The remnants of plant cell walls that are resistant to digestion by the alimentary enzymes of man. It comprises various polysaccharides and lignins.
Fats present in food, especially in animal products such as meat, meat products, butter, ghee. They are present in lower amounts in nuts, seeds, and avocados.
Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.
Seeds from grasses (POACEAE) which are important in the diet.
A polysaccharide with glucose units linked as in CELLOBIOSE. It is the chief constituent of plant fibers, cotton being the purest natural form of the substance. As a raw material, it forms the basis for many derivatives used in chromatography, ion exchange materials, explosives manufacturing, and pharmaceutical preparations.
High molecular weight polysaccharides present in the cell walls of all plants. Pectins cement cell walls together. They are used as emulsifiers and stabilizers in the food industry. They have been tried for a variety of therapeutic uses including as antidiarrheals, where they are now generally considered ineffective, and in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia.
Carbohydrates present in food comprising digestible sugars and starches and indigestible cellulose and other dietary fibers. The former are the major source of energy. The sugars are in beet and cane sugar, fruits, honey, sweet corn, corn syrup, milk and milk products, etc.; the starches are in cereal grains, legumes (FABACEAE), tubers, etc. (From Claudio & Lagua, Nutrition and Diet Therapy Dictionary, 3d ed, p32, p277)
Proteins obtained from foods. They are the main source of the ESSENTIAL AMINO ACIDS.
Slender processes of NEURONS, including the AXONS and their glial envelopes (MYELIN SHEATH). Nerve fibers conduct nerve impulses to and from the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.
A food group comprised of EDIBLE PLANTS or their parts.
Products in capsule, tablet or liquid form that provide dietary ingredients, and that are intended to be taken by mouth to increase the intake of nutrients. Dietary supplements can include macronutrients, such as proteins, carbohydrates, and fats; and/or MICRONUTRIENTS, such as VITAMINS; MINERALS; and PHYTOCHEMICALS.
Polysaccharide gums from PLANTS.
Polysaccharides composed of repeating galactose units. They can consist of branched or unbranched chains in any linkages.
Dried, ripe seeds of PLANTAGO PSYLLIUM; PLANTAGO INDICA; and PLANTAGO OVATA. Plantain seeds swell in water and are used as demulcents and bulk laxatives.
Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
Total number of calories taken in daily whether ingested or by parenteral routes.
The fleshy or dry ripened ovary of a plant, enclosing the seed or seeds.
Large, multinucleate single cells, either cylindrical or prismatic in shape, that form the basic unit of SKELETAL MUSCLE. They consist of MYOFIBRILS enclosed within and attached to the SARCOLEMMA. They are derived from the fusion of skeletal myoblasts (MYOBLASTS, SKELETAL) into a syncytium, followed by differentiation.
The process of breakdown of food for metabolism and use by the body.
Baked food product made of flour or meal that is moistened, kneaded, and sometimes fermented. A major food since prehistoric times, it has been made in various forms using a variety of ingredients and methods.
Short-chain fatty acids of up to six carbon atoms in length. They are the major end products of microbial fermentation in the ruminant digestive tract and have also been implicated in the causation of neurological diseases in humans.
Foodstuff used especially for domestic and laboratory animals, or livestock.
Measurement and evaluation of the components of substances to be taken as FOOD.
Acquired or learned food preferences.
Records of nutrient intake over a specific period of time, usually kept by the patient.
Cholesterol present in food, especially in animal products.
A plant species of the family POACEAE that is widely cultivated for its edible seeds.
Anaerobic degradation of GLUCOSE or other organic nutrients to gain energy in the form of ATP. End products vary depending on organisms, substrates, and enzymatic pathways. Common fermentation products include ETHANOL and LACTIC ACID.
The amounts of various substances in the diet recommended by governmental guidelines as needed to sustain healthy life.
Polysaccharides consisting of mannose units.
Calcium compounds used as food supplements or in food to supply the body with calcium. Dietary calcium is needed during growth for bone development and for maintenance of skeletal integrity later in life to prevent osteoporosis.
The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.
Powdered exudate from various Acacia species, especially A. senegal (Leguminosae). It forms mucilage or syrup in water. Gum arabic is used as a suspending agent, excipient, and emulsifier in foods and pharmaceuticals.
Systematic collections of factual data pertaining to the diet of a human population within a given geographic area.
The blind sac or outpouching area of the LARGE INTESTINE that is below the entrance of the SMALL INTESTINE. It has a worm-like extension, the vermiform APPENDIX.
The consumption of edible substances.
Long, pliable, cohesive natural or manufactured filaments of various lengths. They form the structure of some minerals. The medical significance lies in their potential ability to cause various types of PNEUMOCONIOSIS (e.g., ASBESTOSIS) after occupational or environmental exposure. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p708)
Unsaturated fats or oils used in foods or as a food.
The principal sterol of all higher animals, distributed in body tissues, especially the brain and spinal cord, and in animal fats and oils.
An indication of the contribution of a food to the nutrient content of the diet. This value depends on the quantity of a food which is digested and absorbed and the amounts of the essential nutrients (protein, fat, carbohydrate, minerals, vitamins) which it contains. This value can be affected by soil and growing conditions, handling and storage, and processing.
The normal process of elimination of fecal material from the RECTUM.
The segment of LARGE INTESTINE between the CECUM and the RECTUM. It includes the ASCENDING COLON; the TRANSVERSE COLON; the DESCENDING COLON; and the SIGMOID COLON.
Skeletal muscle fibers characterized by their expression of the Type II MYOSIN HEAVY CHAIN isoforms which have high ATPase activity and effect several other functional properties - shortening velocity, power output, rate of tension redevelopment. Several fast types have been identified.
Skeletal muscle fibers characterized by their expression of the Type I MYOSIN HEAVY CHAIN isoforms which have low ATPase activity and effect several other functional properties - shortening velocity, power output, rate of tension redevelopment.
Properties and processes of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM as a whole or of any of its parts.
A plant genus of the family POACEAE that is the source of EDIBLE GRAIN. A hybrid with rye (SECALE CEREALE) is called TRITICALE. The seed is ground into FLOUR and used to make BREAD, and is the source of WHEAT GERM AGGLUTININS.
Nutritional physiology of animals.
Any of a group of polysaccharides of the general formula (C6-H10-O5)n, composed of a long-chain polymer of glucose in the form of amylose and amylopectin. It is the chief storage form of energy reserve (carbohydrates) in plants.
A TEXTILE fiber obtained from the pappus (outside the SEEDS) of cotton plant (GOSSYPIUM). Inhalation of cotton fiber dust over a prolonged period can result in BYSSINOSIS.
Infrequent or difficult evacuation of FECES. These symptoms are associated with a variety of causes, including low DIETARY FIBER intake, emotional or nervous disturbances, systemic and structural disorders, drug-induced aggravation, and infections.
Derivatives of BUTYRIC ACID. Included under this heading are a broad variety of acid forms, salts, esters, and amides that contain the carboxypropane structure.
Dietary practice of completely avoiding meat products in the DIET, consuming VEGETABLES, CEREALS, and NUTS. Some vegetarian diets called lacto-ovo also include milk and egg products.
Any substances taken in by the body that provide nourishment.
The contents included in all or any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.
Uptake of substances through the lining of the INTESTINES.
A segment of the LOWER GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT that includes the CECUM; the COLON; and the RECTUM.
An organism of the vegetable kingdom suitable by nature for use as a food, especially by human beings. Not all parts of any given plant are edible but all parts of edible plants have been known to figure as raw or cooked food: leaves, roots, tubers, stems, seeds, buds, fruits, and flowers. The most commonly edible parts of plants are FRUIT, usually sweet, fleshy, and succulent. Most edible plants are commonly cultivated for their nutritional value and are referred to as VEGETABLES.
Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).
A process involving chance used in therapeutic trials or other research endeavor for allocating experimental subjects, human or animal, between treatment and control groups, or among treatment groups. It may also apply to experiments on inanimate objects.
Passage of food (sometimes in the form of a test meal) through the gastrointestinal tract as measured in minutes or hours. The rate of passage through the intestine is an indicator of small bowel function.
Polysaccharides are complex carbohydrates consisting of long, often branched chains of repeating monosaccharide units joined together by glycosidic bonds, which serve as energy storage molecules (e.g., glycogen), structural components (e.g., cellulose), and molecular recognition sites in various biological systems.
Surgical creation of an external opening into the ILEUM for fecal diversion or drainage. This replacement for the RECTUM is usually created in patients with severe INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASES. Loop (continent) or tube (incontinent) procedures are most often employed.
Sodium or sodium compounds used in foods or as a food. The most frequently used compounds are sodium chloride or sodium glutamate.
Native, inorganic or fossilized organic substances having a definite chemical composition and formed by inorganic reactions. They may occur as individual crystals or may be disseminated in some other mineral or rock. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed; McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
The portion of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT between the PYLORUS of the STOMACH and the ILEOCECAL VALVE of the LARGE INTESTINE. It is divisible into three portions: the DUODENUM, the JEJUNUM, and the ILEUM.
Triglycerides are the most common type of fat in the body, stored in fat cells and used as energy; they are measured in blood tests to assess heart disease risk, with high levels often resulting from dietary habits, obesity, physical inactivity, smoking, and alcohol consumption.
Bundles of actin filaments (ACTIN CYTOSKELETON) and myosin-II that span across the cell attaching to the cell membrane at FOCAL ADHESIONS and to the network of INTERMEDIATE FILAMENTS that surrounds the nucleus.
A generic term for fats and lipoids, the alcohol-ether-soluble constituents of protoplasm, which are insoluble in water. They comprise the fats, fatty oils, essential oils, waxes, phospholipids, glycolipids, sulfolipids, aminolipids, chromolipids (lipochromes), and fatty acids. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
The processes and properties of living organisms by which they take in and balance the use of nutritive materials for energy, heat production, or building material for the growth, maintenance, or repair of tissues and the nutritive properties of FOOD.
An annual legume. The SEEDS of this plant are edible and used to produce a variety of SOY FOODS.
A cellulose derivative which is a beta-(1,4)-D-glucopyranose polymer. It is used as a bulk laxative and as an emulsifier and thickener in cosmetics and pharmaceuticals and as a stabilizer for reagents.
The distal and narrowest portion of the SMALL INTESTINE, between the JEJUNUM and the ILEOCECAL VALVE of the LARGE INTESTINE.
Increase in BODY WEIGHT over existing weight.
Evaluation and measurement of nutritional variables in order to assess the level of nutrition or the NUTRITIONAL STATUS of the individual. NUTRITION SURVEYS may be used in making the assessment.
The large family of plants characterized by pods. Some are edible and some cause LATHYRISM or FAVISM and other forms of poisoning. Other species yield useful materials like gums from ACACIA and various LECTINS like PHYTOHEMAGGLUTININS from PHASEOLUS. Many of them harbor NITROGEN FIXATION bacteria on their roots. Many but not all species of "beans" belong to this family.
Guidelines and objectives pertaining to food supply and nutrition including recommendations for healthy diet.
Iron or iron compounds used in foods or as food. Dietary iron is important in oxygen transport and the synthesis of the iron-porphyrin proteins hemoglobin, myoglobin, cytochromes, and cytochrome oxidase. Insufficient amounts of dietary iron can lead to iron-deficiency anemia.
State of the body in relation to the consumption and utilization of nutrients.
Any aspect of the operations in the preparation, processing, transport, storage, packaging, wrapping, exposure for sale, service, or delivery of food.
Components of the usual diet that may provide health benefits beyond basic nutrients. Examples of functional foods include soy, nuts, chocolate, and cranberries (From NCCAM Backgrounder, March 2004, p3).
A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.
The chemical reactions involved in the production and utilization of various forms of energy in cells.
Glucose in blood.
A numerical system of measuring the rate of BLOOD GLUCOSE generation from a particular food item as compared to a reference item, such as glucose = 100. Foods with higher glycemic index numbers create greater blood sugar swings.
Modified cardiac muscle fibers composing the terminal portion of the heart conduction system.
Ground up seed of WHEAT.
Non-digestible food ingredients mostly of a carbohydrate base that improve human health by selectively stimulating the growth and/or activity of existing BACTERIA in the COLON.
Studies comparing two or more treatments or interventions in which the subjects or patients, upon completion of the course of one treatment, are switched to another. In the case of two treatments, A and B, half the subjects are randomly allocated to receive these in the order A, B and half to receive them in the order B, A. A criticism of this design is that effects of the first treatment may carry over into the period when the second is given. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
The measurement of an organ in volume, mass, or heaviness.
A class of nerve fibers as defined by their structure, specifically the nerve sheath arrangement. The AXONS of the myelinated nerve fibers are completely encased in a MYELIN SHEATH. They are fibers of relatively large and varied diameters. Their NEURAL CONDUCTION rates are faster than those of the unmyelinated nerve fibers (NERVE FIBERS, UNMYELINATED). Myelinated nerve fibers are present in somatic and autonomic nerves.
Potassium or potassium compounds used in foods or as foods.
A diet prescribed in the treatment of diabetes mellitus, usually limited in the amount of sugar or readily available carbohydrate. (Dorland, 27th ed)
Organic, monobasic acids derived from hydrocarbons by the equivalent of oxidation of a methyl group to an alcohol, aldehyde, and then acid. Fatty acids are saturated and unsaturated (FATTY ACIDS, UNSATURATED). (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
Food and dietary formulations including elemental (chemically defined formula) diets, synthetic and semisynthetic diets, space diets, weight-reduction formulas, tube-feeding diets, complete liquid diets, and supplemental liquid and solid diets.
The resistance that a gaseous or liquid system offers to flow when it is subjected to shear stress. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
Steroid acids and salts. The primary bile acids are derived from cholesterol in the liver and usually conjugated with glycine or taurine. The secondary bile acids are further modified by bacteria in the intestine. They play an important role in the digestion and absorption of fat. They have also been used pharmacologically, especially in the treatment of gallstones.
The section of the alimentary canal from the STOMACH to the ANAL CANAL. It includes the LARGE INTESTINE and SMALL INTESTINE.
Sucrose present in the diet. It is added to food and drinks as a sweetener.
