Silicon: A trace element that constitutes about 27.6% of the earth's crust in the form of SILICON DIOXIDE. It does not occur free in nature. Silicon has the atomic symbol Si, atomic number 14, and atomic weight [28.084; 28.086].Silicon Compounds: Inorganic compounds that contain silicon as an integral part of the molecule.Dietary Fats: Fats present in food, especially in animal products such as meat, meat products, butter, ghee. They are present in lower amounts in nuts, seeds, and avocados.Carbon Compounds, Inorganic: Inorganic compounds that contain carbon as an integral part of the molecule but are not derived from hydrocarbons.Silicon Dioxide: Transparent, tasteless crystals found in nature as agate, amethyst, chalcedony, cristobalite, flint, sand, QUARTZ, and tridymite. The compound is insoluble in water or acids except hydrofluoric acid.Nanowires: Nanometer-scale wires made of materials that conduct electricity. They can be coated with molecules such as antibodies that will bind to proteins and other substances.Dietary Proteins: Proteins obtained from foods. They are the main source of the ESSENTIAL AMINO ACIDS.Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Dietary Fiber: The remnants of plant cell walls that are resistant to digestion by the alimentary enzymes of man. It comprises various polysaccharides and lignins.Dietary Supplements: Products in capsule, tablet or liquid form that provide dietary ingredients, and that are intended to be taken by mouth to increase the intake of nutrients. Dietary supplements can include macronutrients, such as proteins, carbohydrates, and fats; and/or MICRONUTRIENTS, such as VITAMINS; MINERALS; and PHYTOCHEMICALS.Dietary Carbohydrates: Carbohydrates present in food comprising digestible sugars and starches and indigestible cellulose and other dietary fibers. The former are the major source of energy. The sugars are in beet and cane sugar, fruits, honey, sweet corn, corn syrup, milk and milk products, etc.; the starches are in cereal grains, legumes (FABACEAE), tubers, etc. (From Claudio & Lagua, Nutrition and Diet Therapy Dictionary, 3d ed, p32, p277)Diatoms: The common name for the phylum of microscopic unicellular STRAMENOPILES. Most are aquatic, being found in fresh, brackish, and salt water. Diatoms are noted for the symmetry and sculpturing of their siliceous cell walls. They account for 40% of PHYTOPLANKTON, but not all diatoms are planktonic.Plant Roots: The usually underground portions of a plant that serve as support, store food, and through which water and mineral nutrients enter the plant. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982; Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Plant Leaves: Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)Plants, Genetically Modified: PLANTS, or their progeny, whose GENOME has been altered by GENETIC ENGINEERING.Arabidopsis: A plant genus of the family BRASSICACEAE that contains ARABIDOPSIS PROTEINS and MADS DOMAIN PROTEINS. The species A. thaliana is used for experiments in classical plant genetics as well as molecular genetic studies in plant physiology, biochemistry, and development.National Academy of Sciences (U.S.): A United States organization of distinguished scientists and engineers established for the purpose of investigating and reporting upon any subject of art or science as requested by any department of government. The National Research Council organized by NAS serves as the principal operating agency to stimulate and support research.Allied Health Occupations: Occupations of medical personnel who are not physicians, and are qualified by special training and, frequently, by licensure to work in supporting roles in the health care field. These occupations include, but are not limited to, medical technology, physical therapy, physician assistant, etc.Nutrition Policy: Guidelines and objectives pertaining to food supply and nutrition including recommendations for healthy diet.Allied Health Personnel: Health care workers specially trained and licensed to assist and support the work of health professionals. Often used synonymously with paramedical personnel, the term generally refers to all health care workers who perform tasks which must otherwise be performed by a physician or other health professional.Nutritional Requirements: The