Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Cattle Diseases: Diseases of domestic cattle of the genus Bos. It includes diseases of cows, yaks, and zebus.Tuberculosis, Bovine: An infection of cattle caused by MYCOBACTERIUM BOVIS. It is transmissible to man and other animals.Animal Husbandry: The science of breeding, feeding and care of domestic animals; includes housing and nutrition.Animal Feed: Foodstuff used especially for domestic and laboratory animals, or livestock.Breeding: The production of offspring by selective mating or HYBRIDIZATION, GENETIC in animals or plants.Trypanosomiasis, Bovine: Infection in cattle caused by various species of trypanosomes.Meat: The edible portions of any animal used for food including domestic mammals (the major ones being cattle, swine, and sheep) along with poultry, fish, shellfish, and game.Rhipicephalus: A genus of TICKS, in the family IXODIDAE, widespread in Africa. Members of the genus include many important vectors of animal and human pathogens.Abattoirs: Places where animals are slaughtered and dressed for market.Brucellosis, Bovine: A disease of cattle caused by bacteria of the genus BRUCELLA leading to abortion in late pregnancy. BRUCELLA ABORTUS is the primary infective agent.Rumen: The first stomach of ruminants. It lies on the left side of the body, occupying the whole of the left side of the abdomen and even stretching across the median plane of the body to the right side. It is capacious, divided into an upper and a lower sac, each of which has a blind sac at its posterior extremity. The rumen is lined by mucous membrane containing no digestive glands, but mucus-secreting glands are present in large numbers. Coarse, partially chewed food is stored and churned in the rumen until the animal finds circumstances convenient for rumination. When this occurs, little balls of food are regurgitated through the esophagus into the mouth, and are subjected to a second more thorough mastication, swallowed, and passed on into other parts of the compound stomach. (From Black's Veterinary Dictionary, 17th ed)Buffaloes: Ruminants of the family Bovidae consisting of Bubalus arnee and Syncerus caffer. This concept is differentiated from BISON, which refers to Bison bison and Bison bonasus.Theileriasis: Infection of cattle, sheep, or goats with protozoa of the genus THEILERIA. This infection results in an acute or chronic febrile condition.Feces: Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.Escherichia coli O157: A verocytotoxin-producing serogroup belonging to the O subfamily of Escherichia coli which has been shown to cause severe food-borne disease. A strain from this serogroup, serotype H7, which produces SHIGA TOXINS, has been linked to human disease outbreaks resulting from contamination of foods by E. coli O157 from bovine origin.Plant Poisoning: Poisoning by the ingestion of plants or its leaves, berries, roots or stalks. The manifestations in both humans and animals vary in severity from mild to life threatening. In animals, especially domestic animals, it is usually the result of ingesting moldy or fermented forage.Neospora: A genus of protozoan parasites of the subclass COCCIDIA. Its species are parasitic in dogs, cattle, goats, and sheep, among others. N. caninum, a species that mainly infects dogs, is intracellular in neural and other cells of the body, multiplies by endodyogeny, has no parasitophorous vacuole, and has numerous rhoptries. It is known to cause lesions in many tissues, especially the brain and spinal cord as well as abortion in the expectant mother.Encephalopathy, Bovine Spongiform: A transmissible spongiform encephalopathy of cattle associated with abnormal prion proteins in the brain. Affected animals develop excitability and salivation followed by ATAXIA. This disorder has been associated with consumption of SCRAPIE infected ruminant derived protein. This condition may be transmitted to humans, where it is referred to as variant or new variant CREUTZFELDT-JAKOB SYNDROME. (Vet Rec 1998 Jul 25;143(41):101-5)Sheep Diseases: Diseases of domestic and mountain sheep of the genus Ovis.Mustelidae: A family of terrestrial carnivores with long, slender bodies, long tails, and anal scent glands. They include badgers, weasels, martens, FERRETS; MINKS; wolverines, polecats, and OTTERS.Bacterial Shedding: The expelling of bacteria from the body. Important routes include the respiratory tract, genital tract, and intestinal tract.Tick Infestations: Infestations with soft-bodied (Argasidae) or hard-bodied (Ixodidae) ticks.Sheep: Any of the ruminant mammals with curved horns in the genus Ovis, family Bovidae. They possess lachrymal grooves and interdigital glands, which are absent in GOATS.Animal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena: Nutritional physiology of animals.Abortion, Veterinary: Premature expulsion of the FETUS in animals.Foot-and-Mouth DiseaseGoats: Any of numerous agile, hollow-horned RUMINANTS of the genus Capra, in the family Bovidae, closely related to the SHEEP.Mycobacterium bovis: The bovine variety of the tubercle bacillus. It is called also Mycobacterium tuberculosis var. bovis.Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex: A multifactorial disease of CATTLE resulting from complex interactions between environmental factors, host factors, and pathogens. The environmental factors act as stressors adversely affecting the IMMUNE SYSTEM and other host defenses and enhancing transmission of infecting agents.Random Allocation: A process involving chance used in therapeutic trials or other research endeavor for allocating experimental subjects, human or animal, between treatment and control groups, or among treatment groups. It may also apply to experiments on inanimate objects.Milk: The white liquid secreted by the mammary glands. It contains proteins, sugar, lipids, vitamins, and minerals.Coccidiosis: Protozoan infection found in animals and man. It is caused by several different genera of COCCIDIA.Poaceae: A large family of narrow-leaved herbaceous grasses of the order Cyperales, subclass Commelinidae, class Liliopsida (monocotyledons). Food grains (EDIBLE GRAIN) come from members of this family. RHINITIS, ALLERGIC, SEASONAL can be induced by POLLEN of many of the grasses.Enzootic Bovine Leukosis: A lymphoid neoplastic disease in cattle caused by the bovine leukemia virus. Enzootic bovine leukosis may take the form of lymphosarcoma, malignant lymphoma, or leukemia but the presence of malignant cells in the blood is not a consistent finding.Weight Gain: Increase in BODY WEIGHT over existing weight.Bison: A genus of the family Bovidae having two species: B. bison and B. bonasus. This concept is differentiated from BUFFALOES, which refers to Bubalus arnee and Syncerus caffer.Bovine Virus Diarrhea-Mucosal Disease: Acute disease of cattle caused by the bovine viral diarrhea viruses (DIARRHEA VIRUSES, BOVINE VIRAL). Often mouth ulcerations are the only sign but fever, diarrhea, drop in milk yield, and loss of appetite are also seen. Severity of clinical disease varies and is strain dependent. Outbreaks are characterized by low morbidity and high mortality.Digestion: The process of breakdown of food for metabolism and use by the body.Ruminants: A suborder of the order ARTIODACTYLA whose members have the distinguishing feature of a four-chambered stomach, including the capacious RUMEN. Horns or antlers are usually present, at least in males.Anaplasmosis: A disease of cattle caused by parasitization of the red blood cells by bacteria of the genus ANAPLASMA.Manure: Accumulations of solid or liquid animal excreta usually from stables and barnyards with or without litter material. Its chief application is as a fertilizer. (From Webster's 3d ed)Leukemia Virus, Bovine: The type species of DELTARETROVIRUS that causes a form of bovine lymphosarcoma (ENZOOTIC BOVINE LEUKOSIS) or persistent lymphocytosis.Weaning: Permanent deprivation of breast milk and commencement of nourishment with other food. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Babesia bovis: A species of protozoa that is a cause of bovine babesiosis. Ticks of the genera Boophilus, Rhipicephalus, and IXODES are the chief vectors.Trypanosoma congolense: A species of Trypanosome hemoflagellates that is carried by tsetse flies and causes severe anemia in cattle. These parasites are also found in horses, sheep, goats, and camels.Bluetongue: A reovirus infection, chiefly of sheep, characterized by a swollen blue tongue, catarrhal inflammation of upper respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts, and often by inflammation of sensitive laminae of the feet and coronet.Brucella abortus: A species of the genus BRUCELLA whose natural hosts are cattle and other bovidae. Abortion and placentitis are frequently produced in the pregnant animal. Other mammals, including humans, may be infected.Diarrhea Viruses, Bovine Viral: A group of viruses in the genus PESTIVIRUS, causing diarrhea, fever, oral ulcerations, hemorrhagic syndrome, and various necrotic lesions among cattle and other domestic animals. The two species (genotypes), BVDV-1 and BVDV-2 , exhibit antigenic and pathological differences. The historical designation, BVDV, consisted of both (then unrecognized) genotypes.Livestock: Domesticated farm animals raised for home use or profit but excluding POULTRY. Typically livestock includes CATTLE; SHEEP; HORSES; SWINE; GOATS; and others.Theileria: A genus of tick-borne protozoa parasitic in the lymphocytes, erythrocytes, and endothelial cells of mammals. Its organisms multiply asexually and then invade erythrocytes, where they undergo no further reproduction until ingested by a transmitting tick.Rinderpest: A viral disease of cloven-hoofed animals caused by MORBILLIVIRUS. It may be acute, subacute, or chronic with the major lesions characterized by inflammation and ulceration of the entire digestive tract. The disease was declared successfully eradicated worldwide in 2010.