Humanism: An ethical system which emphasizes human values and the personal worth of each individual, as well as concern for the dignity and freedom of humankind.Occupations: Crafts, trades, professions, or other means of earning a living.Anatomy: A branch of biology dealing with the structure of organisms.General Surgery: A specialty in which manual or operative procedures are used in the treatment of disease, injuries, or deformities.Internship and Residency: Programs of training in medicine and medical specialties offered by hospitals for graduates of medicine to meet the requirements established by accrediting authorities.Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.Students, Medical: Individuals enrolled in a school of medicine or a formal educational program in medicine.Ontario: A province of Canada lying between the provinces of Manitoba and Quebec. Its capital is Toronto. It takes its name from Lake Ontario which is said to represent the Iroquois oniatariio, beautiful lake. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p892 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p391)Occupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Sequence Homology, Amino Acid: The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.Protein Isoforms: Different forms of a protein that may be produced from different GENES, or from the same gene by ALTERNATIVE SPLICING.Transcription Factors: Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.DNA-Binding Proteins: Proteins which bind to DNA. The family includes proteins which bind to both double- and single-stranded DNA and also includes specific DNA binding proteins in serum which can be used as markers for malignant diseases.Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action during the developmental stages of an organism.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Protein Structure, Tertiary: The level of protein structure in which combinations of secondary protein structures (alpha helices, beta sheets, loop regions, and motifs) pack together to form folded shapes called domains. Disulfide bridges between cysteines in two different parts of the polypeptide chain along with other interactions between the chains play a role in the formation and stabilization of tertiary structure. Small proteins usually consist of only one domain but larger proteins may contain a number of domains connected by segments of polypeptide chain which lack regular secondary structure.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Protein Binding: The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.Binding Sites: The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Gene Expression: The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Gene Deletion: A genetic rearrangement through loss of segments of DNA or RNA, bringing sequences which are normally separated into close proximity. This deletion may be detected using cytogenetic techniques and can also be inferred from the phenotype, indicating a deletion at one specific locus.Neurons: The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.Mice, Inbred C57BLGene Expression Regulation: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Isoenzymes: Structurally related forms of an enzyme. Each isoenzyme has the same mechanism and classification, but differs in its chemical, physical, or immunological characteristics.Mice, Knockout: Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.Cloning, Molecular: The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.DNA, Complementary: Single-stranded complementary DNA synthesized from an RNA template by the action of RNA-dependent DNA polymerase. cDNA (i.e., complementary DNA, not circular DNA, not C-DNA) is used in a variety of molecular cloning experiments as well as serving as a specific hybridization probe.Transcription, Genetic: The biosynthesis of RNA carried out on a template of DNA. The biosynthesis of DNA from an RNA template is called REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION.Membrane Proteins: Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Mutagenesis, Site-Directed: Genetically engineered MUTAGENESIS at a specific site in the DNA molecule that introduces a base substitution, or an insertion or deletion.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Sequence Alignment: The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.Cell Differentiation: Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.Gene Expression Regulation, Plant: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in plants.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.DNA Primers: Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.Blotting, Western: Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.Protein Transport: The process of moving proteins from one cellular compartment (including extracellular) to another by various sorting and transport mechanisms such as gated transport, protein translocation, and vesicular transport.Tissue Distribution: Accumulation of a drug or chemical substance in various organs (including those not relevant to its pharmacologic or therapeutic action). This distribution depends on the blood flow or perfusion rate of the organ, the ability of the drug to penetrate organ membranes, tissue specificity, protein binding. The distribution is usually expressed as tissue to plasma ratios.Nuclear Proteins: Proteins found in the nucleus of a cell. Do not confuse with NUCLEOPROTEINS which are proteins conjugated with nucleic acids, that are not necessarily present in the nucleus.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Arabidopsis: A plant genus of the family BRASSICACEAE that contains ARABIDOPSIS PROTEINS and MADS DOMAIN PROTEINS. The species A. thaliana is used for experiments in classical plant genetics as well as molecular genetic studies in plant physiology, biochemistry, and development.Cell Membrane: The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.Substrate Specificity: A characteristic feature of enzyme activity in relation to the kind of substrate on which the enzyme or catalytic molecule reacts.Carrier Proteins: Transport proteins that carry specific substances in the blood or across cell membranes.Homeodomain Proteins: Proteins encoded by homeobox genes (GENES, HOMEOBOX) that exhibit structural similarity to certain prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA-binding proteins. Homeodomain proteins are involved in the control of gene expression during morphogenesis and development (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION, DEVELOPMENTAL).Promoter Regions, Genetic: DNA sequences which are recognized (directly or indirectly) and bound by a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase during the initiation of transcription. Highly conserved sequences within the promoter include the Pribnow box in bacteria and the TATA BOX in eukaryotes.Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A species of the genus SACCHAROMYCES, family Saccharomycetaceae, order Saccharomycetales, known as "baker's" or "brewer's" yeast. The dried form is used as a dietary supplement.Phosphorylation: The introduction of a phosphoryl group into a compound through the formation of an ester bond between the compound and a phosphorus moiety.Models, Molecular: Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.Plant Proteins: Proteins found in plants (flowers, herbs, shrubs, trees, etc.). The concept does not include proteins found in vegetables for which VEGETABLE PROTEINS is available.Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins: Proteins obtained from the species SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE. The function of specific proteins from this organism are the subject of intense scientific interest and have been used to derive basic understanding of the functioning similar proteins in higher eukaryotes.Cell Proliferation: All of the processes involved in increasing CELL NUMBER including CELL DIVISION.Recombinant Proteins: Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.Escherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.Genetic Complementation Test: A test used to determine whether or not complementation (compensation in the form of dominance) will occur in a cell with a given mutant phenotype when another mutant genome, encoding the same mutant phenotype, is introduced into that cell.Transfection: The uptake of naked or purified DNA by CELLS, usually meaning the process as it occurs in eukaryotic cells. It is analogous to bacterial transformation (TRANSFORMATION, BACTERIAL) and both are routinely employed in GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUES.Plant Leaves: Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)Amygdala: Almond-shaped group of basal nuclei anterior to the INFERIOR HORN OF THE LATERAL VENTRICLE of the TEMPORAL LOBE. The amygdala is part of the limbic system.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Organ Specificity: Characteristic restricted to a particular organ of the body, such as a cell type, metabolic response or expression of a particular protein or antigen.Interneurons: Most generally any NEURONS which are not motor or sensory. Interneurons may also refer to neurons whose AXONS remain within a particular brain region in contrast to projection neurons, which have axons projecting to other brain regions.Biological Transport: The movement of materials (including biochemical substances and drugs) through a biological system at the cellular level. The transport can be across cell membranes and epithelial layers. It also can occur within intracellular compartments and extracellular compartments.