A pouch or sac opening from the COLON.
Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.
Tumors or cancer of the COLON.
Acids derived from monosaccharides by the oxidation of the terminal (-CH2OH) group farthest removed from the carbonyl group to a (-COOH) group. (From Stedmans, 26th ed)
Contractile tissue that produces movement in animals.
A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to the nutritional status of a human population within a given geographic area. Data from these surveys are used in preparing NUTRITION ASSESSMENTS.
An element with the atomic symbol N, atomic number 7, and atomic weight [14.00643; 14.00728]. Nitrogen exists as a diatomic gas and makes up about 78% of the earth's atmosphere by volume. It is a constituent of proteins and nucleic acids and found in all living cells.
Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. This also includes animals with a long history of closed colony breeding.
The study of NUTRITION PROCESSES, as well as the components of food, their actions, interaction, and balance in relation to health and disease in animals.
Production or presence of gas in the gastrointestinal tract which may be expelled through the anus.
Axons of certain cells in the DENTATE GYRUS. They project to the polymorphic layer of the dentate gyrus and to the proximal dendrites of PYRAMIDAL CELLS of the HIPPOCAMPUS. These mossy fibers should not be confused with mossy fibers that are cerebellar afferents (see NERVE FIBERS).
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
A hardy grain crop, rye, grown in northern climates. It is the most frequent host to ergot (CLAVICEPS), the toxic fungus. Its hybrid with TRITICUM is TRITICALE, another grain.
'Menu planning' in a medical context refers to the process of designing and selecting meals that meet specific dietary needs and restrictions of patients in healthcare facilities, taking into account nutritional requirements, allergies, cultural preferences, and therapeutic goals.
A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.
The motor activity of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.
Use of written, printed, or graphic materials upon or accompanying a food or its container or wrapper. The concept includes ingredients, NUTRITIONAL VALUE, directions, warnings, and other relevant information.
A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).
The general name for a group of fat-soluble pigments found in green, yellow, and leafy vegetables, and yellow fruits. They are aliphatic hydrocarbons consisting of a polyisoprene backbone.
The most abundant natural aromatic organic polymer found in all vascular plants. Lignin together with cellulose and hemicellulose are the major cell wall components of the fibers of all wood and grass species. Lignin is composed of coniferyl, p-coumaryl, and sinapyl alcohols in varying ratios in different plant species. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)
Compounds used in food or in food preparation to replace dietary fats. They may be carbohydrate-, protein-, or fat-based. Fat substitutes are usually lower in calories but provide the same texture as fats.
A plant species of the family POACEAE. It is a tall grass grown for its EDIBLE GRAIN, corn, used as food and animal FODDER.
The edible portions of any animal used for food including domestic mammals (the major ones being cattle, swine, and sheep) along with poultry, fish, shellfish, and game.
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
A subtype of striated muscle, attached by TENDONS to the SKELETON. Skeletal muscles are innervated and their movement can be consciously controlled. They are also called voluntary muscles.
Generally refers to the digestive structures stretching from the MOUTH to ANUS, but does not include the accessory glandular organs (LIVER; BILIARY TRACT; PANCREAS).
Multicellular marine macroalgae including some members of red (RHODOPHYTA), green (CHLOROPHYTA), and brown (PHAEOPHYTA) algae. They are widely distributed in the ocean, occurring from the tide level to considerable depths, free-floating (planktonic) or anchored to the substratum (benthic). They lack a specialized vascular system but take up fluids, nutrients, and gases directly from the water. They contain CHLOROPHYLL and are photosynthetic, but some also contain other light-absorbing pigments. Many are of economic importance as FOOD, fertilizer, AGAR, potash, or source of IODINE.
The physical or physiological processes by which substances, tissue, cells, etc. take up or take in other substances or energy.
Full gratification of a need or desire followed by a state of relative insensitivity to that particular need or desire.
A sulfonic acid-based naphthylazo dye used as a coloring agent for foodstuffs and medicines and as a dye and chemical indicator. It was banned by the FDA in 1976 for use in foods, drugs, and cosmetics. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)
Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.
Essential dietary elements or organic compounds that are required in only small quantities for normal physiologic processes to occur.
An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
Hydrazines substituted with two methyl groups in any position.
A 51-amino acid pancreatic hormone that plays a major role in the regulation of glucose metabolism, directly by suppressing endogenous glucose production (GLYCOGENOLYSIS; GLUCONEOGENESIS) and indirectly by suppressing GLUCAGON secretion and LIPOLYSIS. Native insulin is a globular protein comprised of a zinc-coordinated hexamer. Each insulin monomer containing two chains, A (21 residues) and B (30 residues), linked by two disulfide bonds. Insulin is used as a drug to control insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (DIABETES MELLITUS, TYPE 1).
Organic substances that are required in small amounts for maintenance and growth, but which cannot be manufactured by the human body.
A carotenoid that is a precursor of VITAMIN A. It is administered to reduce the severity of photosensitivity reactions in patients with erythropoietic protoporphyria (PORPHYRIA, ERYTHROPOIETIC). (From Reynolds JEF(Ed): Martindale: The Extra Pharmacopoeia (electronic version). Micromedex, Inc, Engewood, CO, 1995.)
Complexing agent for removal of traces of heavy metal ions. It acts also as a hypocalcemic agent.
Derivatives of propionic acid. Included under this heading are a broad variety of acid forms, salts, esters, and amides that contain the carboxyethane structure.
Lining of the INTESTINES, consisting of an inner EPITHELIUM, a middle LAMINA PROPRIA, and an outer MUSCULARIS MUCOSAE. In the SMALL INTESTINE, the mucosa is characterized by a series of folds and abundance of absorptive cells (ENTEROCYTES) with MICROVILLI.
A pouch or sac developed from a tubular or saccular organ, such as the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.
The time frame after a meal or FOOD INTAKE.
A generic descriptor for all TOCOPHEROLS and TOCOTRIENOLS that exhibit ALPHA-TOCOPHEROL activity. By virtue of the phenolic hydrogen on the 2H-1-benzopyran-6-ol nucleus, these compounds exhibit varying degree of antioxidant activity, depending on the site and number of methyl groups and the type of ISOPRENOIDS.
The extent to which the active ingredient of a drug dosage form becomes available at the site of drug action or in a biological medium believed to reflect accessibility to a site of action.
Any food that has been supplemented with essential nutrients either in quantities that are greater than those present normally, or which are not present in the food normally. Fortified food includes also food to which various nutrients have been added to compensate for those removed by refinement or processing. (From Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)
Typical way of life or manner of living characteristic of an individual or group. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)
A six carbon compound related to glucose. It is found naturally in citrus fruits and many vegetables. Ascorbic acid is an essential nutrient in human diets, and necessary to maintain connective tissue and bone. Its biologically active form, vitamin C, functions as a reducing agent and coenzyme in several metabolic pathways. Vitamin C is considered an antioxidant.
A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.
The ability of a substance to be dissolved, i.e. to form a solution with another substance. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
Agents that produce a soft formed stool, and relax and loosen the bowels, typically used over a protracted period, to relieve CONSTIPATION.
A process leading to shortening and/or development of tension in muscle tissue. Muscle contraction occurs by a sliding filament mechanism whereby actin filaments slide inward among the myosin filaments.
A condition with abnormally high levels of CHOLESTEROL in the blood. It is defined as a cholesterol value exceeding the 95th percentile for the population.
Lipid-protein complexes involved in the transportation and metabolism of lipids in the body. They are spherical particles consisting of a hydrophobic core of TRIGLYCERIDES and CHOLESTEROL ESTERS surrounded by a layer of hydrophilic free CHOLESTEROL; PHOSPHOLIPIDS; and APOLIPOPROTEINS. Lipoproteins are classified by their varying buoyant density and sizes.
A metallic element of atomic number 30 and atomic weight 65.38. It is a necessary trace element in the diet, forming an essential part of many enzymes, and playing an important role in protein synthesis and in cell division. Zinc deficiency is associated with ANEMIA, short stature, HYPOGONADISM, impaired WOUND HEALING, and geophagia. It is known by the symbol Zn.
A plant species of the family FABACEAE widely cultivated for ANIMAL FEED.
The relative amounts of various components in the body, such as percentage of body fat.
Liquids that are suitable for drinking. (From Merriam Webster Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)
Physiological processes in biosynthesis (anabolism) and degradation (catabolism) of LIPIDS.
A starch found in the tubers and roots of many plants. Since it is hydrolyzable to FRUCTOSE, it is classified as a fructosan. It has been used in physiologic investigation for determination of the rate of glomerular function.
Plants whose roots, leaves, seeds, bark, or other constituent parts possess therapeutic, tonic, purgative, curative or other pharmacologic attributes, when administered to man or animals.
Statistical models in which the value of a parameter for a given value of a factor is assumed to be equal to a + bx, where a and b are constants. The models predict a linear regression.
Behavioral response associated with the achieving of gratification.
The study of NUTRITION PROCESSES as well as the components of food, their actions, interaction, and balance in relation to health and disease.
A group of organs stretching from the MOUTH to the ANUS, serving to breakdown foods, assimilate nutrients, and eliminate waste. In humans, the digestive system includes the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT and the accessory glands (LIVER; BILIARY TRACT; PANCREAS).
A plant genus of the family POACEAE. The EDIBLE GRAIN, barley, is widely used as food.
Nutritional physiology of children aged 2-12 years.
Polysaccharides composed of repeating glucose units. They can consist of branched or unbranched chains in any linkages.
A plant genus of the family Plantaginaceae. The small plants usually have a dense tuft of basal leaves and long, leafless stalks bearing a terminal spike of small flowers. The seeds, known as PSYLLIUM, swell in water and are used as laxatives. The leaves have been used medicinally.
3-Phenylchromones. Isomeric form of FLAVONOIDS in which the benzene group is attached to the 3 position of the benzopyran ring instead of the 2 position.
Oils high in unsaturated fats extracted from the bodies of fish or fish parts, especially the LIVER. Those from the liver are usually high in VITAMIN A. The oils are used as DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS. They are also used in soaps and detergents and as protective coatings.
A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.
Eating of excrement by animal species.
A class of dibenzylbutane derivatives which occurs in higher plants and in fluids (bile, serum, urine, etc.) in man and other animals. These compounds, which have a potential anti-cancer role, can be synthesized in vitro by human fecal flora. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)
A group of fatty acids, often of marine origin, which have the first unsaturated bond in the third position from the omega carbon. These fatty acids are believed to reduce serum triglycerides, prevent insulin resistance, improve lipid profile, prolong bleeding times, reduce platelet counts, and decrease platelet adhesiveness.
The appearance of an abnormally large amount of GLUCOSE in the urine, such as more than 500 mg/day in adults. It can be due to HYPERGLYCEMIA or genetic defects in renal reabsorption (RENAL GLYCOSURIA).
Agents that are used to stimulate evacuation of the bowels.
A potent carcinogen and neurotoxic compound. It is particularly effective in inducing colon carcinomas.
Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.
The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.
The amounts of various substances in food needed by an organism to sustain healthy life.
The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.
Botanically, a type of single-seeded fruit in which the pericarp enclosing the seed is a hard woody shell. In common usage the term is used loosely for any hard, oil-rich kernel. Of those commonly eaten, only hazel, filbert, and chestnut are strictly nuts. Walnuts, pecans, almonds, and coconuts are really drupes. Brazil nuts, pistachios, macadamias, and cashews are really seeds with a hard shell derived from the testa rather than the pericarp.
Naturally occurring or synthetic substances that inhibit or retard the oxidation of a substance to which it is added. They counteract the harmful and damaging effects of oxidation in animal tissues.
A four carbon acid, CH3CH2CH2COOH, with an unpleasant odor that occurs in butter and animal fat as the glycerol ester.
Oils derived from plants or plant products.
A plant genus of the family RUTACEAE. They bear the familiar citrus fruits including oranges, grapefruit, lemons, and limes. There are many hybrids which makes the nomenclature confusing.
The desire for FOOD generated by a sensation arising from the lack of food in the STOMACH.
The middle portion of the SMALL INTESTINE, between DUODENUM and ILEUM. It represents about 2/5 of the remaining portion of the small intestine below duodenum.
## I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Japan" is not a medical term or concept. It is a country located in Asia, known as Nihon-koku or Nippon-koku in Japanese, and is renowned for its unique culture, advanced technology, and rich history. If you have any questions related to medical topics, I would be happy to help answer them!
FATTY ACIDS in which the carbon chain contains one or more double or triple carbon-carbon bonds.
An unbranched glucan in starch.
Gradual increase in the number, the size, and the complexity of cells of an individual. Growth generally results in increase in ORGAN WEIGHT; BODY WEIGHT; and BODY HEIGHT.
Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.
A member of the vitamin B family that stimulates the hematopoietic system. It is present in the liver and kidney and is found in mushrooms, spinach, yeast, green leaves, and grasses (POACEAE). Folic acid is used in the treatment and prevention of folate deficiencies and megaloblastic anemia.
A plant genus in the LAURACEAE family. The tree, Persea americana Mill., is known for the Avocado fruit, the food of commerce.
F344 rats are an inbred strain of albino laboratory rats (Rattus norvegicus) that have been widely used in biomedical research due to their consistent and reliable genetic background, which facilitates the study of disease mechanisms and therapeutic interventions.
Steroids with a hydroxyl group at C-3 and most of the skeleton of cholestane. Additional carbon atoms may be present in the side chain. (IUPAC Steroid Nomenclature, 1987)
A group of chemical elements that are needed in minute quantities for the proper growth, development, and physiology of an organism. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
The art or practice of preparing food. It includes the preparation of special foods for diets in various diseases.
Pathological conditions involving the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM including the HEART; the BLOOD VESSELS; or the PERICARDIUM.
Pathological developments in the RECTUM region of the large intestine (INTESTINE, LARGE).