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Deer: The family Cervidae of 17 genera and 45 species occurring nearly throughout North America, South America, and Eurasia, on most associated continental islands, and in northern Africa. Wild populations of deer have been established through introduction by people in Cuba, New Guinea, Australia, New Zealand, and other places where the family does not naturally occur. They are slim, long-legged and best characterized by the presence of antlers. Their habitat is forests, swamps, brush country, deserts, and arctic tundra. They are usually good swimmers; some migrate seasonally. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1362)Animals, Inbred Strains: Animals produced by the mating of progeny over multiple generations. The resultant strain of animals is virtually identical genotypically. Highly inbred animal lines allow the study of certain traits in a relatively pure form. (Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Body Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Housing, AnimalMannheimia haemolytica: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria normally commensal in the flora of CATTLE and SHEEP. But under conditions of physical or PHYSIOLOGICAL STRESS, it can cause MASTITIS in sheep and SHIPPING FEVER or ENZOOTIC CALF PNEUMONIA in cattle. Its former name was Pasteurella haemolytica.Disease Reservoirs: Animate or inanimate sources which normally harbor disease-causing organisms and thus serve as potential sources of disease outbreaks. Reservoirs are distinguished from vectors (DISEASE VECTORS) and carriers, which are agents of disease transmission rather than continuing sources of potential disease outbreaks.Escherichia coli Infections: Infections with bacteria of the species ESCHERICHIA COLI.Animals, Wild: Animals considered to be wild or feral or not adapted for domestic use. It does not include wild animals in zoos for which ANIMALS, ZOO is available.Animal Identification Systems: Procedures for recognizing individual animals and certain identifiable characteristics pertaining to them; includes computerized methods, ear tags, etc.Cereals: Seeds from grasses (POACEAE) which are important in the diet.Eating: The consumption of edible substances.Silage: Fodder converted into succulent feed for livestock through processes of anaerobic fermentation (as in a silo).Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Anaplasma: A genus of gram-negative bacteria whose organisms are obligate parasites of vertebrates. Species are transmitted by arthropod vectors with the host range limited to ruminants. Anaplasma marginale is the most pathogenic species and is the causative agent of severe bovine anaplasmosis.Abomasum: The fourth stomach of ruminating animals. It is also called the "true" stomach. It is an elongated pear-shaped sac lying on the floor of the abdomen, on the right-hand side, and roughly between the seventh and twelfth ribs. It leads to the beginning of the small intestine. (From Black's Veterinary Dictionary, 17th ed)Body Composition: The relative amounts of various components in the body, such as percentage of body fat.Festuca: A plant genus of the family POACEAE. The common name of fescue is also used with some other grasses.Veterinary Medicine: The medical science concerned with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases in animals.Goat Diseases: Diseases of the domestic or wild goat of the genus Capra.ArtiodactylaTheileria parva: A protozoan parasite that is the etiologic agent of East Coast fever (THEILERIASIS). Transmission is by ticks of the Physicephalus and Hyalomma genera.Genetic Variation: Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.Zea mays: A plant species of the family POACEAE. It is a tall grass grown for its EDIBLE GRAIN, corn, used as food and animal FODDER.Food Handling: Any aspect of the operations in the preparation, processing, transport, storage, packaging, wrapping, exposure for sale, service, or delivery of food.Quantitative Trait, Heritable: A characteristic showing quantitative inheritance such as SKIN PIGMENTATION in humans. (From A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Lactation: The processes of milk secretion by the maternal MAMMARY GLANDS after PARTURITION. The proliferation of the mammary glandular tissue, milk synthesis, and milk expulsion or let down are regulated by the interactions of several hormones including ESTRADIOL; PROGESTERONE; PROLACTIN; and OXYTOCIN.Babesiosis: A group of tick-borne diseases of mammals including ZOONOSES in humans. They are caused by protozoa of the genus BABESIA, which parasitize erythrocytes, producing hemolysis. In the U.S., the organism's natural host is mice and transmission is by the deer tick IXODES SCAPULARIS.Mastitis, Bovine: INFLAMMATION of the UDDER in cows.Herpesvirus 1, Bovine: A species of VARICELLOVIRUS that causes INFECTIOUS BOVINE RHINOTRACHEITIS and other associated syndromes in CATTLE.Anaplasma marginale: A species of gram-negative bacteria and causative agent of severe bovine ANAPLASMOSIS. It is the most pathogenic of the ANAPLASMA species.Fatty Acids, Volatile: Short-chain fatty acids of up to six carbon atoms in length. They are the major end products of microbial fermentation in the ruminant digestive tract and have also been implicated in the causation of neurological diseases in humans.Pasteurellosis, Pneumonic: Bovine respiratory disease found in animals that have been shipped or exposed to CATTLE recently transported. The major agent responsible for the disease is MANNHEIMIA HAEMOLYTICA and less commonly, PASTEURELLA MULTOCIDA or HAEMOPHILUS SOMNUS. All three agents are normal inhabitants of the bovine nasal pharyngeal mucosa but not the LUNG. They are considered opportunistic pathogens following STRESS, PHYSIOLOGICAL and/or a viral infection. The resulting bacterial fibrinous BRONCHOPNEUMONIA is often fatal.Zoonoses: Diseases of non-human animals that may be transmitted to HUMANS or may be transmitted from humans to non-human animals.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Hoof and Claw: Highly keratinized processes that are sharp and curved, or flat with pointed margins. They are found especially at the end of the limbs in certain animals.Least-Squares Analysis: A principle of estimation in which the estimates of a set of parameters in a statistical model are those quantities minimizing the sum of squared differences between the observed values of a dependent variable and the values predicted by the model.Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Pasteurella Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus PASTEURELLA.Bluetongue virus: The type species of ORBIVIRUS causing a serious disease in sheep, especially lambs. It may also infect wild ruminants and other domestic animals.Transportation: The means of moving persons, animals, goods, or materials from one place to another.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Monensin: An antiprotozoal agent produced by Streptomyces cinnamonensis. It exerts its effect during the development of first-generation trophozoites into first-generation schizonts within the intestinal epithelial cells. It does not interfere with hosts' development of acquired immunity to the majority of coccidial species. Monensin is a sodium and proton selective ionophore and is widely used as such in biochemical studies.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Insemination, Artificial: Artificial introduction of SEMEN or SPERMATOZOA into the VAGINA to facilitate FERTILIZATION.Pneumonia, Atypical Interstitial, of Cattle: A cattle disease of uncertain cause, probably an allergic reaction.Ticks: Blood-sucking acarid parasites of the order Ixodida comprising two families: the softbacked ticks (ARGASIDAE) and hardbacked ticks (IXODIDAE). Ticks are larger than their relatives, the MITES. They penetrate the skin of their host by means of highly specialized, hooked mouth parts and feed on its blood. Ticks attack all groups of terrestrial vertebrates. In humans they are responsible for many TICK-BORNE DISEASES, including the transmission of ROCKY MOUNTAIN SPOTTED FEVER; TULAREMIA; BABESIOSIS; AFRICAN SWINE FEVER; and RELAPSING FEVER. (From Barnes, Invertebrate Zoology, 5th ed, pp543-44)Dystocia: Slow or difficult OBSTETRIC LABOR or CHILDBIRTH.Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay: An immunoassay utilizing an antibody labeled with an enzyme marker such as horseradish peroxidase. While either the enzyme or the antibody is bound to an immunosorbent substrate, they both retain their biologic activity; the change in enzyme activity as a result of the enzyme-antibody-antigen reaction is proportional to the concentration of the antigen and can be measured spectrophotometrically or with the naked eye. Many variations of the method have been developed.Meat-Packing Industry: The aggregate enterprise of technically producing packaged meat.Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus: The type species of APHTHOVIRUS, causing FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE in cloven-hoofed animals. Several different serotypes exist.United States Department of Agriculture: A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with improving and maintaining farm income and developing and expanding markets for agricultural products. Through inspection and grading services it safeguards and insures standards of quality in food supply and production.Antibodies, Bacterial: Immunoglobulins produced in a response to BACTERIAL ANTIGENS.Coronavirus, Bovine: A species of CORONAVIRUS infecting neonatal calves, presenting as acute diarrhea, and frequently leading to death.Fermentation: Anaerobic degradation of GLUCOSE or other organic nutrients to gain energy in the form of ATP. End products vary depending on organisms, substrates, and enzymatic pathways. Common fermentation products include ETHANOL and LACTIC ACID.