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in enzyme synthesis.Proteins: Linear POLYPEPTIDES that are synthesized on RIBOSOMES and may be further modified, crosslinked, cleaved, or assembled into complex proteins with several subunits. The specific sequence of AMINO ACIDS determines the shape the polypeptide will take, during PROTEIN FOLDING, and the function of the protein.Protein Conformation: The characteristic 3-dimensional shape of a protein, including the secondary, supersecondary (motifs), tertiary (domains) and quaternary structure of the peptide chain. PROTEIN STRUCTURE, QUATERNARY describes the conformation assumed by multimeric proteins (aggregates of more than one polypeptide chain).Amino Acid Motifs: Commonly observed structural components of proteins formed by simple combinations of adjacent secondary structures. A commonly observed structure may be composed of a CONSERVED SEQUENCE which can be represented by a CONSENSUS SEQUENCE.Alternative Splicing: A process whereby multiple RNA transcripts are generated from a single gene. Alternative splicing involves the splicing together of other possible sets of EXONS during the processing of some, but not all, transcripts of the gene. Thus a particular exon may be connected to any one of several alternative exons to form a mature RNA. The alternative forms of mature MESSENGER RNA produce PROTEIN ISOFORMS in which one part of the isoforms is common while the other parts are different.Mice, Transgenic: Laboratory mice that have been produced from a genetically manipulated EGG or EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.Rats, Wistar: A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.Rats, Long-Evans: An outbred strain of rats developed in 1915 by crossing several Wistar Institute white females with a wild gray male. Inbred strains have been derived from this original outbred strain, including Long-Evans cinnamon rats (RATS, INBRED LEC) and Otsuka-Long-Evans-Tokushima Fatty rats (RATS, INBRED OLETF), which are models for Wilson's disease and non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, respectively.Gene Expression Regulation, Fungal: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in fungi.In Situ Hybridization: A technique that localizes specific nucleic acid sequences within intact chromosomes, eukaryotic cells, or bacterial cells through the use of specific nucleic acid-labeled probes.Trans-Activators: Diffusible gene products that act on homologous or heterologous molecules of viral or cellular DNA to regulate the expression of proteins.Isoquinolines: A group of compounds with the heterocyclic ring structure of benzo(c)pyridine. The ring structure is characteristic of the group of opium alkaloids such as papaverine. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Electric Stimulation: Use of electric potential or currents to elicit biological responses.Chemotaxis: The movement of cells or organisms toward or away from a substance in response to its concentration gradient.RNA, Small Interfering: Small double-stranded, non-protein coding RNAs (21-31 nucleotides) involved in GENE SILENCING functions, especially RNA INTERFERENCE (RNAi). Endogenously, siRNAs are generated from dsRNAs (RNA, DOUBLE-STRANDED) by the same ribonuclease, Dicer, that generates miRNAs (MICRORNAS). The perfect match of the siRNAs' antisense strand to their target RNAs mediates RNAi by siRNA-guided RNA cleavage. siRNAs fall into different classes including trans-acting siRNA (tasiRNA), repeat-associated RNA (rasiRNA), small-scan RNA (scnRNA), and Piwi protein-interacting RNA (piRNA) and have different specific gene silencing functions.Two-Hybrid System Techniques: Screening techniques first developed in yeast to identify genes encoding interacting proteins. Variations are used to evaluate interplay between proteins and other molecules. Two-hybrid techniques refer to analysis for protein-protein interactions, one-hybrid for DNA-protein interactions, three-hybrid interactions for RNA-protein interactions or ligand-based interactions. Reverse n-hybrid techniques refer to analysis for mutations or other small molecules that dissociate known interactions.Cricetinae: A subfamily in the family MURIDAE, comprising the hamsters. Four of the more common genera are Cricetus, CRICETULUS; MESOCRICETUS; and PHODOPUS.Apoptosis: One of the mechanisms by which CELL DEATH occurs (compare with NECROSIS and AUTOPHAGOCYTOSIS). Apoptosis is the mechanism responsible for the physiological deletion of cells and appears to be intrinsically programmed. It is characterized by distinctive morphologic changes in the nucleus and cytoplasm, chromatin cleavage at regularly spaced sites, and the endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA; (DNA FRAGMENTATION); at internucleosomal sites. This mode of cell death serves as a balance to mitosis in regulating the size of animal tissues and in mediating pathologic processes associated with tumor growth.HeLa Cells: The first continuously cultured human malignant CELL LINE, derived from the cervical carcinoma of Henrietta Lacks. These cells are used for VIRUS CULTIVATION and antitumor drug screening assays.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Recombinant Fusion Proteins: Recombinant proteins produced by the GENETIC TRANSLATION of fused genes formed by the combination of NUCLEIC ACID REGULATORY SEQUENCES of one or more genes with the protein coding sequences of one or more genes.DNA: A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).Models, Neurological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of the neurological system, processes or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Morphogenesis: The development of anatomical structures to create the form of a single- or multi-cell organism. Morphogenesis provides form changes of a part, parts, or the whole organism.Protein Subunits: Single chains of amino acids that are the units of multimeric PROTEINS. Multimeric proteins can be composed of identical or non-identical subunits. One or more monomeric subunits may compose a protomer which itself is a subunit structure of a larger assembly.Arabidopsis Proteins: Proteins that originate from plants species belonging to the genus ARABIDOPSIS. The most intensely studied species of Arabidopsis, Arabidopsis thaliana, is commonly used in laboratory experiments.Nerve Tissue ProteinsEnzyme Activation: Conversion of an inactive form of an enzyme to one possessing metabolic activity. It includes 1, activation by ions (activators); 2, activation by cofactors (coenzymes); and 3, conversion of an enzyme precursor (proenzyme or zymogen) to an active enzyme.Cercopithecus aethiops: A species of CERCOPITHECUS containing three subspecies: C. tantalus, C. pygerythrus, and C. sabeus. They are found in the forests and savannah of Africa. The African green monkey (C. pygerythrus) is the natural host of SIMIAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS and is used in AIDS research.Epithelial Cells: Cells that line the inner and outer surfaces of the body by forming cellular layers (EPITHELIUM) or masses. Epithelial cells lining the SKIN; the MOUTH; the NOSE; and the ANAL CANAL derive from ectoderm; those lining the RESPIRATORY SYSTEM and the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM derive from endoderm; others (CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM and LYMPHATIC SYSTEM) derive from mesoderm. Epithelial cells can be classified mainly by cell shape and function into squamous, glandular and transitional epithelial cells.Cell Movement: The movement of cells from one location to another. Distinguish from CYTOKINESIS which is the process of dividing the CYTOPLASM of a cell.Structure-Activity Relationship: The relationship between the chemical structure of a compound and its biological or pharmacological activity. Compounds are often classed together because they have structural characteristics in common including shape, size, stereochemical arrangement, and distribution of functional groups.PhosphoproteinsElectrophysiology: The study of the generation and behavior of electrical charges in living organisms particularly the nervous system and the effects of electricity on living organisms.Muscle, Skeletal: A subtype of striated muscle, attached by TENDONS to the SKELETON. Skeletal muscles are innervated and their movement can be consciously controlled. They are also called voluntary muscles.Multigene Family: A set of genes descended by duplication and variation from some ancestral gene. Such genes may be clustered together on the same chromosome or dispersed on different chromosomes. Examples of multigene families include those that encode the hemoglobins, immunoglobulins, histocompatibility antigens, actins, tubulins, keratins, collagens, heat shock proteins, salivary glue proteins, chorion proteins, cuticle proteins, yolk proteins, and phaseolins, as well as histones, ribosomal RNA, and transfer RNA genes. The latter three are examples of reiterated genes, where hundreds of identical genes are present in a tandem array. (King & Stanfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Action Potentials: Abrupt changes in the membrane potential that sweep along the CELL MEMBRANE of excitable cells in response to excitation stimuli.Brain Mapping: Imaging techniques used to colocalize sites of brain functions or physiological activity with brain structures.Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial: Any of the processes by which cytoplasmic or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in bacteria.Plant Roots: The usually underground portions of a plant that serve as support, store food, and through which water and mineral nutrients enter the plant. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982; Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Animals, Newborn: Refers to animals in the period of time just after birth.Gene Expression Profiling: The determination of the pattern of genes expressed at the level of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION, under specific circumstances or in a specific cell.Neural Pathways: Neural tracts connecting one part of the nervous system with another.Up-Regulation: A positive regulatory effect on physiological processes at the molecular, cellular, or systemic level. At the molecular level, the major regulatory sites include membrane receptors, genes (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION), mRNAs (RNA, MESSENGER), and proteins.Cell Adhesion: Adherence of cells to surfaces or to other cells.Embryonic Development: Morphological and physiological development of EMBRYOS.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Genes, Plant: The functional hereditary units of PLANTS.Hippocampus: A curved elevation of GRAY MATTER extending the entire length of the floor of the TEMPORAL HORN of the LATERAL VENTRICLE (see also TEMPORAL LOBE). The hippocampus proper, subiculum, and DENTATE GYRUS constitute the hippocampal formation. Sometimes authors include the ENTORHINAL CORTEX in the hippocampal formation.Evolution, Molecular: The process of cumulative change at the level of DNA; RNA; and PROTEINS, over successive generations.Embryo, Nonmammalian: The developmental entity of a fertilized egg (ZYGOTE) in animal species other than MAMMALS. For chickens, use CHICK EMBRYO.Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins: Proteins and peptides that are involved in SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION within the cell. Included here are peptides and proteins that regulate the activity of TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS and cellular processes in response to signals from CELL SURFACE RECEPTORS. Intracellular signaling peptide and proteins may be part of an enzymatic signaling cascade or act through binding to and modifying the action of other signaling factors.Drosophila Proteins: Proteins that originate from insect species belonging to the genus DROSOPHILA. The proteins from the most intensely studied species of Drosophila, DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER, are the subject of much interest in the area of MORPHOGENESIS and development.Green Fluorescent Proteins: Protein analogs and derivatives of the Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein that emit light (FLUORESCENCE) when excited with ULTRAVIOLET RAYS. They are used in REPORTER GENES in doing GENETIC TECHNIQUES. Numerous mutants have been made to emit other colors or be sensitive to pH.Down-Regulation: A negative regulatory effect on physiological processes at the molecular, cellular, or systemic level. At the molecular level, the major regulatory sites include membrane receptors, genes (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION), mRNAs (RNA, MESSENGER), and proteins.Myocardium: The muscle tissue of the HEART. It is composed of striated, involuntary muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC) connected to form the contractile pump to generate blood flow.Calcium: A basic element found in nearly all organized tissues. It is a member of the alkaline earth family of metals with the atomic symbol Ca, atomic number 20, and atomic weight 40. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and combines with phosphorus to form calcium phosphate in the bones and teeth. It is essential for the normal functioning of nerves and muscles and plays a role in blood coagulation (as factor IV) and in many enzymatic processes.Ligands: A molecule that binds to another molecule, used especially to refer to a small molecule that binds specifically to a larger molecule, e.g., an antigen binding to an antibody, a hormone or neurotransmitter binding to a receptor, or a substrate or allosteric effector binding to an enzyme. Ligands are also molecules that donate or accept a pair of electrons to form a coordinate covalent bond with the central metal atom of a coordination complex. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Membrane Glycoproteins: Glycoproteins found on the membrane or surface of cells.Enzyme Inhibitors: Compounds or agents that combine with an enzyme in such a manner as to prevent the normal substrate-enzyme combination and the catalytic reaction.Microscopy, Confocal: A light microscopic technique in which only a small spot is illuminated and observed at a time. An image is constructed through point-by-point scanning of the field in this manner. Light sources may be conventional or laser, and fluorescence or transmitted observations are possible.Models, Genetic: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of genetic processes or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Cell Line, Tumor: A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.Cytoplasm: The part of a cell that contains the CYTOSOL and small structures excluding the CELL NUCLEUS; MITOCHONDRIA; and large VACUOLES. (Glick, Glossary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 1990)Repressor Proteins: Proteins which maintain the transcriptional quiescence of specific GENES or OPERONS. Classical repressor proteins are DNA-binding proteins that are normally bound to the OPERATOR REGION of an operon, or the ENHANCER SEQUENCES of a gene until a signal occurs that causes their release.Chick Embryo: The developmental entity of a fertilized chicken egg (ZYGOTE). The developmental process begins about 24 h before the egg is laid at the BLASTODISC, a small whitish spot on the surface of the EGG YOLK. After 21 days of incubation, the embryo is fully developed before hatching.Fungal Proteins: Proteins found in any species of fungus.Neural Inhibition: The function of opposing or restraining the excitation of neurons or their target excitable cells.Actins: Filamentous proteins that are the main constituent of the thin filaments of muscle fibers. The filaments (known also as filamentous or F-actin) can be dissociated into their globular subunits; each subunit is composed of a single polypeptide 375 amino acids long. This is known as globular or G-actin. In conjunction with MYOSINS, actin is responsible for the contraction and relaxation of muscle.COS Cells: CELL LINES derived from the CV-1 cell line by transformation with a replication origin defective mutant of SV40 VIRUS, which codes for wild type large T antigen (ANTIGENS, POLYOMAVIRUS TRANSFORMING). They are used for transfection and cloning. (The CV-1 cell line was derived from the kidney of an adult male African green monkey (CERCOPITHECUS AETHIOPS).)Blotting, Northern: Detection of RNA that has been electrophoretically separated and immobilized by blotting on nitrocellulose or other type of paper or nylon membrane followed by hybridization with labeled NUCLEIC ACID PROBES.Catalytic Domain: The region of an enzyme that interacts with its substrate to cause the enzymatic reaction.Cell Nucleus: Within a eukaryotic cell, a membrane-limited body which contains chromosomes and one or more nucleoli (CELL NUCLEOLUS). The nuclear membrane consists of a double unit-type membrane which is perforated by a number of pores; the outermost membrane is continuous with the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM. A cell may contain more than one nucleus. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)Receptors, N-Methyl-D-Aspartate: A class of ionotropic glutamate receptors characterized by affinity for N-methyl-D-aspartate. NMDA receptors have an allosteric binding site for glycine which must be occupied for the channel to open efficiently and a site within the channel itself to which magnesium ions bind in a voltage-dependent manner. The positive voltage dependence of channel conductance and the high permeability of the conducting channel to calcium ions (as well as to monovalent cations) are important in excitotoxicity and neuronal plasticity.Dimerization: The process by which two molecules of the same chemical composition form a condensation product or polymer.Neuronal Plasticity: The capacity of the NERVOUS SYSTEM to change its reactivity as the result of successive activations.Drosophila melanogaster: A species of fruit fly much used in genetics because of the large size of its chromosomes.Antigens, CD: Differentiation antigens residing on mammalian leukocytes. CD stands for cluster of differentiation, which refers to groups of monoclonal antibodies that show similar reactivity with certain subpopulations of antigens of a particular lineage or differentiation stage. The subpopulations of antigens are also known by the same CD designation.Nerve Net: A meshlike structure composed of interconnecting nerve cells that are separated at the synaptic junction or joined to one another by cytoplasmic processes. In invertebrates, for example, the nerve net allows nerve impulses to spread over a wide area of the net because synapses can pass information in any direction.Mutagenesis: Process of generating a genetic MUTATION. It may occur spontaneously or be induced by MUTAGENS.CHO Cells: CELL LINE derived from the ovary of the Chinese hamster, Cricetulus griseus (CRICETULUS). The species is a favorite for cytogenetic studies because of its small chromosome number. The cell line has provided model systems for the study of genetic alterations in cultured mammalian cells.RNA Interference: A gene silencing phenomenon whereby specific dsRNAs (RNA, DOUBLE-STRANDED) trigger the degradation of homologous mRNA (RNA, MESSENGER). The specific dsRNAs are processed into SMALL INTERFERING RNA (siRNA) which serves as a guide for cleavage of the homologous mRNA in the RNA-INDUCED SILENCING COMPLEX. DNA METHYLATION may also be triggered during this process.Cell Division: The fission of a CELL. It includes CYTOKINESIS, when the CYTOPLASM of a cell is divided, and CELL NUCLEUS DIVISION.Cadherins: Calcium-dependent cell adhesion proteins. They are important in the formation of ADHERENS JUNCTIONS between cells. Cadherins are classified by their distinct immunological and tissue specificities, either by letters (E- for epithelial, N- for neural, and P- for placental