The food matrix of spinach is a limiting factor in determining the bioavailability of beta-carotene and to a lesser extent of lutein in humans. (1/2441)

Carotenoid bioavailability depends, amongst other factors, on the food matrix and on the type and extent of processing. To examine the effect of variously processed spinach products and of dietary fiber on serum carotenoid concentrations, subjects received, over a 3-wk period, a control diet (n = 10) or a control diet supplemented with carotenoids or one of four spinach products (n = 12 per group): whole leaf spinach with an almost intact food matrix, minced spinach with the matrix partially disrupted, enzymatically liquefied spinach in which the matrix was further disrupted and the liquefied spinach to which dietary fiber (10 g/kg wet weight) was added. Consumption of spinach significantly increased serum concentrations of all-trans-beta-carotene, cis-beta-carotene, (and consequently total beta-carotene), lutein, alpha-carotene and retinol and decreased the serum concentration of lycopene. Serum total beta-carotene responses (changes in serum concentrations from the start to the end of the intervention period) differed significantly between the whole leaf and liquefied spinach groups and between the minced and liquefied spinach groups. The lutein response did not differ among spinach groups. Addition of dietary fiber to the liquefied spinach had no effect on serum carotenoid responses. The relative bioavailability as compared to bioavailability of the carotenoid supplement for whole leaf, minced, liquefied and liquefied spinach plus added dietary fiber for beta-carotene was 5.1, 6.4, 9.5 and 9.3%, respectively, and for lutein 45, 52, 55 and 54%, respectively. We conclude that the bioavailability of lutein from spinach was higher than that of beta-carotene and that enzymatic disruption of the matrix (cell wall structure) enhanced the bioavailability of beta-carotene from whole leaf and minced spinach, but had no effect on lutein bioavailability.  (+info)