amounts of various substances in food needed by an organism to sustain healthy life.Recommended Dietary Allowances: The amounts of various substances in the diet recommended by governmental guidelines as needed to sustain healthy life.Institute of Medicine (U.S.): Identifies, for study and analysis, important issues and problems that relate to health and medicine. The Institute initiates and conducts studies of national policy and planning for health care and health-related education and research; it also responds to requests from the federal government and other agencies for studies and advice.Patents as Topic: Exclusive legal rights or privileges applied to inventions, plants, etc.War Crimes: Criminal acts committed during, or in connection with, war, e.g., maltreatment of prisoners, willful killing of civilians, etc.Search Engine: Software used to locate data or information stored in machine-readable form locally or at a distance such as an INTERNET site.Rift Valley Fever: An acute infection caused by the RIFT VALLEY FEVER VIRUS, an RNA arthropod-borne virus, affecting domestic animals and humans. In animals, symptoms include HEPATITIS; abortion (ABORTION, VETERINARY); and DEATH. In humans, symptoms range from those of a flu-like disease to hemorrhagic fever, ENCEPHALITIS, or BLINDNESS.Rift Valley fever virus: A mosquito-borne species of the PHLEBOVIRUS genus found in eastern, central, and southern Africa, producing massive hepatitis, abortion, and death in sheep, goats, cattle, and other animals. It also has caused disease in humans.Acetylcarnitine: An acetic acid ester of CARNITINE that facilitates movement of ACETYL COA into the matrices of mammalian MITOCHONDRIA during the oxidation of FATTY ACIDS.Amino Acids: Organic compounds that generally contain an amino (-NH2) and a carboxyl (-COOH) group. Twenty alpha-amino acids are the subunits which are polymerized to form proteins.Carnitine: A constituent of STRIATED MUSCLE and LIVER. It is an amino acid derivative and an essential cofactor for fatty acid metabolism.Vitamin B Complex: A group of water-soluble vitamins, some of which are COENZYMES.Folic Acid: A member of the vitamin B family that stimulates the hematopoietic system. It is present in the liver and kidney and is found in mushrooms, spinach, yeast, green leaves, and grasses (POACEAE). Folic acid is used in the treatment and prevention of folate deficiencies and megaloblastic anemia.Parenteral Nutrition: The administering of nutrients for assimilation and utilization by a patient who cannot maintain adequate nutrition by enteral feeding alone. Nutrients are administered by a route other than the alimentary canal (e.g., intravenously, subcutaneously).Osteoclasts: A large multinuclear cell associated with the BONE RESORPTION. An odontoclast, also called cementoclast, is cytomorphologically the same as an osteoclast and is involved in CEMENTUM resorption.Bone Diseases: Diseases of BONES.Bone and Bones: A specialized CONNECTIVE TISSUE that is the main constituent of the SKELETON. The principle cellular component of bone is comprised of OSTEOBLASTS; OSTEOCYTES; and OSTEOCLASTS, while FIBRILLAR COLLAGENS and hydroxyapatite crystals form the BONE MATRIX.Lactoferrin: An iron-binding protein that was originally characterized as a milk protein. It is widely distributed in secretory fluids and is found in the neutrophilic granules of LEUKOCYTES. The N-terminal part of lactoferrin possesses a serine protease which functions to inactivate the TYPE III SECRETION SYSTEM used by bacteria to export virulence proteins for host cell invasion.Bone Resorption: Bone loss due to osteoclastic activity.Growth Inhibitors: Endogenous or exogenous substances which inhibit the normal growth of human and animal cells or micro-organisms, as distinguished from those affecting plant growth (= PLANT GROWTH REGULATORS).Bone Remodeling: The continuous turnover of BONE MATRIX and mineral that involves first an increase in BONE RESORPTION (osteoclastic activity) and later, reactive BONE FORMATION (osteoblastic activity). The process of bone remodeling takes place in the adult skeleton at discrete foci. The process ensures the mechanical integrity of the skeleton throughout life and plays an important role in calcium HOMEOSTASIS. An imbalance in the regulation of bone remodeling's two