Forman, S. A.; Whiting, F.; Connell, R. (1959). "Silica urolithiasis in beef cattle. 3. Chemical and physical composition of ... National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse (2006). "Crohn's Disease (NIH Publication No. 06-3410)". Digestive ... Kidney stones are more common in people with Crohn's disease;[24] Crohn's disease is associated with hyperoxaluria and ... As noted above (section on calcium oxalate stones), people with inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis ...
"Leptospirosis in Cattle". National Animal Disease Information Service (UK). Archived from the original on 2014-06-19. Retrieved ... Tuberculosis is able to be transmitted from cattle mainly via milk products that are unpasteurised. The disease has been ... Crohn's disease has been linked to infection with the bacterium M. paratuberculosis,[19][20][21][22][23] which has been found ... paratuberculosis in Crohn's disease". Inflamm. Bowel Dis. 11 (12): 1123. doi:10.1097/01.MIB.0000191609.20713.ea. PMID 16306778. ...
A fatal disease of cattle, probably rinderpest, spreads through the Italian provinces of Padua, Udine, Treviso, and Vicenza, ... Great numbers of cattle die in Italy, as they had in previous years (1559, 1562, 1566, 1590, 1598) in other European regions ... Calves are also not slaughtered for a some time afterwards, so that Italy's cattle herds can be replenished. At the behest of ... Dobyns, Henry F. (1993). "Disease Transfer at Contact". Annual Review of Anthropology. 22: 273-291. doi:10.1146/annurev.anthro. ...
A fatal disease of cattle, probably rinderpest, spreads through the Italian provinces of Padua, Udine, Treviso, and Vicenza, ... Great numbers of cattle die in Italy, as they had in previous years (1559, 1562, 1566, 1590, 1598) in other European regions ... Calves are also not slaughtered for a some time afterwards, so that Italy's cattle herds can be replenished. At the behest of ... August 2 - Jamestown: Deputy Governor Sir Thomas Gates returns to Virginia with 280 people, provisions and cattle on 6 ships ...
Olafson P, MacCallum AD, Fox FH (July 1946). "An apparently new transmissible disease of cattle". The Cornell Veterinarian. 36 ... These discoveries have continued in the 21st century as new viral diseases such as SARS[72] and nipah virus[73] have emerged. ... Cossart Y (October 1981). "Parvovirus B19 finds a disease". Lancet. 2 (8253): 988-9. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(81)91185-5. PMID ... Cooper LZ (1985). "The history and medical consequences of rubella". Reviews of Infectious Diseases. 7 Suppl 1: S2-10. doi: ...
In 1931 80 head of cattle were found to have pleuropneumonia in one muster. The disease meant cattle had to be quarantined. In ... The property was stocked with cattle and soon after the cattle tick first appeared in the West Kimberley regions. Kimberley ... "Cattle Tick in Western Australia". The Brisbane Courier. Queensland: National Library of Australia. 2 July 1918. p. 8. ... "Stock diseases". The West Australian. Perth: National Library of Australia. 4 November 1931. p. 4. Retrieved 15 December 2013. ...
... there was an outbreak of a previously unrecognized cattle disease in the northern United States and Canada. Cattle were ... 64: 553-6. Roderick LM (1931). "A problem in the coagulation of the blood; "sweet clover disease of the cattle"". Am J Physiol ... ISBN 0-443-04990-4. Schofield FW (1924). "Damaged sweet clover; the cause of a new disease in cattle simulating haemorrhagic ... Kurnik D, Loebstein R, Farfel Z, Ezra D, Halkin H, Olchovsky D (March 2004). "Complex drug-drug-disease interactions between ...
These migrants came to the jungle area to clear forest and grow crops and raise livestock, especially cattle. Now there are ... They traditionally regard barn owls "disease givers". Agriculture is the basic economic activity of the Tzeltal people. ... Domestic animals include pigs, donkeys, cattle and domestic fowl. Those who live in larger villages tend to specialize in craft ...
... is a worldwide disease of cattle. Symptoms include ring or horseshoe shaped scabs on the teats, which usually heal ... This disease in humans is nearly identical to orf. Farmyard pox James, William D.; Berger, Timothy G.; et al. (2006). Andrews' ... Pseudocowpox is a disease caused by Pseudocowpox virus, (also known as "Paravaccinia") a virus of the family Poxviridae and the ... Diseases of the Skin: clinical Dermatology. Saunders Elsevier. ISBN 0-7216-2921-0. Fenner, Frank J.; Gibbs, E. Paul J.; Murphy ...
... (also cattle plague or steppe murrain) was an infectious viral disease of cattle, domestic buffalo, and many other ... The disease is believed to have originated in Asia, later spreading through the transport of cattle. Other cattle epizootics ... The disease is highly communicable and spreads rapidly once introduced into nonimmune herds. Cattle herds are no longer ... The use of attenuated culture virus as a vaccine for cattle". Res Vet Sci. 3: 172-182. "EMPRES Transboundary Animal Diseases ...
Smith turned his attention to Texas fever, a debilitating cattle disease; this work is detailed in a chapter in Microbe Hunters ... Established by Congress to combat a wide range of animal diseases-from infectious disease of swine to bovine pneumonia, Texas ... associated with the disease of the fetal membranes in cattle". J Exp Med. 30 (4): 299-311. doi:10.1084/jem.30.4.299. "Smith, ... Theobald Smith, Head of The New Department Of Animal Diseases At The Rockefeller Institute". The World's Work: A History of Our ...
2007). "Endocarditis in cattle caused by Bartonella bovis". Emerging Infectious Diseases. 13 (9): 1383. doi:10.3201/ ... Welc-Falęciak, Renata; Grono, Krzysztof (2013). "The first cases of Bartonella bovis infection in cattle from Central Europe". ...
The Texas cattle were immune to this disease; but the ticks that they left on their bedding areas infected the local cattle, ... Used before and just after the Civil War, the Shawnee Trail gathered cattle from east and west of its main stem, which passed ... The Shawnee Trail was the earliest and easternmost route by which Texas Longhorn cattle were taken to the north. It played a ... Early drovers referred to their route as the cattle trail, the Sedalia Trail, the Kansas Trail, or simply the trail. Why some ...
He found feeding cattle bonemeal prevented the disease. His work was quoted as recently as 2012 by Bigalke. During the Boer War ... Borthwick served as Edington's assistant in the study of animal diseases until 1893 when he was succeeded by Thomas Bowhill ... Borthwick did important work in finding a prophylaxis for lamsiekte in cattle. ...
The Nature of Lambing Sickness (1929) Greig, J. Russell (1933). "Pine: A disease affecting sheep and young cattle". The ... "Mineral Deficiency Diseases In Farm Animals * *Summary of Lecture delivered at the Royal Veterinary College, London, May 18th, ...
The disease is relatively common, infecting cattle only. Treatment is the use of either subconjunctival injection of a ... ISBN 978-0-443-10209-7. "Gonorrhea Laboratory Information: Moraxella catarrhalis". Center for Disease Control and Prevention. ... but can gain access to the lower respiratory tract in patients with chronic chest disease or compromised host defenses, thus ...
"Cattle disease vaccine launched 30 years after invention". 2010-05-07. SciDev.net (7 May 2010). *Theileria reviewed and ... Englund, L. P. (2003). "New diseases and increased risk of diseases in companion animals and horses due to transport". Acta ... In May 2010, it was reported that a vaccine to protect cattle against East Coast fever had been approved and registered by the ... Theileria can be transmitted to cattle through tick bites, including the brown ear tick Rhipicephalus spp. The cause of bovine ...
"Cattle disease vaccine launched 30 years after invention". 2010-05-07. SciDev.net (7 May 2010). East Coast Fever reviewed and ... It does not include tropical theileriosis (or Mediterranean theileriosis), a cattle disease caused by T. annulata, nor human ... It excludes diseases caused by other Theileria East Coast fever or theileriosis is an animal disease in Africa caused by the ... The intermediate hosts for T. parva are cattle. The definitive hosts are the ticks. Native cattle are often resistant to the ...