Modulation of distal colonic epithelial barrier function by dietary fibre in normal rats. (2/2441)

BACKGROUND: Dietary fibre influences the turnover and differentiation of the colonic epithelium, but its effects on barrier function are unknown. AIMS: To determine whether altering the type and amount of fibre in the diet affects paracellular permeability of intestinal epithelium, and to identify the mechanisms of action. METHODS: Rats were fed isoenergetic low fibre diets with or without supplements of wheat bran (10%) or methylcellulose (10%), for four weeks. Paracellular permeability was determined by measurement of conductance and 51Cr-EDTA flux across tissue mounted in Ussing chambers. Faecal short chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentrations were assessed by gas chromatography, epithelial kinetics stathmokinetically, and mucosal brush border hydrolase activities spectrophotometrically. RESULTS: Body weight was similar across the dietary groups. Conductance and 51Cr-EDTA flux were approximately 25% higher in animals fed no fibre, compared with those fed wheat bran or methylcellulose in the distal colon, but not in the caecum or jejunum. Histologically, there was no evidence of epithelial injury or erosion associated with any diet. The fibres exerted different spectra of effects on luminal SCFA concentrations and pH, and on mucosal indexes, but both bulked the faeces, were trophic to the epithelium, and stimulated expression of a marker of epithelial differentiation. CONCLUSIONS: Both a fermentable and a non-fermentable fibre reduce paracellular permeability specifically in the distal colon, possibly by promoting epithelial cell differentiation. The mechanisms by which the two fibres exert their effects are likely to be different.  (+info)

The influence of a diet rich in wheat fibre on the human faecal flora. (3/2441)

The effect on the faecal flora of adding wheat fibre to a controlled diet in four healthy volunteers for a 3-week period has been observed. No change in the concentration of the bacteria in the bacterial groups counted was found, although there was a slight increase in total output associated with increased faecal weight. The predominant organisms in all subjects were non-sporing anaerobes, but the dominant species in each subject was different and was unaffected by changing the diet. Similarly, the concentration of faecal beta-glucuronidase detected in two subjects was unaltered and the concentration of clostridia able to dehydrogenate the steroid nucleus found in one subject was unaltered. It is suggested that the faecal microflora is not primarily controlled by the presence of undigested food residues in the large bowel.  (+info)

Fermentation substrate and dilution rate interact to affect microbial growth and efficiency. (4/2441)

The effect of dilution rate (D) on carbohydrate, fibrous and nonfibrous, and protein fermentation by ruminal microorganisms was studied using a single-effluent continuous-culture system. The diets of fibrous carbohydrate, nonfibrous carbohydrate, or protein were formulated with soybean hulls (FC), ground corn (NFC), or isolated soy protein (PR) as the primary ingredient, respectively. Six dilution rates (.025, .050, .075, .10, .15, and .20/h of fermenter volume) were used. Digestibilities of DM, OM, and CP for the three diets and of NDF and ADF for the FC diet decreased (P<.001) as D increased, although the response of the digestibility to D varied with diet. Increasing D resulted in an increase in pH (P<.001) and a decrease (P<.001) in ammonia concentration. Daily volatile fatty acid production increased (quadratic; P<.01) for the FC and NFC diets, but decreased (quadratic; P<.001) for the PR diet. Increasing D quadratically increased (P<.001) the molar percentage of acetate and propionate, but quadratically decreased (P<.001) butyrate and valerate for the FC and NFC diets. For the PR diet, the molar percentage of propionate and valerate increased (quadratic; P<.01), whereas acetate and butyrate decreased (linear; P<.001) in response to increasing D. Molar percentage of isobutyrate and isovalerate decreased (P<.01) with increasing D for all three diets. As D increased, daily microbial N production showed quadratic responses with maximum values achieved at .126, .143, and .187/h D for the FC, NFC, and PR diet, respectively. There was a positive correlation between microbial growth efficiency (MOEFF) and D. A quadratic model fit the data of MOEFF as affected by D, and maximum MOEFF of 37.3, 59.6, and 71.4 g of bacterial N/kg OM truly fermented were calculated to be achieved at .177, .314, and .207/h D for the FC, NFC, and PR diet, respectively. Dilution rate significantly influenced the ruminal microbial fermentation of fibrous and nonfibrous carbohydrates and proteins, and was positively related to microbial yield and growth efficiency. In addition, microbial nitrogen composition, and therefore efficiency, was affected by substrate fermented.  (+info)

Health aspects of partially defatted flaxseed, including effects on serum lipids, oxidative measures, and ex vivo androgen and progestin activity: a controlled crossover trial. (5/2441)

BACKGROUND: Currently there is considerable interest in the potential health benefits of oil seeds, such as soy and flaxseed, especially in relation to cardiovascular disease and cancer. OBJECTIVE: We therefore evaluated health aspects of partially defatted flaxseed in relation to serum lipids, indicators of oxidative stress, and ex vivo sex hormone activities. DESIGN: Twenty-nine hyperlipidemic subjects (22 men and 7 postmenopausal women) completed two 3-wk treatment periods in a randomized, crossover trial. Subjects were given muffins that contributed approximately 20 g fiber/d from either flaxseed (approximately 50 g partially defatted flaxseed/d) or wheat bran (control) while they consumed self-selected National Cholesterol Education Program Step II diets. Both muffins had similar macronutrient profiles. Treatment phases were separated by > or = 2 wk. RESULTS: Partially defatted flaxseed reduced total cholesterol (4.6+/-1.2%; P = 0.001), LDL cholesterol (7.6+/-1.8%; P < 0.001), apolipoprotein B (5.4+/-1.4%; P = 0.001), and apolipoprotein A-I (5.8+/-1.9%; P = 0.005), but had no effect on serum lipoprotein ratios at week 3 compared with the control. There were no significant effects on serum HDL cholesterol, serum protein carbonyl content, or ex vivo androgen or progestin activity after either treatment. Unexpectedly, serum protein thiol groups were significantly lower (10.8+/-3.6%; P = 0.007) at week 3 after the flaxseed treatment than after the control, suggesting increased oxidation. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that partially defatted flaxseed is effective in lowering LDL cholesterol. No effects on lipoprotein ratios, ex vivo serum androgen or progestin activity, or protein carbonyl content were observed. The significance of increased oxidation of protein thiol groups with flaxseed consumption requires further investigation.  (+info)

Human metabolism of mammalian lignan precursors in raw and processed flaxseed. (6/2441)

BACKGROUND: The mammalian lignans enterolactone and enterodiol are produced in the colon by the action of bacteria on the plant precursor secoisolariciresinol diglycoside, which is found in high concentrations in flaxseed. OBJECTIVE: Two experiments were conducted to determine 1) whether there is a dose response in urinary lignan excretion with increasing flaxseed intake, 2) whether flaxseed processing affects lignan excretion, 3) peak plasma lignan concentrations, and 4) plasma lignan concentrations after chronic supplementation. DESIGN: Nine healthy young women supplemented their diets with 5, 15, or 25 g raw or 25 g processed (muffin or bread) flaxseed for 7 d during the follicular phase of their menstrual cycles. Twenty-four-hour urine samples were collected at baseline and on the final day of supplementation. As an adjunct to the 25-g-flaxseed arm, subjects consumed the supplement for an additional day and blood and urine samples were collected at specific intervals. All blood and urine samples were analyzed for enterolactone and enterodiol by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. RESULTS: A dose-dependent urinary lignan response to raw flaxseed was observed (r = 0.72, P < 0.001). The processing of flaxseed as a muffin or bread did not affect the quantity of lignan excretion. Plasma lignan concentrations were greater (P < or = 0.05) than baseline by 9 h after flaxseed ingestion (29.35+/-3.69 and 51.75+/-7.49 nmol/L, respectively). The total plasma area under the curve was higher on the eighth than on the first day (1840.15+/-343.02 and 1027.15+/-95.71 nmol x h/L, respectively). CONCLUSION: Mammalian lignan production from flaxseed precursors is dependent on time and dose but not on processing.  (+info)

