TRITICALE. The seed is ground into FLOUR and used to make BREAD, and is the source of WHEAT GERM AGGLUTININS.
The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.
Proteins found in any species of bacterium.
A genus of mitosporic Phyllachoraceae fungi which contains at least 40 species of plant parasites. They have teleomorphs in the genus Glomerella (see PHYLLACHORALES).
A mitosporic Loculoascomycetes fungal genus including several plant pathogens and at least one species which produces a highly phytotoxic antibiotic. Its teleomorph is Lewia.
A kingdom of eukaryotic, heterotrophic organisms that live parasitically as saprobes, including MUSHROOMS; YEASTS; smuts, molds, etc. They reproduce either sexually or asexually, and have life cycles that range from simple to complex. Filamentous fungi, commonly known as molds, refer to those that grow as multicellular colonies.
The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.
The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.
A plant genus in the family FABACEAE which is the source of edible beans and the lectin PHYTOHEMAGGLUTININS.
Variant forms of the same gene, occupying the same locus on homologous CHROMOSOMES, and governing the variants in production of the same gene product.
Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.
A plant family of the order Solanales, subclass Asteridae. Among the most important are POTATOES; TOMATOES; CAPSICUM (green and red peppers); TOBACCO; and BELLADONNA.
Nonsusceptibility of bacteria to the action of TETRACYCLINE which inhibits aminoacyl-tRNA binding to the 30S ribosomal subunit during protein synthesis.
Multicellular, eukaryotic life forms of kingdom Plantae (sensu lato), comprising the VIRIDIPLANTAE; RHODOPHYTA; and GLAUCOPHYTA; all of which acquired chloroplasts by direct endosymbiosis of CYANOBACTERIA. They are characterized by a mainly photosynthetic mode of nutrition; essentially unlimited growth at localized regions of cell divisions (MERISTEMS); cellulose within cells providing rigidity; the absence of organs of locomotion; absence of nervous and sensory systems; and an alternation of haploid and diploid generations.
The type species of TOBAMOVIRUS which causes mosaic disease of tobacco. Transmission occurs by mechanical inoculation.
Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.
Differential and non-random reproduction of different genotypes, operating to alter the gene frequencies within a population.
A mitosporic Ceratobasidiaceae fungal genus that is an important plant pathogen affecting potatoes and other plants. There are numerous teleomorphs.
The largest genus in the family Myxobolidae, class MYXOSPOREA, containing over 400 species.
Ribonucleic acid in plants having regulatory and catalytic roles as well as involvement in protein synthesis.
The degree of pathogenicity within a group or species of microorganisms or viruses as indicated by case fatality rates and/or the ability of the organism to invade the tissues of the host. The pathogenic capacity of an organism is determined by its VIRULENCE FACTORS.
A plant genus of the family APIACEAE used for flavoring food.
Plants or plant parts which are harmful to man or other animals.
A mitosporic fungal genus commonly isolated from soil. Some species are the cause of wilt diseases in many different plants.
The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.
Nonsusceptibility of an organism to the action of penicillins.
A genus of plant viruses in the family FLEXIVIRIDAE, that cause mosaic and ringspot symptoms. Transmission occurs mechanically. Potato virus X is the type species.
The termination of the cell's ability to carry out vital functions such as metabolism, growth, reproduction, responsiveness, and adaptability.
A species of gram-negative bacteria in the genus XANTHOMONAS, which causes citrus cankers and black rot in plants.
A phenotypically recognizable genetic trait which can be used to identify a genetic locus, a linkage group, or a recombination event.
Deliberate breeding of two different individuals that results in offspring that carry part of the genetic material of each parent. The parent organisms must be genetically compatible and may be from different varieties or closely related species.
Change brought about to an organisms genetic composition by unidirectional transfer (TRANSFECTION; TRANSDUCTION, GENETIC; CONJUGATION, GENETIC, etc.) and incorporation of foreign DNA into prokaryotic or eukaryotic cells by recombination of part or all of that DNA into the cell's genome.
Potent cholinesterase inhibitor used as an insecticide and acaricide.
A plant species of the family POACEAE. It is a tall grass grown for its EDIBLE GRAIN, corn, used as food and animal FODDER.
The ability of fungi to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antifungal agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation.
A mitosporic fungal genus including both saprophytes and plant parasites.
A species of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria that is pathogenic for plants.
Physiologically, the opposition to flow of air caused by the forces of friction. As a part of pulmonary function testing, it is the ratio of driving pressure to the rate of air flow.
A genus of RNA plant viruses in the family FLEXIVIRIDAE, containing slightly flexuous filaments, often transmitted by aphids in a non-persistent manner. Carnation latent virus is the type species.
The production of offspring by selective mating or HYBRIDIZATION, GENETIC in animals or plants.
Plant growth factor derived from the root of Scopolia carniolica or Scopolia japonica.
The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.
A plant genus of the family FABACEAE that is a source of SPARTEINE, lupanine and other lupin alkaloids.
Interruption or suppression of the expression of a gene at transcriptional or translational levels.
A plant genus of the family MALVACEAE. It is the source of COTTON FIBER; COTTONSEED OIL, which is used for cooking, and GOSSYPOL. The economically important cotton crop is a major user of agricultural PESTICIDES.
A plant genus of the family LINACEAE that is cultivated for its fiber (manufactured into linen cloth). It contains a trypsin inhibitor and the seed is the source of LINSEED OIL.
Very young plant after GERMINATION of SEEDS.
In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.
DNA sequences that form the coding region for a trans-activator protein that specifies rapid growth in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). vpr is short for viral protein R, where R is undefined.
Infections with bacteria of the family FLAVOBACTERIACEAE.
The determination of the pattern of genes expressed at the level of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION, under specific circumstances or in a specific cell.
The process of cumulative change at the level of DNA; RNA; and PROTEINS, over successive generations.
Transport proteins that carry specific substances in the blood or across cell membranes.
Nonsusceptibility of bacteria to the action of the beta-lactam antibiotics. Mechanisms responsible for beta-lactam resistance may be degradation of antibiotics by BETA-LACTAMASES, failure of antibiotics to penetrate, or low-affinity binding of antibiotics to targets.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.
Enzymes which catalyze the hydrolysis of carboxylic acid esters with the formation of an alcohol and a carboxylic acid anion.
A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that causes rotting, particularly of storage tissues, of a wide variety of plants and causes a vascular disease in CARROTS; and POTATO plants.
The usually underground portions of a plant that serve as support, store food, and through which water and mineral nutrients enter the plant. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982; Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)
A type of strength-building exercise program that requires the body muscle to exert a force against some form of resistance, such as weight, stretch bands, water, or immovable objects. Resistance exercise is a combination of static and dynamic contractions involving shortening and lengthening of skeletal muscles.
An enzyme that catalyzes the deamination of PHENYLALANINE to form trans-cinnamate and ammonia.
A plant species of the family FABACEAE that yields edible seeds, the familiar peanuts, which contain protein, oil and lectins.
The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.
A plant genus in the family VITACEAE, order Rhamnales, subclass Rosidae. It is a woody vine cultivated worldwide. It is best known for grapes, the edible fruit and used to make WINE and raisins.
Infections or infestations with parasitic organisms. They are often contracted through contact with an intermediate vector, but may occur as the result of direct exposure.
Any of the hormones produced naturally in plants and active in controlling growth and other functions. There are three primary classes: auxins, cytokinins, and gibberellins.
A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that may be pathogenic for frogs, fish, and mammals, including man. In humans, cellulitis and diarrhea can result from infection with this organism.
Common name of the order Siluriformes. This order contains many families and over 2,000 species, including venomous species. Heteropneustes and Plotosus genera have dangerous stings and are aggressive. Most species are passive stingers.
Substances that prevent infectious agents or organisms from spreading or kill infectious agents in order to prevent the spread of infection.
An order of insects, restricted mostly to the tropics, containing at least eight families. A few species occur in temperate regions of North America.
A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.
Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.
A class of plasmids that transfer antibiotic resistance from one bacterium to another by conjugation.
The salts or esters of salicylic acids, or salicylate esters of an organic acid. Some of these have analgesic, antipyretic, and anti-inflammatory activities by inhibiting prostaglandin synthesis.
A test used to determine whether or not complementation (compensation in the form of dominance) will occur in a cell with a given mutant phenotype when another mutant genome, encoding the same mutant phenotype, is introduced into that cell.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Mutagenesis where the mutation is caused by the introduction of foreign DNA sequences into a gene or extragenic sequence. This may occur spontaneously in vivo or be experimentally induced in vivo or in vitro. Proviral DNA insertions into or adjacent to a cellular proto-oncogene can interrupt GENETIC TRANSLATION of the coding sequences or interfere with recognition of regulatory elements and cause unregulated expression of the proto-oncogene resulting in tumor formation.
A class of unsegmented helminths with fundamental bilateral symmetry and secondary triradiate symmetry of the oral and esophageal structures. Many species are parasites.
The relationship between an invertebrate and another organism (the host), one of which lives at the expense of the other. Traditionally excluded from definition of parasites are pathogenic BACTERIA; FUNGI; VIRUSES; and PLANTS; though they may live parasitically.
The mating of plants or non-human animals which are closely related genetically.
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
Processes occurring in various organisms by which new genes are copied. Gene duplication may result in a MULTIGENE FAMILY; supergenes or PSEUDOGENES.
The co-inheritance of two or more non-allelic GENES due to their being located more or less closely on the same CHROMOSOME.
An order of fungi in the phylum ASCOMYCOTA that includes a number of species which are parasitic on higher plants, insects, or fungi. Other species are saprotrophic.
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of genetic processes or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
Screening techniques first developed in yeast to identify genes encoding interacting proteins. Variations are used to evaluate interplay between proteins and other molecules. Two-hybrid techniques refer to analysis for protein-protein interactions, one-hybrid for DNA-protein interactions, three-hybrid interactions for RNA-protein interactions or ligand-based interactions. Reverse n-hybrid techniques refer to analysis for mutations or other small molecules that dissociate known interactions.
A plant genus in the family ROSACEAE, order Rosales, subclass Rosidae. It is best known as a source of the edible fruit (apple) and is cultivated in temperate climates worldwide.
A 170-kDa transmembrane glycoprotein from the superfamily of ATP-BINDING CASSETTE TRANSPORTERS. It serves as an ATP-dependent efflux pump for a variety of chemicals, including many ANTINEOPLASTIC AGENTS. Overexpression of this glycoprotein is associated with multidrug resistance (see DRUG RESISTANCE, MULTIPLE).
A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.
Nonsusceptibility of a microbe to the action of ampicillin, a penicillin derivative that interferes with cell wall synthesis.
A constitution or condition of the body which makes the tissues react in special ways to certain extrinsic stimuli and thus tends to make the individual more than usually susceptible to certain diseases.
Nonsusceptibility of bacteria to the action of CHLORAMPHENICOL, a potent inhibitor of protein synthesis in the 50S ribosomal subunit where amino acids are added to nascent bacterial polypeptides.
A species of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria isolated from soil and the stems, leafs, and roots of plants. Some biotypes are pathogenic and cause the formation of PLANT TUMORS in a wide variety of higher plants. The species is a major research tool in biotechnology.
The genetic process of crossbreeding between genetically dissimilar parents to produce a hybrid.
Partial cDNA (DNA, COMPLEMENTARY) sequences that are unique to the cDNAs from which they were derived.
The regular and simultaneous occurrence in a single interbreeding population of two or more discontinuous genotypes. The concept includes differences in genotypes ranging in size from a single nucleotide site (POLYMORPHISM, SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE) to large nucleotide sequences visible at a chromosomal level.
One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.
A sequence of amino acids in a polypeptide or of nucleotides in DNA or RNA that is similar across multiple species. A known set of conserved sequences is represented by a CONSENSUS SEQUENCE. AMINO ACID MOTIFS are often composed of conserved sequences.
The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.
Any of the various plants of the genus Lactuca, especially L. sativa, cultivated for its edible leaves. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)
A plant genus of the family POACEAE. The grain is used for FOOD and for ANIMAL FEED. This should not be confused with KAFFIR LIME or with KEFIR milk product.
The gourd plant family of the order Violales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida. It is sometimes placed in its own order, Cucurbitales. 'Melon' generally refers to CUCUMIS; CITRULLUS; or MOMORDICA.
A plant species of the family POACEAE that is widely cultivated for its edible seeds.
DNA constructs that are composed of, at least, a REPLICATION ORIGIN, for successful replication, propagation to and maintenance as an extra chromosome in bacteria. In addition, they can carry large amounts (about 200 kilobases) of other sequence for a variety of bioengineering purposes.
Polysaccharides composed of repeating glucose units. They can consist of branched or unbranched chains in any linkages.
A naphthacene antibiotic that inhibits AMINO ACYL TRNA binding during protein synthesis.
Mapping of the linear order of genes on a chromosome with units indicating their distances by using methods other than genetic recombination. These methods include nucleotide sequencing, overlapping deletions in polytene chromosomes, and electron micrography of heteroduplex DNA. (From King & Stansfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 5th ed)
Prolonged dry periods in natural climate cycle. They are slow-onset phenomena caused by rainfall deficit combined with other predisposing factors.
The detection of RESTRICTION FRAGMENT LENGTH POLYMORPHISMS by selective PCR amplification of restriction fragments derived from genomic DNA followed by electrophoretic analysis of the amplified restriction fragments.
RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.
Extrachromosomal, usually CIRCULAR DNA molecules that are self-replicating and transferable from one organism to another. They are found in a variety of bacterial, archaeal, fungal, algal, and plant species. They are used in GENETIC ENGINEERING as CLONING VECTORS.
Viruses parasitic on plants higher than bacteria.
Infections with bacteria of the genus SERRATIA.
A large stout-bodied, sometimes anadromous, TROUT found in still and flowing waters of the Pacific coast from southern California to Alaska. It has a greenish back, a whitish belly, and pink, red, or lavender stripes on the sides, with usually a sprinkling of black dots. It is highly regarded as a sport and food fish. Its former name was Salmo gairdneri. The sea-run rainbow trouts are often called steelheads. Redband trouts refer to interior populations of rainbows.
Single-stranded complementary DNA synthesized from an RNA template by the action of RNA-dependent DNA polymerase. cDNA (i.e., complementary DNA, not circular DNA, not C-DNA) is used in a variety of molecular cloning experiments as well as serving as a specific hybridization probe.
One of the mechanisms by which CELL DEATH occurs (compare with NECROSIS and AUTOPHAGOCYTOSIS). Apoptosis is the mechanism responsible for the physiological deletion of cells and appears to be intrinsically programmed. It is characterized by distinctive morphologic changes in the nucleus and cytoplasm, chromatin cleavage at regularly spaced sites, and the endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA; (DNA FRAGMENTATION); at internucleosomal sites. This mode of cell death serves as a balance to mitosis in regulating the size of animal tissues and in mediating pathologic processes associated with tumor growth.
A strong oxidizing agent used in aqueous solution as a ripening agent, bleach, and topical anti-infective. It is relatively unstable and solutions deteriorate over time unless stabilized by the addition of acetanilide or similar organic materials.
The functional hereditary units of BACTERIA.
A large increase in oxygen uptake by neutrophils and most types of tissue macrophages through activation of an NADPH-cytochrome b-dependent oxidase that reduces oxygen to a superoxide. Individuals with an inherited defect in which the oxidase that reduces oxygen to superoxide is decreased or absent (GRANULOMATOUS DISEASE, CHRONIC) often die as a result of recurrent bacterial infections.
Specific regions that are mapped within a GENOME. Genetic loci are usually identified with a shorthand notation that indicates the chromosome number and the position of a specific band along the P or Q arm of the chromosome where they are found. For example the locus 6p21 is found within band 21 of the P-arm of CHROMOSOME 6. Many well known genetic loci are also known by common names that are associated with a genetic function or HEREDITARY DISEASE.
The level of protein structure in which combinations of secondary protein structures (alpha helices, beta sheets, loop regions, and motifs) pack together to form folded shapes called domains. Disulfide bridges between cysteines in two different parts of the polypeptide chain along with other interactions between the chains play a role in the formation and stabilization of tertiary structure. Small proteins usually consist of only one domain but larger proteins may contain a number of domains connected by segments of polypeptide chain which lack regular secondary structure.
A parasexual process in BACTERIA; ALGAE; FUNGI; and ciliate EUKARYOTA for achieving exchange of chromosome material during fusion of two cells. In bacteria, this is a uni-directional transfer of genetic material; in protozoa it is a bi-directional exchange. In algae and fungi, it is a form of sexual reproduction, with the union of male and female gametes.
Non-susceptibility of a microbe to the action of METHICILLIN, a semi-synthetic penicillin derivative.
A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria found in soil, water, food, and clinical specimens. It is a prominent opportunistic pathogen for hospitalized patients.
Proteins found in any species of fungus.
A commercially important species of SALMON in the family SALMONIDAE, order SALMONIFORMES, which occurs in the North Atlantic.
Genes that are introduced into an organism using GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUES.
A sequential pattern of amino acids occurring more than once in the same protein sequence.
A 51-amino acid pancreatic hormone that plays a major role in the regulation of glucose metabolism, directly by suppressing endogenous glucose production (GLYCOGENOLYSIS; GLUCONEOGENESIS) and indirectly by suppressing GLUCAGON secretion and LIPOLYSIS. Native insulin is a globular protein comprised of a zinc-coordinated hexamer. Each insulin monomer containing two chains, A (21 residues) and B (30 residues), linked by two disulfide bonds. Insulin is used as a drug to control insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (DIABETES MELLITUS, TYPE 1).
A variety of simple repeat sequences that are distributed throughout the GENOME. They are characterized by a short repeat unit of 2-8 basepairs that is repeated up to 100 times. They are also known as short tandem repeats (STRs).
The presence of two or more genetic loci on the same chromosome. Extensions of this original definition refer to the similarity in content and organization between chromosomes, of different species for example.
Molecules or ions formed by the incomplete one-electron reduction of oxygen. These reactive oxygen intermediates include SINGLET OXYGEN; SUPEROXIDES; PEROXIDES; HYDROXYL RADICAL; and HYPOCHLOROUS ACID. They contribute to the microbicidal activity of PHAGOCYTES, regulation of signal transduction and gene expression, and the oxidative damage to NUCLEIC ACIDS; PROTEINS; and LIPIDS.
Non-susceptibility of an organism to the action of the cephalosporins.
The systematic study of the complete DNA sequences (GENOME) of organisms.
A bacteriostatic antibiotic macrolide produced by Streptomyces erythreus. Erythromycin A is considered its major active component. In sensitive organisms, it inhibits protein synthesis by binding to 50S ribosomal subunits. This binding process inhibits peptidyl transferase activity and interferes with translocation of amino acids during translation and assembly of proteins.