cadherins) or by numbers (cadherin-12 or N-cadherin 2 for brain-cadherin). Cadherins promote cell adhesion via a homophilic mechanism as in the construction of tissues and of the whole animal body.Epithelium: One or more layers of EPITHELIAL CELLS, supported by the basal lamina, which covers the inner or outer surfaces of the body.Peptides: Members of the class of compounds composed of AMINO ACIDS joined together by peptide bonds between adjacent amino acids into linear, branched or cyclical structures. OLIGOPEPTIDES are composed of approximately 2-12 amino acids. Polypeptides are composed of approximately 13 or more amino acids. PROTEINS are linear polypeptides that are normally synthesized on RIBOSOMES.Protein Structure, Secondary: The level of protein structure in which regular hydrogen-bond interactions within contiguous stretches of polypeptide chain give rise to alpha helices, beta strands (which align to form beta sheets) or other types of coils. This is the first folding level of protein conformation.Mice, Inbred BALB CTestis: The male gonad containing two functional parts: the SEMINIFEROUS TUBULES for the production and transport of male germ cells (SPERMATOGENESIS) and the interstitial compartment containing LEYDIG CELLS that produce ANDROGENS.RNA: A polynucleotide consisting essentially of chains with a repeating backbone of phosphate and ribose units to which nitrogenous bases are attached. RNA is unique among biological macromolecules in that it can encode genetic information, serve as an abundant structural component of cells, and also possesses catalytic activity. (Rieger et al., Glossary of Genetics: Classical and Molecular, 5th ed)Plasmids: Extrachromosomal, usually CIRCULAR DNA molecules that are self-replicating and transferable from one organism to another. They are found in a variety of bacterial, archaeal, fungal, algal, and plant species. They are used in GENETIC ENGINEERING as CLONING VECTORS.Sequence Homology, Nucleic Acid: The sequential correspondence of nucleotides in one nucleic acid molecule with those of another nucleic acid molecule. Sequence homology is an indication of the genetic relatedness of different organisms and gene function.Conserved Sequence: A sequence of amino acids in a polypeptide or of nucleotides in DNA or RNA that is similar across multiple species. A known set of conserved sequences is represented by a CONSENSUS SEQUENCE. AMINO ACID MOTIFS are often composed of conserved sequences.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Membrane Transport Proteins: Membrane proteins whose primary function is to facilitate the transport of molecules across a biological membrane. Included in this broad category are proteins involved in active transport (BIOLOGICAL TRANSPORT, ACTIVE), facilitated transport and ION CHANNELS.Cytoskeleton: The network of filaments, tubules, and interconnecting filamentous bridges which give shape, structure, and organization to the cytoplasm.T-Lymphocytes: Lymphocytes responsible for cell-mediated immunity. Two types have been identified - cytotoxic (T-LYMPHOCYTES, CYTOTOXIC) and helper T-lymphocytes (T-LYMPHOCYTES, HELPER-INDUCER). They are formed when lymphocytes circulate through the THYMUS GLAND and differentiate to thymocytes. When exposed to an antigen, they divide rapidly and produce large numbers of new T cells sensitized to that antigen.Subcellular Fractions: Components of a cell produced by various separation techniques which, though they disrupt the delicate anatomy of a cell, preserve the structure and physiology of its functioning constituents for biochemical and ultrastructural analysis. (From Alberts et al., Molecular Biology of the Cell, 2d ed, p163)Cell Adhesion Molecules: Surface ligands, usually glycoproteins, that mediate cell-to-cell adhesion. Their functions include the assembly and interconnection of various vertebrate systems, as well as maintenance of tissue integration, wound healing, morphogenic movements, cellular migrations, and metastasis.Lysine: An essential amino acid. It is often added to animal feed.Proto-Oncogene Proteins: Products of proto-oncogenes. Normally they do not have oncogenic or transforming properties, but are involved in the regulation or differentiation of cell growth. They often have protein kinase activity.Cysteine: A thiol-containing non-essential amino acid that is oxidized to form CYSTINE.Adenosine Triphosphatases: A group of enzymes which catalyze the hydrolysis of ATP. The hydrolysis reaction is usually coupled with another function such as transporting Ca(2+) across a membrane. These enzymes may be dependent on Ca(2+), Mg(2+), anions, H+, or DNA.Transcriptional Activation: Processes that stimulate the GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION of a gene or set of genes.Fluorescent Antibody Technique: Test for tissue antigen using either a direct method, by conjugation of antibody with fluorescent dye (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, DIRECT) or an indirect method, by formation of antigen-antibody complex which is then labeled with fluorescein-conjugated anti-immunoglobulin antibody (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, INDIRECT). The tissue is then examined by fluorescence microscopy.Cytoskeletal Proteins: Major constituent of the cytoskeleton found in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells. They form a flexible framework for the cell, provide attachment points for organelles and formed bodies, and make communication between parts of the cell possible.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Genes, Reporter: Genes whose expression is easily detectable and therefore used to study promoter activity at many positions in a target genome. In recombinant DNA technology, these genes may be attached to a promoter region of interest.Reaction Time: The time from the onset of a stimulus until a response is observed.Microscopy, Fluorescence: Microscopy of specimens stained with fluorescent dye (usually fluorescein isothiocyanate) or of naturally fluorescent materials, which emit light when exposed to ultraviolet or blue light. Immunofluorescence microscopy utilizes antibodies that are labeled with fluorescent dye.Glycoproteins: Conjugated protein-carbohydrate compounds including mucins, mucoid, and amyloid glycoproteins.Cell Cycle Proteins: Proteins that control the CELL DIVISION CYCLE. This family of proteins includes a wide variety of classes, including CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASES, mitogen-activated kinases, CYCLINS, and PHOSPHOPROTEIN PHOSPHATASES as well as their putative substrates such as chromatin-associated proteins, CYTOSKELETAL PROTEINS, and TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS.Cell Cycle: The complex series of phenomena, occurring between the end of one CELL DIVISION and the end of the next, by which cellular material is duplicated and then divided between two daughter cells. The cell cycle includes INTERPHASE, which includes G0 PHASE; G1 PHASE; S PHASE; and G2 PHASE, and CELL DIVISION PHASE.Protein Kinase C: An serine-threonine protein kinase that requires the presence of physiological concentrations of CALCIUM and membrane PHOSPHOLIPIDS. The additional presence of DIACYLGLYCEROLS markedly increases its sensitivity to both calcium and phospholipids. The sensitivity of the enzyme can also be increased by PHORBOL ESTERS and it is believed that protein kinase C is the receptor protein of tumor-promoting phorbol esters.3T3 Cells: Cell lines whose original growing procedure consisted being transferred (T) every 3 days and plated at 300,000 cells per plate (J Cell Biol 17:299-313, 1963). Lines have been developed using several different strains of mice. Tissues are usually fibroblasts derived from mouse embryos but other types and sources have been developed as well. The 3T3 lines are valuable in vitro host systems for oncogenic virus transformation studies, since 3T3 cells possess a high sensitivity to CONTACT INHIBITION.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Macrophages: The relatively long-lived phagocytic cell of mammalian tissues that are derived from blood MONOCYTES. Main types are PERITONEAL MACROPHAGES; ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES; HISTIOCYTES; KUPFFER CELLS of the liver; and OSTEOCLASTS. They may further differentiate within chronic inflammatory lesions to EPITHELIOID CELLS or may fuse to form FOREIGN BODY GIANT CELLS or LANGHANS GIANT CELLS. (from The Dictionary of Cell Biology, Lackie and Dow, 3rd ed.)Amino Acids: Organic compounds that generally contain an amino (-NH2) and a carboxyl (-COOH) group. Twenty alpha-amino acids are the subunits which are polymerized to form proteins.Muscle Proteins: The protein constituents of muscle, the major ones being ACTINS and MYOSINS. More than a dozen accessory proteins exist including TROPONIN; TROPOMYOSIN; and DYSTROPHIN.Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases: A group of enzymes that catalyzes the phosphorylation of serine or threonine residues in proteins, with ATP or other nucleotides as phosphate donors.Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases: Phosphotransferases that catalyzes the conversion of 1-phosphatidylinositol to 1-phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate. Many members of this enzyme class are involved in RECEPTOR MEDIATED SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION and regulation of vesicular transport with the cell. Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases have been classified both according to their substrate specificity and their mode of action within the cell.Crystallography, X-Ray: The study of crystal structure using X-RAY DIFFRACTION techniques. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
The city clerk and attorney perform supporting roles. The Community Development Department is the agency responsible for ...