Supplemental cracked corn for steers fed fresh alfalfa: I. Effects on digestion of organic matter, fiber, and starch. (7/2441)

The effect of supplementation with different levels of cracked corn on the sites of OM, total dietary fiber (TDF), ADF, and starch digestion in steers fed fresh alfalfa indoors was determined. Six Angus steers (338 +/- 19 kg) fitted with cannulas in the rumen, duodenum, and ileum consumed 1) alfalfa (20.4% CP, 41.6% NDF) ad libitum (AALF); 2), 3), and 4) AALF supplemented (S) with .4, .8, or 1.2%, respectively, of BW of corn; or 5) alfalfa restricted at the average level of forage intake of S steers (RALF), in a 5 x 5 Latin square design. Total OM intake was lower (P < .01) in steers fed RALF than in those fed AALF but level of forage intake did not affect sites of OM, TDF, or starch digestion (P > .05). Forage OM intake decreased (P < .01) linearly (8,496 to 5,840 g/d) but total OM intake increased (P = .03) linearly (8,496 to 9,344 g/d) as corn increased from .4 to 1.2% BW. Ruminal apparent and true OM disappearance was not affected, but OM disappearing in the small intestine increased (P < .01) linearly with increasing levels of corn. Total tract OM digestibility (71.2 to 76.2%) and the proportion of OM intake that was digested in the small intestine (15.4 to 24.5%) increased (P < .01) linearly as corn increased. The TDF and ADF intakes decreased (P < .01) linearly as level of corn increased. Total tract TDF and ADF digestibilities were not different among treatments (average 62.9 and 57.8%, respectively). Starch intake and starch digested in the rumen and small and large intestine increased (P < .01) linearly with increasing corn level. Ruminal pH and VFA concentrations decreased and increased (P < .01), respectively, with increasing corn. Supplementation with corn increased OM intake, decreased forage OM intake, and increased the proportion of OM that was digested in the small intestine, but fiber digestion was not affected.  (+info)

Fractionation of fiber and crude protein in fresh forages during the spring growth. (8/2441)

The composition of the fiber and CP of alfalfa, bromegrass, and endophyte-free and -infected tall fescue forages was compared during the spring growth from vegetative to reproductive stages. Forages were sampled from April 27 to June 6 in 1994, and from April 27 to June 11 in 1995, with 11 and 12 harvest dates, respectively. Total dietary fiber (TDF) was fractionated into insoluble and soluble fiber (SF). The CP of the forages was fractionated into nonprotein N (A), soluble CP (B1), insoluble CP that was soluble in neutral detergent (B2), CP insoluble in neutral detergent but soluble in acid detergent (B3), and CP insoluble in acid detergent (C). Effects of year, forage species, and harvest dates (day as a covariable) were included in the model. Across harvest dates, alfalfa (A) had lower (P < .01) TDF and higher (P < .01) SF concentrations than grasses (GR) (A: 49.9 and 14.4% and GR: 60.4 and 4.5% [OM basis] for TDF and SF, respectively). Alfalfa had higher (P < .01) CP (20.6% DM) than GR (15.3%). The rate of decrease in CP (% DM) across days was higher (P < .01) for bromegrass (-.4%/d) than for the other forages (-.29%/d). Fraction A (% of CP) was not different (P = .24) among forages (22.5%), but B1 was higher (P < .01) in A (17.1%) than in GR (13.2%). The B2 fraction (% of CP) was higher (P < .01) in A compared with GR (51.6 vs 45.9%, respectively). Alfalfa had lower (P < .01) B3 (3.0% of CP) than bromegrass (18.6%) and tall fescue (13.2%). Fraction C was not different (P = .23) among forages (3.8%). Fractions A, B1, and C (% of CP) did not change (P > .05) across days for all forages. Fraction B2 (% of CP) decreased across days in A (-.21%/d) but was not affected in GR. Fraction B3 (% of CP) increased (P < .05) in A (.1%/d), decreased in endophyte-infected tall fescue (-.20%/d), and did not change (P > .05) in the other forages. Crude protein and fiber composition were affected more by forage species than by maturity. The CP and NDF concentrations were more affected by maturity. Insoluble fractions but not soluble fractions of CP were affected by maturity.  (+info)

Dietary fiber, also known as roughage, is the indigestible portion of plant foods that makes up the structural framework of the plants we eat. It is composed of cellulose, hemicellulose, pectin, gums, lignins, and waxes. Dietary fiber can be classified into two categories: soluble and insoluble.

Soluble fiber dissolves in water to form a gel-like material in the gut, which can help slow down digestion, increase feelings of fullness, and lower cholesterol levels. Soluble fiber is found in foods such as oats, barley, fruits, vegetables, legumes, and nuts.

Insoluble fiber does not dissolve in water and passes through the gut intact, helping to add bulk to stools and promote regular bowel movements. Insoluble fiber is found in foods such as whole grains, bran, seeds, and the skins of fruits and vegetables.

Dietary fiber has numerous health benefits, including promoting healthy digestion, preventing constipation, reducing the risk of heart disease, controlling blood sugar levels, and aiding in weight management. The recommended daily intake of dietary fiber is 25-38 grams per day for adults, depending on age and gender.

Dietary fats, also known as fatty acids, are a major nutrient that the body needs for energy and various functions. They are an essential component of cell membranes and hormones, and they help the body absorb certain vitamins. There are several types of dietary fats:

1. Saturated fats: These are typically solid at room temperature and are found in animal products such as meat, butter, and cheese, as well as tropical oils like coconut and palm oil. Consuming a high amount of saturated fats can raise levels of unhealthy LDL cholesterol and increase the risk of heart disease.
2. Unsaturated fats: These are typically liquid at room temperature and can be further divided into monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats. Monounsaturated fats, found in foods such as olive oil, avocados, and nuts, can help lower levels of unhealthy LDL cholesterol while maintaining levels of healthy HDL cholesterol. Polyunsaturated fats, found in foods such as fatty fish, flaxseeds, and walnuts, have similar effects on cholesterol levels and also provide essential omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids that the body cannot produce on its own.
3. Trans fats: These are unsaturated fats that have been chemically modified to be solid at room temperature. They are often found in processed foods such as baked goods, fried foods, and snack foods. Consuming trans fats can raise levels of unhealthy LDL cholesterol and lower levels of healthy HDL cholesterol, increasing the risk of heart disease.

It is recommended to limit intake of saturated and trans fats and to consume more unsaturated fats as part of a healthy diet.

A diet, in medical terms, refers to the planned and regular consumption of food and drinks. It is a balanced selection of nutrient-rich foods that an individual eats on a daily or periodic basis to meet their energy needs and maintain good health. A well-balanced diet typically includes a variety of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean proteins, and low-fat dairy products.

A diet may also be prescribed for therapeutic purposes, such as in the management of certain medical conditions like diabetes, hypertension, or obesity. In these cases, a healthcare professional may recommend specific restrictions or modifications to an individual's regular diet to help manage their condition and improve their overall health.

It is important to note that a healthy and balanced diet should be tailored to an individual's age, gender, body size, activity level, and any underlying medical conditions. Consulting with a healthcare professional, such as a registered dietitian or nutritionist, can help ensure that an individual's dietary needs are being met in a safe and effective way.

Cereals, in a medical context, are not specifically defined. However, cereals are generally understood to be grasses of the family Poaceae that are cultivated for the edible components of their grain (the seed of the grass). The term "cereal" is derived from Ceres, the Roman goddess of agriculture and harvest.

The most widely consumed cereals include:

1. Wheat
2. Rice
3. Corn (Maize)
4. Barley
5. Oats
6. Millet
7. Sorghum
8. Rye

Cereals are a significant part of the human diet, providing energy in the form of carbohydrates, as well as protein, fiber, vitamins, and minerals. They can be consumed in various forms, such as whole grains, flour, flakes, or puffed cereals. Some people may have allergies or intolerances to specific cereals, like celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder that requires a gluten-free diet (wheat, barley, and rye contain gluten).

Cellulose is a complex carbohydrate that is the main structural component of the cell walls of green plants, many algae, and some fungi. It is a polysaccharide consisting of long chains of beta-glucose molecules linked together by beta-1,4 glycosidic bonds. Cellulose is insoluble in water and most organic solvents, and it is resistant to digestion by humans and non-ruminant animals due to the lack of cellulase enzymes in their digestive systems. However, ruminants such as cows and sheep can digest cellulose with the help of microbes in their rumen that produce cellulase.

Cellulose has many industrial applications, including the production of paper, textiles, and building materials. It is also used as a source of dietary fiber in human food and animal feed. Cellulose-based materials are being explored for use in biomedical applications such as tissue engineering and drug delivery due to their biocompatibility and mechanical properties.

Pectins are complex polysaccharides that are commonly found in the cell walls of plants. In the context of food and nutrition, pectins are often referred to as dietary fiber. They have a variety of important functions within the body, including promoting digestive health by adding bulk to stools and helping to regulate bowel movements.