Trichothecenes in cereal grains. (1/759)

Trichothecenes are sesquiterpenoid mycotoxins associated with fusarium head blight (FHB) of cereals, with worldwide economic and health impacts. While various management strategies have been proposed to reduce the mycotoxin risk, breeding towards FHB-resistance appears to be the most effective means to manage the disease, and reduce trichothecene contamination of cereal-based food products. This review provides a brief summary of the trichothecene synthesis in Fusarium species, their toxicity in plants and humans, followed by the current methods of screening and breeding for resistance to FHB and trichothecene accumulation.  (+info)

Calcium signaling during the plant-plant interaction of parasitic Cuscuta reflexa with its hosts. (2/759)

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A single dominant locus, ren4, confers rapid non-race-specific resistance to grapevine powdery mildew. (3/759)

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Development of a host-induced RNAi system in the wheat stripe rust fungus Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici. (4/759)

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The genetic basis of resistance to downy mildew in Cucumis spp.--latest developments and prospects. (5/759)

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Molecular cloning of ATR5(Emoy2) from Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis, an avirulence determinant that triggers RPP5-mediated defense in Arabidopsis. (6/759)

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Resistance to Tomato yellow leaf curl virus accumulation in the tomato wild relative Solanum habrochaites associated with the C4 viral protein. (7/759)

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Population genetics of malaria resistance in humans. (8/759)

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Plant activators induce defense responses in plants, which can prevent or slow pathogen infection and some of these products have been reported to enhance yield. This project tested several activators labeled for use in NY to determine whether induction of defense response pathways could be followed in the field and whether these product could be utilized in a manner that if there is any yield improvement or efficacy against common tomato diseases. While we did not see a yield enhancement using products that are suggested to increase yield, we did see encouraging results for disease control. We found that one class of activators (the SAR-inducing type) controlled bacterial speck of tomato without negatively affecting yield. The ISR-inducing activator failed to provide protection from bacterial diseases. Also, this compound produced inconsistent growth enhancement over several field seasons and it is not clear whether this type of compound (ISR-inducing) provides yield enhancement. Based on these ...
Plant disease resistance (R) genes trigger innate immune responses upon pathogen attack. RAR1 is an early convergence point in a signaling pathway engaged by multiple R genes. Here, we show that RAR1 interacts with plant orthologs of the yeast protein SGT1, an essential regulator in the cell cycle. Silencing the barley geneSgt1 reveals its role in R gene-triggered,Rar1-dependent disease resistance. SGT1 associates with SKP1 and CUL1, subunits of the SCF (Skp1-Cullin-F-box) ubiquitin ligase complex. Furthermore, the RAR1-SGT1 complex also interacts with two COP9 signalosome components. The interactions among RAR1, SGT1, SCF, and signalosome subunits indicate a link between disease resistance and ubiquitination. ...
Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions 27:196-206...Vivianne G. A. A. Vleeshouwers1 and Richard P. Oliver2...© 2014 The American Phytopathological Society...One of most important challenges in plant breeding is improving resistance to the plethora of pathogens that threaten our crops. The ever-growing world population, changing pathogen populations, and fungicide resistance issues have increased the urgency of this task. In addition to a vital inflow o...
A $3.6 million grant from the National Science Foundation will support a new research project aimed at pinpointing the genes that confer disease resistance in cacao. The ultimate goal of the four-year study is to develop a new approach that plant scientists and breeders can use to identify the genetic basis for disease resistance in a variety of perennial crops.
Disease resistance genes (R genes), as part of the plant defense system, have coevolved with corresponding pathogen molecules. The main objectives of this project were to identify non-Toll interleukin receptor, nucleotide-binding site, leucine-rich repeat (nTNL) genes and elucidate their evolutionary divergence across six plant genomes. Using reference sequences from Arabidopsis, we investigated nTNL orthologs in the genomes of common bean, Medicago, soybean, poplar, and rice. We used Hidden Markov Models for sequence identification, performed model-based phylogenetic analyses, visualized chromosomal positioning, inferred gene clustering, and assessed gene expression profiles. We analyzed 908 nTNL R genes in the genomes of the six plant species, and classified them into 12 subgroups based on the presence of coiled-coil (CC), nucleotide binding site (NBS), leucine rich repeat (LRR), resistance to Powdery mildew 8 (RPW8), and BED type zinc finger domains. Traditionally classified CC-NBS-LRR (CNL) genes
Plants have evolved a sophisticated innate immune system to recognize invading pathogens and to induce a set of host defense mechanisms resulting in disease resistance. Pathogen recognition is often mediated by plant disease resistance (R) proteins that respond specifically to one or a few pathogen- …
A method for determining improved innate immunity, disease resistance or performance in animals is disclosed. The method involves assays for a genetic differences in the NRAMP1 gene of the animal which is associated with superior disease resistance. Novel NRAMP1 sequence, assays, and compositions for identifying the presence of absence of these alleles are provided.
In human pathophysiology, the clash between microbial sponsor and infection immunity plays a part in multiple diseases. the primitive CF lung, particularly concentrating on the part of sponsor versus bacterial elements; (ii) critical, neutrophil-derived innate immune effectors that are implicated in CF pulmonary disease, including reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antimicrobial peptides (e.g., LL-37); (iii) virulence factors and adaptive mutations that enable evasion of the host response; and (iv) ongoing work examining the distribution and colocalization of host and bacterial factors within distinct anatomical niches of the CF lung. and and studies. Wherein the latter have been augmented by the relatively recent development of the CF ferret and pig models (21,C23), most animal work within the field has continued, primarily in mouse models (24). Additionally, translational work using bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and immune cells obtained directly from CF patients has added significantly to ...
Pris: 608,-. E-bok, 2012. Leveres direkte via nedlastning . Kjøp boken Disease Resistance in Plants av J.E. Vanderplank (ISBN 9780323161985) hos Adlibris.com. Fri frakt.
Nielsen, M.T.; Legg, P.D.; Litton, C.C., 1985: Effects of 2 introgressed disease resistance factors on agronomic characteristics and certain chemical components in burley tobacco nicotiana tabacum
Biomarkers have proved to be useful for the diagnosis and prognosis of many diseases, and over the years. Our research focuses on the identification of biomarkers for natural disease resistance, including research on monitoring of specific treatments and effects on the innate immune system such as natural antibodies and investigations of trained immunity.
Strong disease resistance, consistent performance and good grain quality are key attributes looked for by winter wheat growers and these are highlighted
Alfalfa Disease Resistance Index (DRI) How it is Calculated and Used in Variety Selection By Don Miller, Alforex Seeds Over the last half century alfalfa breeders have … ...
The ultimate aim of plant genetics is to understand completely how genotype controls phenotype and this information can then be transferred to plant breeders in a way they can easily access and use.
A new study uses genomics to show that fusions of plant immune receptors and other protein domains occur in significant numbers. This finding will generate many new research hypotheses and provide new opportunities for breeding resistant plant varieties. Please see related Research article: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12915-016-0228-7
: Re-blooming, slightly fragrant Rambler of intense colour and excellent disease resistance. Due to moderate vigour well-suited for presentation in containers and utilization in smaller gardens. Addition to our popular SILUETTA assortment.
תקציר בעברית: הערים בהן אנו חיים משתנות ללא הרף. מאמר זה מתמקד בשימוש הגובר בטכנולוגיות מידע והשפעתן על פרטיות התושבים בעיר בחיי
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Specific disease resistance of Arabidopsis thaliana against the Hyaloperonospora parasitica isolate Hiks1 (HpHiks1) is mediated by RPP7. Although this disease resistance gene encodes a typical nucleotide binding site leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) disease resistance protein, its function is independent of the defense hormone salicylic acid and most known genes required for plant immune responses. We identified EDM2 (enhanced downy mildew 2) in a genetic screen for RPP7 suppressors. Mutations of EDM2 phenocopy RPP7 mutations, but do not affect other tested disease resistance genes. We isolated EDM2 by map-based cloning. The predicted EDM2 protein is structurally unrelated to previously identified components of the plant immune system, bears typical features of transcriptional regulators, including plant homeodomain (PHD)-finger-like domains, and defines a plant-specific protein family. In edm2 mutants both constitutive and HpHiks1-induced RPP7 transcript levels are reduced, suggesting that EDM2 is ...
To investigate the role of N-terminal domains of plant disease resistance proteins in membrane targeting, the N termini of a number of Arabidopsis and flax disease resistance proteins were fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) and the fusion proteins localized in planta using confocal microscopy. …
Plant disease resistance protects plants from pathogens in two ways: by pre-formed structures and chemicals, and by infection-induced responses of the immune system. Relative to a susceptible plant, disease resistance is the reduction of pathogen growth on or in the plant (and hence a reduction of disease), while the term disease tolerance describes plants that exhibit little disease damage despite substantial pathogen levels. Disease outcome is determined by the three-way interaction of the pathogen, the plant and the environmental conditions (an interaction known as the disease triangle). Defense-activating compounds can move cell-to-cell and systemically through the plant vascular system. However, plants do not have circulating immune cells, so most cell types exhibit a broad suite of antimicrobial defenses. Although obvious qualitative differences in disease resistance can be observed when multiple specimens are compared (allowing classification as resistant or susceptible after ...
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A method for promoting plant growth and/or disease resistance comprising applying a purified polypeptide that is a bacteriocin and that possesses plant growth and/or disease resistance promoting activ
Plants have an immune system that resists infection, yet 10% of the worlds agricultural production is lost annually to diseases caused by bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Understanding how disease resistance works may help combat this scourge.
Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a powerful reverse genetics technology used to unravel the functions of genes. It uses viruses as vectors to carry targeted plant genes. The virus vector is used to induce RNA-mediated silencing of a gene or genes in the host plant. The process of silencing is triggered by dsRNA molecules, the mechanism is explained in this chapter. Over the years a large number of viruses have been modified for use as VIGS vectors and a list of these vectors is also included. As the name suggests, virus-induced gene silencing uses the host plants natural defense mechanisms against viral infection to silence plant genes. VIGS is methodologically simple and is widely used to determine gene functions, including disease resistance, abiotic stress, biosynthesis of secondary metabolites and signal transduction pathways. Here, we made an attempt to describe the basic underlying molecular mechanism of VIGS, the methodology and various experimental requirements, as well as its ...
Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of Breeding for disease resistance by editing plant susceptibility genes. Together they form a unique fingerprint. ...
TY - CHAP. T1 - Improvement of chicken disease resistance by haemopoietic cytokines. AU - Boyd, Richard L. AU - Siatskas, C. PY - 1997. Y1 - 1997. M3 - Chapter (Book). SN - 1 898099 09X. SP - 463. EP - 474. BT - Perspectives in Avian Endocrinology. PB - Society for Endocrinology. CY - Bristol UK. ER - ...
Post-Doctoral Fellow, *Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, *Lunenfeld Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mt. Sinai Hospital, Toronto, *Department of Laboratory Medicine & Pathobiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto ...
Schneider has always embraced the concept of mission oriented research, i.e. conducting whatever research was necessary in order to solve recalcitrant disease problems affecting the commodities for which he assumed responsibility in order to provide disease management solutions - in short, conducting basic research on applied problems. Most of Schneiders fundamental research achievements were funded by commodity groups because he was able to relate to producers why it was important to understand, for example, the genetic mechanisms by which new races or biotypes arose. This information was necessary in order to develop effective disease resistance breeding programs and to determine how best to deploy resistance genes. For example, if there was no evidence for sexual recombination and reproduction, then new varieties could be released without fear of these varieties succumbing to the disease in the near future. Furthermore, these findings meant that breeders could use a few carefully selected ...
The research has opened up the possibility in the future that bacteria could be used as soil probiotics to protect plants from pathogens
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García-Espinosa, R., Breeding for Horizontal Resistance in Bean: An example from Mexico. About six years ago, a comprehensive horizontal resistance breeding programme in bean was started for the Mixteca region in Mexico. The programme selected bean, since it is one of Mexicos major food crops and protein sources. However, due to diseases, the crop is no longer profitable and has tended to be abandoned by farmers in Mixteca.
The diagnosis of comorbidities, which refers to the coexistence of different acute and chronic diseases, is difficult due to the modern extreme specialisation of physicians. We envisage that a software dedicated to comorbidity diagnosis could result in an effective aid to the health practice. We have developed an R software comoR to compute novel estimators of the disease comorbidity associations. Starting from an initial diagnosis, genetic and clinical data of a patient the software identifies the risk of disease comorbidity. Then it provides a pipeline with different causal inference packages (e.g. pcalg, qtlnet etc) to predict the causal relationship of diseases. It also provides a pipeline with network regression and survival analysis tools (e.g. Net-Cox, rbsurv etc) to predict more accurate survival probability of patients. The input of this software is the initial diagnosis for a patient and the output provides evidences of disease comorbidity mapping. The functions of the comoR offer flexibility
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A team of University of Kentucky researchers, led by plant pathologists Pradeep and Aardra Kachroo, has discovered an important component in plants’ ability to resist bacterial and viral pathogens.
Current Feedstuffs Subscribers: Online and mobile access are now included at no charge to you. To read this article, use your subscriber email and password to log-in to your account (or contact us for assistance in updating your account.). ...
Seed Company Catalogues checked in 2011. F=Fedco; HS = Harris Seeds; H = High Mowing Organic; HO = Holmes; JO = Johnnys; RU = Rupps; SW = Seedway; SI = Sieger; ST = Stokes; T = Takii; TR = Territorial; TT = Totally Tomato ...
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Like all businesses, Chippers is responding to and operating based on the latest Covid-19 information from our state and national…. ...
Specific responses to PM among the most resistant Central Asian accessions (a) Multiple factor analysis (MFA) of the seven PM-partially resistant genotypes usin
Author: Harbans Bariana, University of Sydney Date: 5th February, 2019 A new method to take genetic material from wild plants to boost the disease resistance of food crops is the outcome of an international collaboration. Professor Harbans Bariana from the Sydney Institute of Agriculture. A global alliance of resea
In our daily life we require different vitamins, minerals, and many other supplementary foods to boost up our immune system and be protected from multiple diseases. ...
Study of the untoward effects associated with the comorbidity of multiple diseases on brain morphology requires identifying differences across multiple diagnostic groupings. To identify such effects...
Researchers have generated chickens and pigs in which target genes in desired organs can be efficiently altered to study molecular mechanisms of disease resistance or biomedical issues.
Our best garlic variety for braiding. Can be stored for up to 9 months. A strong, pungent type with excellent flavor. Very fine for cooking and extremely productive. Also exhibits good disease resistance. Found to be extremely winter hardy and stores well.
Tumors consist of many individual cells that evolve and mutate as the disease progresses, so it is essential to understand exactly how different each cell is...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Chromosome location, linkage with simple sequence repeat markers, and leaf rust resistance conditioned by gene Lr63 in wheat. AU - Kolmer, J. A.. AU - Anderson, J. A.. AU - Flor, J. M.. PY - 2010/11. Y1 - 2010/11. N2 - RL6137, a Thatcher backcross line of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) has resistance to Puccinia triticina (causal agent of wheat leaf rust) derived from T. monococcum. To determine the chromosome location of this resistance, RL6137 was crossed with Thatcher and F2 individual seedlings were tested for segregation of leaf rust resistance and segregation of polymorphic simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Leaf rust resistance genotypes of F2 individuals were confirmed with segregation of F3 families. The F2 seedlings and F3 families segregated for a single leaf rust resistance gene. The SSR markers barc 57 and barc 321 located on chromosome 3AS were tightly linked with the leaf rust resistance gene. The leaf rust resistance gene in RL6137 was designated as Lr63. This ...
Hypersensitive adult plant resistance genes Lr48 and Lr49 were named based on their genetic independence of the known adult plant resistance genes. This study was planned to determine genomic locations of these genes. Recombinant inbred line populations derived from crosses involving CSP44 and VL404, sources of Lr48 and Lr49, respectively, and the susceptible parent WL711, were used to determine the genomic locations of these genes. Bulked segregant analyses were performed using multiplex-ready PCR technology. Lr48 in genotype CSP44 was mapped on chromosome arm 2BS flanked by marker loci Xgwm429b (6.1 cM) and Xbarc7 (7.3 cM) distally and proximally, respectively. Leaf rust resistance gene Lr13, carried by the alternate parent WL711, was proximal to Lr48 and was flanked by Xksm58 (5.1 cM) and Xstm773-2 (8.7 cM). Lr49 was flanked by Xbarc163 (8.1 cM) and Xwmc349 (10.1 cM) on chromosome arm 4BL. The likely presence of the durable leaf rust resistance gene Lr34 in both CSP44 and VL404 was confirmed ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Diuretics Prime Plant Immunity in Arabidopsis thaliana. AU - Noutoshi, Yoshiteru. AU - Ikeda, Mika. AU - Shirasu, Ken. PY - 2012/10/29. Y1 - 2012/10/29. N2 - Plant activators are agrochemicals that activate the plant immune system, thereby enhancing disease resistance. Due to their prophylactic and durable effects on a wide spectrum of diseases, plant activators can provide synergistic crop protection when used in combination with traditional pest controls. Although plant activators have achieved great success in wet-rice farming practices in Asia, their use is still limited. To isolate novel plant activators applicable to other crops, we screened a chemical library using a method that can selectively identify immune-priming compounds. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of three diuretics, bumetanide, bendroflumethiazide and clopamide, as immune-priming compounds. These drugs upregulate the immunity-related cell death of Arabidopsis suspension-cultured cells ...
Synthetic hexaploid wheats (SHWs) are an important component of the breeding programs of the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT). CIMMYT germplasm is the most important source of genetic resources for wheat breeding programs in Iran, but their utilization has to be examined prior to their incorporation into breeding programs. This study was conducted to evaluate the resistance of 128 CIMMYT SHWs to septoria tritici blotch (STB), a destructive wheat disease caused by Zymoseptoria tritici. Wheat seedlings were inoculated with Z. tritici spores in the greenhouse, kept at 20-22ºC and scored 21 days post inoculation by estimating the percentage of necrotic lesions bearing pycnidia. Inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers revealed that 11 Z. tritici isolates had high genetic variability. The isolates varied in their virulence towards SHWs. Among all interactions (n=1408), 304 resistance responses were identified. Of 128 genotypes, 60 synthetic hexaploid wheat genotypes showed no
A South African Research Chairs Initiative (SARChI) chair has been awarded in the Department of Plant Sciences at the University of the Free State (UFS). The chair will be headed by Prof Maryke Labuschagne, and will focus on crop quality breeding and disease resistance in field crops. The disease resistance research by the chair will be headed by Prof Zakkie Pretorius. The disease resistance breeding will be a continuation of the internationally-acclaimed wheat rust research that Prof Pretorius has been conducting during his career. The quality breeding will focus on crop protein quantity and quality as well as on iron, zinc, and beta carotene biofortification of staple crops such as wheat, maize, and cassava. Prof Labuschagne believes that food security is one of the key factors for stability and prosperity on the continent. Her research and that of her students focuses on the genetic improvement of food security crops in Africa, including such staples as maize and cassava. These crops are ...
Plant disease resistance governed by quantitative trait loci (QTL) is predicted to be effective against a broad spectrum of pathogens and long lasting. Use of these QTL to improve crop species, however, is hindered because the genes contributing to the trait are not known. Five disease resistance QTL that colocalized with defense response genes were accumulated by marker-aided selection to develop blast-resistant varieties. One advanced backcross line carrying the major-effect QTL on chromosome (chr) 8, which included a cluster of 12 germin-like protein (OsGLP) gene members, exhibited resistance to rice (Oryza sativa) blast disease over 14 cropping seasons. To determine if OsGLP members contribute to resistance and if the resistance was broad spectrum, a highly conserved portion of the OsGLP coding region was used as an RNA interference trigger to silence a few to all expressed chr 8 OsGLP family members. Challenge with two different fungal pathogens (causal agents of rice blast and sheath ...
Fungal Resistance of Particleboard Made Using Glutardialdehyde Modified Corn Starch as the Binder with the Aid of Urea Formaldehyde Resin
Phytoalexins are low molecular weight antimicrobial compounds that are produced by plants as a response to biotic and abiotic stresses. The rapidity and extent of their accumulation is determined by their release of immediate precursors from conjugates or de novo synthesis, as well as detoxification as a result of plant or microbial enzymes. The rapidity of phytoalexin accumulation is associated with resistance in plants to diseases caused by fungi and bacteria, although the genetic information for phytoalexin synthesis is found in susceptible and resistant plants. Phytoalexins are only one component of the complex mechanisms for disease resistance in plants.