Thomas J. Divers (2008). Rebhun's diseases of dairy cattle. Elsevier Health Sciences. ISBN 978-1-4160-3137-6. Retrieved 18 May ... Heather Smith Thomas (2009). The Cattle Health Handbook: Preventive Care, Disease Treatments & Emergency Procedures for ...
Some farmers affirm that their Croatian Sheepdog knows and will single out every head of cattle by hearing its name. In the ... It is healthy, resistant to disease and not expensive to keep. It possesses a well-developed herding instinct and is an ... Probably because it possesses an excellent hereditary instinct for working sheep and cattle, selection on the basis of ... The breed also possesses an hereditary predisposition for working cattle. ...
"Plans to eradicate tick disease in New Caledonian cattle". North Queensland Register. 20 March 2008. Retrieved 28 September ...
It causes skin disease in cattle, horses, and pigs. Most notably, it is the agent that causes exudative dermatitis, also known ... Devriese, LA; Derycke, J (May 1979). "Staphylococcus hyicus in cattle". Research in veterinary science. 26 (3): 356-8. PMID ... as greasy pig disease, in piglets. Devriese, L. A.; Hajek, V.; Oeding, P.; Meyer, S. A.; Schliefer, K. H. (1 October 1978). " ... doi:10.1111/j.1574-695X.1998.tb01140.x. Merck Veterinary Manual: Exudative Epidermitis (Greasy pig disease) - http://www. ...
The condition in cattle is known as hardware disease. Cystocentesis Organ replacement in animals American College of Veterinary ... and dairy cattle, and Livestock dehorning in cattle, sheep, and goats. These procedures have been controversial and recently ... A variety of non-edible objects are commonly swallowed by dogs, cats, and cattle. These foreign bodies can cause obstruction of ... Neutering is also performed as an emergency procedure to treat certain reproductive diseases, like pyometra and testicular ...
As a symbol of prestige, the traditional Ila do not routinely eat their cattle.. However, drought and disease have affected the ... They are famous for their large herds of cattle with livestock farming, not surprisingly, their main economic activity. Other ... The Ila people, the traditional inhabitants of Namwala District, engage mostly in cattle herding, fishing, hunting and ... cattle population. The Ila are closely related in language and culture to their more numerous Tonga neighbours in Southern ...
Abortion in dairy cattle was also observed as a major cause of disease by neosporosis. Although this disease is worldwide, it ... However, the disease is often fatal to young puppies. Preventative vaccines have been tested on cattle. An inactivated vaccine ... One control method is to test for the disease and remove infected cattle from the herd. Another method of control is preventing ... In addition to being an important cause of cattle abortions, neosporosis is a significant disease in dogs throughout the world ...
The marsh environment meant that certain diseases, such as schistosomiasis and malaria, were endemic;[12] Maʻdānī agriculture ... they also kept some sheep and cattle. Rice cultivation was especially important; it was carried out in small plots cleared in ...
Export of contaminated meat and bone meal and live cattle incubating the disease caused the spread of bovine spongiform ... and potential secondary human to human spread of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, so that both diseases should gradually ... It is sometimes forgotten that in the story of bovine spongiform encephalopathy and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease there is ... Bovine spongiform encephalopathy and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease BMJ 2001; 322 :841 ...
Celebration honours success against cattle disease. FAO Director-General Jacques Diouf lauds international cooperation. ... "The total eradication of rinderpest - a disease that decimated cattle, buffalo and many other animal species, both domestic and ... or cattle plague, one of historys deadliest animal diseases and a long-time threat to human livelihoods and food security.. ... The global eradication of rinderpest, achieved under an FAO coordinated programme, makes the virus the first animal disease to ...
The Vegetarian Societys fact sheets about cattle - dairy cows and welfare, supermarket policies and soil association, beef ... 700,000 cattle were culled (1).. Other diseases Cows can also suffer from a range of other diseases. These can include grass ... Cattle. Disease. Dairy cows can suffer from a range of welfare and disease problems including mastitis, lameness, ketosis and ... The virus affects cloven-hoofed animals such as cattle, sheep, pigs, goats and deer. The disease is not normally fatal to adult ...
Industries ministry said on Wednesday that an eighth farm in the countrys South Island has tested positive for the cattle ... disease mycoplasma bovis, which can seriously affect animal health. ... ministry said on Wednesday that an eighth farm in the countrys South Island has tested positive for the cattle disease ... Two other nearby farms suspected of being affected by the disease were being tested and restrictions have been placed on the ...
... is a highly contagious disease that affects cattle throughout most of sub Saharan Africa. It is one of the most seri... ... Developing disease-resistant cattle for Africa - Duration: 11:11. International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) 2,623 views ... Developing disease-resistant cattle for Africa - Summary - Duration: 3:20. International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) ... Genetic analysis of costly cattle disease may aid in vaccine development - Duration: 1:47. UFHealth 522 views ...
... makes the virus the first animal disease to be eliminated from its natural setting. ... Celebration honours success against cattle disease. Tags: RINDERPEST, ANIMAL DISEASE, ANIMAL HEALTH, ANIMAL DISEASE ERADICATION ... "The total eradication of rinderpest - a disease that decimated cattle, buffalo and many other animal species, both domestic and ... or cattle plague, one of historys deadliest animal diseases and a long-time threat to human livelihoods and food security. ...
The discovery is important because cattle in feed yards are dying from brisket disease. The disease, which results from ... Analyzing Disease Mutations Using Online Cattle Genomes. March 8, 2017. Thanks to U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) ... ARS Home » News & Events » News Articles » Research News » 2017 » Analyzing Disease Mutations Using Online Cattle Genomes ... These bulls look alike, but they may carry different genes that influence disease. ARS research has cut the time and cost to ...
Mark Bryan also says the cattle disease could be a major setback for efforts to reduce antibiotic use in farm animals. ... and arthritis in cattle. Hes part of a support group formed in the area. He says farmers and share milkers need to be making ... Farmers in limbo over cattle disease. From Nine To Noon, 9:09 am on 7 February 2018 ... Mark Bryan also says the cattle disease could be a major setback for efforts to reduce antibiotic use in farm animals. ...
WELLINGTON, Aug 29 (Reuters) - Three more New Zealand farms have been identified as having a serious bacterial cattle disease, ... The disease is spread by close contact between animals and does not pose a food safety risk or any risk to humans. ... which first had two farms test positive for the Mycoplasma bovis disease in July. ...
New Zealand said on Monday a fourth dairy farm has been hit by a bacterial cattle disease that can seriously affect animal ... New Zealand said on Monday a fourth dairy farm has been hit by a bacterial cattle disease that can seriously affect animal ... New Zealand said on Monday a fourth dairy farm has been hit by a bacterial cattle disease that can seriously affect animal ... www.independent.ie/business/farming/dairy/new-zealand-finds-4th-farm-hit-by-bacterial-cattle-disease-36187921.html ...
Cattle disease vaccine launched 30 years after invention. By Maina Waruru. [NAIROBI] An effective vaccine that languished, ... The vaccine protects cattle against the deadly East Coast Fever (ECF), which kills two cows every minute - one million a year ... The vaccine protects cattle against the deadly East Coast Fever (ECF), which kills two cows every minute - one million a year ... The disease is caused by the parasite Theileria parve, transmitted by brown ear ticks. The East African Veterinary Research ...
Epizootic hemorrhagic disease (EHD) is a disease of great concern for deer in North America. The epizootic hemorrhagic disease ... In years of high incidence, the disease can cross over into cattle by insect vectors, especially biting midges, gnats, and ... Deer Disease Confirmed in Nebraska Cattle September 14, 2012 04:04 AM ... Confirmed cases of epizootic hemorrhagic disease have occurred in North American cattle, in conjunction with epidemics in deer ...
The breeding bull from which the mutation and thus the deformation originate has now been put down to prevent the disease from ... research conducted at the University of Copenhagen is able to uncover a hitherto unknown disease found among Holstein cattle. ... researchers-discover-new-cattle-disease-and-prevent-it-from-spreading/. More in Agriculture. * Global grazing lands ... Researchers discover new cattle disease and prevent it from spreading University of Copenhagen The Faculty of Health and ...
... a costly disease of beef and dairy cattle that also poses potential ... The disease costs dairy farmers and beef cattle producers an estimated $168 million annually. In cattle, the infection causes ... a costly disease of beef and dairy cattle that also poses potential human health hazards. ... Cattle with false-positive reactions may still have to be quarantined until their infection status is resolved, just as if they ...