Pectins are also used in the medical field as a demulcent, which is a substance that forms a soothing film over mucous membranes. This can be helpful in treating conditions such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

In addition to their use in medicine, pectins are widely used in the food industry as a gelling agent, thickener, and stabilizer. They are commonly found in jams, jellies, and other preserved fruits, as well as in baked goods and confectionery products.

Dietary carbohydrates refer to the organic compounds in food that are primarily composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen atoms, with a general formula of Cm(H2O)n. They are one of the three main macronutrients, along with proteins and fats, that provide energy to the body.

Carbohydrates can be classified into two main categories: simple carbohydrates (also known as simple sugars) and complex carbohydrates (also known as polysaccharides).

Simple carbohydrates are made up of one or two sugar molecules, such as glucose, fructose, and lactose. They are quickly absorbed by the body and provide a rapid source of energy. Simple carbohydrates are found in foods such as fruits, vegetables, dairy products, and sweeteners like table sugar, honey, and maple syrup.

Complex carbohydrates, on the other hand, are made up of long chains of sugar molecules that take longer to break down and absorb. They provide a more sustained source of energy and are found in foods such as whole grains, legumes, starchy vegetables, and nuts.

It is recommended that adults consume between 45-65% of their daily caloric intake from carbohydrates, with a focus on complex carbohydrates and limiting added sugars.

Dietary proteins are sources of protein that come from the foods we eat. Protein is an essential nutrient for the human body, required for various bodily functions such as growth, repair, and immune function. Dietary proteins are broken down into amino acids during digestion, which are then absorbed and used to synthesize new proteins in the body.

Dietary proteins can be classified as complete or incomplete based on their essential amino acid content. Complete proteins contain all nine essential amino acids that cannot be produced by the human body and must be obtained through the diet. Examples of complete protein sources include meat, poultry, fish, eggs, dairy products, soy, and quinoa.

Incomplete proteins lack one or more essential amino acids and are typically found in plant-based foods such as grains, legumes, nuts, and seeds. However, by combining different incomplete protein sources, it is possible to obtain all the essential amino acids needed for a complete protein diet. This concept is known as complementary proteins.

It's important to note that while dietary proteins are essential for good health, excessive protein intake can have negative effects on the body, such as increased stress on the kidneys and bones. Therefore, it's recommended to consume protein in moderation as part of a balanced and varied diet.

Nerve fibers are specialized structures that constitute the long, slender processes (axons) of neurons (nerve cells). They are responsible for conducting electrical impulses, known as action potentials, away from the cell body and transmitting them to other neurons or effector organs such as muscles and glands. Nerve fibers are often surrounded by supportive cells called glial cells and are grouped together to form nerve bundles or nerves. These fibers can be myelinated (covered with a fatty insulating sheath called myelin) or unmyelinated, which influences the speed of impulse transmission.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "vegetables" is not a term that has a medical definition. It is a dietary category that includes various plant-based foods, typically referring to the edible parts of herbaceous plants excluding fruit (but including seeds), such as leaves, stems, roots, tubers, and bulbs.

However, in a nutritional or clinical context, vegetables are often defined by their nutrient content. For example, they may be classified as foods that are high in certain vitamins, minerals, and fiber, and low in calories and fat. Different healthcare professionals or organizations might have slightly different definitions or classifications of what constitutes a vegetable, but there is no single medical definition for this term.

A dietary supplement is a product that contains nutrients, such as vitamins, minerals, amino acids, herbs or other botanicals, and is intended to be taken by mouth, to supplement the diet. Dietary supplements can include a wide range of products, such as vitamin and mineral supplements, herbal supplements, and sports nutrition products.

Dietary supplements are not intended to treat, diagnose, cure, or alleviate the effects of diseases. They are intended to be used as a way to add extra nutrients to the diet or to support specific health functions. It is important to note that dietary supplements are not subject to the same rigorous testing and regulations as drugs, so it is important to choose products carefully and consult with a healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns about using them.

I believe there might be some confusion in your question as "plant gums" is not a standard medical term. However, if you are referring to "gum" in the context of botany, it relates to the supportive tissues found in plants, similar to how gums support teeth in humans. In this case, I can provide a brief overview of what plant gums are from an organic chemistry and botanical perspective:

Plant gums are complex polysaccharides (long chains of sugar molecules) that serve various functions within plants. They are often produced as a response to injury or stress, helping to seal off wounds and protect the plant. Some common examples include:

1. Gum arabic: Exuded from Acacia senegal trees, it is primarily composed of arabinogalactan proteins and has applications in food, pharmaceutical, and industrial industries due to its emulsifying, thickening, and stabilizing properties.
2. Guar gum: Derived from the seeds of Cyamopsis tetragonoloba, it is a galactomannan that swells in water, making it useful as a thickener, stabilizer, and binder in food, textile, paper, and pharmaceutical industries.
3. Locust bean gum: Extracted from the seeds of Ceratonia siliqua (carob tree), it is another galactomannan with similar uses to guar gum.

If you meant something different by "plant gums," please provide clarification, and I will do my best to offer a suitable response.

Galactans are a type of complex carbohydrates known as oligosaccharides that are composed of galactose molecules. They can be found in certain plants, including beans, lentils, and some fruits and vegetables. In the human body, galactans are not digestible and can reach the colon intact, where they may serve as a substrate for fermentation by gut bacteria. This can lead to the production of short-chain fatty acids, which have been shown to have various health benefits. However, in some individuals with irritable bowel syndrome or other functional gastrointestinal disorders, consumption of galactans may cause digestive symptoms such as bloating, gas, and diarrhea.

Psyllium is a type of fiber derived from the seeds of the Plantago ovata plant. It's often used as a bulk-forming laxative to help promote regularity and relieve constipation. When psyllium comes into contact with water, it swells and forms a gel-like substance that helps move waste through the digestive tract. In addition to its laxative effects, psyllium has also been shown to help lower cholesterol levels and control blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. It's available in various forms such as powder, capsules, and wafers, and can be found in many over-the-counter supplements and medications.

Feces are the solid or semisolid remains of food that could not be digested or absorbed in the small intestine, along with bacteria and other waste products. After being stored in the colon, feces are eliminated from the body through the rectum and anus during defecation. Feces can vary in color, consistency, and odor depending on a person's diet, health status, and other factors.

"Energy intake" is a medical term that refers to the amount of energy or calories consumed through food and drink. It is an important concept in the study of nutrition, metabolism, and energy balance, and is often used in research and clinical settings to assess an individual's dietary habits and health status.

Energy intake is typically measured in kilocalories (kcal) or joules (J), with one kcal equivalent to approximately 4.184 J. The recommended daily energy intake varies depending on factors such as age, sex, weight, height, physical activity level, and overall health status.

It's important to note that excessive energy intake, particularly when combined with a sedentary lifestyle, can lead to weight gain and an increased risk of chronic diseases such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. On the other hand, inadequate energy intake can lead to malnutrition, decreased immune function, and other health problems. Therefore, it's essential to maintain a balanced energy intake that meets individual nutritional needs while promoting overall health and well-being.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "fruit" is not a medical term per se. It is a common term used to describe the part of a plant that develops from the ovary after flowering and contains seeds. However, in a nutritional or dietary context, "fruits" are often referred to as foods that are typically sweet and juicy, and come from plants' flowers. They are rich in fiber, vitamins, and minerals, making them an essential part of a healthy diet. But in a strict medical sense, there isn't a specific definition for "fruit."

Skeletal muscle fibers, also known as striated muscle fibers, are the type of muscle cells that make up skeletal muscles, which are responsible for voluntary movements of the body. These muscle fibers are long, cylindrical, and multinucleated, meaning they contain multiple nuclei. They are surrounded by a connective tissue layer called the endomysium, and many fibers are bundled together into fascicles, which are then surrounded by another layer of connective tissue called the perimysium.

Skeletal muscle fibers are composed of myofibrils, which are long, thread-like structures that run the length of the fiber. Myofibrils contain repeating units called sarcomeres, which are responsible for the striated appearance of skeletal muscle fibers. Sarcomeres are composed of thick and thin filaments, which slide past each other during muscle contraction to shorten the sarcomere and generate force.

Skeletal muscle fibers can be further classified into two main types based on their contractile properties: slow-twitch (type I) and fast-twitch (type II). Slow-twitch fibers have a high endurance capacity and are used for sustained, low-intensity activities such as maintaining posture. Fast-twitch fibers, on the other hand, have a higher contractile speed and force generation capacity but fatigue more quickly and are used for powerful, explosive movements.

Digestion is the complex process of breaking down food into smaller molecules that can be absorbed and utilized by the body for energy, growth, and cell repair. This process involves both mechanical and chemical actions that occur in the digestive system, which includes the mouth, esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine, and accessory organs such as the pancreas, liver, and gallbladder.

The different stages of digestion are:

1. Ingestion: This is the first step in digestion, where food is taken into the mouth.
2. Mechanical digestion: This involves physically breaking down food into smaller pieces through chewing, churning, and mixing with digestive enzymes.
3. Chemical digestion: This involves breaking down food molecules into simpler forms using various enzymes and chemicals produced by the digestive system.
4. Absorption: Once the food is broken down into simple molecules, they are absorbed through the walls of the small intestine into the bloodstream and transported to different parts of the body.
5. Elimination: The undigested material that remains after absorption is moved through the large intestine and eliminated from the body as feces.