Control of common scab disease can be reached by resistant cultivars or suppressive soils. Both mechanisms are likely to translate into particular potato microbiome profiles, but the relative importance of each is not known. Here, microbiomes of bulk and tuberosphere soil and of potato periderm were studied in one resistant and one susceptible cultivar grown in a conducive and a suppressive field. Disease severity was suppressed similarly by both means yet, the copy numbers of txtB gene (coding for a pathogenicity determinant) were similar in both soils but higher in periderms of the susceptible cultivar from conducive soil. Illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA genes for bacteria (completed by 16S rRNA microarray approach) and archaea, and of 18S rRNA genes for micro-eukarytes showed that in bacteria, the more important was the effect of cultivar and diversity decreased from resistant cultivar to bulk soil to susceptible cultivar. The major changes occurred in proportions of Actinobacteria, Chloroflexi, and
Interesting traits could be components of the innate immune systems associated with high/low immunologic responders which may be measured in blood/milk, but also specific metabolic indicator traits of microbiota . Furthermore Natural Antibodies (Nab) could potentially be defined as a parameter of humoral innate immunity at the effector level. A prerequisite for these indicator traits to qualify as a selection tool / marker is that they are heritable, quantifiable, stable at specific time points and locations and linked to genetic variation in disease resistance.. The objective of the programme Intestinal health and Disease resistance in cattle, pig and poultry is to develop and to validate tools/phenotypes/technologies for genetic improvement in robustness of animals. This will contribute to improvement of health and welfare of animals, reduction in losses due to environmental challenges, improvement of longevity and reduction in use of antibiotics/drugs.. ...
Citation: Viteri, D.M., Teran, H., Asencio-S.-Manzanera, M., Asencio, C., Porch Clay, T.G., Miklas, P.N., Singh, S. 2014. Progress in breeding Andean common bean for resistance to common bacerial blight. Crop Science. 54:2084-2092. Interpretive Summary: Common bacterial blight is a severe disease of common bean worldwide. Use of resistant cultivars is crucial for the control of this disease. The objectives of this research were to assess the progress made in breeding large-seeded Andean beans developed between 1974 and 2010, and then to determine their molecular markers composition for specific markers lined to bacterial blight resistance genes. Ten Andean and three Middle American common bacterial blight resistant beans and the susceptible cultivar Othello were evaluated in the greenhouse in 2011. Bacterial strains ARX8 and Xcp25 were used to inoculate primary and trifoliolate leaves. The Xcp25 strain caused more disease than ARX8 strain. Andean Montcalm with the SAP6 marker and USDK-CBB-15 ...
Investigating associations between Mhc and parasite prevalence is a common means of studying genetically determined disease resistance in wild animals. Until recently, positive associations between Mhc alleles and parasite prevalence had been taken as evidence of susceptibility to disease, while the potential for quantitative resistance (immuno-alleles that reduce the development of infection) has been largely neglected (see [21]). In this study, we incorporated a detailed investigation of avian malaria infection and analysis of Mhc class I genes in a wild great tit population, to understand the role that Mhc genes play in determining host resistance and susceptibility to Plasmodium infections. We found that the presence of two Mhc supertypes (defined based on functional properties of the ABS) was significantly associated with the probability of host infection with two congeneric Plasmodium species, but in contrasting manners. The direction of the association for one Mhc supertype was indicative ...
...Powdery mildew is a fungus that infects both crop and ornamental plant...Investigating mildew susceptibility in plants is not really a main res...Recently Grossniklaus and his team uncovered a mutant that they named...Pollination and fun...,Fertility,or,powdery,mildew,resistance?,biological,biology news articles,biology news today,latest biology news,current biology news,biology newsletters
The ketogenic diet was developed at John Hopkins hospital in the 1920s as a natural cure for epilepsy, when drugs failed. There is now promising new research showing that it could be a cure for multiple diseases.
Plant NBS-LRR -resistance genes tend to be found in clusters, which have been shown to be hot spots of genome variability. In melon, half of the 81 predicted NBS-LRR genes group in nine clusters, and a 1 Mb region on linkage group V contains the highest density of R-genes and presence/absence gene polymorphisms found in the melon genome. This region is known to contain the locus of Vat, an agronomically important gene that confers resistance to aphids. However, the presence of duplications makes the sequencing and annotation of R-gene clusters difficult, usually resulting in multi-gapped sequences with higher than average errors. A 1-Mb sequence that contains the largest NBS-LRR gene cluster found in melon was improved using a strategy that combines Illumina paired-end mapping and PCR-based gap closing. Unknown sequence was decreased by 70% while about 3,000 SNPs and small indels were corrected. As a result, the annotations of 18 of a total of 23 NBS-LRR genes found in this region were modified,
In a segregating homozygous F₂ population of bread wheat involving a leaf rust resistance gene Lr28 derived from Aegilops speltoides, six randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers, three each in coupling and repulsion phase were identified as linked to Lr28, mapped to a region spanning 32 cM including the locus. The F₂ and F₃ populations were studied in the phytotron challenged with the mo ...
Fungal Disease Resistance in Plants: Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, and Genetic Engineering (Crop Science) | Zamir K Punja, Zamir Punja | digital library Bookfi | BookFi - BookFinder. Download books for free. Find books
Feb. 4, 2015 - A new canola variety was recently registered claiming an intermediate reaction to clubroot pathotype 5x, as well as resistance to established clubroot pathotypes 2, 3, 5, 6 and 8. Based on Western Canada Canola/Rapeseed Recommending Committee protocol for clubroot disease resistance, seed that is resistant (R) shows less than 30 per cent infection based on a severity-by-incidence rating, and seed that is susceptible (S) will have more than 70 per cent infection. An intermediate (I) reaction is somewhere in the middle. A variety with intermediate reaction to 5x is not recommended on fields infected with the 5x pathotype. A minimum four-year rotation for canola is still recommended on these fields. An intermediate reaction to clubroot pathotype 5x is similar to MS or MR ratings for blackleg, and to the partial resistance rating for sclerotinia stem rot tolerance available in some varieties. It may take the edge off full-blown infection, but economic levels of damage may still occur. An
Due to sessility, plants rely on a complex, sophisticated, innate immune system to fight pathogen assaults. The activation of inducible defenses may bring about costs that can negatively affect fitness; therefore, plant immune system is usually suppressed or minimally expressed until induced in response to pathogen attack [1], [2]. Like immunity in invertebrate animals, the plant immune system enables the primary pathogen infection to induce lifelong enhanced resistance to the secondary infection. This common immune memory correlates with the so‐called cellular priming that renders more rapid and robust responses to secondary attacks to primed cells than to non‐primed cells [3], [4]. Defense priming can be induced by pathogen‐ or microbe‐associated molecular patterns (PAMPs or MAMPs, respectively), damage‐associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), pathogen effectors, wound stimuli, or treatments with some natural or synthetic compounds. This process has been recently proven pivotal to ...
Author: Parker, J.; Genre: Journal Article; Published in Print: 2019; Open Access; Title: Early Leads to Mechanisms of Plant Cultivar-Specific Disease Resistance
Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) play an essential role as one of the primary mutualistic plant?microbe symbioses. Oral presentation on mycorrhiza-mediated disease resistance. ...
2 to − 4.8%. Four susceptibility QTL were detected on Chrs.A7, D3, D5 and D8 based on the RDIs of the CSILs. The additive effect of the decrease in G. hirsutum cv. TM-1 resistance to V. dahliae D8092 ranged from 8.28 to 11.04 and the percentage of PV ranged from 2.3 to 4.1%. There were seven QTL for resistance to V. dahliae V991 on the At subgenome, which was more than the three found on the Dt subgenome ( Table 4). However, there was no significant difference between the numbers of resistance QTL on At and Dt subgenome chromosomes (P = 0.21) by chi-square test ( Table 4). The total additive effect and PV of the V.. dahliae V991 resistance QTL on the At subgenome chromosomes were − 61.63 and 16.6%, respectively, and the total additive effect and PV of those on the Dt subgenome were AG-014699 nmr − 25.06 and 6.3%, respectively. The values for the other two V. dahliae isolates were similar to those obtained for the V991 isolate. These results indicate that the resistance effects of the QTL ...
Scientists have identified possible resistance against Phytophora rot, a pathogen that costs U.S. soybean growers $250 million annually.
Stip disorder is officially found in New Mexico and Arizona-grown chile peppers. Stip disorder could be tied to a physiological disorder possibly combined with abiotic stress factors including hot temperatures. Stip may be linked to a calcium imbalance or deficiency - perhaps a different expression of a calcium imbalance. In the U.S., Stip disorder was found in Texas in 1975 and in California and Florida in the mid 1990s.
A Chinese rice field afflicted by rice blight (Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae), one of the diseases that the newly engineered rice crops successfully resisted.
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Glossy heavy leaves with a mild buttery taste. Multiple disease resistance for organic gardens. Resistant to Downy Mildew. No pesticides required. Matures in 65 days from transplants. Seeds are pelleted for easy handling, your seeds will go farther as well, less thinning. Great for the beginner gardener. Tip: sow seed
Open pollinated. 55 days. Tender lime green butter leaves quickly head up even in cold weather or in an unheated winter greenhouse. Kweik Lettuce , a old Dutch variety shows multiple disease resistance including mildew and sclerotinia. Sweet heads run 8
Almost every cultivated variety of potato is susceptible to late blight, except a genetically engineered variety developed in the late 2000s.
Principal Investigator:AOKI Takashi, Project Period (FY):1996 - 1998, Research Category:Grant-in-Aid for international Scientific Research, Section:University-to-University Cooperative Research, Research Field:General fisheries
The plants immune system can recognize whether a piece of RNA is an invader or not based on whether the RNA has a threaded bead-like structure at the end, say University of Tokyo researchers. Their finding provides an answer to the quarter-century-old question of why RNAs belonging to the plant escape its self-defense mechanism, paving the way for future biotechnological techniques to modify crops.
All plants can be injured by receiving too much water just the same as if they do not receive enough. Most insects and disease will not infest healthy trees. By not having the proper watering schedules for your particular landscape, your plants are susceptible to attacks from insects and disease. Basically, proper watering helps keep the plants immune system working properly. If planning a new landscape or working with a fairly young landscape, utilize all resources available to discover what watering requirements are necessary for each plant. Mature landscapes offer little opportunity to re-design watering zones or schedules. Talk to a professional about making watering changes. Once a landscape adapts to a particular schedule, stress may be induced if that schedule is changed. Remember, ALWAYS water the ENTIRE year. During warm dry spells in the winter, drag out your hose and give your landscape a good soaking.. ...
This is a disease that seems more than others an issue of our choice of variety. Some get it, and some dont. Now, it is easy to select the resistant cultivars, but sometimes you just want to have the type you want and are willing to work a bit for it. First off, a bit of culturing choices will help you win most of the battle. More to come…. ...
Researchers at the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture have sequenced the genome of the cassava, enabling them to better understand the genetic basis of the plants disease resistance, quality and crop maturity.
The Crane elastic resistance band set. Set of 5 high tensile strength and durable resistance bands (60x5 cm.) of different strengths. Each offers a smooth and consistent stretch to provide a force on the muscles to improve strength and help you shape and tone your body. Widely used in all kinds of exercise sports. Includes pouch for storage and decoration. Nylon and latex. ...
A common plant breeding procedure involves moving valuable traits, such as disease resistance, from wild relatives to crop varieties. To achieve this, breeders cross a wild variety to a crop variety. The result is called a hybrid, and it mixes genes from both parents. Most of the genes from the wild variety, however, are unsuited for agriculture and must be cast away. This is done by repeated crossing to the crop variety, coupled to selection for the trait of interest, a process called backcrossing that often requires as many as 10 years. This constitutes a dramatic bottleneck to developing new varieties. Therefore, shortening the development time is particularly critical in the face of unexpected crop challenges when human sustenance depends on the rapid development of new, improved varieties. This project addresses this need. It aims at developing a method for rapid deployment of useful traits into crops, using potato as the experimental system. The collaboration between University of ...
By Daisy A. Martinez, Ulrich E. Loening, and Margaret C. Graham. Abstract: Based on experimental data from laboratory and field, numerous authors have raised concern that exposure to glyphosate-based herbicides (GBHs) may pre-dispose crops to damage by microbial pathogens. In this review, we …. … read moreStudy: Impacts of glyphosate-based herbicides on disease resistance and health of crops: a review ...
The ATCC collection includes a variety of normal foreskin cell lines and cell lines representing multiple disease states, including Down syndrome.
Overview : Dr. Ali Hellani is a renowned Reproductive Geneticist with over 15 years of experience, particularly in Pre-Implantation Genetic Diagnosis. was the first scientist worldwide to diagnose multiple diseases on a single cell as well as the first to diagnose the whole set of chromosomes on a single cell. He is currently the first and only scientist to perform PGD on single gene disorders with direct HLA matching ...
Ticks are dangerous parasites. They can carry multiple diseases that can be very harmful to your cat. Get the facts and learn how to protect yourself and your pet.
In an early study which involved just 166 patients, a new experimental drug for Alzheimers disease has already exceeded high expectations.
Aston Martin is significantly expanding its vehicle engineering facilities with the opening of a cutting edge prototype and vehicle development base at the new MIRA Technology Park in Nuneaton, Warwickshire.
Fondation Mira : Accroissement de lautonomie de personnes handicapées et soutien à leur intégration sociale en fournissant des chiens développés et entraînés à répondre à leurs besoins en adaptation et réadaptation * ...
Knock Out roses, rose cultivars valued for their low maintenance and disease resistance, reach about 6 feet in height and width, though pruning yields a denser growth habit. Hardy in zones 5b through 9, the plants thrive throughout much of the United States with little care. With regular upkeep, Knock Out roses ...
A step up from the original Champion, Champion II has the same delicious flavor with much-improved disease resistance for easier gardening success. This garden favorite produces large yields of medium-sized fruits into the Fall ...
Low growing with distinctive mounded flowers, deep pink flowers with soft faded center blooms in abundance through the season. Disease resistance plant is easy to care for and combines well with other plants.
Seasoned cattlemen have long suspected a link between calf genetics and health, and a mounting body of research is proving them right. Uncovering that connection might lead to new tools for managing disease resistance.
... not only for immune system resistance to disease, but also smarter brains for learning skills in avoiding disease and selecting ... Intelligence as a disease-resistance sign[edit]. The number of people with severe cognitive impairment caused by childhood ... the effect is to select for superior intelligence that results in superior disease resistance.[citation needed] ... such as Alzheimer's disease.[72] For example, researchers associate the expanded TPJ region with Alzheimer's disease. However, ...
Begbie's disease, Flajani's disease, Flajani-Basedow syndrome, and Marsh's disease.[39] These names for the disease were ... a b c d e f g Basedow's syndrome or disease at Who Named It? - the history and naming of the disease ... Graves' disease[39][40] has also been called exophthalmic goiter.[40] Less commonly, it has been known as Parry's disease,[39][ ... Graves' disease, also known as toxic diffuse goiter, is an autoimmune disease that affects the thyroid.[1] It frequently ...
Thyroid hormone resistance. Calcium homeostasis disorders and Metabolic bone disease[edit]. *Parathyroid gland disorders * ... List of diseases[edit]. Glucose homeostasis disorders[edit]. *Diabetes *Type 1 Diabetes ... Types of disease[edit]. Broadly speaking, endocrine disorders may be subdivided into three groups:[1] ... Endocrine diseases are disorders of the endocrine system. The branch of medicine associated with endocrine disorders is known ...
"Antifungal Resistance". Fungal Diseases. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 22 June 2017. Bonnin, Alain; Vagner, Odile ... Skin disease diagnosis is difficult, as cultures collected from swabs and biopsies will test negative for fungus and a special ... A major phenotype and potential virulence factor that C. glabrata possesses is low-level intrinsic resistance to the azole ... C. glabrata is of special relevance in nosocomial infections due to its innately high resistance to antifungal agents, ...
Disease resistance. Potatoes with resistances to local pests and diseases could be helpful, especially in adapting to diseases ... Solanum verrucosum - a wild potato species with genes that give it good resistance to late blight. Sullu, an Andean potato ... As well as affecting potatoes directly, climate change is predicted to affect many potato pests and diseases. These include: ... Several pathogens causing potato blackleg disease (e.g. Dickeya) can grow and reproduce faster at higher temperatures and so ...
Tom Frieden, former director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, credits feedback from Styblo for leading ... CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link) Sir John Crofton (December 2009). "Fighting resistance". Bull. World Health Organ. 87 ( ... The International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases (IUATLD) instituted the Karel Styblo Public Health Prize after ... CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link) "About the Union Awards". International Union against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease. ...
... a serious vascular disease caused by a fungus, or the browning caused by anthracnose, a fairly minor leaf disease. Biotic ... Such induced resistance provides a mechanism whereby the costs of defence are avoided until defense is beneficial to the plant ... Garrett, K. A.; Dendy, S. P.; Frank, E. E.; Rouse, M. N.; Travers, S. E. (2006). "Climate Change Effects on Plant Disease: ... Losses to pests and disease in crop plants continue to pose a significant threat to agriculture and food security. During the ...
Contribution to models of disease[edit]. Inherited disease[edit]. BACs are now being utilized to a greater extent in modelling ... for antibiotic resistance; some BACs also have lacZ at the cloning site for blue/white selection.. T7 & Sp6. phage promoters ... BACs have been used to some degree of success with mice when studying neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's disease or as ... Infectious disease[edit]. The genomes of several large DNA viruses and RNA viruses have been cloned as BACs. These constructs ...
"ResistanceMap - Antibiotic Resistance". resistancemap.cddep.org. Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics & Policy. 2017. ... Resistance to other antibiotics was documented in some strains of S. aureus. In 1996, vancomycin resistance was reported in ... Antimicrobial resistance is genetically based; resistance is mediated by the acquisition of extrachromosomal genetic elements ... "Antibiotic Resistance Threats in the United States, 2013 - Antibiotic/Antimicrobial Resistance - CDC". 2019-05-07. This article ...
"Disease resistance terminology". Rev. Appl. Mycol. 48: 593-606. Robinson, R.A. (1971). "Vertical resistance". Rev. Plant. ... Robinson, R.A. (1982). "Theoretical resistance models". Durable Resistance in Crops. Plenum Press, New York and London. pp. 45- ... "Recurrent selection for quantitative resistance to soil-borne diseases in beans in the Mixteca region, Mexcico". Euphytica. 130 ... Robinson, R.A. (1973). "Horizontal resistance". Rev. Appl. Mycol. 52: 483-501. Robinson, R.A. (1974). "Terminal report of the ...
The worldwide emergence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance. Lancet Infectious Diseases. 6, 629-640 (2006). Martínez- ... Microbial Drug Resistance. 8, 281-289 (2002). Ruiz J. Mechanisms of resistance to quinolones: target alterations, decreased ... Clinical Infectious Diseases. 40 (9), 1333-1341 (2006). Erratum in: Clinical Infectious Diseases. 42 (12), 1819 (2006). Price ... Infectious Agents and Disease. 2 (4), 272-274 (1993). Zogaj X, Bokranz W, Nimtz M, Romling U. Production of cellulose and curli ...
Selected cultivars 'Amerika Touch-O-Pink' - large bracts, tinged pink; large leaves; good disease resistance. 'Appalachian ... The selection of healthy, disease-free planting stock is essential and transplanting trees from the forest should be avoided. ... Kay's Appalachian Mist' - stiff, creamy white bracts; red fall foliage; good resistance to powdery mildew. 'Plena' - double ... Micropropagation of flowering dogwood is now used in breeding programs aiming to incorporate resistance to dogwood anthracnose ...