Archived version of list) "Clive Vale Church (Ore, Christ Church)". Sussex On-line Parish Clerks (OPC). 2010. Retrieved 10 May ... Beevers, David; Marks, Richard; Roles, John (1989). Sussex Churches and Chapels. Brighton: The Royal Pavilion, Art Gallery and ... "Church of Latter Day Saints (Hollington, St John the Evangelist)". Sussex On-line Parish Clerks (OPC). 2010. Retrieved 10 May ... "St Leonard (The Church in the Wood) (Hollington)". Sussex On-line Parish Clerks (OPC). 2010. Retrieved 10 May 2010. "Heritage ...
Ross became clerk of the Cherokee Senate in 1843. He became the founder and editor of the Cherokee Advocate. Later, he was ... Ross served in several different roles in the Cherokee Nation. By then, his uncle had been elected as principal chief. ... His Uncle John helped him to become clerk of the Cherokee Senate in 1843, where he helped write legislation and drafted papers ...
Both roles were filled by British appointments who were not Gibraltarians. Clerk of the Legislative Council E.H. Davis Esq. OBE ... http://www.parliament.gi/images/parliament_speakers_clerks/past_&_present_speakers.pdf http://www.panorama.gi/localnews/ ...
He worked as a junior clerk before volunteering for the Royal Navy. Peters has had many roles in other television shows, ...
Beevers, Marks & Roles 1989, p. 143. Historic England. "Church of Holy Trinity, Trinity Trees, Eastbourne, East Sussex (Grade ... "St Mary the Virgin (Hampden Park)". Sussex On-line Parish Clerks (OPC). 2010. Retrieved 11 May 2010. Historic England. "Church ... Beevers, Marks & Roles 1989, pp. 63, 104. Watney 2007, pp. 102-104. Surtees & Taylor 2005, p. 81. Historic England. "Church of ... Beevers, Marks & Roles 1989, p. 65. Wilton 1999, Introduction. Surtees 2002, p. 96. Elleray 2004, p. 20. Elleray 2004, p. 21. ...
Deputy Principal / Deputy CEO / Clerk to Governors, Deborah Scully; prior to joining Central, Debbie held a number of roles in ... Divisional Office Management Clerk (1980-1981); and roles at Westminster College, London 1976-1981) and ILEA Accounts (1974- ...
Chris, among other roles, was Chairman of the Social Responsibility Council, 1970 - 1972; Clerk of Quaker Social Responsibility ...
Pritzker's roles while enlisted included aviation repair parts clerk, rifleman, and fire team leader. After completing military ...
Women took on the roles of journalists, teachers, clerks, and more. These women were forward thinking in their reasons for ... Different sex roles, moreover, are probably confirmed by the practice of separating boys and girls at both the elementary and ... Women's roles were just as important as the men's. The 1972 constitution asserted that "women hold equal social status and ... There were a few exceptions to limitations imposed on women's roles. For example, female shamans were called on to cure ...
Beckley served in several public service roles, often in overlapping terms: School Commissioner, 1837‑1850; Deputy Clerk of ... and a clerk for the United States House of Representatives. John Beckley died in 1807, and the family first moved to Pittsburgh ... Clerk of Circuit Court of Law and Chancery, 1850‑1852, Superintendent of Common Schools, 1850‑1873, for Raleigh County; ...
He succeeded as First Deemster and Clerk of the Roles in 1988, serving until 1998. In 1998 he was elected a Freeman of the ... Attorney General, 1974-1980 Second Deemster, 1980-1988 First Deemster and Clerk of the Rolls, 1988-1998 "Deemster Jack Corrin ...
The ATS served in non combat roles as cooks, clerks and storewoman. Large numbers of ATS also served with the artillery ...
A customs station was built on Jambongan Island, staffed by a non-European clerk and policeman. A new police station was ... This consequently alienated them and undermined their roles and social statuses. ... They also took hostage F. S. Neubronner, the treasury clerk. The success of this attack increased his reputation as a local ...
He was clerk of the court in the new English colony and served various judge roles. He was a member of the Convention at ...
The difference in roles of sergeant and corporal in the artillery corps is not as clearly defined as in the infantry corps. ... Another role is that of company clerk and instructor. There are higher ranks of company sergeant and company quartermaster ... Artillery sergeants are usually assigned as detachment and section commanders, as well as in administrative roles. ... chief clerk, etc. The rank insignia of a sergeant is a three-bar chevron, worn point down, surmounted by a maple leaf. ...
She held previous roles in the office including Assistant Provincial Auitor and Director, Training and Technology. Ms. ... Acting Auditor General ^^Audit Clerk The current Auditor General of British Columbia is Carol Bellringer. She began her term on ...
She took a variety of roles but it was not until 1854 that she found her niche. She took on "grandmotherly" type roles in a ... She had a husband called Joseph Stephens who was a solicitor's clerk. Before she took to the stage in 1840 she ran a ...
He began a career in accounting in 1965 as a clerk with the Matchbox Toys company. While with the firm, he progressed through ... various accounting roles to become Chief Management Accountant in 1974. He also, during that time, qualified as an Associate ...
"Roles of Women in the Dominican Republic" (PDF). THE BIG READ. National Endowment for the Arts. Retrieved 24 October 2013. La ... They worked at home alongside their husbands or fathers as merchants, clerks and provisioners. Some were widowed, and took over ... This allowed Incan women in the Andes of South America to have assertive roles in society. The country of Peru saw European ... By the time of contact with Europeans, most North American women were farmers, and had accepted supporting roles to their men, ...
Lord Justice Clerk Thomson Smith "The investigation of complaints against the police in Scotland: A Fair Cop?". Scottish ... permanent dead link] http://www.crownoffice.gov.uk/About/roles/pf-role/prosecution/how-prosecution Procurator Fiscal - "Powers ... sheriff clerks and other public officials, transmits instructions from Crown counsel to procurators fiscal about prosecutions, ... and, subject to the direction of the Principal Clerk of Justiciary, arranges sittings of the High Court of Justiciary. At ...
Lishner created roles in two more operas by Menotti. He portrayed Don Marco in Menotti's The Saint of Bleecker Street which ... In 1963 he performed The Desk Clerk / Death in Menotti's Labyrinth which was also commissioned by the NBCOT. He sang in several ... Some of the other roles he sang with the company were Alcindoro in La bohème (1955), Carlino in Don Pasquale (1955), Herr Reich ... After appearing in supporting roles in several operas with a variety of companies, his first prominent stage part was the Chief ...
A reorganisation of roles within Formula One resulted in him becoming race director and FIA safety delegate. During his time in ... In 1971, he succeeded Pierre Stasse as clerk of the course at the Zolder circuit in Belgium. His involvement in the ... He left his Formula One roles in December 1995, and was appointed race director and safety delegate for the new International ...
Among his other roles and titles including serving as a vice president of the Underhill Society of America. Underhill was Chief ... Clerk and later became the Assistant Cashier at the Fourth National Bank on February 19, 1895. As Assistant Cashier he was ...