Dairy cattle are susceptible to the same diseases as beef cattle. Many diseases and pests plague the cattle industries of the ... This disease produces undulant fever in humans through milk from infected cows. Leptospirosis, prevalent in warm-blooded ... One of the more common diseases to be found in the developed countries is brucellosis, which has been controlled quite ... Diseases of beef and dairy cattle. Dairy cattle are susceptible to the same diseases as beef cattle. Many diseases and pests ...
Scientists have announced that they expect to be able to announce the worldwide eradication of the cattle disease rinderpest ... Scientists have announced that they expect to be able to announce the worldwide eradication of the cattle disease rinderpest ... The disease has not been seen in Europe since the early 1900s, but rinderpest remained a serious problem in sub-Saharan Africa ... The disease is suspected as having played a role in the decline and collapse of the Roman Empire and recurring epidemics in ...
... despite another Canterbury farm testing positive for a bacterial cattle disease. Mycoplasma bovis is ... Federated Farmers upbeat despite new case of cattle disease. Author Newstalk ZB staff, Section. National, Publish Date. Monday ... despite another Canterbury farm testing positive for a bacterial cattle disease. ... The disease was first found on a South Canterbury farm in July. (Photo \ NZ Herald). ...
Head of cattle, nearly 90 of them which tested positive for deadly brucellosis disease two years ago will be put to death in ... Brucellosis disease function as facultative intracellular parasites, causing chronic disease, which usually persists for life ... about the KVASU plan to transport and kill these head of cattle as they had tested positive for the deadly disease also called ... The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always ...
... a disease traceability initiative. The goal is to develop a national infrastructure for disease ... Cattle disease traceability advances Cattle Organizations from Major Beef Producing Regions Launch U.S. CattleTrace * Jan 27, ... "Cattle disease traceability is a top priority in the beef cattle industry, and this partnership will continue to help guide the ... In order to protect the producers share of the protein market from the potential impact of a disease event, cattle ...
... and Land Stewardship announced Thursday that Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease has been found in more than fifteen herds of cattle ... Several herds of cattle in western Iowa have tested positive for a disease that normally targets deer. The Iowa Department of ... The disease can be fatal to deer.. The Iowa Department of Agriculture is advising cattle farmers to use insect control to ... The disease isnt likely to prove fatal for cattle but can cause fever, mouth and gum ulcers, swollen tongue and lameness. It ...
Better test for cattle disease available at Cornell. Updated November 1, 2012 at 12:20 PM. ; Posted November 1, 2012 at 11:45 ... Ithaca, NY -- A test for the cattle disease salmonella dublin that is cheaper, quicker, safer and more sensitive than ... Salmonella can cause serious disease on cattle farms, killing calves, causing cows to abort, contaminating raw milk and harming ... As the cattle-adapted strain salmonella dublin creeps into the northeastern United States, veterinarians and farmers struggle ...
Comparison of disease severity scoring systems for dairy cattle with acute coliform mastitis.. Wenz JR1, Garry FB, Barrington ... Cows were classified as having mild, moderate, or severe disease with a scoring system based on systemic disease signs alone ( ... To compare use of 4 disease severity scoring systems to predict bacteremia (yes vs no) and outcome (survived vs died or culled ... 21%, 53%, 63%, and 38% of cows were classified as having severe disease with the SSS, LSS, LS1, and LS2 systems, respectively. ...
... testing cattle this week. It is not something I do very often nowadays. TB testing used to be a regular job for all mixed and ... to make sure cattle that had just been moved onto the premises did not have the disease, before introducing them to the rest of ... This is in huge contrast to some parts of the country, where the disease is rife and all stock must be tested annually. It is a ... But first I need to go back to check my cattle for lumps. It is not just me that is hoping for a clear test. ...
... or mad cow disease) since 2003. Under current USDA rules, these higher-risk cattle are allowed to commingle with the U.S. herd ... The USDA must protect the U.S. cattle herd, and consumers, from the introduction of BSE. ... USDAs Lax Import Rules Expose US Cattle to Mad Cow Disease - Canada, which lacks mandatory testing, just announced its 17th ... USDAs Lax Import Rules Expose US Cattle to Mad Cow Disease. Wall Street Reform Act Already Benefiting Cattle Industry. USDA ...
... is a disease that is almost always fatal in cattle. Cows contract MCF after coming into contact with wildebeest carrying a form ... Scientists develop vaccine against cattle disease. April 30, 2013 by Marcia Malory report ... Phys.org) -Malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) is a disease that is almost always fatal in cattle. Cows contract MCF after coming ... including cattle). This acute and lethal lymphoproliferative disease occurs after a prolonged asymptomatic incubation period ...
  • WELLINGTON (Reuters) - New Zealand's Primary Industries ministry said on Wednesday that an eighth farm in the country's South Island has tested positive for the cattle disease mycoplasma bovis, which can seriously affect animal health. (reuters.com)
  • Mycoplasma bovis is common in many countries and can lead to conditions such as udder infection, pneumonia and arthritis in affected cattle, but does not pose a food safety risk or any risk to humans. (reuters.com)
  • Southland vet Mark Bryan says farmers are unable to plan for the future while they wait for results of MPI tests for Mycoplasma bovis - the bacterium causing mastitis, abortion, pneumonia, and arthritis in cattle. (radionz.co.nz)
  • Floron (Buddy) Faries, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service, says the three species of coccidia of most concern in cattle are Eimeria bovis , E.zuernii , and E. auburnensis . (beefmagazine.com)
  • Bartonella bovis was identified by PCR, gene sequences analysis, and specific internal transcribed spacer amplicon product size in 2 bovine endocarditis cases with high antibody titers, which demonstrates that B. bovis is a pathogen for cattle. (cdc.gov)
  • The vaccine protects cattle against the deadly East Coast Fever (ECF), which kills two cows every minute - one million a year - causing economic losses of US$189 million in the 11 countries in eastern and southern Africa where the disease is endemic. (scidev.net)
  • This disease produces undulant fever in humans through milk from infected cows. (britannica.com)
  • Within Danish cattle breeding the semen of one breeding bull is used to inseminate a lot of cows. (eurekalert.org)
  • Salmonella can cause serious disease on cattle farms, killing calves, causing cows to abort, contaminating raw milk and harming humans along the way. (syracuse.com)
  • While the disease seemed to have little impact on the health of the pregnant cows grazing in the foothills, it resulted in their calves being aborted, stillborn or born so weak that they soon died. (redbluffdailynews.com)
  • With expanded coverage of herd diseases, this new edition meets the growing need for management of both diseases of individual cows and medical problems affecting whole herds. (elsevier.com)
  • features diseases of individual cows, as well as problems affecting entire herds, that challenge today's large animal veterinarians. (elsevier.com)
  • To prevent white muscle disease within four weeks after birth, cows are given 15 mg of selenium, usually as sodium selenite four weeks before calving. (thecattlesite.com)
  • At least 73 cows in Nagari were reported dead due to unknown disease. (thedairysite.com)
  • In beef cattle, this is possible in high traffic areas (around hay rings, feeding areas) when mud and manure are splashed on the udder, when calving cows in dirty sheds or barns, or when cattle are held in close confinement. (farms.com)
  • Trichomoniasis is a venereal disease of cattle that causes infertility and occasional abortions in cows and heifers. (cattletoday.info)
  • To investigate the additional genetic effect of this program, a genetic-epidemiological model was developed to assess the effect of selection of cows that test negative for Johne's disease (dam selection). (wur.nl)
  • Meanwhile, adult cattle rarely develop the disease, though it can occur in thin, malnourished or severely stressed cows, or those compromised by another cattle disease. (beefmagazine.com)
  • Reproductive efficiency is further impaired during summer months and after cows develop postpartum uterine disease. (k-state.edu)
  • The current research conducted five different studies to investigate the effects of nutrition, infection, disease and different calving BCS on cows' hepatic transcriptomes and metabolic profiles using mRNA gene expression profiles, biochemical parameters, and the latest bioinformatics tools. (illinois.edu)
  • Milk production, blood metabolites, and disease biomarkers did not differ greatly between healthy and SCE cows. (illinois.edu)
  • Broad-spectrum antibiotics (antibiotics that are effective against various microorganisms), as well as powerful and specific pharmaceuticals, are effective and profitable means of keeping cattle herds healthy. (britannica.com)
  • Several herds of cattle in western Iowa have tested positive for a disease that normally targets deer. (whotv.com)
  • The Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship announced Thursday that Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease has been found in more than fifteen herds of cattle, mostly in the western part of the state. (whotv.com)