The best method of control for eyespot disease is breeding for resistance. Currently the gene conferring resistance to eyespot ... Disease Resistance - Eyespot. Retrieved October 28, 2007, from [5] Archived 2007-10-09 at the Wayback Machine K-State Research ... Use of fungicide can be effective in the short term but is not a long term solution as the pathogen can develop resistance to ... Severe cases of the disease can reduce yield by up to 40%. It is most common in temperate regions such as North and South ...
"Antibiotic resistance 101". Retrieved 2011-10-25. Mathew, A.; et al. (2007). "Antibiotic Resistance in Bacteria Associated with ... They are used for disease treatment, disease prevention and control, and growth promotion. When used for growth promoting ... there is difficulty in transmitting resistance across genera and species). Bacterial antibiotic resistance is a process that ... Resistant bacteria and their genetic material that codes for resistance are not only found in food, but also the environment. ...
"Molecular Genetics of Mosquito Resistance to Malaria Parasites". In Sullivan, D; Krishna, S. (eds.). Malaria: Drugs, Disease, ... "The History of Malaria, an Ancient Disease". U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved 31 May 2016.. ... Nunn, C., Altizer, S. (2006). Infectious Diseases in Primates: Behavior, Ecology and Evolution (1 ed.). Oxford University Press ... Again, some species of Plasmodium can cause severe disease in some of these hosts, while many appear not to.[25] ...
Some confer resistance predominantly to ceftazidime, but OXA-17 confers greater resistance to cefotaxime and cefepime than it ... Infectious Diseases. 9 (4): 228-36. doi:10.1016/S1473-3099(09)70054-4. PMID 19324295. Cuzon G, Naas T, Nordmann P (February ... Resistance to non-beta-lactam antibiotics is common in strains making any of these enzymes, such that alternative options for ... Up to 90% of ampicillin resistance in E. coli is due to the production of TEM-1. Also responsible for the ampicillin and ...
Insulin resistance and hypertriglyceridemia occur. Calf muscular hypertrophy may occur. Type 5 is due to mutations in the AKT2 ... 2006). Andrews' Diseases of the Skin: clinical Dermatology. Saunders Elsevier. ISBN 978-0-7216-2921-6. Herbst KL, Tannock LR, ... Insulin resistance is common. Other conditions associated with this condition include acanthosis nigricans, fatty liver, ... There is an increased risk of coronary heart disease. Cardiomyopathy and muscular dystrophy may occur rarely. Xanthoma and nail ...
This is the more common process of insulin resistance, which leads to adult-onset diabetes. Another example can be seen in ... Kastan MB (2008). "DNA damage responses: mechanisms and roles in human disease: 2007 G.H.A. Clowes Memorial Award Lecture". Mol ... Wilcox, Gisela (2016-11-20). "Insulin and Insulin Resistance". Clinical Biochemist Reviews. 26 (2): 19-39. ISSN 0159-8090. PMC ... increasing the subject's resistance by decreasing sensitivity to this hormone.[citation needed] There is also a hepatic ...
Marteau P (2009). "Bacterial flora in inflammatory bowel disease". Digestive Diseases. 27 Suppl 1: 99-103. doi:10.1159/ ... Infection and Drug Resistance. 12: 1597-1615. doi:10.2147/IDR.S207572. PMC 6579870. PMID 31354309. "What is FMT? - The Fecal ... cardiovascular disease, and obesity. Dysbiosis has played a role in autoimmune diseases, allergies, and metabolic disorders. ... Many diseases, such as IBD, Type 2 Diabetes, Crohn's, and even allergies, are suggested to be due, in part, to an alteration in ...
"Tafenoquine Approved for Malaria Prophylaxis and Treatment". Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). 25 April 2019. ... Infection and Drug Resistance. 12: 553-570. doi:10.2147/IDR.S151031. PMC 6411314. PMID 30881061. " ...
Myers, Charles E (August 24, 2006). "Androgen Resistance, Part 1". Prostate Cancer Research Institute. Archived from the ... August 1, 2006). "Prostate Cancer: Metastatic and Advanced Disease". eMedicine. Retrieved January 11, 2007. ...
PPH is a serious complication of liver disease, present in 0.25 to 4% of all patients suffering from cirrhosis. Once an ... Pulmonary vascular resistance-PVR > 240 dynes s cm−5 . Pulmonary artery occlusion pressure- PAOP < 15mmHg or transpulmonary ... Structural and pathologic changes in lung vasculature in chronic liver disease. Clin Chest Med 1996; 17: 1 Matsubara, O; ... Moller, S; Henriksen, JH (28 January 2006). "Cardiopulmonary complications in chronic liver disease". World Journal of ...
Infectious Diseases Society of, America.; European Society for Microbiology and Infectious, Diseases. (1 March 2011). " ... In areas where there is a higher prevalence of fluoroquinolone resistance, it is useful to initiate treatment with a single ... A 2010 update by the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the European Society for Microbiology and Infectious Diseases ... A 2010 Update by the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the European Society for Microbiology and Infectious Diseases ...
Flag Smut of Wheat - Pathogen Biology and Host Resistance." Disease resistance in wheat. 1 ed. Wallingford, Oxfordshire: CABI, ... "Smut diseases G. Fuentes-Dávila, B.J. Goates, P. Thomas, J. Nielsen, B. Ballantyne." Smut diseases. N.p., n.d. Web. 22 Oct. ... The occurrence of the disease in the United States was limited to the Pacific Northwest and was the result of the introduction ... Carboxin is a commonly used fungicide on seeds, which works well to prevent onset of disease. In addition to seed treatments, ...
The imbalance of the macrophage types is related to a number of immunity-related diseases. For example, it has been shown that ... Mackaness GB (September 1962). "Cellular resistance to infection". The Journal of Experimental Medicine. 116 (3): 381-406. doi: ... Moreover, it is observed that macrophage states are changing during the time course of the inflammation and disease. This ... Liu YC, Zou XB, Chai YF, Yao YM (2014). "Macrophage polarization in inflammatory diseases". International Journal of Biological ...
First attempts at armed resistance in summer 1941 were crushed by the Axis powers, but the Resistance movement began again in ... deaths from hunger and related diseases, 600,000. Included in the number of concentration camp victims are 69,151 Greek Jews ... The resistance of the forts under general Konstantinos Bakopoulos was both courageous and determined, but eventually futile. ... Until the summer of 1942, as the Resistance movement was in its infancy, they faced little real opposition and considered the ...
Van Der Biezen, E.; Jones, J. D. G. (1998). "Plant disease-resistance proteins and the gene-for-gene concept". Trends in ... Hammond-Kosack, K. E.; Jones, J. D. G. (1997). "Plant Disease Resistance Genes". Annual Review of Plant Physiology and Plant ... "Bacterial disease resistance in Arabidopsis through flagellin perception". Nature. 428 (6984): 764-767. Bibcode:2004Natur.428.. ... Laboratory and a Professor at the University of East Anglia using molecular and genetic approaches to study disease resistance ...
Grafting for disease resistance. HortScience. Pg 1673-1676 Black, L.L., D.L. Wu, J.F. Wang, T. Kalb, D. Abbass, and J.H. Chen. ... Grafting for Disease Resistance in Heirloom Tomatoes College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, ed. North Carolina Cooperative ... Tomato grafting became popular in the 1960s as a way to reduce certain diseases caused by soilborne plant pathogens such as ... and nematode diseases. Furthermore, many researchers are looking to utilize specific rootstocks as an alternative to methyl ...
If chloroquine-resistance is detected, ACT is the treatment of choice. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has ... CDC-Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2019-03-27. Retrieved 2020-08-02. Worldwide Antimalarial Resistance Network ( ... falciparum developing resistance. In areas that have higher rates of resistance to the antimalarial Sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine, ... The disease results from the aggregation of erythrocytes infected by Plasmodium falciparum which have been shown to adhere to ...
Huovinen, P (1 June 2001). "Resistance to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole". Clinical Infectious Diseases. 32 (11): 1608-14. doi: ... and HIV Medicine Association of the Infectious Diseases Society of America". Clinical Infectious Diseases. 58 (9): 1308-11. doi ... Resistance to trimethoprim is increasing, but it is still a first line antibiotic in many countries. Cultures and ... Masur, H; Brooks, JT; Benson, CA; Holmes, KK; Pau, AK; Kaplan, JE; National Institutes of, Health; Centers for Disease Control ...
Diseases of the endocrine system (ICD-10 Chapter IV: Endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases - Endocrine diseases, E00- ... Type 2 diabetes is due to insufficient insulin production from beta cells in the setting of insulin resistance.[13] Insulin ... Diabetes was one of the first diseases described.[21] The importance of insulin in the disease was determined in the 1920s.[22] ... two to four times the risk of cardiovascular disease, including ischemic heart disease and stroke; a 20-fold increase in lower ...
A Lithuanian trial searching for disease-resistance resulted in the selection of fifty disease-resistant trees for the ... Developing resistance to the disease in the native UK ash tree population ... Hymenoscyphus fraxineus is an Ascomycete fungus that causes ash dieback, a chronic fungal disease of ash trees in Europe ... "Ash dieback disease: Survey of Scottish tree stocks launched". BBC News. 4 November 2012. Retrieved 5 November 2012.. ...
Dense Deposit Disease/Membranoproliferative Glomerulonephritis Type II. 19 May 2011. PMID 20301598. NBK1425.. In GeneReviews ... Major insulin resistance syndromes: clinical and physiopathological aspects]. J. Soc. Biol. 2002, 195 (3): 249-57. PMID ... Life at the edge: the nuclear envelope and human disease. Nat. Rev. Mol. Cell Biol. 2002, 3 (8): 575-85. PMID 12154369. doi: ... Mutations in the LMNA gene are associated with several diseases, including Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy, familial partial ...
Viral resistance[edit]. Many people were skeptical of being too hopeful with indinavir due to previous events that occurred ... Impairs endothelial function in healthy HIV-negative men and may accelerate atherosclerotic disease.[10] ... Viral resistance to the drug leads to the drug becoming useless since the virus evolves to have cells that are able to resist ... Currently, it is being replaced by newer drugs that are more convenient to take, less likely to promote virus resistance, and ...
Heritable disease and multifactorial inheritance[edit]. A mutation resulting in a disease state is often recessive, so both ... Family-based mapping of quantitative trait loci in plant breeding populations with resistance to Fusarium head blight in wheat ... If it is shown that the brothers and sisters of the patient have the disease, then there is a strong chance that the disease is ... Alzheimer's Disease. Multifactorially inherited diseases are said to constitute the majority of genetic disorders affecting ...
Sihanouk desired independence from French rule, but after France refused his requests he called for public resistance to its ... there he was diagnosed with Hodgkin's disease.[376] In mid-1984, Office 131 was moved to a new base further into Cambodia, near ... as the most promising resistance group. He believed the Khmer Việt Minh's relationship to the Việt Minh and thus the ...
... chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), renal failure, and severe burns; patients who have "cachexia" in these disease settings ... One important rehabilitation tool for muscle atrophy includes the use of functional electrical stimulation to stimulate the ... There are many diseases and conditions which cause a decrease in muscle mass, known as atrophy, including activity, as seen ... Muscle atrophy results from a co-morbidity of several common diseases, including cancer, AIDS, congestive heart failure, COPD ( ...
"Critical decline in pneumococcal disease and antibiotic resistance in South Africa". NICD. Retrieved 20 July 2015.. ... Diseases and symptoms[edit]. Pneumonia is the most common of the S. pneumoniae diseases which include symptoms such as fever ... 16: Pneumococcal Disease". In Atkinson W; Wolfe S; Hamborsky J. Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases ( ... "Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.. *^ "Pneumococcal vaccines WHO position paper--2012" (PDF). Wkly Epidemiol Rec. 87 ...
2009). "Coeliac disease-associated risk variants in TNFAIP3 and REL implicate altered NF-kappaB signalling". Gut. 58 (8): 1078- ... 2007). "MN1 overexpression induces acute myeloid leukemia in mice and predicts ATRA resistance in patients with AML". Blood. ...
Infectious diseasesEdit. Imaging infections with molecular imaging technologies can improve diagnosis and treatment follow-up. ... The advantage is a better noise profile and resistance to the streak artifacts common with FBP, but the disadvantage is higher ... Cardiology, atherosclerosis and vascular disease study: In clinical cardiology, FDG-PET can identify so-called "hibernating ... March 1999). "In vivo mapping of cerebral acetylcholinesterase activity in aging and Alzheimer's disease". Neurology. 52 (4): ...
"Ebola Virus Disease". SRHD. Retrieved 15 September 2020.. *^ a b c d "Q&A on Transmission, Ebola". Centers for Disease Control ... with more than 1,000 cases and insecurity continuing to being the major resistance to providing an adequate response.[215][216] ... "About Ebola Virus Disease". Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Archived from the original on 16 October 2014. ... "Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease) Transmission". Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). 5 November 2014. Archived from the ...
... familial glucocorticoid resistance, and hyperthyroidism.[9] ... and the disease is called Itsenko-Kushing disease.[citation ... The disease is often diagnosed 3-6 years after the onset of illness.[19] Several studies have shown that Cushing's disease is ... Cases of Cushing's disease are rare, and little epidemiological data is available on the disease. An 18-year study conducted on ... Cushing disease, tertiary or secondary hypercortisolism, tertiary or secondary hypercorticism, Itsenko-Cushing disease[1][2]. ...
Where they live in the same area, the newts get more poisonous, and the snakes develop more resistance to the poison.[6][7][8] ... The disease is spreading into eastern Panama and threatening all amphibians living there.[27] ... However, some species of snakes have develop a resistance. This means that they can eat newts without the toxin hurting them. ... and diseases like chytridiomycosis. Ultraviolet radiation damages the skin, eyes and eggs of amphibians. However, the declines ...
... and even disease resistance. A few chloroplast genes found new homes in the mitochondrial genome-most became nonfunctional ...
Diseases and parasitesEdit. The black wildebeest is particularly susceptible to anthrax, and rare and widely scattered ... the muscles to use large amounts of oxygen help explain the rapid running speed of the black wildebeest and its high resistance ... Malignant catarrhal fever is a fatal disease of domestic cattle caused by a gammaherpesvirus. Like the blue wildebeest, the ... Wild individuals can be competitors of commercial livestock, and can transmit fatal diseases such as rinderpest, and cause ...
This article is about a skin disease common during adolescence. For other acneiform skin diseases, see Acne (disambiguation). ... Andriessen A, Lynde CW (November 2014). "Antibiotic resistance: shifting the paradigm in topical acne treatment". Journal of ... Disease Primers. 1: 15033. doi:10.1038/nrdp.2015.33. PMID 27227877.. *^ a b "Frequently Asked Questions: Acne" (PDF). U.S. ... Acne, also known as acne vulgaris, is a long-term skin disease that occurs when dead skin cells and oil from the skin clog hair ...
... of kin selection to account for altruistic behaviour and the theoretical demonstration of a link between disease resistance and ...
It is often described as being "a disease of the diseased", occurring in the very young, the very old, or the very sick. ... Drug resistance is increasingly more common and presents a serious problem in persons who are immunocompromised. Prophylactic ... Candidiasis can be a marker for underlying disease, so the overall prognosis may also be dependent upon this. For example, a ... 2006). Andrews' Diseases of the Skin: Clinical Dermatology. Philadelphia: Saunders Elsevier. p. 308. ISBN 0-7216-2921-0. OCLC ...
Graft-versus-host disease[edit]. Main article: Graft-versus-host disease. Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is an inflammatory ... This genetic trait confers resistance to HIV infection by blocking attachment of HIV to the cell. Roughly one in 1000 people of ... Veno-occlusive disease[edit]. Severe liver injury can result from hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD). Elevated levels of ... Major complications are veno-occlusive disease, mucositis, infections (sepsis), graft-versus-host disease and the development ...
This leads to a chronic inflammation of the liver and eventually alcoholic liver disease. ... "Ethanol Causes Acute Inhibition of Carbohydrate, Fat, and Protein Oxidation and Insulin Resistance". J. Clin. Invest. 81 (4): ... "Alcohol use and burden for 195 countries and territories, 1990-2016: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease ...
Sometimes, one allele is a disease-causing variation while the other allele is healthy. Sometimes, the different variations in ... "Drug resistance is not directly affected by mating type locus zygosity in Candida albicans". Antimicrobial Agents and ...
Pest resistance[edit]. The insecticidal toxin from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis has been inserted into a tomato plant.[ ... Korean scientists are looking at using the tomato to express a vaccine against Alzheimer's disease.[42] Hilary Koprowski, who ... Other genes from various species have been inserted into the tomato with the hope of increasing their resistance to various ... 22] When field tested they showed resistance to the tobacco hornworm (Manduca sexta), tomato fruitworm (Heliothis zea), the ...
... differentiation and disease". Nature Reviews. Endocrinology. 11 (1): 29-42. doi:10.1038/nrendo.2014.186. PMID 25350068.. ... "Thyroid hormone resistance and increased metabolic rate in the RXR-gamma-deficient mouse". The Journal of Clinical ... "Pax genes in renal development, disease and regeneration". Seminars in Cell & Developmental Biology. Paramutation & Pax ...
The resistance of a genospecies of Lyme disease spirochetes to the bacteriolytic activities of the alternative complement ... "Lyme disease rashes and look-alikes". Lyme Disease. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 21 December 2018. Archived from ... "Lyme Disease Data and surveillance". Lyme Disease. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 5 February 2019. Archived from ... Treatment regimens for Lyme disease range from 14 days in early localized disease, to 14-21 days in early disseminated disease ...
The wild species possess many diverse traits including disease resistances and abiotic stress tolerances. The above-mentioned L ... Diseases[edit]. Below is a list of the most common lentil diseases. ... progress in quantity and quality as well as in the resistance to disease and abiotic stresses are the major breeding aims.[1] ...
As such, it happens automatically (though there are exceptions in some disease states) and does not need conscious control or ...
These qualities might include disease resistance, higher yields, dwarf habit and vibrant or new colors. These improvements are ... herbicide tolerance and insect resistance. In 1996, Monsanto introduced its first RoundUp Ready seeds engineered to tolerate ...
Mixed connective tissue disease - a disease of the autoimmune system, also undifferentiated connective tissue disease. ... also provide resistance to stretch forces.[15]:171 They are found in the walls of large blood vessels and in certain ligaments ... "Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases. 17 (2): 125-139. doi:10.1016/j.numecd.2006.10.005. PMC 4426988. PMID ... Congenital diseases include Marfan syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome.. *Myxomatous degeneration - a pathological weakening of ...
Some disease like coeliac disease primarily associate with certain genes. While other diseases, like type 1 diabetes may have ... Resistance to recombination[edit]. A1::DQ2 is found in Iceland, Pomors of Northern Russia, the Serbians of Northern Slavic ... DQ2 are believed to also contribute to autoimmune disease.[3] Also a dozen inflammatory diseases of the immune system can ... "Celiac disease autoantibodies in severe autoimmune liver disease and the effect of liver transplantation". Liver Int. 28 (4): ...
... disease resistance are generally preferred. Breeding for disease resistance began when plants were first domesticated. Breeding ... they could provide durable disease resistance to Ug99 and its derivatives. Another class of plant disease resistance genes ... Disease control is achieved by use of plants that have been bred for good resistance to many diseases, and by plant cultivation ... A plant line with acceptable resistance against one pathogen may lack resistance against others. Breeding for resistance ...
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Antibiotic Resistance Threats in the United States, 2019. ... Content source: National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Division of Bacterial Diseases ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. CDC twenty four seven. Saving Lives, Protecting People ... Resistance can lead to treatment failures.. Background. Until 2000, pneumococcal infections caused 60,000 cases of invasive ...