She served from 1917 to 1919 at the Naval Gun Factory in the Washington Navy Yard as a clerk. By December 1918, more than ... When the Navy opened support roles to women, Charlotte and her sister, Sophie, joined in 1917. ...
... rural workers and immigrants into the work force in large numbers and in new roles. They encountered a large hostility in their ... Clerk of the Chapel. *Father of the Chapel. *Local union. *Union dues ...
Hotel Front Desk Clerk Quality Inn - Morgantown, WV 26508 Provide accurate, descriptive hotel and town information to all ... Salary Search: Front Desk Clerk/Night Auditor salaries in Morgantown, WV. *Related forums: Morgantown West, Virginia - Holiday ... Roles and Responsibilities:.... Easily apply 25 days ago - save job - more.... *View all Quality Inn jobs in Morgantown, WV - ...
CLERK. http://data.example.com/roles/general-office. NIGHTGUARD. http://data.example.com/roles/security. ... TriplesMap1, rr:logicalTable [ rr:sqlQuery """ SELECT EMP.*, (CASE JOB WHEN CLERK THEN general-office WHEN NIGHTGUARD ... http://data.example.com/jobgraph/CLERK,. 9.1 Scope of Blank Nodes. Blank nodes in the output dataset are scoped to a single RDF ... http://data.example.com/roles/engineering. The IRIs are not found in the original database and therefore the mapping from ...
Roles in this area include: Clerks. Clerks are employed throughout the health service. In some clerical roles you will have a ...
A Finance Director & Clerk to the Governor role has just become available at a top independent school. ... Our senior executive roles cover multiple responsibilities that include Executive Management, Operations and Sales across a ... School Finance Director & Clerk to the Governors. *England, London, City of London ... Senior Management Jobs in the UK - Latest Executive Roles with Leading Employers. *Browse ...
The city clerk and attorney perform supporting roles. The Community Development Department is the agency responsible for ...
While data entry and clerical jobs may become obsolete, AI-powered roles may see a surge in the forthcoming months, says ... Automation and AI are playing a major role to create the jobs/job roles that will replace the above ones. ... It is estimated that 52-69 per cent of repetitive and predictive roles in sectors including IT, financial services, ... What kind of jobs/job roles will be obsolete in the coming years? Why? ...
Compare pay for popular roles and read about the teams work-life balance. Uncover why PrideStaff is the best company for you. ... Most popular roles. 5.0. Accounting Clerk. 4.7. Quality Control Inspector. 4.7. Event Staff. ...
roles within International Office. *Assistant Stores Officer. Grade E - Processing Clerks. Summary of role. *Converts ... Below you are able to access information, by grade, on some of the roles available within this and other pathways that might be ... some of the above roles may need additional specific qualifications e.g. PRINCE2) ...
Federal Court Clerk Fired After 2 Judges Complain By Jim Leusner of The Sentinel Staff. ... 2 Central Florida Actors Have Miami Vice Roles By Gail Williams of The Sentinel Staff. ...
Ross became clerk of the Cherokee Senate in 1843. He became the founder and editor of the Cherokee Advocate. Later, he was ... Ross served in several different roles in the Cherokee Nation. By then, his uncle had been elected as principal chief. ... His Uncle John helped him to become clerk of the Cherokee Senate in 1843, where he helped write legislation and drafted papers ...
New roles for mental health personnel. 3. The aide as psychiatric clerk. ...
Surveillance Data Clerks, Disease Intervention Specialists (DIS)*** Administrative Support Staff, Data Entry Technicians. ... Roles and responsibilities of key public health staff to support COVID-19 case investigation and contact tracing. Roles and ... Scaling Up Staffing Roles in Case Investigation and Contact Tracing. Scaling Up Staffing Roles in Case Investigation and ... The table below outlines the various roles of key public health staff needed. There may be variability in the title and ...
His education was then overseen by his father and his fathers sister-in-law Jane, both of whom played pivotal roles in his ... Wikiquote has quotations related to: James Clerk Maxwell. Wikisource has original works written by or about:. James Clerk ... Maxwell, James Clerk (2011). The Scientific Papers of James Clerk Maxwell. ISBN 9781108012256. Archived from the original on 2 ... Maxwell, James Clerk (1890), The scientific papers of James Clerk Maxwell Vol II, Cambridge, University Press. ...
... in business they assumed traditionally male clerk and secretarial roles; at home they managed family finances. With men getting ... The slump showed that neither women nor men wished to abandon these roles, which after the war were reconfirmed (at least for ... Soap became the symbolic carrier of whiteness, imperialism, and Victorian gender roles. ... abandoning the need for an appointment to enter a shop or the requirement to seek a clerks assistance to see and touch goods ...
... emailaddress.com Job Objective To obtain a Quality Control Clerk position that ... Managed to utilize tools to analyze, query and manipulate data according to defined business roles and procedures. ... Job Objective To obtain a Quality Control Clerk position that will allow me to utilize my skills and has potential for growth. ...
Techrights politely takes note of the growing role (or roles) of Microsoft employees inside the Linux Foundation; there are now ... Marks & Clerk Blames Battistellis Victims, the Boards of Appeal, Whose Job Guarded Patent Quality. Posted in Europe, Patents ... Kate Appleby (Marks & Clerk) has just published this self-promotional puff piece about the Technical Board of Appeal, citing ... This wasnt actually the worst from Marks & Clerk. On almost the same day they also published an article by Jennifer Bailey ...
Hire an Administrative Assistant Clerk Ended ...Australia. Browns consists of a multi-metal oxide deposit overlying a related ... FLEXIBLE WORK With many varied roles across Data Entry $7 / hr (Avg Bid) ... Hire an Administrative Assistant Clerk - 03/09/2018 10:22 EDT Ended ...
Food Clerk , Junior Clerk , Coordinator , Administration (0 - 1 yrs) Hiring Department (More Jobs) *. DETAILS. BRITANNIA ...
Temp Office Support Roles , Working Holiday Visas Welcome. Listed two days ago2d agoat Lotus People. This is a Contract/Temp. ... Data Entry Clerk Administrator. Listed one day ago1d agoat Loci Solutions Group Pty Limited. This is a Full Time. job ... We are seeking to add a Data Entry Clerk Administrator to our team!. Save ... Growing regional service provider seeking motivated, positive people for office based roles.. Save ...
Clerks for All Departments. Job ID: n003. Are you passionate about customer service? Are you available anytime? If so, then ... These roles are based out of our store in Squamish.. Job Duties and Responsibilities include but are not limited to the ... look no further as we have the perfect opportunity for you! Nesters Market is currently seeking Part Time Clerks in the ...
Public Officials - Courts and Judicial Administration Roles. Clerks of Court. Topics - Courts and Judicial Administration ...
In 1983, she came to CDC as a Clerk Typist in the Division of Tuberculosis, Surveillance Section. Glenda has worked on TB ... surveillance, moving up into a Statistical Assistant position and playing crucial roles in supporting the annual case count ...
Each month, more than 8,000 legal roles are added to our site - well bring you the best opportunities out there. ... Senior clerks leave in Hardwicke restructure. Hardwicke Building has parted company with its two senior clerks after the set ... selected briefings from key firms and gain essential careers insight to help you make the most of your current and future roles ... selected briefings from key firms and gain essential careers insight to help you make the most of your current and future roles ...
The clerks say their roles as security checkpoints cannot be accomplished by software. ... Shipping lines want to let customers book berths, cutting out the need for clerks. The clerks say their roles as security ... The union maintains that this presents a safety hazard and that all orders should be cleared through clerks. When a customer ... The companies want to take the clerks out of their intermediary and, they claim, duplicative role. "We are not fighting the ...