  • Cases of epizootic hemorrhagic disease, or EHD, were reported this summer in South Dakota cattle herds and in white-tailed deer. (feedstuffs.com)
  • Over 20 cattle and farmed bison herds have been infected in Wyoming, Idaho and Montana since 2002, and the presence of the disease within livestock results in additional testing requirements and trade restrictions. (usgs.gov)
  • Federated Farmers says there's no cause for concern, despite another Canterbury farm testing positive for a bacterial cattle disease. (newstalkzb.co.nz)
  • The Iowa Department of Agriculture is advising cattle farmers to use insect control to protect their animals. (whotv.com)
  • As the cattle-adapted strain salmonella dublin creeps into the northeastern United States, veterinarians and farmers struggle to catch the bacteria in time to protect livestock because these bacteria often hide dormant in carrier animals, making the strain particularly hard to diagnose. (syracuse.com)
  • McGraw says farmers who notice signs of illness in cattle should contact their veterinarian to rule out other disease. (wrn.com)
  • OVER 2 000 cattle have succumbed to tick-borne disease with farmers raising concern that if new supplies of dip stocks were not procured in time, current dip stocks will run out over the next few weeks and trigger more deaths. (co.zw)
  • Tick-borne disease is caused by people who are not dipping their animals and would like to encourage our farmers to dip their animals," he said. (co.zw)
  • The disease, is very common during the rainy season due to high tick prevalence that has thrived due to irregular cattle dipping by most farmers. (co.zw)
  • Last year, the disease claimed hundreds of cattle in Mashonaland East and Mashonaland Central provinces, leaving farmers distraught. (co.zw)
  • In Mhondoro-Mubaira area, about 100 cattle have died from the disease in Kwaramba Village in ward six, according to the Farmers Voice. (co.zw)
  • Farmers are advised not to panic and sell their cattle for peanuts," he said. (co.zw)
  • Most of the farmers in this part of Sinazongwe do not have dip tanks and rarely treat their cattle. (co.zm)
  • Cattle farmers are being urged to find out more about how new funding could help to eradicate a disease which costs the farming industry more than £60m a year. (edp24.co.uk)
  • The problem with this disease is that very often farmers don't realise their cattle have it: they just think that their yield is five or 10% lower than what it could be. (edp24.co.uk)
  • British farmers know that trading cattle can bring risks of disease transmission. (producer.com)
  • The findings showed that iatrogenic diseases were more often caused by farmers (92.6per cent) than by bovine practitioners (7.4 per cent). (bva.co.uk)
  • If farmers pay the annual fee, the money raised will be used to procure dipping chemicals and that will see the cattle being dipped regularly," she said. (co.zw)
  • Thousands of cattle have been lost in parts of Mashonaland East Province especially among the communal farmers, at a time when the government is working towards rebuilding the national herd and restocking. (co.zw)
  • In cattle, the infection causes spontaneous abortions, calf deaths, calves with low birth weights and reduced milk production. (chicagotribune.com)
  • Cattle with false-positive reactions may still have to be quarantined until their infection status is resolved, just as if they had developed the disease,`` Adams said. (chicagotribune.com)
  • Scientists say a peek into the eyes of cattle may become the basis for a long-sought test to detect infection with the agent that causes Mad Cow Disease. (medindia.net)
  • U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists have identified the primary site where the virus that causes foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) begins infection in cattle. (eurekalert.org)
  • Signs of EHD infection include fever, mouth and gum ulcers, stiffness, and lameness, similar to those of Foot and Mouth Disease. (wrn.com)
  • Reverse transcription-PCR and sequence analyses indicated that the virus belonged to EHD virus serotype 6, thus confirming EHD virus infection of cattle in Turkey. (cdc.gov)
  • However, the clinical signs of the disease were consistent with either EHD or BTV infection ( 6 , 8 - 10 ). (cdc.gov)
  • We tested the hypotheses that cattle grazing used in woodland management decreases the density of questing I. ricinus, and that it decreases the nympal infection prevalence of B. burgdorferi sensu lato. (wur.nl)
  • We further expected the nympal infection prevalence of tick-borne pathogens that utilize cattle as amplifying hosts, namely Anaplasma phagocytophilum, and Babesia sensu stricto, to increase. (wur.nl)
  • this virus can replicate in ferrets (a model for human influenza infection), and a seroprevalance of 91% was found in persons working closely with cattle ( 5 ). (cdc.gov)
  • The research could help identify potential routes of infection and therefore provide information on potential ways to improve disease control strategies. (producer.com)
  • Analysis of antemortem infection dynamics demonstrated that the subclinical divergence between FMDV carriers and animals that cleared the infection had occurred by 10 days postinfection (dpi) in vaccinated cattle and by 21 dpi in nonvaccinated animals. (asm.org)
  • The anatomic distribution of virus in subclinically infected, vaccinated cattle was restricted to the pharynx throughout both the early and the persistent phases of infection. (asm.org)
  • The work described here elucidates aspects of the FMDV carrier state in cattle which may facilitate identification and/or abrogation of asymptomatic FMDV infection. (asm.org)
  • Clinical disease, viral excretion, interferon and antibody were studied following infection with virus of types 0, A and C. Interferon was detected for up to 4 days at the period of maximum viral excretion. (bl.uk)
  • This is a slow, progressive disease that begins when calves (not adult cattle) are infected with the MAP bacteria, most often around the time of birth but infection can occur up to 6 months of age and very rarely after. (farms.com)
  • Disease organisms transferred to the cow's vagina from the bull during breeding migrate up to the uterus and cause the infection. (cattletoday.info)
  • The role of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) carrier cattle in causing new outbreaks is still a matter of debate and it is important to find out these carrier animals by post-outbreak serosurveillance to declare freedom from FMDV infection. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • We collected nasal and saliva samples from 32 vaccinated and 7 unvaccinated FMDV carrier cattle and 48 vaccinated and 13 unvaccinated non-carrier cattle (total n=100) during the acute phase of infection (up to 28 days post-challenge) and then from limited number of animals up to a maximum 168 days post-challenge. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • We distinguish between infection and disease," Faries says. (beefmagazine.com)
  • The definition of disease implies infection and damage, plus clinical symptoms," Faries says. (beefmagazine.com)
  • A clinical trial, including five East Coast fever (ECF) control strategies (involving tick control and/or immunisation by infection-and-treatment) in five different groups of traditionally managed Sanga cattle, was conducted in Central Province of Zambia over 2.5 years between 1992 and 1995. (biomedsearch.com)
  • People don't die from Mad Cow Disease, but from CJD after BSE infection. (ourstrangeplanet.com)
  • According to SRUC experts by the time one or two animals are showing obvious signs of respiratory infection many others in the group will be going through the less eye catching, early phase of the disease. (sruc.ac.uk)
  • This contagious and chronic progressive bacterial infection is proficient with destroying the digestive tracts of cattle, sheep, goats, deer, bison, llamas and alpacas. (yorktonthisweek.com)
  • Johne's disease is found worldwide, with the infection first reported in North America in 1908. (yorktonthisweek.com)
  • One of the more common diseases to be found in the developed countries is brucellosis , which has been controlled quite successfully through vaccination and testing. (britannica.com)
  • In addition, cattle vaccinated with strain 19 sometimes react to brucellosis test almost exactly as if they were actually infected with the disease. (chicagotribune.com)
  • Head of cattle, nearly 90 of them which tested positive for deadly brucellosis disease two years ago will be put to death in two weeks' time, decided the experts of the Kerala Veterinary and Animal Sciences University (KVASU). (medindia.net)
  • Brucellosis disease function as facultative intracellular parasites, causing chronic disease, which usually persists for life in cattle. (medindia.net)
  • The U.S. Geological Survey and its partners have shown how brucellosis has impacted cattle, bison and elk in the greater Yellowstone area. (usgs.gov)
  • Scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey and its partners have shown how brucellosis, a disease which has significant economic implications for the cattle industry and wildlife health, has been transmitted back and forth between cattle, bison and elk in the greater Yellowstone area. (usgs.gov)
  • Federal scientists developed and analyzed a genomic dataset of Brucella abortus, the bacteria that causes brucellosis, which spanned 30 years and included samples from cattle, bison and elk. (usgs.gov)
  • This study shows that elk, in some areas distant from the feeding grounds, have strains that are unrelated to bison, suggesting that management of bison and feeding grounds may not affect brucellosis dynamics in these other elk populations, where the disease has been spreading. (usgs.gov)
  • There is a Cooperative State Federal Brucellosis program in the United States to eradicate the disease from this country. (vt.edu)