This emerging phenomenon is known as antifungal resistance, and its primarily a concern for invasive infections with the ... Test for antifungal resistance in patients with invasive disease who are not improving with first-line antifungal drugs.6,7 ... Resistance can also develop over time when fungi are exposed to antifungal drugs. This resistance can occur when antifungal ... Tackling antifungal resistance. Antifungal resistance is a growing threat. Everyone-from CDC researchers and laboratorians to ...
Disease resistance in ornamental plants - transformation of Symphyotrichum novi-belgii with powdery mildew resistance genes. ... Improved disease resistance is therefore often a high priority on the wish list of ornamental plant breeders. For food crops, ... Höfte M (2015) Basal and induced disease resistance mechanisms in ornamentals. Acta Hortic 1087:473-478CrossRefGoogle Scholar ... Orton WA (1918) Breeding for disease resistance in plants. Am J Bot 5:279-283CrossRefGoogle Scholar ...
A simplified model relating insulin resistance to dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease. Insulin resistance at the adipocyte ... Insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease. Henry N. Ginsberg Department of Medicine, Columbia University College of ... Cardiovascular disease and the dyslipidemia of insulin resistance. The available in vitro and in vivo data suggest that, as ... To me, on the other hand, insulin resistance represents a major underlying abnormality driving cardiovascular disease, the ...
... Downy mildew. Downy mildew of onion caused by Peronospora destructor is an extrememly damaging foliar ... Plant resistance to basal rot in onion is therefore highly desirable.. Previous work in VeGIN developed both seedling and ... These were taken forward in a BBSRC HAPI project where new onion populations segregating for FOC resistance were developed by ... The FOC screening method has also been used successfully to identify sources of resistance in onion lines generated by other ...
NDSU › Carrington Research Extension Center › Northern Hardy Fruit Evaluation Project / Fruit Index / Elderberry / Disease ...
... three were about disease resistance in roses. One was about mildew resistance and CWS was among the top 42 hybrid teas listed ... For a change I will completely ignore disease resistance in seed and pollen parents and I might just be lucky to have a better ... 25 Years of Breeding for Disease Resistance. (and its still 99 % luck and only one percent planning!) ... It was then that I learned that some roses are disease resistant. I only kept this one, and when it went outside it could go 3 ...
... www.fs.usda.gov/rmrs/keywords/disease-resistance. ... Keyword: disease resistance. Keyword cloud * climate change ( ... Stem rust diseases of Pinus kesiya in Vietnam. Publications Posted on: August 30, 2018 ... The proactive strategy: Preparing the landscape for invasion by accelerating the evolution of resistance. Publications Posted ... Surveys of two stem rust diseases of Pinus kesiya were implemented in Da Lat, Lam Dong province, in the Central Highlands of ...
In wheat, the focus is on emerging and recalcitrant diseases - soil-borne cereal mosaic virus, Fusarium, take-all and ergot. ... NIABs extensive screening programmes aim to identify novel sources of resistance to address the twin challenges of reducing ... promising sources of resistance are the currently the subject of efforts to identify molecular markers which can be used to ... with the number one target being resistance to the bruchid beetle. ...
Interplay of signaling pathways in plant disease resistance.. Feys BJ1, Parker JE. ... Genetic analysis of plant mutants impaired in mounting a resistance response to invading pathogens has uncovered a number of ...
... By Jessica Wapner On 03/01/17 at 11:45 AM EST ... "Infectious disease doctors are scared.". So are global public health authorities. This week, the World Health Organization ... "But for infectious disease experts, its ominous.". Further examination of the hospital records revealed additional disturbing ... According to the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, at least 30 percent of antibiotics prescribed each year in the U.S. ...
Copyright © 2021 Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists. All rights reserved. Terms of UsePrivacy Policy. 1307 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637 , 773.702.6308. ...
... Min-Tser Liao,1,2 Chih-Chien Sung,3 Kuo-Chin Hung,4 Chia-Chao Wu,3 ... Metabolic syndrome and its components are associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) development. Insulin resistance (IR) ... In patients with end stage renal disease, IR is an independent predictor of cardiovascular disease and is linked to protein ... IR, along with oxidative stress and inflammation, also promotes kidney disease. ...
... Min-Tser Liao,1,2 Chih-Chien Sung,3 Kuo-Chin Hung,4 Chia-Chao Wu,3 ... "Insulin resistance in patients with chronic kidney disease," American Journal of Kidney Diseases, vol. 45, no. 2, pp. 275-280, ... "Clinical epidemiology of cardiovascular disease in chronic renal disease," American Journal of Kidney Diseases, vol. 32, no. 5 ... H. Pham, K. M. Utzschneider, and I. H. De Boer, "Measurement of insulin resistance in chronic kidney disease," Current Opinion ...
Fungal Disease Resistance in Plants explores: * cellular expression of resistance to fungal pathogens ... the hypersensitive response and its role in disease resistance * induced plant resistance to fungal pathogens mechanisms and ... Fungal Disease Resistance in Plants: Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, and Genetic Engineering. ISBN , Quantity: ... Fungal Disease Resistance in Plants Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, and Genetic Engineering By Zamir Punja. ...
... have shown how Australian wheat crops would cope if a destructive disease thats yet to hit our shores ever made it into the ... to see how theyd stand up to the disease. While 16 Australian wheat varieties were significantly affected, four survived. ... "Crops typically only evolve resistance to a disease if theyre exposed to it - kind of like humans developing resistance to a ... "Most of the diseases we deal with here in Australia youre looking at more like 10-15 per cent loses, and they can typically be ...
"We recognize," he said, "that this disease starts with insulin resistance … [we] need to treat IGT with insulin resistance and ... reviewing aspects of insulin resistance pertaining to dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease.. Insulin resistance and ... Insulin Resistance, Dyslipidemia, and Cardiovascular Disease Message Subject (Your Name) has forwarded a page to you from ... Insulin resistance is associated with coronary artery disease, to an extent similar to that seen in lean individuals with type ...
I have read about insulin resistance. Wondering if anyone with lyme has developed insulin res... ... Allergies & Asthma Alzheimers Disease Anxiety & Panic Disorders Arthritis Breast Cancer Chronic Fatigue Crohns Disease Cystic ... Lyme Disease Multiple Sclerosis Parkinsons Disease Prostate Cancer ... I do not have insulin resistance but it is so common that I do know people that have it (not necessarily lymies either). I ...
forest disease and insect resistance, evolutionary biology, climate change, durable resistance. Related Search. *Assessing ... the discovery of heritable quantitative resistance to disease in the lab, and potential links between morphology and disease ... Developing a disease resistance research program for tanoaks. In: Sniezko, Richard A.; Yanchuk, Alvin D.; Kliejunas, John T.; ... We show the relevance of laboratory studies to field outcomes, and discuss the potential for disease resistance in driving the ...
However, the combination of insulin resistance and compensatory hyperinsulinemi … ... Insulin resistance, the insulin resistance syndrome, and cardiovascular disease Panminerva Med. 2005 Dec;47(4):201-10. ... shown that the prevalence of insulin resistance/hyperinsulinemia is increased in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease ... These changes increase risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), and in 1988, this cluster of related abnormalities was designated ...
Pulmonary Resistance in Acquired Heart Disease. BERNARD L. CHARMS, BERNARD L. BROFMAN, PAUL M. KOHN ... Disproportionately high pulmonary artery pressures and pulmonary vascular resistance in acquired heart disease, particularly ... The data show that despite very high initial resistance, increase in flow in the lung can occur with rapid reduction in ... Our mission is to build healthier lives, free of cardiovascular diseases and stroke. That single purpose drives all we do. The ...
The key intersection among the three diseases is insulin resistance, which has been classically described to occur in ... obesity and Alzheimers disease. Finally, we briefly discuss how lifelong allostatic load may interact with aging to increase ... obesity and Alzheimers disease. Finally, we briefly discuss how lifelong allostatic load may interact with aging to increase ... and has recently been shown to develop in Alzheimers disease brains. Here we review encouraging preclinical and clinical data ...
Resistance to Diseases and Physiological Disorders. Pole Bean Variety. Seed Company. Organic Seed. Nontreated Seed. Specifics. ... Pole Bean: Disease Resistance Table. KEY to the table. DNS = disease not specified in catalogue; described as disease ...
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says that those people who overuse and misuse antibiotics are also at ... How Antibiotic Resistance Poses Global Threat To Public Health. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the dilemma ... The antibiotic resistance of superbugs also results in higher health care expenditures both from the patients and the ... Brendan Reiter, one of the leaders of the biology club, said that they recognize the fact that antibiotic resistance capability ...
Aspirin Resistance in Coronary Artery Disease Official Title ICMJE Evaluation of Aspirin Resistance at a Molecular Level in ... Aspirin Resistance in Coronary Artery Disease. The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the ... The purpose of this study is to evaluate possible mechanisms of aspirin resistance at a molecular level in aspirin-treated ... We hypothesize that certain patient characteristics associate with aspirin resistance. In addition, we will compare the effects ...
Mount Sinai researchers have discovered a signature of cells that are involved in a type of the disease that does not respond ... By mapping out more than 100,000 immune cells in patients with Crohns disease, ... Mount Sinai researchers discover drug resistance signature in Crohns disease. *Download PDF Copy ... that correlates with a patients resistance to the standard therapy for Crohns disease, an anti-inflammatory drug called a TNF ...
Disease resistance is the ability to prevent or reduce the presence of diseases in otherwise susceptible hosts. It can arise ... Disease tolerance is different as it is the ability of a host to limit the impact of disease on host health. MacArthur, Daniel ... "Superheroes of disease resistance". Nature Biotechnology. 34 (5): 512-513. doi:10.1038/nbt.3555. ISSN 1546-1696. PMID 27065009. ...
Antimicrobial resistance(AMR) is resistance of a bacterium to an antimicrobial to which it waspreviously sensitive. ...
Resistance to insulin-stimulated glucose uptake is present in the majority of patients with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) or ... However, even if insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia are not involved in the etiology of hypertension, it is likely that ... The relationship between insulin resistance, plasma insulin level, and glucose intolerance is mediated to a significant degree ... The development of hypertension in normal rats by an experimental manipulation known to induce insulin resistance and ...
  • Its septoria rating of 7, which is based on at least two genes, will be a big attraction, while its other disease scores are good and it has OWBM resistance. (fwi.co.uk)
  • To clarify the respective roles of rabbit PrPC and non-PrP host factors in the rabbits' pronounced but not absolute resistance to TSE, they created transgenic rabbits that have both sheep and rabbit PRNP genes and tested their susceptibility to TSE. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Researchers at Lembaga Ilmu Pengetahuan Indonesia (LIPI) and Wageningen University & Research (WUR) have now succeeded in identifying resistance genes in bananas to tackle the notorious soil fungus. (wur.nl)
  • The research carried out by LIPI and WUR is therefore focused on identifying the genes responsible for such resistance. (wur.nl)
  • Contrary to current models, which propose that recognition of resistance genes occurs solely through their leucine-rich repeat domain, the authors show that association is mediated by a completely different region on N's Toll-interleukin-1 receptor homology domain, which is structurally similar to animal innate immunity molecules. (science20.com)
  • The research funded by this grant will focus on the precise genes and mutations that are involved in the resistance in this laboratory genetic cross. (eurekalert.org)
  • Researchers will then determine whether the same genes are involved in PZQ resistance in schistosome parasites infecting people in Kenya and Uganda. (eurekalert.org)
  • A proportion of these patients will still be infected: we can identify the genes involved in resistance by sequencing the parasites that survive drug treatment. (eurekalert.org)
  • Identification of the genes involved in resistance would allow development of simple molecular tests to monitor resistance during parasite treatment programs. (eurekalert.org)
  • To address this growing problem, NIAID is funding and conducting research to better understand how microbes develop and pass on resistance genes. (nih.gov)
  • In response to these findings, plant breeders look for wheat varieties, wild varieties for instance, that are able to recognize - by resistance genes - the fungus as an attacker by identifying a specific protein, a so-called effector. (farmprogress.com)
  • Gonzalez-Cendales, Y., Catanzariti, A-M., Baker, B., Mcgrath, D.J. and Jones, D.A. (2016) Identification of I -7 expands the repertoire of genes for resistance to Fusarium wilt in tomato to three resistance gene classes. (edu.au)
  • In this landmark study , Dr. Sangeeta Dhaubhadel isolated 11 genes in soybeans which function in a critical step in the fight against this devastating disease. (gc.ca)
  • One of these genes - GmCHR2A - will be key to breeding new disease-resistant varieties of soybeans. (gc.ca)
  • As P. sojae is a soil borne disease, Dr. Dhaubhadel knew that when P. sojae infection occurred, the resistance genes had to be expressed in the roots. (gc.ca)
  • A total of 77 QTLs were found to be linked with resistance, and in these areas, one out of 11 CHR genes was discovered to be the most critical in the search for resistance - the GmCHR2A gene. (gc.ca)
  • Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada scientist Dr. Sangeeta Dhaubhadel discovered 11 key genes in soybean which are critical in the fight against P. sojae , a devastating stem and root rot disease which causes $1 to $2 billion in soybean yield loss annually around the world. (gc.ca)
  • Furthermore, as regards fungal and bacterial disease resistance, the strategies based on CRISPR/Cas9 targeted modification of susceptibility genes in crop species such as rice, tomato, wheat, and citrus will be reviewed. (frontiersin.org)
  • Many of the plant disease resistance genes that have been isolated encode proteins with a putative nucleotide binding site and leucine-rich repeats (NBS-LRR resistance genes). (apsnet.org)
  • Some RFLPs were shown to map to genomic regions containing virus and fungus resistance genes. (apsnet.org)
  • These data strongly suggest that some of the RGA clones may hybridize to resistance genes. (apsnet.org)
  • Several R genes conferring resistance to a variety of fungal, bacterial, and viral pathogens have recently been cloned from various plants, including Arabidopsis thaliana ( 4 - 6 ). (pnas.org)
  • The mechanisms of such induced resistance responses have been under intense study in recent years due to our basic interest in understanding immunity in plants and the possibility of identifying target genes for engineering long-lasting, broad-spectrum resistance in crops ( 10 - 15 ). (pnas.org)
  • the roles of these genes in determining resistance have been inferred based on their expression patterns and sequence information ( 19 - 22 ), and demonstrated in some cases by observation of enhanced resistance in transgenic plants overexpressing a specific PR gene ( 23 - 27 ). (pnas.org)
  • Upon SAR induction, activation of the NPR1 protein must also occur because constitutive expression of NPR1 in the absence of an inducer does not lead to constitutive expression of PR genes or resistance ( 31 ). (pnas.org)
  • Disease resistance genes (R genes), as part of the plant defense system, have coevolved with corresponding pathogen molecules. (mdpi.com)
  • We analyzed 908 nTNL R genes in the genomes of the six plant species, and classified them into 12 subgroups based on the presence of coiled-coil (CC), nucleotide binding site (NBS), leucine rich repeat (LRR), resistance to Powdery mildew 8 (RPW8), and BED type zinc finger domains. (mdpi.com)
  • The mapped genes included 639 nucleotide-binding site leucine-rich repeat genes (NBS-LRRs), 290 receptor-like protein kinase genes (RLKs), and 1014 genes with potential roles in the defense response and induced systemic resistance to attack by pathogens. (fed.us)
  • In the presence of an antimicrobial, microbes are either killed or, if they carry resistance genes, survive. (nih.gov)
  • Researchers from Queen Mary University of London and the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew sequenced the DNA from over 1,250 ash trees to find inherited genes associated with ash dieback resistance. (phys.org)
  • The study, published in leading journal Nature Ecology & Evolution , showed that resistance is controlled by multiple genes, offering hope that surviving trees could be used to restore diseased woodlands, either by natural regeneration or selective breeding . (phys.org)
  • We found that the genetics behind ash dieback resistance resembled other characteristics like human height, where the trait is controlled by many different genes working together, rather than one specific gene. (phys.org)
  • Now we have established which genes are important for resistance we can predict which trees will survive ash dieback. (phys.org)
  • The researchers screened for resistance genes using a rapid, cost-effective approach, where the DNA of multiple trees was combined into separate pools for diseased and unaffected trees. (phys.org)
  • Many of the genes found to be associated with ash dieback resistance were similar to those previously shown to be involved in disease or pathogen responses in other species. (phys.org)
  • According to botanists, the resistance genes in plants have been shown to be effective against certain strains, races, pathotypes or biotypes of pest and this can trigger a fresh emergence of new pathotypes and biotypes. (maximumyield.com)
  • That's just one percent of the infections resistant to antibiotics, but the eight-year span of the study, published this month in the Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society , reveals a shocking trend. (newsweek.com)
  • Because the MDR infection count relied on diagnostic codes and billing claims from health care records, rather than blood samples or other biological data, the total may be inaccurate, says Michael Smith , who specializes in pediatric infectious diseases at the University of Louisville School of Medicine. (newsweek.com)
  • According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the dilemma created by the superbugs includes the inability to treat infectious diseases and other illnesses like TB, HIV, and malaria, plus not to mention the possible spread of infection. (inquisitr.com)
  • Antibiotics and similar drugs, together called antimicrobial agents, have been used for the last 70 years to treat people who have infectious diseases. (cdc.gov)
  • Since the 1940s, these drugs have greatly reduced illness and death from infectious diseases. (cdc.gov)
  • The Challenge: In an era when emerging infectious diseases are steadily increasing, human populations are exposed to virulent new pathogens. (usgs.gov)
  • The study, published in The New England Journal of Medicine , was led by Sergio Rosenzweig, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Primary Immune Deficiency (PID) Clinic at the NIH's National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID). (medindia.net)
  • This website is designed to provide education to the public and healthcare professionals about the burden, causes, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of infectious diseases across the lifespan. (nfid.org)
  • Pancreas Disease is one of the most problematic infectious diseases of farmed Atlantic salmon and is responsible for major economic losses to salmon farmers in the UK and Norway. (ed.ac.uk)
  • It is clear that our DNA determines not only the emergence of catastrophic single-gene disorders, which affect millions of persons worldwide, but also interacts with environments to predispose individuals to cancer, allergy, hypertension, heart disease, diabetes, psychiatric disorders and even to some infectious diseases. (indigo.ca)
  • All products that support the digestive system also support our resistance to infectious diseases. (maharishi.co.uk)
  • Genome-editing offers opportunities to boost food security by reducing waste and losses from infectious diseases, as well as improving animal welfare by reducing the burden of disease. (ed.ac.uk)
  • Furthermore, the study - published in the prestigious journal Clinical Infectious Diseases - discovered azole-resistance markers in three-quarters of the small number of aspergillosis patients (eight) who had never been treated with an azole, suggesting widespread dissemination of resistance. (healthcanal.com)
  • Plant disease resistance protects plants from pathogens in two ways: by pre-formed structures and chemicals, and by infection-induced responses of the immune system. (wikipedia.org)
  • Genetic analysis of plant mutants impaired in mounting a resistance response to invading pathogens has uncovered a number of distinct, but interconnecting, signaling networks that are under both positive and negative control. (nih.gov)
  • Fungal Disease Resistance in Plants is your guide to understanding the various barriers that plants have developed through evolution and adaptation to protect themselves from invading fungal pathogens. (routledge.com)
  • Affected countries are relying on this resistance and we don't know how long it is going to hold up - these fungal pathogens are very good at getting around it. (edu.au)
  • Under constant attack from an ever‐evolving array of pathogens, the multilayered plant immune system provides a broad‐spectrum resistance that is the result of millions of years of coevolution of plants and microorganisms. (els.net)
  • Two studies published in PLOS Pathogens address what makes rabbits hard to infect with prions and how their resistance can be overcome. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Most of our commercial varieties need help standing up to pests and pathogens, including late blight, the fungal disease that caused Ireland's potato famine in the mid-1800s. (utne.com)
  • Texas Biomed partners with hundreds of researchers and institutions around the world to develop vaccines and therapeutics against viral pathogens causing AIDS, hepatitis, herpes, hemorrhagic fevers and parasitic diseases responsible for malaria and schistosomiasis. (eurekalert.org)