contrasting events, bone resorption and bone formation, results in many of the metabolic bone diseases, such as OSTEOPOROSIS.GluconatesTablets: Solid dosage forms, of varying weight, size, and shape, which may be molded or compressed, and which contain a medicinal substance in pure or diluted form. (Dorland, 28th ed)Calcium Gluconate: The calcium salt of gluconic acid. The compound has a variety of uses, including its use as a calcium replenisher in hypocalcemic states.Potassium: An element in the alkali group of metals with an atomic symbol K, atomic number 19, and atomic weight 39.10. It is the chief cation in the intracellular fluid of muscle and other cells. Potassium ion is a strong electrolyte that plays a significant role in the regulation of fluid volume and maintenance of the WATER-ELECTROLYTE BALANCE.Tablets, Enteric-Coated: Tablets coated with material that delays release of the medication until after they leave the stomach. (Dorland, 28th ed)Morinda: A plant genus of the family RUBIACEAE. Members contain iridoid glycosides and ANTHRAQUINONES.Powders: Substances made up of an aggregation of small particles, as that obtained by grinding or trituration of a solid drug. In pharmacy it is a form in which substances are administered. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Beauty: Characteristics or attributes of persons or things which elicit pleasurable feelings.Air Ionization: The dissociation of molecules in the air into positive and negative ions under the influence of an electric field.Glycopyrrolate: A muscarinic antagonist used as an antispasmodic, in some disorders of the gastrointestinal tract, and to reduce salivation with some anesthetics.
  • WASHINGTON -- Darkly colored, carotene-rich fruits and vegetables -- such as carrots, sweet potatoes, and broccoli -- provide the body with half as much vitamin A as previously thought, says the latest report on Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) from the National Academies' Institute of Medicine. (nationalacademies.org)
  • 1. Institute of Medicine Panel on Micronutrients, Subcommittees on Upper Reference Levels of Nutrients and of Interpretation and Use of Dietary Reference Intakes, and the Standing Committee on the Scientific Evaluation of Dietary Reference Intakes. (empowher.com)
  • Nutrition 21, LLC, Purchase, NY, a developer and marketer of nutritional ingredients, has launched of Nitrosigine, a novel patented source of inositol-stabilized arginine silicate accepted by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as a New Dietary Ingredient (NDI). (nutraceuticalsworld.com)
  • When it comes to silicon, absorption matters. (amazon.com)
  • Our clinical scientist developed the patent-pending, proprietary process to allow the LIVING SILICA to remain in a silicon form best suited for intestinal absorption. (amazon.com)
  • The adult requirements for zinc are based on metabolic studies of zinc absorption, defined as the minimum amount of dietary zinc necessary to offset total daily losses of the nutrient. (nap.edu)
  • In pre-clinical studies, Nitrosigine has been shown to demonstrate superiority over arginine in blood flow markers and has been shown to positively affect silicon absorption, providing evidence of health benefits applicable to many market categories. (nutraceuticalsworld.com)
  • Based on pre-clinical results, Nitrosigine demonstrated superiority over arginine as shown by increases in blood flow markers and silicon absorption. (nutraceuticalsworld.com)
  • Iodized salt and seafood are the major dietary sources of iodine. (cdc.gov)
  • While iodine deficiency is one of the reasons that the thyroid gland can become enlarged, it does not always become enlarged following iodine deficiency and it can become enlarged for other reasons not involving dietary iodine. (whfoods.com)
  • We say "aptly" here since seafoods are such an important dietary source of iodine. (whfoods.com)
  • Plants supply most dietary manganese. (nutramed.com)
  • When it comes to microminerals, they are an excellent source of boron (which promotes good bone health), copper (which supports the production of collagen, elastin, haemoglobin, melanin and myelin), manganese (which activates key enzymes in the body), nickel (which supports metabolism ) and silicon (which supports healthy growth). (freefitnesstips.co.uk)