  • ISS employees have skills ready to take on roles such as: Administrative and Executive Assistants, Receptionists, File Clerks, Medical Office Support, Financial Assistants, Special Event Assistants, Data Entry and General Office Clerks. (ualberta.ca)
  • The Women's Army Auxiliary Corps (WAAC) was formed in May 1942 so that women could serve as typists, file clerks, telephone switchboard operators, bookkeepers, cooks and bakers, radio operators, and drivers of military vehicles, among many other activities. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The Accounting Clerk Basic Certificate will prepare individuals to provide high-tech administrative support to professional accountants, financial managers, and business owners. (ccc.edu)
  • James Clerk Maxwell FRS FRSE (13 June 1831 - 5 November 1879) was a Scottish scientist in the field of mathematical physics . (wikipedia.org)
  • James Clerk Maxwell was born on 13 June 1831 at 14 India Street, Edinburgh , to John Clerk Maxwell of Middlebie , an advocate, and Frances Cay daughter of Robert Hodshon Cay and sister of John Cay . (wikipedia.org)
  • His birthplace now houses a museum operated by the James Clerk Maxwell Foundation . (wikipedia.org)
  • Knox County Clerk - Foster D. Arnett, Jr. (knoxcounty.org)
  • What this means to Mr. Arnett as Knox County Clerk is a dedication to serving Knox County taxpayers with excellent customer service, being a good steward of their money and conducting all the affairs of office with honesty and transparency. (knoxcounty.org)
  • Lane, then in his 20s, began performing with the Pasadena Playhouse, and landed his first tiny film role as a desk clerk in 1931's Smart Money . (nndb.com)
  • Delta Bessborough Information Desk Clerk- Volunteers must be at least 18 years of age and have strong English language skills (additional languages are beneficial). (eventbrite.ca)
  • It is estimated that 52-69 per cent of repetitive and predictive roles in sectors including IT, financial services, manufacturing, transportation, packaging and shipping face risk of automation in the coming years. (rediff.com)
  • GAAPweb advertise Purchase Ledger Manager, Purchase Ledger Administrator and Purchase Ledger Clerk roles in sectors such as Banking, Financial Services and Retail. (gaapweb.com)
  • The American Society of Legislative Clerks and Secretaries (ASLCS) was founded in 1943 to improve legislative administration, and to establish better communication between clerks and secretaries throughout the United States and its territories. (wikipedia.org)
  • The society includes an active membership of more than four hundred principal clerks, secretaries, and legislative support staff. (wikipedia.org)
  • Legislative clerks and secretaries and their staff members work in a unique environment for which little formal training is available. (wikipedia.org)
  • and Providing a forum in which clerks and secretaries can meet and learn from one another. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Society's membership is made up of the elected or appointed legislative clerks and secretaries in the 50 states and the possessions and territories of the U.S.A. Associate members are legislative employees designated by the principal clerks and secretaries from the personnel in their offices. (wikipedia.org)
  • Legislative Administrator The Legislative Administrator is the official newsletter of the American Society of Legislative Clerks and Secretaries. (wikipedia.org)
  • International Directory The International Directory is a booklet that provides a resource in English, Spanish and French of the objectives and goals of the American Society of Legislative Clerks and Secretaries (ASLCS), Association of Chief Clerks of Mexico's State Legislatures and the Federal District of Mexico (ANOMAC), Association of Central American Legislative Clerks (ATELCA), the Canadian Clerks-at-the Table, South African Legislative Secretaries Association (SALSA), and the Australian Clerks. (wikipedia.org)
  • With assistance from the American Society of Legislative Clerks and Secretaries (ASLCS), the Mason's Manual Commission was created to oversee the revisions of Mason's Manual. (wikipedia.org)
  • A quarterly newsletter was established to keep all clerks abreast of developments in the Clerk's office. (knoxcounty.org)
  • A court clerk's career progression within HM Courts and Tribunals Service involves moving through the ranks, from trainee roles into Tier One court clerk positions and then upwards through various stages until they reach Tier Five. (allaboutcareers.com)
  • WEST PALM BEACH, FLA. (January 28, 2013) - High school students who want to earn community service hours with the Clerk & Comptroller's office during Spring Break and over summer vacation should plan to attend a special orientation session to learn about volunteering opportunities available at the Clerk's office. (mypalmbeachclerk.com)
  • Volunteering at the Clerk's office is an excellent way for high school students to earn service hours while learning about our justice system, and the Clerk's role in it," said Clerk Sharon Bock. (mypalmbeachclerk.com)
  • Corporal Cruz, of Fleischmanns, N.Y., joined the Marines as a supply clerk in 2013 and completed infantry training in 2014. (theothermccain.com)
  • Two years later, she requested to transfer to an infantry unit after then- Secretary of Defense Ash Carter ordered that women be allowed in all previously restricted combat roles. (theothermccain.com)
  • The army reserves offer all kinds of job roles such as infantry, combat medic technician, clerk, physical training instructor and many more. (wlv.ac.uk)
  • Students must be at least 15 years old to volunteer with the Clerk & Comptroller's office, and must pass required background checks. (mypalmbeachclerk.com)
  • Check out the volunteer roles that we are currently looking to fill! (eventbrite.ca)
  • Her leadership roles continued into her senior year where she has served as Vice President of Volunteer Management for the Senior Class Campaign, and worked with her classmates to introduce the Class of 2014 to the many opportunities available to Cornell alumni. (cornell.edu)
  • In over five decades of volunteer service, she undertook many roles at the Hospital and in the Humber River Foundation, including Clerk, Convener, President and Chairman. (hospitalnews.com)
  • Civics Class 452 views The Enrichment Program at Old Hammondtown School in Mattapoisett recently sponsored a visit from several Mattapoisett town officials to Grade 5 students to discuss local government and the officials roles in Mattapoisett. (wanderer.com)
  • Officials listed vary from one municipality to another, but may include the city clerk, data processing, accounting and budget staff, as well as a variety of other roles. (mass.gov)
  • But one of her earliest roles was officiating between officials who occasionally settled their disputes with fists. (sun-sentinel.com)
  • Apart from completing the training and qualification process for becoming a solicitor or barrister, court clerks need to complete the Induction Training Programme (ITP), conducted by the Judicial Studies Board (JSB) . (allaboutcareers.com)
  • The programme covers law, practice principles and procedures, hands-on experience under the guidance of an experienced clerk, rotations through related and ancillary departments under the judicial system, maintenance of a detailed training record, and theoretical and practical assessments of professional competence. (allaboutcareers.com)
  • Before joining Hinshaw, she was a judicial clerk to the Honorable Mary Jane Theis and the Honorable Maureen E. Connors in the Illinois Appellate Court. (hinshawlaw.com)
  • In a city where race and ethnicity still play major roles in local politics, the contest now features former Chicago Board of Education President Gery Chico and City Clerk Miguel del Valle as the only major Latino candidates facing off against Braun and former White House chief of staff Rahm Emanuel. (chicagotribune.com)
  • Supervisory training from sources such as the University of Tennessee, CTAS, Knox County Human Resources and elsewhere was instituted to empower managers in their roles as leaders and administrators. (knoxcounty.org)
  • After working in different secretarial roles for five years, Nelson accepted a receptionist job at a clinic attached to the hospital, the Cherokee Regional Clinic. (aama-ntl.org)
  • The role consisted of "clerking" patients (carrying out admission histories and physicals), following the progress of patients through their hospital stay, arranging and following up on investigations, and coordinating discharge and post hospitalization follow-up. (queensu.ca)
  • What else can be expected from UPC and software patents proponents such as Marks & Clerk? (techrights.org)
  • Kate Appleby (Marks & Clerk) has just published this self-promotional puff piece about the Technical Board of Appeal, citing the EPC which Marks & Clerk would gladly ignore/override if that means more income. (techrights.org)
  • This wasn't actually the worst from Marks & Clerk. (techrights.org)