The process of digestion is essential for maintaining good health, as it provides the necessary nutrients and energy required for various bodily functions.

I apologize, but "bread" is a common food item and not a medical term. It is typically made from flour, water, yeast, and salt, and is baked at high temperatures. There is no medical definition for bread. If you have any specific concerns about bread or its ingredients in relation to your health, I would be happy to try to help address those.

Volatile fatty acids (VFA) are a type of fatty acid that have a low molecular weight and are known for their ability to evaporate at room temperature. They are produced in the body during the breakdown of carbohydrates and proteins in the absence of oxygen, such as in the digestive tract by certain bacteria.

The most common volatile fatty acids include acetic acid, propionic acid, and butyric acid. These compounds have various roles in the body, including providing energy to cells in the intestines, modulating immune function, and regulating the growth of certain bacteria. They are also used as precursors for the synthesis of other molecules, such as cholesterol and bile acids.

In addition to their role in the body, volatile fatty acids are also important in the food industry, where they are used as flavorings and preservatives. They are produced naturally during fermentation and aging processes, and are responsible for the distinctive flavors of foods such as yogurt, cheese, and wine.

Animal feed refers to any substance or mixture of substances, whether processed, unprocessed, or partially processed, which is intended to be used as food for animals, including fish, without further processing. It includes ingredients such as grains, hay, straw, oilseed meals, and by-products from the milling, processing, and manufacturing industries. Animal feed can be in the form of pellets, crumbles, mash, or other forms, and is used to provide nutrients such as energy, protein, fiber, vitamins, and minerals to support the growth, reproduction, and maintenance of animals. It's important to note that animal feed must be safe, nutritious, and properly labeled to ensure the health and well-being of the animals that consume it.

"Food analysis" is not a medical term per se, but it falls under the broader field of food science and nutrition. Food analysis refers to the laboratory methods and techniques used to determine the composition and quality of food products. This can include testing for nutrients (such as proteins, fats, carbohydrates, vitamins, and minerals), contaminants (like heavy metals, pesticides, or allergens), and other components that may affect the safety, quality, or authenticity of food.

The results of food analysis can be used to ensure compliance with regulatory standards, develop new food products, assess the nutritional value of diets, investigate food-borne illnesses, and monitor trends in food consumption. While not a medical definition, food analysis is an important tool for promoting public health and preventing diet-related diseases.

"Food habits" refer to the established patterns or behaviors that individuals develop in relation to their food choices and eating behaviors. These habits can include preferences for certain types of foods, meal timing, portion sizes, and dining experiences. Food habits are influenced by a variety of factors including cultural background, personal beliefs, taste preferences, social norms, and economic resources. They can have significant impacts on an individual's nutritional status, overall health, and quality of life.

It is important to note that while "food habits" may not be a formal medical term, it is often used in the context of nutrition and public health research and interventions to describe the behaviors related to food choices and eating patterns.

Diet records are documents used to track and record an individual's food and beverage intake over a specific period. These records may include details such as the type and quantity of food consumed, time of consumption, and any related observations or notes. Diet records can be used for various purposes, including assessing dietary habits and patterns, identifying potential nutritional deficiencies or excesses, and developing personalized nutrition plans. They are often used in research, clinical settings, and weight management programs.

Dietary cholesterol is a type of cholesterol that comes from the foods we eat. It is present in animal-derived products such as meat, poultry, dairy products, and eggs. While dietary cholesterol can contribute to an increase in blood cholesterol levels for some people, it's important to note that saturated and trans fats have a more significant impact on blood cholesterol levels than dietary cholesterol itself.

The American Heart Association recommends limiting dietary cholesterol intake to less than 300 milligrams per day for most people, and less than 200 milligrams per day for those with a history of heart disease or high cholesterol levels. However, individual responses to dietary cholesterol can vary, so it's essential to monitor blood cholesterol levels and adjust dietary habits accordingly.

'Avena sativa' is the scientific name for a type of grass species known as common oat or cultivated oat. It is widely grown as a crop for its seed, which is used as a food source for both humans and animals. Oats are rich in fiber, vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants, making them a popular choice for breakfast cereals, baked goods, and animal feeds. In addition to their nutritional value, oats have also been used in traditional medicine for various purposes, such as treating skin irritation and promoting hair growth.

Fermentation is a metabolic process in which an organism converts carbohydrates into alcohol or organic acids using enzymes. In the absence of oxygen, certain bacteria, yeasts, and fungi convert sugars into carbon dioxide, hydrogen, and various end products, such as alcohol, lactic acid, or acetic acid. This process is commonly used in food production, such as in making bread, wine, and beer, as well as in industrial applications for the production of biofuels and chemicals.

Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs) are the average daily levels of nutrients that are sufficient to meet the nutrient requirements of nearly all (97-98%) healthy individuals in a specific life stage and gender group. They are considered as the gold standard for establishing nutrient intake recommendations and are used as a benchmark for planning and assessing the nutrient intakes of individuals and populations. The RDAs are established by the Food and Nutrition Board of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in the United States. They represent the minimum daily amounts of various nutrients that are necessary to prevent deficiencies and maintain good health.

Mannans are a type of complex carbohydrate, specifically a heteropolysaccharide, that are found in the cell walls of certain plants, algae, and fungi. They consist of chains of mannose sugars linked together, often with other sugar molecules such as glucose or galactose.

Mannans have various biological functions, including serving as a source of energy for microorganisms that can break them down. In some cases, mannans can also play a role in the immune response and are used as a component of vaccines to stimulate an immune response.

In the context of medicine, mannans may be relevant in certain conditions such as gut dysbiosis or allergic reactions to foods containing mannans. Additionally, some research has explored the potential use of mannans as a delivery vehicle for drugs or other therapeutic agents.

Dietary calcium is a type of calcium that is obtained through food sources. Calcium is an essential mineral that is necessary for many bodily functions, including bone formation and maintenance, muscle contraction, nerve impulse transmission, and blood clotting.

The recommended daily intake of dietary calcium varies depending on age, sex, and other factors. For example, the recommended daily intake for adults aged 19-50 is 1000 mg, while women over 50 and men over 70 require 1200 mg per day.

Good dietary sources of calcium include dairy products such as milk, cheese, and yogurt; leafy green vegetables like broccoli and kale; fortified cereals and juices; and certain types of fish, such as salmon and sardines. It is important to note that some foods can inhibit the absorption of calcium, including oxalates found in spinach and rhubarb, and phytates found in whole grains and legumes.

If a person is unable to get enough calcium through their diet, they may need to take calcium supplements. However, it is important to talk to a healthcare provider before starting any new supplement regimen, as excessive intake of calcium can lead to negative health effects.

Body weight is the measure of the force exerted on a scale or balance by an object's mass, most commonly expressed in units such as pounds (lb) or kilograms (kg). In the context of medical definitions, body weight typically refers to an individual's total weight, which includes their skeletal muscle, fat, organs, and bodily fluids.

Healthcare professionals often use body weight as a basic indicator of overall health status, as it can provide insights into various aspects of a person's health, such as nutritional status, metabolic function, and risk factors for certain diseases. For example, being significantly underweight or overweight can increase the risk of developing conditions like malnutrition, diabetes, heart disease, and certain types of cancer.

It is important to note that body weight alone may not provide a complete picture of an individual's health, as it does not account for factors such as muscle mass, bone density, or body composition. Therefore, healthcare professionals often use additional measures, such as body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, and blood tests, to assess overall health status more comprehensively.

Gum arabic, also known as acacia gum, is a natural gum made from the sap of two species of acacia tree: Senegalia senegal and Vachellia seyal. It's primarily composed of complex polysaccharides and has been used in various medical and non-medical applications for centuries.

In a medical context, gum arabic is often used as an excipient or a component of the delivery system for medications. Its properties as a binder, emulsifier, and stabilizer make it useful in the production of tablets, capsules, and other pharmaceutical forms. It can also be found in some oral medications, throat lozenges, and cough syrups due to its soothing effects on mucous membranes.

However, it's important to note that gum arabic itself is not a medication or therapeutic agent, but rather a component that aids in the administration or delivery of medical substances.

A diet survey is a questionnaire or interview designed to gather information about an individual's eating habits and patterns. It typically includes questions about the types and quantities of foods and beverages consumed, meal frequency and timing, and any dietary restrictions or preferences. The purpose of a diet survey is to assess an individual's nutritional intake and identify areas for improvement or intervention in order to promote health and prevent or manage chronic diseases. Diet surveys may also be used in research settings to gather data on the eating habits of larger populations.

The cecum is the first part of the large intestine, located at the junction of the small and large intestines. It is a pouch-like structure that connects to the ileum (the last part of the small intestine) and the ascending colon (the first part of the large intestine). The cecum is where the appendix is attached. Its function is to absorb water and electrolytes, and it also serves as a site for the fermentation of certain types of dietary fiber by gut bacteria. However, the exact functions of the cecum are not fully understood.

The medical definition of "eating" refers to the process of consuming and ingesting food or nutrients into the body. This process typically involves several steps, including:

1. Food preparation: This may involve cleaning, chopping, cooking, or combining ingredients to make them ready for consumption.
2. Ingestion: The act of taking food or nutrients into the mouth and swallowing it.
3. Digestion: Once food is ingested, it travels down the esophagus and enters the stomach, where it is broken down by enzymes and acids to facilitate absorption of nutrients.
4. Absorption: Nutrients are absorbed through the walls of the small intestine and transported to cells throughout the body for use as energy or building blocks for growth and repair.
5. Elimination: Undigested food and waste products are eliminated from the body through the large intestine (colon) and rectum.