  • Even so, specialized pathogens overcome plant defenses, posing a persistent threat to crop and food security worldwide, raising the need for agricultural products with broad, efficient resistance. (nature.com)
  • The SlNRC4a mutant reported here possesses enhanced immunity and disease resistance to a broad-spectrum of pathogenic fungi, bacteria and pests, while lacking auto-activated HR or negative effects on plant growth and crop yield, providing promising prospects for agricultural adaptation in the war against plant pathogens that decrease productivity. (nature.com)
  • NIAID is researching infections of growing concern to human health, including pathogens identified by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as urgent, serious, and concerning threats. (nih.gov)
  • the other class exhibits enhanced resistance to pathogens. (apsnet.org)
  • The cep mutant spontaneously formed hypersensitive response (HR)-like lesions on the leaves and cotyledons and also exhibited enhanced resistance to virulent bacterial and fungal pathogens. (apsnet.org)
  • However, due to the high evolutionary potential of many plant pathogens, novel genotypes no longer sensitive to the resistance gene or the phytosanitary product can rapidly emerge via mutation or recombination. (frontiersin.org)
  • In this study, we found that NPR1 confers resistance to the pathogens Pseudomonas syringae and Peronospora parasitica in a dosage-dependent fashion. (pnas.org)
  • Mutations in the NPR1 gene result in a loss of resistance to virulent bacterial and fungal pathogens even when the plants are pretreated with SAR inducers ( 10 ). (pnas.org)
  • Orthologous loci for resistance to rust pathogens were identified and were co-positioned with multiple members of the R gene family, revealing the evolutionary pressure acting upon them. (fed.us)
  • Despite this low use in humans, chloramphenicol resistance can be common in many human pathogens, e.g., multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (7) and Pneumococcus (8) . (cdc.gov)
  • Plants can be resistant to many potential pathogens, but just how is this resistance accomplished? (farmprogress.com)
  • Cuticle thickness and toughness of epidermal cell walls play an important role in the resistance of plants to several pathogens. (farmprogress.com)
  • These physical plant attributes, that are present before exposure to potential plant pathogens, play an important role in the plant's ability to resist many diseases. (farmprogress.com)
  • However, breeding for resistance to pathogens has proven more difficult. (allaboutfeed.net)
  • Project description: This work, a 5 year BBSRC LINK project applies effectoromics and comparative genomics techniques to identify pathogen effectors and map resistance QTL for the oomycete pathogens, Phytophthora cactorum and Phytophthora fragariae in Fragaria spp. (emr.ac.uk)
  • Through collaborations with the World Health Organization's (WHO's) Global Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance System (GLASS), CDC continues to support increased detection and tracking of antibiotic resistance to prevent illnesses and save lives. (cdc.gov)
  • Antimicrobial resistance(AMR) is resistance of a bacterium to an antimicrobial to which it waspreviously sensitive. (europa.eu)
  • Antimicrobial resistance is a significant public health problem in the U.S. and around the world as infections are becoming increasingly difficult to treat, especially in healthcare facilities and in people with weakened immune systems. (nih.gov)
  • In December 2019, NIAID unveiled its updated strategic approaches to address antimicrobial resistance. (nih.gov)
  • NIAID's report titled " NIAID's Antibiotic Resistance Research Framework: Current Status and Future Directions ," lays out the institute's portfolio of basic, translation and clinical research in antimicrobial resistance and outlines innovative research approaches based on the latest scientific advances. (nih.gov)
  • We need innovative and effective ways of controlling wound infections that are unlikely to contribute to increased antimicrobial resistance. (preventdisease.com)
  • However, there are additional societal pressures that act to accelerate the increase of antimicrobial resistance. (nih.gov)
  • These situations contribute to selective pressure and accelerate antimicrobial resistance. (nih.gov)
  • To me, on the other hand, insulin resistance represents a major underlying abnormality driving cardiovascular disease, the major cause of morbidity and mortality in much of the world. (jci.org)
  • Because most of the work on insulin resistance has focused on its role in the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus, a brief review of the history of the link between cardiovascular disease and insulin resistance is in order. (jci.org)
  • As the components of the syndrome have increased, scientific interest and excitement, as well as the opportunities to investigate the links between insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease, have multiplied. (jci.org)
  • In this Perspective I will attempt to provide an overview of what we do and do not know about the contribution of insulin resistance to the various components of the insulin resistance syndrome and to cardiovascular disease. (jci.org)
  • In patients with end stage renal disease, IR is an independent predictor of cardiovascular disease and is linked to protein energy wasting and malnutrition. (hindawi.com)
  • R. N. Foley, P. S. Parfrey, and M. J. Sarnak, "Clinical epidemiology of cardiovascular disease in chronic renal disease," American Journal of Kidney Diseases , vol. 32, no. 5, pp. (hindawi.com)
  • Insulin resistance as an independent predictor of cardiovascular mortality in patients with end-stage renal disease," Journal of the American Society of Nephrology , vol. 13, no. 7, pp. 1894-1900, 2002. (hindawi.com)
  • This is the fourth in a series of four articles on presentations at the World Congress on the insulin resistance syndrome (IRS), reviewing aspects of insulin resistance pertaining to dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • These changes increase risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), and in 1988, this cluster of related abnormalities was designated as comprising a syndrome (X). Several other clinical syndromes are now known to be associated with insulin resistance and compensatory hyperinsulinemia. (nih.gov)
  • Our mission is to build healthier lives, free of cardiovascular diseases and stroke. (ahajournals.org)
  • The researchers found that people with the highest levels of insulin resistance had twice as much PAD , regardless of other cardiovascular risk factors, including diabetes. (emaxhealth.com)
  • EndocrineWeb shares exclusive Interviews with experts who presented the results of their research at the 2017 World Congress on Insulin Resistance, Diabetes, and Cardiovascular Disease . (endocrineweb.com)
  • At the World Congress on Insulin Resistance, Diabetes, and Cardiovascular Disease in Los Angeles, Dr. Chilton, who is an interventional cardiologist and associate professor of cardiology at the Universty of Texas Health Sciences Center, in Houston, proposed that for many people with diabetes, feeling short of breath may result from too much volume in the heart. (endocrineweb.com)
  • In a study of women with type 2 diabetes who also have high triglycerides, Megan Montgomery, PhD, a medical science liaison with Amarin Pharma, Inc, reported that women who received a highly purified supplement of omega 3, EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid), experienced a significant reduction their triglyceride levels, which lowered their risk of cardiovascular disease. (endocrineweb.com)
  • At the World Congress on Insulin Resistance, Diabetes, and Cardiovascular Disease, Dr. Montgomery shared these findings as part of an oral presentation and then summarized these exciting results for EndocrineWeb . (endocrineweb.com)
  • Insulin resistance and hyperinsulinaemia often occur with many cardiovascular risk factors. (nih.gov)
  • Evidence is presented of how hyperinsulinaemia and insulin resistance increase the risk for coronary heart disease indirectly through their effects on cardiovascular risk factors. (nih.gov)
  • This is the third of four reports on the 8th Annual World Congress on Insulin Resistance, Diabetes, and Cardiovascular Disease, held on 4-6 November 2010, in Los Angeles, California. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Marja-Ritta Taskinen (Helsinki, Finland) reviewed aspects of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), touching on possible mechanisms of its linkage to cardiovascular disease (CVD) and on its association with inflammatory cytokines, fatty acids, hypercoagulation, and atherogenic dyslipidemia-all in the context of insulin resistance ( 5 ). (diabetesjournals.org)
  • 11 Because these changes increase cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, 12-15 insulin resistance/hyperinsulinemia, owing to its associated abnormalities, contributed substantially to CVD. (ahajournals.org)
  • The Institute also has programs in the genomics of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, psychiatric disorders and other diseases. (eurekalert.org)
  • So, stress is associated with just about every modern disease that you can name, from depression to cardiovascular disease to type 2 diabetes to autoimmune conditions like rheumatoid arthritis and Crohn's disease and multiple sclerosis to upper respiratory infections and even the common cold. (chriskresser.com)
  • The body's decreased response to insulin beginning as early as age 13 may mean increased cardiovascular disease risk by age 19, according to research reported in Hypertension: Journal of the American Heart Association. (emaxhealth.com)
  • The finding indicates that the prevalence of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk factors and type 2 diabetes (both of which are related to obesity and are increasing as today's children reach adulthood) also are related to insulin resistance independent from obesity, said Alan R. Sinaiko, M.D., lead author of the study and professor of pediatrics at the University of Minnesota Medical School in Minneapolis. (emaxhealth.com)
  • This is the first study to show insulin resistance by itself is a significant predictor of cardiovascular disease, beginning in childhood," Sinaiko said. (emaxhealth.com)
  • Aim Increased frequency of cardiovascular disease and its possible relations with insulin resistance have been reported in patients with inflammatory diseases. (wiley.com)
  • The aim of our study was to investigate insulin resistance and serum adiponectin levels as cardiovascular risk markers in patients with Behçet's disease. (wiley.com)
  • Our results suggest that there exists no increased risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease associated with adiponectin levels and insulin resistance in patients with Behçet's disease. (wiley.com)
  • Health experts call this antibiotic resistance. (cdc.gov)
  • Kim L, McGee L, Tomczyk S, Beall B. Biological and epidemiological features of antibiotic-resistance Streptococcus pneumoniae in pre- and post-conjugate vaccine eras: A United States perspective external icon . (cdc.gov)
  • Fungi, like bacteria, can develop antibiotic resistance , when germs like bacteria and fungi develop the ability to defeat the drugs designed to kill them. (cdc.gov)
  • Through these investments, CDC is transforming how the nation combats and slows antibiotic resistance at all levels. (cdc.gov)
  • Supporting a network of regional public health laboratories through the Antibiotic Resistance Laboratory Network (AR Lab Network) to detect resistant fungi and perform antifungal susceptibility testing. (cdc.gov)
  • E. coli is a member of the Enterobacteriaceae bacterial family, which is showing dangerous increases in antibiotic resistance. (newsweek.com)
  • Unwittingly, people have a role to play in terms of the evolution whereby microbes that may cause bacterial infection undergo mutation and transform into superbugs capable of antibiotic resistance. (inquisitr.com)
  • And, health experts around the world underscore the importance of understanding this evolutionary process of antibiotic resistance as they scurry to find ways on how to defeat these superbugs. (inquisitr.com)
  • The latest findings, published on February 9 in the journal Science , reveal that bacteria mutate into superbugs with antibiotic resistance at a faster rate after they develop some form of tolerance against drug exposure by "sleeping" or going into a dormant state. (inquisitr.com)
  • It was then shown via a mathematical population genetics model that tolerance can indeed speed up antibiotic resistance. (inquisitr.com)
  • The team is dealing with a particular type of superbug with antibiotic resistance called Methicillin-resistant staph aureus (MSRA), and they aim to test a new approach in hopes of obliterating these superbugs that have been wreaking havoc in many hospitals in North America. (inquisitr.com)
  • Brendan Reiter, one of the leaders of the biology club, said that they recognize the fact that antibiotic resistance capability can spread from one bacterium to another, resulting in the growth in numbers of these superbugs. (inquisitr.com)
  • The antibiotic resistance of superbugs also results in higher health care expenditures both from the patients and the government because of the longer duration and more expensive kind of treatments. (inquisitr.com)
  • Antibiotic resistance is making gonorrhea much harder to treat. (apic.org)
  • Antibiotic resistance occurs when bacteria develop defenses against the antibiotics designed to kill them. (nfid.org)
  • What is Antibiotic Resistance? (nfid.org)
  • Other work in our lab has shown that honey can make MRSA more sensitive to antibiotics such as oxacillin -- effectively reversing antibiotic resistance. (preventdisease.com)
  • The figures supplied by the authors clearly show that antibiotic resistance in cattle and human isolates is related and that resistance in Salmonella is and has been more of a problem in cattle than in humans, presumably as a result of widespread use of antibiotics in cattle. (cdc.gov)
  • Antibiotic resistance over the medium- to long-term is an inevitable consequence of antibiotic use. (cdc.gov)
  • Then, I will present our current work on the spread of antibiotic resistance plasmids and how these selfish genetic elements are subverting the pathogen and the host for spreading efficiently in microbial communities. (gulbenkian.pt)
  • Deciphering the underlying mechanisms may help to devise strategies for fighting the antibiotic resistance crisis. (gulbenkian.pt)
  • Also, high quality research contributions describing original and unpublished results of conceptual, constructive, empirical, experimental, or theoretical work in all areas of Antibiotic Resistance and Infectious Disease Epidemiology are cordially invited for presentation at the conference. (waset.org)
  • ICARIDE 2020 has teamed up with the Special Journal Issue on Antibiotic Resistance and Infectious Disease Epidemiology . (waset.org)
  • Using genetic sequencing and developing new laboratory tests to identify and understand specific mutations associated with antifungal resistance. (cdc.gov)
  • As other Perspectives in this series make clear, insulin resistance can be seen as a molecular and genetic mystery involving defective insulin signaling and glucose transport into cells. (jci.org)
  • These were taken forward in a BBSRC HAPI project where new onion populations segregating for FOC resistance were developed by Hazera Seeds for genetic analysis and development of a marker assisted breeding program. (warwick.ac.uk)
  • Fungal Disease Resistance in Plants: Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, and Genetic Engineering presents the latest developments in crop protection from fungal infection. (routledge.com)
  • These trees have been evaluated for variation in neutral genetic markers, growth and morphology, and quantitative resistance to laboratory inoculations. (usda.gov)
  • Classical genetic analysis and molecular genetic-mapping of the landraces showed that a major dominant gene confers this resistance. (springer.com)
  • A rare genetic disease, while depleting patients of infection-fighting antibodies, may actually protect them from certain severe or recurrent viral infections, reports a National Institutes of Health (NIH) study. (medindia.net)
  • The genetic defect of the disease disrupts glycosylation, or the process of attaching sugars to proteins. (medindia.net)
  • Farber disease is a genetic disease characterised by the deficiency of ceramidase. (medindia.net)
  • Pompe disease or Glycogen Storage Disease is a rare genetic disease caused by the buildup of a sugar called glycogen in the body s cells. (medindia.net)
  • However, while this success story is now decades old, the genetic basis for the resistance remained unknown, and Race 1 strains have now spread around the world. (wur.nl)
  • Genetic mapping of Fusarium wilt resistance in a wild banana Musa acuminata ssp. (wur.nl)
  • There is a slightly higher prevalence of this disease in males than in females, and it is often associated with genetic disorders, such as Li-Fraumeni familiar cancer syndrome and neurofibromatosis type 1 2 . (nature.com)
  • Dr. Tim Anderson in the Department of Genetics at Texas Biomedical Research Institute and Dr. Phil LoVerde at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio have been awarded a $3.5 million grant over the next five years by the National Institutes of Health to understand the genetic changes in the parasite that lead to drug resistance. (eurekalert.org)
  • In a prior study led by Anderson and LoVerde, genetic crosses between sensitive and resistant parasites identified a single region of the parasite genome that is strongly linked to PZQ resistance. (eurekalert.org)
  • Farmed Atlantic salmon production could be boosted by the discovery of a genetic marker associated with resistance to a potentially devastating virus. (ed.ac.uk)
  • They found that half of the observed variation in resistance to the disease could be explained by genetic factors that are passed from one generation to the next. (ed.ac.uk)
  • We are now performing genetic analyses which will help us understand how valuable traits such as disease resistance , malting quality and nitrogen use are inherited. (phys.org)
  • Genetic Variation in Resistance to Inflammation and Infectious Disease, Inflammatory Diseases Mahin Khatami, IntechOpen, DOI: 10.5772/26969. (intechopen.com)
  • Genome editing technologies have progressed rapidly and become one of the most important genetic tools in the implementation of pathogen resistance in plants. (frontiersin.org)
  • Researchers with the USDA Agricultural Research Service have identified genetic markers that have the potential to be used for the selection of breeder lines of chickens with improved genetic resistance to Marek's disease. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • Use of genetic markers conferring MD resistance in breeding programmes to augment current control methods for MD is a logical and attractive alternative strategy, say Drs Zhang and Heidari. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • It was hoped that the identified SNP(s) will eventually be used in marker-assisted selection to improve genetic resistance in breeder lines of chickens. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • Using these findings, Zhang and Heidari concluded that primary breeding companies may choose to use these markers in the selection process to improve the genetic resistance to MD in commercial chicken lines. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • Thus, for the first time, a single gene is shown to be a workable target for genetic engineering of nonspecific resistance in plants. (pnas.org)
  • Genetic maps can provide essential knowledge for understanding genetic disease resistance as well as local adaptation to changing climates. (fed.us)
  • New research has identified the genetic basis of resistance to ash dieback in UK trees, opening up new avenues for conservation. (phys.org)
  • Our new findings of the genetic basis of natural resistance found in a small minority of British ash trees help us to predict how ash populations will evolve under ash dieback. (phys.org)
  • Risk for both early- and late-onset Alzheimer's disease is affected by genetic factors. (brightsurf.com)
  • New disease-resistant varieties are now being produced and bred under CIRAD's genetic improvement programme, for instance the Pointe d'Or ® variety (CIRAD 925). (cirad.fr)
  • It is concluded that RPW8 is an essential component of resistance to powdery mildews in A. thaliana , but not the only genetic factor involved in this process. (wiley.com)
  • Genome editing offers new opportunities to livestock breeding for disease resistance as it can take input not only from breeding programmes but also other genetic and laboratory research. (allaboutfeed.net)
  • EMR, Driscoll's Genetics Ltd and Berry Gardens growers are working in an industry-led project to identify and characterise the genetic basis of strawberry powdery mildew resistance in the octoploid cultivated strawberry. (emr.ac.uk)
  • The world's first mass-cultivated banana cultivar Gros Michel was lost in the 1920s to Panama disease caused by the fungus Fusarium oxysporum. (wikipedia.org)
  • The soilborne fungus Fusarium oxysporum affects many different crops worldwide and causes some of the most devastating diseases in horticulture. (warwick.ac.uk)
  • Using DNA barcode sequencing to identifying which species were inside leaves before, during, and after the disease, Amend and Zahn determined the beneficial fungus that was most likely responsible for protection from disease: the yeast Pseudozyma aphidis. (eurekalert.org)
  • Significant progress has been made in accelerating the development of banana varieties with resistance to the Fusarium fungus. (wur.nl)
  • As a result the Mycosphaerella fungus is genetically very flexible, which is a challenge for its control either by fungicides or resistance breeding. (farmprogress.com)
  • Stem and root rot caused by the fungus-like disease Phytophthora sojae (P. sojae) causes approximately $50 million of soybean yield loss in Canada every year. (gc.ca)
  • Using the new test, which uses direct molecular detection rather than culturing the fungus in a Petri dish, the team found that 55% of aspergillosis patients had telltale signs known as 'markers' that indicated they had developed resistance to azoles. (healthcanal.com)
  • The disease, caused by the invasive alien fungus Hymenoscyphus fraxineus, has spread throughout Europe's ash populations, and was first recorded in the UK in 2012. (phys.org)
  • Genomic basis of European ash tree resistance to ash dieback fungus, Nature Ecology & Evolution (2019). (phys.org)
  • The dessert banana export market relies solely on the Cavendish variety, which is highly susceptible to black Sigatoka, a disease caused by the fungus Pseudocercospora fijiensi s. (cirad.fr)
  • Funded chiefly by LINK programmes and NIAB Trust, and in close collaboration with academic partners and breeders, promising sources of resistance are the currently the subject of efforts to identify molecular markers which can be used to select the associated resistances quickly and inexpensively into new cereal varieties. (niab.com)
  • Professor Peter Solomon from the ANU Research School of Biology tested 20 Australian wheat varieties, to see how they'd stand up to the disease. (edu.au)
  • Most of the diseases we deal with here in Australia you're looking at more like 10-15 per cent loses, and they can typically be controlled by existing practices such as growing resistant varieties or using fungicides. (edu.au)
  • Strong disease resistance, consistent performance and good grain quality are key attributes looked for by winter wheat growers and these are highlighted in Limagrain's five varieties looking for official recommendation this year. (fwi.co.uk)
  • Ed Flatman, the group's senior wheat breeder, says 19 varieties are being assessed for the AHDB Recommended List, and all are coming under high disease pressure especially from yellow rust. (fwi.co.uk)