  • On almost the same day they also published an 'article' by Jennifer Bailey and Stephen Blake (Marks & Clerk) in which they're blaming the Boards themselves for the outcome of them being victimised, titling it "Backlog at the boards" (a rather shallow analysis regarding an old report). (techrights.org)
  • Marks & Clerk - these shameless boosters of the UPC, software patents and the brutal regime at the EPO - fail to mention illegal acts by Battistelli against the Boards of Appeal (the reason for the named issues! (techrights.org)
  • Below you are able to access information, by grade, on some of the roles available within this and other pathways that might be of interest. (bristol.ac.uk)
  • Prior to joining the firm, she was a law clerk to U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor. (wsgr.com)
  • The essential roles of mXinβ in cardiac development and intercalated disc maturation were investigated. (ahajournals.org)
  • 6,9 Supporting the roles of Xin in heart chamber formation and function, we have previously shown that knocking down the sole cXin in the chicken embryo collapses the wall of heart chambers and leads to abnormal cardiac morphogenesis. (ahajournals.org)
  • Automation and AI are playing a major role to create the jobs/job roles that will replace the above ones. (rediff.com)
  • Depending on the jurisdiction, each role may be assigned to an individual staff member or one staff member may cover several roles. (cdc.gov)
  • The companies want to take the clerks out of their intermediary and, they claim, duplicative role. (informationweek.com)
  • The study supports previous findings that membership in roles promotes health and well-being, but the quantity of roles may be equal to or even less a factor than consistency of membership in even a single role. (scirp.org)
  • While membership in many roles has been proven to enhance the quality of life for older adults, member-ship in a single role may offer the same benefits. (scirp.org)
  • This experience might be current or reflect a prior role in a top-tier Human Capital consulting firm, and could be combined with profound roles in organisational change - transformation domains within leading companies . (jobkralle.ch)
  • 8. The system of claim 7 , wherein the particular software application is organized into a role hierarchy such that if a user is granted a certain role, then that user is automatically granted any children roles. (google.com)
  • Being a "Clerk" was to have a job or role within the hospital's complex service delivery. (queensu.ca)
  • Interestingly, the role of the Clerk varied very little between services, specialties and differing patient populations, the goal being to develop strong foundational skills in patient assessment and management, which were felt to be consistent and "learnable" within any patient care context. (queensu.ca)
  • What kind of jobs/job roles will be obsolete in the coming years? (rediff.com)
  • He also spent eight years with Dell where he held various finance and general manager roles. (reuters.com)
  • Her part-time job with Alumni Affairs grew when she became Head Reunion Clerk and, for two years, has coordinated the management of the young alumni classes. (cornell.edu)
  • One can identify 4 kinds of roles depending on the nature of work that would be impacted by automation. (indiatimes.com)
  • Jay and Silent Bob (Jason Mewes and Kevin Smith himself) work ok (and, obviously, went on to star in their own movie) but other parts are filled by re-casting the same actor in different roles with one actor (Walter Flanagan) appearing in 4 different roles throughout the movie. (avforums.com)
  • However, court clerks may work extra hours when necessary in order to accommodate urgent hearings. (allaboutcareers.com)
  • Ferguson will portray an aspiring actor and haggard reservations clerk at a snooty, upscale New York City restaurant who must switch from character to character as he plays his boss, colleagues and pompous patrons scrambling to get a table. (sungazette.com)
  • There are certainly others out there for whom there's some new sense of purpose suddenly being cast an essential employee , some recognition of the necessary roles they play in society, and possibly winning some respect for what can be thankless, invisible, dangerous - even at the best of times - and poorly-compensated jobs in our economy. (candlepowerforums.com)
  • The Army, with roughly 740 women who are serving in previously restricted combat roles, has encountered its own issues with integrating women into the jobs. (theothermccain.com)
  • The table below outlines the various roles of key public health staff needed. (cdc.gov)
  • While automation delivers on efficiency and the promise of an enhanced customer experience like minimal queues, what happens to roles of staff with increased automation? (indiatimes.com)
  • Can you name the Healthcare Providers and Staff Roles? (sporcle.com)
  • Oh my I'm a Ward Clerk, I sure hope I don't add problems, I really try to help and remind the staff of things we need to do. (allnurses.com)
  • Her early roles also included Myrna, Oscar's secretary, in "The Odd Couple," and appearances on "The Mary Tyler Moore Show" and "Love, American Style. (cbsnews.com)
  • When a customer calls to book a container, clerks type the customer information into a database, crosscheck it with other databases, quote a shipping rate, and verify the customer's information. (informationweek.com)
  • Earlier in his pharmaceutical career Flemming held roles of increasing responsibility at Merck & Co., Inc. and Novartis AG, following a distinguished period spent in hospitals and academic medicine. (reuters.com)
  • She previously held various Human Resources management and executive search roles at Teradyne Inc., Covansys Corporation, Avid Technology, Inc. and Sybase Inc. Joanne holds a Bachelor's degree in Marketing from Northeastern University. (reuters.com)
  • Professor Glover has held roles in the political arena, including as Chief Scientific Adviser to the President of the European Commission (2012-2015). (abdn.ac.uk)
  • Both sessions will be held in the Clerk & Comptroller's Learning Center, on the fifth floor of the Main Courthouse, 205 N. Dixie Highway, West Palm Beach. (mypalmbeachclerk.com)
  • Clerks are employed throughout the health service. (derbyhospitals.nhs.uk)
  • Once settled in, Mrs. Bosarge began her long service to the city as the town's clerk in 1964, her husband said. (sun-sentinel.com)
  • In addition, Clerks had unofficial but widely accepted service delivery roles of their own within hospitals, including phlebotomy, administering intravenous medications, performing simple procedures such as Foley catheter insertion and cast removal, simple suturing and recording electrocardiograms. (queensu.ca)
  • Some roles are based in hospitals, others are based in the community, and increasingly health and social care services are integrated or co-ordinated in order to provide a seamless service for people with a range of needs. (nottinghamshirehealthcare.nhs.uk)
  • The music and calm he knows it offers harried shoppers gives Rudy some respite, as does his friendship with Sasha, the Hungarian sales clerk who manages the watch counter. (simonandschuster.com)
  • On completion of the course you will be well prepared for roles including Finance Manager, Purchase or Sales ledger Clerk, or a Bookkeeper. (don.ac.uk)
  • The Florida Constitution established the independent office of the Clerk & Comptroller as a public trustee, responsible for safeguarding public records and public funds. (mypalmbeachclerk.com)
  • Lucas and Moore turn Phil's love of "Days of Thunder" into a good running gag, they write witty nasty small roles for Wanda Sykes (as a had-it-up-to-here phone-boutique clerk) and Michael Peña (as Phil's anything-for-a-click website boss), and they pad the movie out with office kickball montages and a scene in which Phil and Cate smoke dope backstage with Kid Cudi (playing himself). (variety.com)
  • To seize the initiative, the skills of industrial psychologists and HR managers need to be utilized to determine where existing female employees can be re-trained to meet these changing roles. (ibtimes.com)
  • The Analytical Reasoning Test assesses inductive and deductive reasoning skills , verbal and quantitative reasoning skills for roles where logic and reasoning skills are paramount in business decision-making. (creativeorgdesign.com)
  • Elevation Recruitment Group are currently recruiting for an experienced Purchase Ledger Clerk to join a well know reputable business within Sheffie. (gaapweb.com)
  • City Clerk Owczarski commented. (legistar.com)
  • Even though her title was town clerk, Mrs. Bosarge was an influential force from the beginning, said former city attorney and longtime close friend, Steve Josias. (sun-sentinel.com)
  • The magistrate considers and analyses the facts of the case and the clerk provides them with guidance on the legal concepts, precedents and rules, which are relevant to the matter being heard. (allaboutcareers.com)
  • or they can be specialised, such as legal clerk. (jobisjob.ca)