  • Larger organisms may also consume soil ( geophagia ) or use mineral resources, such as salt licks , to obtain limited minerals unavailable through other dietary sources. (wikipedia.org)
  • Only one such study has been performed on silicon as a treatment for osteoporosis, and it found equivocal results at best. (empowher.com)
  • It is not clear that increased dietary silicon would have benefits, but is clear that the role of silicate needs further evaluation, especially as an osteoporosis preventative. (nutramed.com)
  • Additionally, she points out that it is particularly important that we improve nutrition education on dietary fats for minority groups and the less educated because of the ethnic and education level disparities in heart disease. (supermarketguru.com)
  • Nitrosigine provides the benefits of arginine and silicon, with additional benefits from the unique combination," said James Komorowski, MS, CNS, vice president scientific and regulatory ffairs at Nutrition 21. (nutraceuticalsworld.com)
  • The effects of dietary zeolites in poultry have been investigated extensively and a growth-promoting effect, evident in mineral utilization and metabolism has been reported. (scielo.org.za)
  • Educational programs that promote a better understanding of the different types of dietary fat will improve consumers awareness, food choices made, and in turn, hopefully their individual health," says Gazzaniga-Moloo. (supermarketguru.com)
  • 70 y 20 1.0 1.8 Pregnancy £ 18 y 17 1.0 ND 19 through 50 y 20 1.0 ND Lactation £ 18 y 17 1.0 ND 19 through 50 y 20 1.0 ND a Data were insufficient to set a UL for arsenic and for silicon. (nap.edu)
  • 5 Fifty women with sun-damaged skin were give either 10 mg silicon daily (as "choline stabilized orthosilicic acid") or placebo for 20 weeks. (empowher.com)
  • Certain restricted diets and conditions that lead to these restrictions, such as food allergies, mental disorders, or family dysfunction may also cause dietary inadequacies that lead to micronutrient deficiencies and complications. (mskcc.org)
  • Lab voles were fed two pelleted diets with differing amounts of silicon, which produced similar dental textures. (biologists.org)
  • This was most probably due to the loss of food mechanical properties through pelletization and/or the small difference in silicon concentration between diets. (biologists.org)
  • The volume change between lithiation and delithiation induces seriously significant stress leading to pulverization of silicon mass with the active material detached from current collector and then resulting in dramatic capacity fading with increasing cycles. (nature.com)
  • Given, all these credentials, we should find an essential role for silicon in life systems, including our own. (nutramed.com)
  • Measurements of skin roughness and elasticity showed improvement in the silicon group as compared to the placebo group. (empowher.com)
  • Ma JF, Takahasi E. Soil, Fertilizer and Plant Silicon Research in Japan. (springer.com)
  • Silicon and plant disease resistance against pathogenic fungi. (springer.com)
  • Ma JF, Nishimura K, Takahashi E. Effect of silicon on the growth of rice plant at different growth stages. (springer.com)
  • We hypothesize that the high amount of phytoliths in response to intense grazing in peak years may result in malocclusion and other dental abnormalities, which would explain how these silicon-based plant defences help provoke population crashes. (biologists.org)
  • Plant carotenoids are the primary dietary source of provitamin A worldwide, with β-carotene as the best-known provitamin A carotenoid. (wikipedia.org)
  • In this work, a binder solution is proposed to overcome the problems of silicon anode materials by providing strong adhesion to silicon as well as elasticity appropriate for composite electrodes. (nature.com)
  • demonstrated in the first field-based study that (1) silicon concentrations in leaves are determined by the vole population density, and thus by the grazing intensity, of the previous year, and (2) overwintering success in voles is correlated with leaf silicon levels in autumn. (biologists.org)
  • Silicon concentrations were consistently circa 16% higher in E+ grasses than in E-grasses, at all levels of grazing. (frontiersin.org)