  • It also has the pod shatter resistance that will be found in all of our forthcoming hybrid varieties," he says. (fwi.co.uk)
  • So little disease information is available though, at least in print, on these old varieties. (groworganicapples.com)
  • Developing wheat varieties with resistance to the feared leaf blotch disease may be very difficult, but recent studies carried out at Wageningen UR have brought it closer than ever. (farmprogress.com)
  • Both type of interactions (resistance gene/effector and sensitivity gene/toxin) play a role in Mycosphaerella-wheat interactions , which explains why it is so difficult to develop resistant wheat varieties. (farmprogress.com)
  • Good disease resistance along with high yields were the highlight of newly approved cereal and oilseed rape varieties giving a helping hand to growers looking to cut production costs. (fwi.co.uk)
  • Sundance is an interesting variety and as it has the best resistance for septoria of all the new varieties, good yellow rust resistance, orange wheat blossom midge resistance and a high treated and untreated yield," said Dr Oxley. (fwi.co.uk)
  • Approaches to disease control that depend on resistant varieties and agrochemicals are usually highly effective whenever they are deployed. (frontiersin.org)
  • By limiting the ability of black Sigatoka to overcome the resistance of new dessert banana varieties, the project aims to offer the value chain in the French West Indies sustainable varietal solutions to remove the need for phytosanitary products. (cirad.fr)
  • In this context, the DuRéBan project aims to endow new banana varieties with sustainable resistance to black Sigatoka. (cirad.fr)
  • Lastly, it defines strategies for rolling out new varieties across a production basin, using an epidemiological simulation model, which makes it possible to identify the spatial scale and patterns for mixing susceptible and resistant varieties that will control the disease most effectively. (cirad.fr)
  • Disease resistance is extremely important in agricultural output and can even help to breed new varieties of the same plant. (maximumyield.com)
  • Most modern apple varieties are susceptible and there is poor chemical control of canker of trees due to its systemic nature of the disease. (emr.ac.uk)
  • The work aims to apply sequencing technologies and '-omics' approaches to understand the cause of the differences in the ability of isolates of the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora fragariae to cause disease in varieties of the cultivated strawberry Fragaria × ananassa. (emr.ac.uk)
  • Increasing restrictions in chemical disease controls mean that existing varieties will soon be unsuitable for sustainable production in the soil. (emr.ac.uk)
  • The key intersection among the three diseases is insulin resistance, which has been classically described to occur in peripheral tissues in diabetes and obesity and has recently been shown to develop in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains. (frontiersin.org)
  • Alzheimer's disease (AD), type 2 diabetes (T2D), and obesity are among the most expensive and disabling disorders worldwide. (frontiersin.org)
  • In the last decades, we have witnessed a dramatic increase in the prevalence of obesity and obesity-associated diseases like type 2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome. (oreilly.com)
  • At the simplest level, obesity is not a component of syndrome X, because in contrast to the other variables, it is not a consequence of insulin resistance but only increases the likelihood of an individual becoming insulin resistant and developing the associated adverse consequences. (ahajournals.org)
  • Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become the most common chronic liver disease in Europe and the United States and a frequent side effect of obesity and type 2 diabetes. (eurekalert.org)
  • We are looking for an outstanding and highly motivated scientist with an expertise in research on metabolic diseases in general, and insulin resistance, obesity in particular. (aftercollege.com)
  • Occurring together, insulin resistance, high blood pressure, low HDL-C, high triglycerides and obesity are defined as the metabolic or insulin resistance syndrome, which Sinaiko and other researchers say may trigger type 2 diabetes and atherosclerosis. (emaxhealth.com)
  • Obesity, diabetes, hypertriglyceridemia, hypertension, and coronary heart disease constitute a phenotype common to individuals with either the IR syndrome or NAFLD1-12. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • TY - JOUR T1 - Obesity, insulin resistance, and other clinicopathological correlates of pediatric nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Campaigns for more judicious use of antibiotics and expanded use of vaccines may slow or reverse emerging drug resistance. (cdc.gov)
  • 4 It is not known if decreasing the use of all or certain antibiotics can reduce Candida infections, but appropriate use of antibiotics and antifungal drugs is one of the most important factors in fighting drug resistance. (cdc.gov)
  • Among approximately 107,000 diagnoses of Enterobacteriaceae infections in the hospital records they examined, the researchers found 724 instances of multi-drug resistance. (newsweek.com)
  • Such "molecular markers" are now used for monitoring resistance in malaria control programs and would be an immensely valuable tool for providing early warning of drug resistance emergence in Schistosomiasis. (eurekalert.org)
  • Why Is the Study of Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance a Priority for NIAID? (nih.gov)
  • This innovative approach to drug resistance detection was made possible because of the application of molecular beacon technology, which was invented by scientists at New Jersey Medical School ," said study co-author David Perlin, Executive Director and Professor at New Jersey Medical School , whose laboratory designed and performed the advanced tests. (healthcanal.com)
  • Diagram showing how gene transfer facilitates the spread of drug resistance. (nih.gov)
  • Scientists also believe that the practice of adding antibiotics to agricultural feed promotes drug resistance. (nih.gov)
  • The purpose of this study is to evaluate possible mechanisms of aspirin resistance at a molecular level in aspirin- treated patients with coronary artery disease. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • In addition, we will evaluate the effect of enteric coating on the pharmacologic efficacy of aspirin in patients with coronary artery disease. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • However, even if insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia are not involved in the etiology of hypertension, it is likely that the increased risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with hypertension and the fact that this risk if not reduced with antihypertensive treatment are due to the clustering of risk factors for CAD, in addition to high blood pressure, associated with insulin resistance. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Anaïs G, Darrasse A, Prior P (2000) Breeding anthuriums ( Anthurium andreanum L.) for resistance to bacterial blight caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. (springer.com)
  • Manuka honey could be an efficient way to clear chronically infected wounds and could even help reverse bacterial resistance to antibiotics, according to research presented at the Society for General Microbiology's Spring Conference in Harrogate. (preventdisease.com)
  • As an added bonus, this gene may also be effective in the fight against other fungal or bacterial diseases, and possibly even initiate a defense response to insects like the soybean aphid. (gc.ca)
  • This review focuses on the recent advances in plant protection using CRISPR/Cas9 technology in model plants and crops in response to viral, fungal and bacterial diseases. (frontiersin.org)
  • Bacterial canker, caused by Pseudomonas syringae is a major disease of cherry, for which there is no effective control. (emr.ac.uk)
  • Although obvious qualitative differences in disease resistance can be observed when multiple specimens are compared (allowing classification as "resistant" or "susceptible" after infection by the same pathogen strain at similar inoculum levels in similar environments), a gradation of quantitative differences in disease resistance is more typically observed between plant strains or genotypes. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1 Resistance is especially concerning for patients with invasive fungal infections-severe infections that affect the blood, heart, brain, eyes, or other parts of the body-because these are serious infections that may be more difficult to treat if they are resistant and if antifungal treatment is limited. (cdc.gov)
  • Tools such as bioassays for the screening of parent and offspring plants, biotechnological tools, or other disease resistance-oriented approaches result in more resistant cultivars. (springer.com)
  • It was then that I learned that some roses are disease resistant. (telus.net)
  • Only two or three of the top miniatures I am presently hybridizing with from other breeders are very disease resistant here in the Pacific Northwest. (telus.net)
  • As Rubies 'n' Pearls is also very mildew resistant, I thought it would be a very good combination to produce some very disease resistant seedlings. (telus.net)
  • More recently, studies have shown that the prevalence of insulin resistance/hyperinsulinemia is increased in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and there are reports that certain forms of cancer are more likely to occur in insulin resistant/hyperinsulinemic persons. (nih.gov)
  • Evidence is also accumulating that sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity is increased in insulin resistant, hyperinsulinemic individuals, and, along with the salt sensitivity associated with insulin resistance/hyperinsulinemia, increases the likelihood that these individuals will develop essential hypertension. (nih.gov)
  • Further evidence of the relationship between insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction is the finding that asymmetric dimethylarginine, an endogenous inhibitor of the enzyme nitric oxide synthase, is increased in insulin resistant/hyperinsulinemic individuals. (nih.gov)
  • A conventional, a hybrid and a clubroot resistant variety are in the winter oilseed rape line-up from Limagrain - all of which bring better disease resistance ratings. (fwi.co.uk)
  • Vincent Beringue, from INRA Virologie Immunologie Moléculaires in Jouy-en-Josas, France, and colleagues designed the second study to address what makes rabbits relatively resistant to prions. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Considerable information has accumulated since the suggestion that a cluster of abnormalities related to insulin resistance/hyperinsulinemia increased CVD risk, and we now know that many more CVD risk factors are present in insulin-resistant, nondiabetic individuals. (ahajournals.org)
  • Scientists say the ability to breed fish stocks that are more resistant to the virus would significantly improve efforts to control the disease. (ed.ac.uk)
  • Breeding from fish that are more resistant has the potential to make a significant positive contribution to controlling disease outbreaks. (ed.ac.uk)
  • Early tests have revealed that cells from the pigs are completely resistant to infection with two major subtypes of the virus that cause the disease. (ed.ac.uk)
  • It tests their sustainability under natural conditions by means of an epidemiosurveillance approach based on monitoring changes in disease levels in new, partially resistant hybrids. (cirad.fr)
  • The new research demonstrates not only that the brain in Alzheimer's disease is, in fact, insulin resistant, but that this occurs in non-diabetics and hence in the absence of hyperglycemia outside the brain," said the lead author Konrad Talbot, PhD , a research assistant professor in Penn's Center for Neurobiology and Behavior, Department of Psychiatry. (pennmedicine.org)
  • These receptors activate defenses when the plant is attacked by any type of plant-borne disease, rendering the plant more resistant against certain conditions. (maximumyield.com)
  • Although resistant individuals shared a major RPW8 genotype, no single allele was uniquely associated with resistance. (wiley.com)
  • This technology is revolutionary and provides exciting possibilities for the production of livestock resistant to diseases. (allaboutfeed.net)
  • Baayen RP, Sparnaaij LD, Jansen J, Niemann GJ (1991) Inheritance of resistance in carnation against Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. (springer.com)
  • Ben-Yephet Y, Reuven M, Mor Y (1993) Selection methods for determining resistance of carnation cultivars to Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. (springer.com)
  • In wheat, the focus is on emerging and recalcitrant diseases - soil-borne cereal mosaic virus, Fusarium, take-all and ergot . (niab.com)
  • Fusarium causes Panama disease, which destroys banana plantations around the world. (wur.nl)
  • Fusarium wilt is commonly known as Panama disease, the most devastating disease in the banana cultivation sector. (wur.nl)
  • Research in the Jones Group investigates the molecular basis of disease and disease resistance in tomato (leaf mould and Fusarium wilt resistance) and flax (flax rust resistance). (edu.au)
  • Identification of signal transduction and accessory protein requirements for resistance responses mediated by the tomato I gene for Fusarium wilt resistance. (edu.au)
  • The tomato I-3 gene: a novel gene for resistance to Fusarium wilt disease. (edu.au)
  • Breeding for Disease Resistance and Nematodes Conference aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results on all aspects of Breeding for Disease Resistance and Nematodes Conference. (waset.org)
  • It also provides a premier interdisciplinary platform for researchers, practitioners, and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns as well as practical challenges encountered and solutions adopted in the fields of Breeding for Disease Resistance and Nematodes Conference. (waset.org)
  • nahG , pathogen resistance, systemic acquired resistance. (apsnet.org)
  • However, disease control is reasonably successful for most crops. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2 , 3 Use of fungicides in agriculture to prevent and treat fungal diseases in crops can also contribute to resistance in people exposed to those fungicides. (cdc.gov)
  • Researchers at The Australian National University (ANU) have shown how Australian wheat crops would cope if a destructive disease that's yet to hit our shores ever made it into the country. (edu.au)
  • Crops typically only evolve resistance to a disease if they're exposed to it - kind of like humans developing resistance to a strain of the flu. (edu.au)
  • This theme principally revolves around investigating and deploying durable disease resistance into economically important crops. (emr.ac.uk)
  • Time-dependent association between metabolic syndrome and risk of CKD in Korean men without hypertension or diabetes," American Journal of Kidney Diseases , vol. 53, no. 1, pp. 59-69, 2009. (hindawi.com)
  • Seventeen patients with pulmonary hypertension secondary to elevated left atrial pressure have been studied by the method of temporary unilateral pulmonary artery occlusion: Resistances calculated before and after occlusion showed no change in most cases. (ahajournals.org)
  • Hypertension can also be produced in normal rats when they are fed a fructose-enriched diet, an intervention that also leads to the development of insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • The development of hypertension in normal rats by an experimental manipulation known to induce insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia provides further support for the view that the relationship between the three variables may be a causal one. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Based on these considerations the possibility is raised that resistance to insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and hyperinsulinemia are involved in the etiology and clinical course of three major related diseases- NIDDM, hypertension, and CAD. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • We hypothesize that insulin resistance is characteristic of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease as compared to age, gender, non-diabetic BMI-matched control subjects, both healthy and those with non-cirrhotic, non-steatotic liver disease. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • To date, no case control study evaluating insulin resistance (IR) in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NALFD) has been published. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • To describe the clinical characteristics of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in children, including insulin resistance, and to test for correlation with liver pathology. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Naturally occurring compounds in ash leaves could be linked to susceptibility or resistance of individual trees to the fungal disease ash dieback (ADB). (warwick.ac.uk)
  • A new gene that provides resistance to a fungal disease responsible for millions of hectares of lost wheat yield has been discovered by scientists from the US and Israel. (phys.org)
  • High frequency triazole resistance found in non-culturable Aspergillus fumigatus from lungs of patients with chronic fungal disease. (healthcanal.com)
  • In addition to the identification of additional clinical syndromes related to insulin resistance/hyperinsulinemia, a number of new risk factors have been recognized that would increase CVD risk in these individuals. (nih.gov)
  • The relationship between insulin resistance, plasma insulin level, and glucose intolerance is mediated to a significant degree by changes in ambient plasma free-fatty acid (FFA) concentration. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • There was no relationship between insulin resistance, adiponectin levels and inflammatory markers. (wiley.com)
  • Subsequent prospective studies were published demonstrating that insulin resistance and/or compensatory hyperinsulinemia as a surrogate estimate of insulin resistance predicted the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus, 9,10 providing the final evidence of the prescience of Himsworth's mechanistic concept of the clinical syndrome of diabetes mellitus. (ahajournals.org)
  • At approximately the same time that the importance of insulin resistance in the etiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus was becoming widely acknowledged, it seemed important to point out that frank hyperglycemia only developed in a relatively small proportion of individuals with that defect in insulin action. (ahajournals.org)
  • The insulin clamp is considered the gold standard to measure insulin resistance, a precursor to type 2 diabetes," Sinaiko said. (emaxhealth.com)
  • Type 2 diabetes is due to insulin resistance and accounts for 90 percent of all diabetes cases. (pennmedicine.org)
  • Scientists at the University of Warwick and University of Exeter have identified a group of chemicals present in ash leaves which could be used as biomarkers to look for susceptibility or resistance to ADB. (warwick.ac.uk)
  • In gardening, disease resistance refers to strategic techniques that are used to decrease a plant's susceptibility to diseases. (maximumyield.com)
  • Table S3 RPW8 haplotypes and their association with resistance or susceptibility of Arabidopsis thaliana to Golovinomyces orontii listed for each population separately. (wiley.com)
  • We employ this information to guide the use of BH3 mimetics to specifically inhibit BCL-2 pro-survival proteins, defeat resistance and avoid relapse. (nature.com)
  • In many plant-pathogen interactions, resistance is associated with the synthesis and accumulation of salicylic acid (SA) and pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins. (apsnet.org)
  • The recessive nature of the cep trait suggests that the CPR20 and CPR21 proteins may act as negative regulators in the disease resistance signal transduction pathway. (apsnet.org)
  • N-terminal motifs in some plant disease resistance proteins function in membrane attachment and contribute to disease resistance. (edu.au)
  • Oligonucleotide primers based on conserved motifs in and around the NBS of known NBS-LRR resistance proteins were used to amplify sequences from maize genomic DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). (apsnet.org)
  • Eleven classes of non-cross-hybridizing sequences were obtained that had predicted products with high levels of amino acid identity to NBS-LRR resistance proteins. (apsnet.org)
  • The investigators used samples of postmortem brain tissue from non-diabetics who had died with Alzheimer's disease, stimulated the tissue with insulin, and measured how much the insulin activated various proteins in the insulin-signaling pathways. (pennmedicine.org)
  • Other proteins linked to insulin action in the brain were abnormal in Alzheimer's disease samples. (pennmedicine.org)
  • However, the combination of insulin resistance and compensatory hyperinsulinemia increases the likelihood that an individual will be hypertensive, and have a dyslipidemia characterized by a high plasma triglyceride (TG) and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentration. (nih.gov)
  • In this study, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance and low adiponectin levels were not detected among our patients with Behçet's disease. (wiley.com)
  • In an attempt to identify mutations in resistance-associated loci, we screened a population of T-DNA tagged Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype Wassilewskija (Ws) for mutants showing c onstitutive e xpression of the P R-1 gene (cep). (apsnet.org)
  • Then she analyzed existing soybean literature to see if there were any QTL markers (quantitative trait loci) linked to P. sojae resistance. (gc.ca)
  • These maize resistance gene analogs (RGAs) and one RGA clone obtained previously from wheat were used as probes to map 20 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) loci in maize. (apsnet.org)
  • Perfect co-segregation was observed between RGA loci and the rust resistance loci rp1 and rp3 . (apsnet.org)
  • Elevated plasma concentrations of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) have been shown to be associated with increased CVD, and there is evidence of a significant relationship between PAI-1 and fibrinogen levels and both insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia. (nih.gov)
  • This response is called systemic acquired resistance (SAR). (pnas.org)
  • This recently resulted in the development of a biocontrol platform for high-throughput screening of libraries ofmicroorganisms/compounds able to trigger "induced systemic resistance (ISR)" in plants, as novel biocontrol tools for integrated pest management. (ugent.be)
  • SAN ANTONIO (June 7, 2016) - Schistosomiasis, a disease caused by parasitic flukes that live in the blood vessels, affects more than 200 million people in Africa, Asia, South America and the Middle East, and ranks second only to malaria as the most devastating parasitic disease of humans, according to the Centers for Disease Control. (eurekalert.org)
  • Chakrabarti, A., Velusamy, T., Tee, C.Y. and Jones, D.A. (2016) A mutational analysis of the cytosolic domain of the tomato Cf-9 disease-resistance protein shows that membrane-proximal residues are important for Avr9-dependent necrosis. (edu.au)
  • It also has orange wheat blossom midge (OWBM) resistance. (fwi.co.uk)
  • The group's other variety Motown showed a yield of 103% and is similar to older variety Revelation, but has an earlier maturity and a higher yield along with orange wheat blossom midge resistance. (fwi.co.uk)