  • States are designated "Brucellosis Class Free" when there are no cattle or bison infected with brucellosis for 12 consecutive months. (vt.edu)
  • Because the lesions look very similar to Vesicular Stomatitis and/or Foot and Mouth Disease, foreign animal disease investigations were performed with submissions to the Foreign Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory at Plum Island, NY. (agweb.com)
  • Foot-and-mouth disease has been eliminated from most of North America , some Central American countries, Australia, and New Zealand . (britannica.com)
  • Presence of Foot and Mouth Disease in That State Is Denied. (nytimes.com)
  • The effects of foot and mouth disease are gruesome, not to mention it is easily spread and can also be passed to humans. (change.org)
  • By donating, you are opening a pathway for the animals that have foot and mouth disease to be cured, and also opening a pathway for the animals that don't have the disease to be protected. (change.org)
  • Evidence of partial protection against foot-and-mouth disease in cattle immunized with a recombinant adenovirus vector expressing the precursor pol. (nih.gov)
  • Causes of mucosal disease, stomatitis, and fever, including bovine viral diarrhea, foot and mouth disease, and infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, were considered, but the rate of spread and some of the clinical signs ruled out these diseases. (cdc.gov)
  • IMPORTANCE The existence of a prolonged, asymptomatic carrier state is a political impediment for control and potential eradication of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD). (asm.org)
  • Natural and induced factors inhibiting foot and mouth disease virus were investigated in bovine secretions, especially in those from the upper respiratory and oro pharyngeal areas. (bl.uk)
  • Virus Excretion from Foot-And-Mouth Disease Virus Carrier Cattle and Their Potential Role in Causing New Outbreaks. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • Tissue culture adaptation of foot-and-mouth disease virus selects viruses that bind to heparin and are attenuated in cattle. (asm.org)
  • Isolates of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) exist as complex mixtures of variants. (asm.org)
  • Scientists search for a preventive measure for cattle suffering from foot and mouth disease in the United States. (criticalpast.com)
  • A film titled 'Suppressing foot and mouth disease' about the effects ad means of controlling foot and mouth disease in cattle. (criticalpast.com)
  • Symptoms of foot and mouth disease in a cow. (criticalpast.com)
  • In a study among Holstein calves published in the scientific journal BMC Genetics they have discovered a hitherto undescribed disease among animals - a facial deformation they have chosen to call Facial Dysplasia Syndrome. (eurekalert.org)
  • The researchers have discovered the genetic mutation that is the cause of the disease among calves and traced it back to one particular breeding bull. (eurekalert.org)
  • The bull has now been put down to prevent further cases of the disease among new-born calves. (eurekalert.org)
  • After having received information from veterinarians of calves with facial deformations, Jørgen Agerholm went looking for more cases in his network of cattle veterinarians, including on Facebook. (eurekalert.org)
  • This gene was sequenced in the calves' genome, and the researchers were then able to determine that a mutation in this gene had caused the disease among the calves. (eurekalert.org)
  • This means that the calves developed the deformation when the mutation was passed on from either the mother or father and not from both the mother and the father, which is the case with many hereditary diseases. (eurekalert.org)
  • Our aim was always to lower the number of sick and dead calves, as some hereditary diseases are very painful and invalidating. (eurekalert.org)
  • The disease, which occurs in California's coastal mountains and the foothill regions of California, Southern Oregon and Northern Nevada, annually results in the death of an estimated 45,000 to 90,000 unborn calves. (redbluffdailynews.com)
  • Respiratory disease in calves, caused by a range of different infectious agents, accounts for major economic loss to the agricultural industry. (vetcontact.com)
  • White muscle disease is also known as nutritional myopathy of calves. (thecattlesite.com)
  • Calves affected by the congenital form of white muscle disease usually die within 2-3 days of birth due to cardiac muscle degeneration. (thecattlesite.com)
  • One of the five most economically important cattle diseases in the industry, coccidiosis is a costly parasitic disease, primarily in young calves. (beefmagazine.com)
  • For this retrospective study, 4262 clinical records of cattle admitted to the veterinary teaching hospital of the University of Milan between 2005 and 2017 were analysed, and 121 cases (2.8 per cent), referred for an iatrogenic-related disease, were selected. (bva.co.uk)
  • Those projects are facilitated by Florida Cattlemen's Association, Texas Cattle Feeders Association, Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association and Kentucky Cattlemen's Association. (hpj.com)
  • Burt Rutherford, a spokesman for the Texas Cattle Feeders Association, praised the mill for quickly notifying the FDA and the feedlot. (mad-cow.org)
  • Most infections with the North American strains of EHD appear to be subclinical and seropositive cattle may be common in some regions. (agweb.com)
  • The problem is difficult to detect early in subclinical cattle (subclinical=before diarrhea and weight loss develop) but these infected animals can and often do shed high numbers of the MAP organism, contaminating the farm long before there is evidence of a problem. (farms.com)
  • All cattle have subclinical infections, which are held in check by host immunity. (beefmagazine.com)
  • Cattle showing signs of oral or nasal lesions should be examined by a veterinarian immediately. (agweb.com)
  • There are no restrictions on these higher-risk OTM cattle when they enter the United States," said R-CALF USA President/Region VI Director Max Thornsberry, a Missouri veterinarian who also chairs the group's animal health committee. (opednews.com)
  • This disease is known in the cattle industry as shipping fever because it commonly occurs when cattle are stressed from being shipped hundreds of miles to feedlots, said Burgess, a veterinarian, genome biology researcher and co-director of MSU's Institute for Digital Biology. (cattletoday.com)
  • State Veterinarian Paul McGraw says it will continue to be a threat to cattle until there's a hard freeze that kills the insects. (wrn.com)
  • If you need advice on a cattle health problem please contact your local veterinarian. (cattletoday.info)
  • Symptoms in cattle include fever, swollen eyes, ulcers on the mouth, lameness and labored breathing. (agweb.com)
  • Symptoms in cattle include sores in the mouth. (feedstuffs.com)
  • Symptoms of the disease include, decrease in milk production, depression, weakness and difficulty in breathing for the animal, followed by rapid and shallow breaths. (co.zw)
  • If there is deep damage to the intestinal mucosa, there will be symptoms and it becomes disease - which we call coccidiosis. (beefmagazine.com)
  • On 27 June, chief veterinary officers and other experts from around the world will meet at FAO Headquarters to discuss measures to safeguard remaining samples of virus and vaccines in laboratories, and to assess risks and response requirements in the fight against other high impact diseases. (fao.org)
  • And of course it also improves the financial situation of the cattle owners, who are able to minimise losses', explains Jørgen Agerholm, who is also Head of the Section for Veterinary Reproduction and Obstetrics. (eurekalert.org)
  • Ithaca, NY -- A test for the cattle disease salmonella dublin that is cheaper, quicker, safer and more sensitive than traditional bacteriological tests is now available for the first time in the United States at the state Animal Health Diagnostic Center at Cornell University's College of Veterinary Medicine. (syracuse.com)
  • The government, through the Veterinary Services Department, has since suspended cattle movement into Harare. (co.zw)
  • The veterinary department informed me that approximately 50 cattle have died because of babesiosis, a tick-borne disease," he said. (co.zm)
  • The disease was regarded as unusual or atypical for the region, and cases were reported to the Uludag University Faculty of Veterinary Medicine. (cdc.gov)
  • To determine whether influenza D virus was present in cattle in Ireland and to investigate epidemiologic factors that might be related to this virus, we conducted a cross-sectional study by using 320 nasal swab specimens from cattle with respiratory disease that were submitted to the Central Veterinary Research Laboratory (Celbridge, Ireland) for routine bovine viral pathogen testing during 2014-2016. (cdc.gov)
  • Retrospective analysis of iatrogenic diseases in cattle requiring admission to a veterinary hospital. (bva.co.uk)
  • Iatrogenic diseases in veterinary medicine are often related to malpractice or lack of skill. (bva.co.uk)
  • Gary Zimmerman, veterinary researcher in Livingston, MT, says there are several different genera and many species of pathogenic coccidia, but only a few affect cattle. (beefmagazine.com)
  • In my veterinary practice of more than twenty years, which has been devoted in large part to cattle, with special reference to the disease of abortion, I have found that in nearly every case of abortion, except such as were caused by a fall, a kick or other absolute violence, the germs of the disease were in both the cow and the foetus. (oldandsold.com)
  • The Director of Veterinary Services, Dr Obatoulo Ushewekunze says the high rate of cattle deaths in Hwedza and other parts of Mashonaland East Province is due to tick borne diseases as a result of prolonged periods of non-dipping. (co.zw)