  • Defying the odds, an individual at high risk for early-onset Alzheimer's disease remained dementia-free for many years beyond what was anticipated. (brightsurf.com)
  • Early-onset Alzheimer's disease is rare, representing less than 10% of all people who have Alzheimer's. (brightsurf.com)
  • Family members who carry a rare gene mutation called Presenilin 1 (PSEN1) E280A, have a 99.9% risk of developing early-onset Alzheimer's disease. (brightsurf.com)
  • She did have large amounts of amyloid protein deposits, a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease, in her brain. (brightsurf.com)
  • The research suggests that a drug or gene therapy that could reduce APOE and HSPG binding has the potential to be a new way to treat or prevent Alzheimer's disease. (brightsurf.com)
  • The individual is from the same family participating in the ongoing Autosomal Dominant Alzheimer's Disease (ADAD) trial, which is designed to find out if the anti-amyloid treatment crenezumab can prevent the disease. (brightsurf.com)
  • PHILADELPHIA - Insulin resistance in the brain precedes and contributes to cognitive decline above and beyond other known causes of Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania . (pennmedicine.org)
  • The team identified extensive abnormalities in the activity of two major signaling pathways for insulin and insulin-like growth factor in non-diabetic people with Alzheimer's disease. (pennmedicine.org)
  • This is the first study to directly demonstrate that insulin resistance occurs in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease. (pennmedicine.org)
  • We believe that brain insulin resistance may be an important contributor to the cognitive decline associated with Alzheimer's disease," said senior author, Steven E. Arnold, MD , professor of Psychiatry and Neurology. (pennmedicine.org)
  • Arnold is also the director of the Penn Memory Center , a National Institute on Aging-designated Alzheimer's Disease Core Center. (pennmedicine.org)
  • The risk of developing Alzheimer's disease is increased by 50 percent in people with diabetes. (pennmedicine.org)
  • Nevertheless, insulin resistance in tissues outside the brain with or without hyperglycemia can potentially cause insulin resistance in the brain and thereby contribute to the onset of Alzheimer's disease. (pennmedicine.org)
  • These abnormalities were highly correlated with episodic memory and other cognitive disabilities in the Alzheimer's disease patients. (pennmedicine.org)
  • In tissue from people with Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment (MCI), researchers found that changes to a protein called insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1 pS636/639 and pS616) in brain cells were linked to the severity of memory impairments regardless of age, sex, diabetes history, or apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene status. (pennmedicine.org)
  • Levels of IRS-1 were also significantly associated with, but not likely to affect, the presence of amyloid beta plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, the signature markers of Alzheimer's disease. (pennmedicine.org)
  • This suggests that insulin resistance contributes to cognitive decline independent of the classical pathology of Alzheimer's disease. (pennmedicine.org)
  • These drugs readily cross the blood-brain barrier and may have therapeutic potential to correct insulin resistance in Alzheimer's disease and MCI. (pennmedicine.org)
  • Clinical trials would need to be conducted to determine the impact the drugs have on Alzheimer's disease and MCI in non-diabetic patients," said Dr. Arnold. (pennmedicine.org)
  • Optimal threshold of homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance in an Iranian population: the implication of metabolic syndrome to detect insulin resistance," Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice , vol. 84, no. 3, pp. 279-287, 2009. (hindawi.com)
  • Resistance to insulin-stimulated glucose uptake is present in the majority of patients with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) or non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) and in ∼25% of nonobese individuals with normal oral glucose tolerance. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • In the course of these 3 presentations, 1-3 he provided evidence that "diabetes mellitus is a disease in which the essential lesion is a diminished ability of the tissue to utilize glucose. (ahajournals.org)
  • In combination with our observations from additional human and cell studies, these results indicate that increased DPP4 production by the liver is the cause rather than the consequence of a fatty liver and insulin resistance," says the head of the study, Annette Schürmann from the German Institute for Human Nutrition Research (DIfE), a partner of the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD). (eurekalert.org)
  • If we can prevent brain insulin resistance from occurring, or re-sensitize brain cells to insulin with any of the currently available insulin-sensitizing diabetes medicines, we may be able to slow down, prevent, or perhaps even improve cognitive decline. (pennmedicine.org)
  • Metabolic syndrome and its components are associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) development. (hindawi.com)
  • Insulin resistance (IR) plays a central role in the metabolic syndrome and is associated with increased risk for CKD in nondiabetic patients. (hindawi.com)
  • Association between the metabolic syndrome and chronic kidney disease in Chinese adults," Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation , vol. 22, no. 4, pp. 1100-1106, 2007. (hindawi.com)
  • Metabolic syndrome and renal disease," International Journal of Cardiology . (hindawi.com)
  • For a long time, the correlation between cognitive impairment and metabolic diseases was undetected. (frontiersin.org)
  • Natural selection drives the diversification of pathogen virulence and plant resistance mechanisms. (els.net)
  • Our work shows that the small molecules in leaves could give a pretty reliable indication of a tree's resistance as well as new insight into possible resistance mechanisms. (warwick.ac.uk)
  • This part of the lecture will cover what has been learned about mechanisms of relapse and how this information has been translated into new therapies for patients with imatinib resistance. (youtube.com)
  • Our in planta research involves various types of pathosystems both in model plants (Arabidopsis) and crop species (tomato, canola, corn, …) for studying different mechanisms underlying resistance to mainly fungal diseases. (ugent.be)
  • By using this information to study the mechanisms of resistance, it will advance our scientific knowledge to improve crop production in a sustainable way. (emr.ac.uk)
  • Everyone-from CDC researchers and laboratorians to healthcare professionals to the general public-has a role to play in preventing fungal infections and reducing antifungal resistance. (cdc.gov)
  • The researchers used in vitro evolution trials in order to find out the correlation between the tolerance and the ensuing resistance capabilities of these eventual superbugs. (inquisitr.com)
  • By mapping out more than 100,000 immune cells in patients with Crohn's disease, Mount Sinai researchers have discovered a signature of cells that are involved in a type of the disease that does not respond to treatment, according to a study published in Cell in August. (news-medical.net)
  • Based on this study's results, researchers have already developed a clinical trial that will test whether it's possible to find the signature in a blood test when a patient is diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease. (news-medical.net)
  • Researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) have shown for the first time that a strong association exists between insulin resistance and peripheral arterial disease (PAD), a risk factor for heart attacks and stroke. (emaxhealth.com)
  • however, the role of insulin resistance in PAD is not well established, according to the researchers. (emaxhealth.com)
  • Researchers compared PAD incidence and insulin sensitivity using a model of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), a simple test derived from fasting glucose and insulin values. (emaxhealth.com)
  • The researchers then exposed these transgenic mice to prion isolates collected from sick animals, including classical and atypical strains of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (i.e., mad cow disease), sheep Scrapie, and deer Chronic Wasting Disease. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • In the study, the researchers diagnosed CDG-IIb in two siblings with severe development issues who were referred to the NIAID PID Clinic though the NIH Undiagnosed Diseases Program. (medindia.net)
  • Although this viral disease is still unknown in LA, its vector - the whitefly - has recently been found. (springer.com)
  • This grant funding further builds a vigorous research program on viral and parasitic diseases at Texas Biomed. (eurekalert.org)
  • Gene discoveries relating to a different viral disease - infectious pancreatic necrosis - are already saving the UK industry around £26 million each year. (ed.ac.uk)
  • This result furthers the case for the criticality of CD163 in PRRSv infection and demonstrates that a targeted removal of the viral interacting domain can confer resistance while the reminder of the protein is present. (ed.ac.uk)
  • As regards the achievement of viral disease resistance, the main strategies employed in model species such as Arabidopsis and Nicotiana benthamiana , which include the integration of CRISPR-encoding sequences that target and interfere with the viral genome and the induction of a CRISPR-mediated targeted mutation in the host plant genome, will be discussed. (frontiersin.org)
  • Some of those mutations can make the bacteria resistance to drug treatment. (nih.gov)
  • Antibiotics are medicines used to kill the bacteria that cause disease. (cdc.gov)
  • Some studies have indicated that antibiotics -which include antifungal drugs-may also contribute to antifungal resistance in Candida . (cdc.gov)
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says that those people who overuse and misuse antibiotics are also at fault not just in the development, but also in the proliferation of superbugs. (inquisitr.com)
  • This is the point when the effects of antibiotics on them are rendered futile (resistance), Phys.org noted. (inquisitr.com)
  • however, using antibiotics too often in humans and animals and in cases where antibiotics are not an appropriate treatment can make resistance develop more quickly. (nih.gov)
  • With these bacteria, the use of other antibiotics (e.g., penicillins, macrolides, and cephalosporins) appears to drive chloramphenicol (and other) resistance, which is often a part of gene clusters that encode for multidrug resistance. (cdc.gov)
  • We should therefore avoid entirely the use of "last-line" human antibiotics such as fluoroquinolones (i.e., antibiotics for which there may be no alternatives if resistance develops) in livestock. (cdc.gov)
  • Thus, the notion of a causal role of insulin resistance in human disease was born almost 70 years ago. (ahajournals.org)
  • Here we examine the molecular diversity in RPW8 (Recognition of Powdery Mildew), a gene conferring broad-spectrum resistance to powdery mildews in Arabidopsis thaliana stock-center accessions. (wiley.com)
  • Across large regions and many crop species, it is estimated that diseases typically reduce plant yields by 10% every year in more developed nations or agricultural systems, but yield loss to diseases often exceeds 20% in less developed settings. (wikipedia.org)
  • Disease control is achieved by use of plants that have been bred for good resistance to many diseases, and by plant cultivation approaches such as crop rotation, pathogen-free seed, appropriate planting date and plant density, control of field moisture, and pesticide use. (wikipedia.org)
  • But conventional approaches haven't been effective in controlling wheat blast, and once symptoms of the disease first appear, it can wipe out an entire crop in around 10 days. (edu.au)
  • Unfortunately once the disease is established, growers often have to burn the crop to the ground to reduce the risk of it spreading. (edu.au)
  • Even so, the disease takes a toll, causing some $210 million worth of crop losses annually. (utne.com)
  • the enhancement of plant resistance plays an important role in adjusting crop production to meet global population increases. (frontiersin.org)
  • IR, along with oxidative stress and inflammation, also promotes kidney disease. (hindawi.com)
  • Decreased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol is associated with inflammation and insulin resistance in non-diabetic haemodialysis patients," Nephrology , vol. 15, no. 7, pp. 692-699, 2010. (hindawi.com)
  • We designed this study in a way that defines inflammation with unprecedented precision using immunology and computational biology to get a better understanding of this disease,' said co- corresponding author Judy H. Cho, MD, Senior Associate Dean for Precision Medicine, Director of The Charles Bronfman Institute for Personalized Medicine, Ward-Coleman Professor of Translational Genetics, and Professor of Medicine, and Genetics and Genomic Sciences, at the Icahn School of Medicine. (news-medical.net)
  • The purpose of this study is to evaluate how Vitamin D affects endothelial function, inflammation, lipids, insulin resistance, vitamin D levels, and parathyroid hormone (PTH). (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Relative to a susceptible plant, disease resistance is the reduction of pathogen growth on or in the plant (and hence a reduction of disease), while the term disease tolerance describes plants that exhibit little disease damage despite substantial pathogen levels. (wikipedia.org)
  • I finally realized that most were more susceptible to diseases than any of my own seedlings that I had kept over the years. (telus.net)
  • Disease resistance is the ability to prevent or reduce the presence of diseases in otherwise susceptible hosts. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, polycystic ovary syndrome appears to be secondary to insulin resistance and compensatory hyperinsulinemia. (nih.gov)
  • Finally, there is substantial evidence of an association between insulin resistance/hyperinsulinemia, and sleep disordered breathing. (nih.gov)
  • Given the rapid increase in the number of clinical syndromes and abnormalities associated with insulin resistance/hyperinsulinemia, it seems reasonable to suggest that the cluster of these changes related to the defect in insulin action be subsumed under the term of the insulin resistance syndrome. (nih.gov)
  • It is obvious that the cluster of abnormalities associated with insulin resistance and compensatory hyperinsulinemia contains many well-recognized CVD risk factors, choosing which one, or ones, that are primarily responsible for the accelerated atherogenesis that characterizes this syndrome is not a simple task. (nih.gov)
  • A proposed nomenclature and diagnostic criteria for protein-energy wasting in acute and chronic kidney disease," Kidney International , vol. 73, no. 4, pp. 391-398, 2008. (hindawi.com)
  • The analysis was conducted on phlegm from patients with allergic and chronic lung disease caused by Aspergillus. (healthcanal.com)
  • Proceedings of the fourth international workshop on the genetics of host-parasite interactions in forestry: Disease and insect resistance in forest trees. (usda.gov)
  • The work thus far has resulted in a significant expansion of the understanding of tanoak phylogeography and population genetics, the discovery of heritable quantitative resistance to disease in the lab, and potential links between morphology and disease resistance in the lab and field. (usda.gov)
  • Here, we tie together the investigations, presenting 3 years of data from laboratory and field resistance trials, along with their correlations with growth traits, in light of the understanding of tanoak population dynamics generated from neutral markers. (usda.gov)
  • To our knowledge, this is the first report of qualitative virus resistance in cassava, and of molecular markers that tag CMD resistance in cassava. (springer.com)
  • We discuss the use of markers linked to CMD2 for marker-assisted breeding of CMD resistance in Latin America and for increasing the cost-effectiveness of resistance breeding in Africa. (springer.com)
  • 0001). Portal fibrosis was predicted by the combination of right upper quadrant pain and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (P=.0028). (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Insulin resistance was evaluated using the homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance method. (wiley.com)
  • To learn about particularly effective immune responses, we study wildlife species that have heightened exposure to foreign microbes, since theory predicts they will evolve better disease resistance. (usgs.gov)
  • All new winter wheats have a 7, 8 or 9 for yellow rust, but it is very much a dynamic situation with new races of the disease coming in, so a lot of feed wheats are relatively lower risk to grow with better disease resistance," he told a briefing on Monday (28 November). (fwi.co.uk)
  • Interplay of signaling pathways in plant disease resistance. (nih.gov)
  • Currently there is no treatment for the disease so it is vital we understand all the possible pathways to developing resistance. (warwick.ac.uk)
  • In 2018, there were about 31,400 cases of invasive pneumococcal disease. (cdc.gov)
  • Until 2000, pneumococcal infections caused 60,000 cases of invasive disease each year. (cdc.gov)
  • Tracking antifungal resistance in Candida infections at 10 sites across the country through the Emerging Infections Program (EIP) . (cdc.gov)
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that approximately 820,000 new gonococcal infections occur in the United States each year. (apic.org)
  • It disrupts our resistance to disease and is a fertile ground for the growth of infections. (maharishi.co.uk)
  • The investigators have used a new ultra-sensitive test that employs technology developed at UMDNJ that not only can better diagnose Aspergillus infections, but also can spot signs of antifungal resistance to azoles - the class of drugs used to treat patients with aspergillosis. (healthcanal.com)
  • also called NIM1 for n on im munity or SAI1 for s alicylic a cid- i nsensitivity) was identified as a key regulator in transducing the SA signal leading to general acquired resistance responses, including SAR as well as local acquired resistance, the ability of plants to restrict the spread of virulent pathogen infections ( 10 , 28 - 30 ). (pnas.org)
  • The prevalence of resistance to fluoroquinolones in human infections acquired from animals through the food chain is increasing ( 2 , 4 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Work is already underway to validate our results on a much larger panel of UK trees, and to identify other compounds that contribute to ash dieback resistance. (warwick.ac.uk)
  • In tobacco and its relatives, the N resistance protein confers resistance to infection by the Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). (science20.com)
  • Antifungal resistance occurs when fungi no longer respond to antifungal drugs. (cdc.gov)
  • Only three types of antifungal drugs currently exist, so antifungal resistance can severely limit treatment options. (cdc.gov)
  • What causes antifungal resistance? (cdc.gov)
  • Antifungal resistance is a growing threat. (cdc.gov)
  • Disproportionately high pulmonary artery pressures and pulmonary vascular resistance in acquired heart disease, particularly mitral stenosis, have been repeatedly observed. (ahajournals.org)
  • Getting enough omega 3 fatty acids is a good idea for anyone concerned about reducing their risks of heart disease. (endocrineweb.com)
  • Whether hyperinsulinaemia and insulin resistance are risk factors for coronary heart disease is still a matter of debate. (nih.gov)
  • The information from prospective population studies, in which the relationship between hyperinsulinaemia and coronary heart disease has been investigated, is summarized. (nih.gov)
  • The possibility that hyperinsulinaemia and insulin resistance increase the risk for coronary heart disease will be approached from two angles. (nih.gov)
  • Chalcone reductase (CHR) is the key enzyme which leads to the production of these glyceollins, and their rapid, increased production is linked to strong partial resistance to P. sojae , a very durable and broad-spectrum type of resistance (lasts for a long time and is effective against many types of dieases). (gc.ca)
  • Rabbits have long been considered immune to prion disease, but recently scientists have shown that they can - under certain circumstances - get transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (or TSE, the scientific term for the fatal brain disease caused by prions). (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • But selecting trees with lower levels of these compounds and breeding for resistance could leave the UK ash tree population open to attack from invading insect pests in the future, according to scientists at the University of Warwick. (warwick.ac.uk)
  • In addition, the scientists observed that human beings suffering from insulin resistance and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease have a greater amount of active DPP4 in their blood than healthy people. (eurekalert.org)
  • Scientists say their research into Pancreas Disease, caused by a salmonid alphavirus, will help salmon breeders to select fish with greater resilience to this infection. (ed.ac.uk)
  • In collaboration with Brewlab and the University of Sunderland, the scientists discovered that Chevallier had valuable disease resistance that can prevent contamination of grain with mycotoxins , which are a concern in the malting industry. (phys.org)
  • Without intense research and scientific study, catastrophic harvest failures due to fungal diseases could cause food shortages, human and animal poisonings, and economic loss throughout the world. (routledge.com)
  • The study analyzed biopsy samples of inflamed and uninflamed Crohn's disease lesions on small intestine tissue as soon as it was removed from patients. (news-medical.net)
  • In a new study published online this week in the open-access journal PLoS Biology, Tessa Burch-Smith, Savithramma Dinesh-Kumar, and colleagues show how one aspect of the plant immune system is defined by the gene-for-gene hypothesis: a plant Resistance (R) gene encodes a protein that specifically recognizes and protects against one pathogen or strain of a pathogen carrying a corresponding Avirulence (Avr) gene. (science20.com)
  • Therefore, in our opinion, they could be used in the future not only to improve the sugar metabolism but also to treat non-alcoholic fatty liver disease***," adds the lead author of the study, Christian Baumeier from DIfE. (eurekalert.org)
  • Based on these results, it is possible to take a small sample of fin tissue from a salmon, study its DNA and make accurate predictions on whether it is likely to produce offspring that have high resistance to salmonid alphavirus. (ed.ac.uk)
  • A new study reports that a common skin disease could be warning sign of an increased risk of mental illness that could affect you and your family. (emaxhealth.com)
  • Given the rising frequency of resistance in Aspergillus in northern Europe, China and the United States, this study provides key data for doctors to shift antifungal therapy in the face of resistance. (healthcanal.com)
  • We have used the naturally occurring plant-parasite system of Arabidopsis thaliana and its common parasite Peronospora parasitica (downy mildew) to study the evolution of resistance specificity in the host population. (genetics.org)
  • Method Study population consisted of 40 patients with Behçet's disease (BD) and a control group composed of age, gender, body mass index-matched 46 healthy individuals. (wiley.com)