  • In: McGavin M.D. and Zachary J.F. (eds), Pathologic basis of veterinary disease, 2nd edn, (Mosby-Elsevier, St Louis, Missouri) 732-374. (springer.com)
  • Bovine Respiratory Disease or BRD is caused by many different things", says Inverness-based Veterinary Investigation Officer with SRUC, Franz Brulisauer. (sruc.ac.uk)
  • The disease, which results from elevated pulmonary arterial pressure, is caused by a lack of oxygen and was commonly thought to occur in cattle raised at altitudes of 5,000 feet or higher. (usda.gov)
  • Beef byproducts are banned for cattle or sheep feed but commonly used in swine and poultry feed. (mad-cow.org)
  • White line disease is characterized by hemorrhage into or separation (avulsion) of the abaxial wall, most commonly at the heel-sole junction. (merckvetmanual.com)
  • More color photographs and illustrations are provided so that clinical signs and pathology of the diseases and diagnostic procedures commonly used in practice can be visualized. (elsevier.com)
  • The most commonly used clostridial vaccination in cattle is the 7-way type which protects against Clostridium chauveoi (blackleg), Clostridium septicum and Clostridium sordelli (malignant edema), Clostridium novyi (black disease), and three types of Clostridium perfringens (enterotoxemia). (cattletoday.info)
  • The enzyme immunoassay (EIA) is a versatile and highly sensitive new tool that can be used to detect a wide variety of infectious diseases or toxic agents and other low molecular weight compound. (unt.edu)
  • The global eradication of rinderpest, achieved under an FAO coordinated programme, makes the virus the first animal disease to be eliminated from its natural setting thanks to human efforts and international cooperation, and only the second disease of any kind to be eradicated, after smallpox in humans. (fao.org)
  • The total eradication of rinderpest - a disease that decimated cattle, buffalo and many other animal species, both domestic and wild - is proof of this today. (fao.org)
  • Deaths in cattle due to EHD have been confirmed by the SDSU Animal Disease Research and Diagnostic Laboratory, but these death losses are considered very uncommon overall. (feedstuffs.com)
  • January disease is another serious problem in cattle, with over 2 000 cattle deaths already recorded from tick-borne disease this season. (co.zw)
  • Tuberculosis is a global burden with oneâ third of the worldâ s population infected with the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and an annual 1.4 million deaths from the disease. (omicsonline.org)
  • INDONESIA - An unknown disease has caused dozens of cattle deaths in Siguntur Nagari, or the traditional village in Dharmasraya District, West Sumatra Province. (thedairysite.com)
  • Chief of Siguntur Nagari recalled that a cow, which was suspected to carry an unknown disease, from a neighboring hamlet was wandering inside Siguntur Nagari territory prior to the deaths of dozens of cattle in the region. (thedairysite.com)
  • Cattle, sheep, and goats are at the highest risk of developing anthrax, but other farm animals, as well as wildlife and humans, can contract the disease. (vt.edu)
  • The AWBI had received a complaint from a whistle-blower about the KVASU plan to transport and kill these head of cattle as they had tested positive for the deadly disease also called Malta fever. (medindia.net)
  • Since implementation of the 2007 OTM Rule, Canada has detected one positive BSE case for about every 10,000 head of cattle tested, which represents a rate of detection greater than several European countries considered to be of high risk for BSE," said R-CALF USA CEO Bill Bullard. (opednews.com)
  • Sung Hua-tsung, deputy head of plant and animal quarantine at the cabinet's Council of Agriculture, said the virus confirmed Thursday in two head of cattle on a farm on Quemoy, which is located just a few kilometers off the Chinese mainland, is not identical to the type of hoof-and-mouth disease prevalent in Taiwan. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Meanwhile, Quemoy authorities sealed off the affected farm and started to kill all its 65 head of cattle. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Between January and May, a total of 295 head of cattle were sent from Quemoy to Taiwan, including 55 from the infected farm. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • In the last few weeks, the Nebraska Department of Agriculture has investigated multiple cases of cattle with severe oral, nasal and ocular lesions. (agweb.com)
  • AntaraNews.com reports that the cases of cattle death have been reported in five out of six jorongs, which are the smaller units of traditional village of Siguntur Nagari. (thedairysite.com)
  • Hello, I'm Ted Oliphant, as a police officer in Fyffe, Alabama I investigated over 35 cases of cattle mutilations over a six month period from October 1992 through May 1993. (ourstrangeplanet.com)
  • The AWBI pointed out that transporting and killing the infected cattle without preceding anaesthesia, would be in apparent violation of the Prevention and Control of Infectious and Contagious Diseases in Animals (PCICDA) Act, 2009, and the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (PCA) Act, 1960. (medindia.net)
  • When wildebeest enter grazing areas, young wildebeest spread the virus through their nasal secretions, infecting cattle. (phys.org)
  • The cattle had stomatitis, swelling of eyelids, respiratory distress, nasal and ocular discharge, redness and scaling of muzzle and lips, lameness, and udder erythema, and some were recumbent ( Table 1 ). (cdc.gov)
  • We detected influenza D virus in 18 nasal swab samples from cattle in Ireland that were clinically diagnosed with respiratory disease. (cdc.gov)
  • Thanks to U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists, a genomic database of U.S. beef cattle is now available online. (usda.gov)
  • Scientists have announced that they expect to be able to announce the worldwide eradication of the cattle disease rinderpest during the next 18 months. (fwi.co.uk)
  • Scientists are trying to develop tests to detect infected cattle before they enter the food supply. (medindia.net)
  • The scientists showed that retinas of sheep infected with scrapie, a disease similar to Mad Cow Disease, emit a characteristic glow when examined with a beam of light from a special instrument. (medindia.net)
  • The discovery was made by scientists with the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) Foreign Animal Disease Research Unit at the Plum Island Animal Disease Center at Orient Point, N.Y. ARS is USDA's principal intramural scientific research agency, and this research supports the USDA priority of promoting international food security. (eurekalert.org)
  • Some scientists have speculated that the level of immunity in the cattle population may currently be on a down cycle, allowing more animals to show clinical signs, although this has not been definitively proven. (feedstuffs.com)
  • Two other nearby farms suspected of being affected by the disease were being tested and restrictions have been placed on the movement of animals to prevent any spread, the Ministry of Primary Industries said in a statement. (reuters.com)
  • It brings the total number of farms confirmed with the disease to seven. (newstalkzb.co.nz)
  • Taiwan's hog farms, however, were hit by a hoof-and-mouth epidemic in 1997 that forced authorities to ban pork exports and destroy some three million diseased sows at contaminated farms to contain the disease. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Researchers analyzed the buying and selling patterns on British farms using official records of 75 million movements of cattle between farms from 2001-15. (producer.com)
  • In a 12-month period of trading, they were able to show that about half of all British cattle farms were connected to more than 1,000 other farms every year when they bought cattle and 16 percent of farms were connected to more than 10,000 other farms in a single year. (producer.com)
  • Focus on bison alone, as was suggested in the past, will not meet the disease eradication objective and conserve wildlife," said the National Park Service's Rick Wallen, lead wildlife biologist for the bison program in Yellowstone National Park and co-author on the study. (usgs.gov)
  • More information about wildlife disease studies can found on the USGS Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center website . (usgs.gov)
  • Journal of Wildlife Diseases, 42, 724-731. (springer.com)
  • Therefore, it is believed that the wildlife/cattle interface may be playing a crucial role in increasing the occurrence, abundance and distribution of R. appendiculatus in the Eastern Cape. (scielo.org.za)
  • Today the Department of Land and Natural Resources' (DLNR) Division of Forestry and Wildlife (DOFAW) is involved in feral cattle eradication, organizing lotteries for special access feral cattle control. (wikipedia.org)
  • R-CALFUSA (Ranchers-Cattlemen Action Legal Fund, United Stockgrowers of America) is a national, non-profit organization dedicated to ensuring the continued profitability and viability of the U.S. cattle industry. (opednews.com)
  • But while industry and government officials stress that the risk is small, cattle ranchers fear the mix-up might be enough to taint public perception, just as beef was rebounding after a decade of flat sales. (mad-cow.org)
  • Ranchers in California and neighboring states have struggled with foothill abortion disease at least as far back as the 1940s. (redbluffdailynews.com)
  • LAS CRUCES, N.M. - Cattle experts from New Mexico State University's Cooperative Extension Service will make presentations to ranchers and others April 26 on the cattle disease trichomoniasis. (demingheadlight.com)
  • Cattle experts share vital information for ranchers on April 26. (demingheadlight.com)