Eating is an essential function that provides the body with the nutrients it needs to maintain health, grow, and repair itself. Disorders of eating, such as anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa, can have serious consequences for physical and mental health.

Mineral fibers are tiny, elongated particles that occur naturally in the environment. They are made up of minerals such as silica and are often found in rocks and soil. Some mineral fibers, like asbestos, have been widely used in various industries for their heat resistance, insulating properties, and strength. However, exposure to certain types of mineral fibers, particularly asbestos, has been linked to serious health conditions such as lung cancer, mesothelioma, and asbestosis.

Mineral fibers are defined by their physical characteristics, including their length, width, and aspect ratio (the ratio of the fiber's length to its width). According to the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), mineral fibers with a length of at least 5 micrometers, a width of no more than 3 micrometers, and an aspect ratio of at least 3:1 are considered to be "respirable," meaning they can be inhaled and potentially become lodged in the lungs.

It's worth noting that not all mineral fibers are created equal when it comes to health risks. Asbestos, for example, is a known human carcinogen, while other mineral fibers such as fiberglass and rock wool are considered less hazardous, although they can still cause respiratory irritation and other health problems with prolonged exposure.

Unsaturated dietary fats are a type of fat that are primarily found in foods from plants. They are called "unsaturated" because of their chemical structure, which contains one or more double bonds in the carbon chain of the fat molecule. These double bonds can be either monounsaturated (one double bond) or polyunsaturated (multiple double bonds).

Monounsaturated fats are found in foods such as olive oil, avocados, and nuts, while polyunsaturated fats are found in foods such as fatty fish, flaxseeds, and vegetable oils. Unsaturated fats are generally considered to be heart-healthy, as they can help lower levels of harmful cholesterol in the blood and reduce the risk of heart disease.

It is important to note that while unsaturated fats are healthier than saturated and trans fats, they are still high in calories and should be consumed in moderation as part of a balanced diet.

Cholesterol is a type of lipid (fat) molecule that is an essential component of cell membranes and is also used to make certain hormones and vitamins in the body. It is produced by the liver and is also obtained from animal-derived foods such as meat, dairy products, and eggs.

Cholesterol does not mix with blood, so it is transported through the bloodstream by lipoproteins, which are particles made up of both lipids and proteins. There are two main types of lipoproteins that carry cholesterol: low-density lipoproteins (LDL), also known as "bad" cholesterol, and high-density lipoproteins (HDL), also known as "good" cholesterol.

High levels of LDL cholesterol in the blood can lead to a buildup of cholesterol in the walls of the arteries, increasing the risk of heart disease and stroke. On the other hand, high levels of HDL cholesterol are associated with a lower risk of these conditions because HDL helps remove LDL cholesterol from the bloodstream and transport it back to the liver for disposal.

It is important to maintain healthy levels of cholesterol through a balanced diet, regular exercise, and sometimes medication if necessary. Regular screening is also recommended to monitor cholesterol levels and prevent health complications.

Nutritive value is a term used to describe the amount and kind of nutrients, such as carbohydrates, proteins, fats, vitamins, minerals, and water, that a food provides. It refers to the ability of a food to supply the necessary components for growth, repair, maintenance, and energy in the body. The nutritive value of a food is usually expressed in terms of its content of these various nutrients per 100 grams or per serving. Foods with high nutritive value are those that provide a significant amount of essential nutrients in relation to their calorie content.

Defecation is the medical term for the act of passing stools (feces) through the anus. It is a normal bodily function that involves the contraction of muscles in the colon and anal sphincter to release waste from the body. Defecation is usually a regular and daily occurrence, with the frequency varying from person to person.

The stool is made up of undigested food, bacteria, and other waste products that are eliminated from the body through the rectum and anus. The process of defecation is controlled by the autonomic nervous system, which regulates involuntary bodily functions such as heart rate and digestion.

Difficulties with defecation can occur due to various medical conditions, including constipation, irritable bowel syndrome, and inflammatory bowel disease. These conditions can cause symptoms such as hard or painful stools, straining during bowel movements, and a feeling of incomplete evacuation. If you are experiencing any problems with defecation, it is important to speak with your healthcare provider for proper diagnosis and treatment.

The colon, also known as the large intestine, is a part of the digestive system in humans and other vertebrates. It is an organ that eliminates waste from the body and is located between the small intestine and the rectum. The main function of the colon is to absorb water and electrolytes from digested food, forming and storing feces until they are eliminated through the anus.

The colon is divided into several regions, including the cecum, ascending colon, transverse colon, descending colon, sigmoid colon, rectum, and anus. The walls of the colon contain a layer of muscle that helps to move waste material through the organ by a process called peristalsis.

The inner surface of the colon is lined with mucous membrane, which secretes mucus to lubricate the passage of feces. The colon also contains a large population of bacteria, known as the gut microbiota, which play an important role in digestion and immunity.

Fast-twitch muscle fibers, also known as type II fibers, are a type of skeletal muscle fiber that are characterized by their rapid contraction and relaxation rates. These fibers have a larger diameter and contain a higher concentration of glycogen, which serves as a quick source of energy for muscle contractions. Fast-twitch fibers are further divided into two subcategories: type IIa and type IIb (or type IIx). Type IIa fibers have a moderate amount of mitochondria and can utilize both aerobic and anaerobic metabolic pathways, making them fatigue-resistant. Type IIb fibers, on the other hand, have fewer mitochondria and primarily use anaerobic metabolism, leading to faster fatigue. Fast-twitch fibers are typically used in activities that require quick, powerful movements such as sprinting or weightlifting.

Slow-twitch muscle fibers, also known as type I muscle fibers, are specialized skeletal muscle cells that contract relatively slowly and generate less force than fast-twitch fibers. However, they can maintain contraction for longer periods of time and have a higher resistance to fatigue. These fibers primarily use oxygen and aerobic metabolism to produce energy, making them highly efficient during prolonged, lower-intensity activities such as long-distance running or cycling. Slow-twitch muscle fibers also have an abundant blood supply, which allows for efficient delivery of oxygen and removal of waste products.

The digestive system is a complex network of organs and glands that work together to break down food into nutrients, which are then absorbed and utilized by the body for energy, growth, and cell repair. The physiological phenomena associated with the digestive system include:

1. Ingestion: This is the process of taking in food through the mouth.
2. Mechanical digestion: This involves the physical breakdown of food into smaller pieces through processes such as chewing, churning, and segmentation.
3. Chemical digestion: This involves the chemical breakdown of food molecules into simpler forms that can be absorbed by the body. This is achieved through the action of enzymes produced by the mouth, stomach, pancreas, and small intestine.
4. Motility: This refers to the movement of food through the digestive tract, which is achieved through a series of coordinated muscle contractions called peristalsis.
5. Secretion: This involves the production and release of various digestive juices and enzymes by glands such as the salivary glands, gastric glands, pancreas, and liver.
6. Absorption: This is the process of absorbing nutrients from the digested food into the bloodstream through the walls of the small intestine.
7. Defecation: This is the final process of eliminating undigested food and waste products from the body through the rectum and anus.

Overall, the coordinated functioning of these physiological phenomena ensures the proper digestion and absorption of nutrients, maintaining the health and well-being of the individual.

"Triticum" is the genus name for a group of cereal grains that includes common wheat (T. aestivum), durum wheat (T. durum), and spelt (T. spelta). These grains are important sources of food for humans, providing carbohydrates, proteins, and various nutrients. They are used to make a variety of foods such as bread, pasta, and breakfast cereals. Triticum species are also known as "wheat" in layman's terms.

"Animal nutritional physiological phenomena" is not a standardized medical or scientific term. However, it seems to refer to the processes and functions related to nutrition and physiology in animals. Here's a breakdown of the possible components:

1. Animal: This term refers to non-human living organisms that are multicellular, heterotrophic, and have a distinct nervous system.
2. Nutritional: This term pertains to the nourishment and energy requirements of an animal, including the ingestion, digestion, absorption, transportation, metabolism, and excretion of nutrients.
3. Physiological: This term refers to the functions and processes that occur within a living organism, including the interactions between different organs and systems.
4. Phenomena: This term generally means an observable fact or event.

Therefore, "animal nutritional physiological phenomena" could refer to the observable events and processes related to nutrition and physiology in animals. Examples of such phenomena include digestion, absorption, metabolism, energy production, growth, reproduction, and waste elimination.

I'm happy to help! However, it seems there might be a bit of confusion here. Starch is not typically considered a medical term, but rather a nutritional and biochemical concept. Here's a brief explanation:

Starch is a complex carbohydrate that serves as the primary form of energy storage in plants. It is made up of long chains of glucose molecules and can be found in various foods such as grains, legumes, fruits, and vegetables. Amylase, an enzyme present in our saliva and digestive system, helps break down starch into simpler sugars during the digestion process so that our bodies can absorb them for energy.

I hope this clarifies any confusion! If you have any other questions or need further information on a medical topic, please don't hesitate to ask.

Cotton fiber is not a medical term, but I can provide you with some information about cotton fibers in a general context.

Cotton fibers are soft, fluffy staple fibers that grow in a protective case called a boll around the seeds of cotton plants. Cotton fibers are primarily composed of cellulose, which is an organic compound and the main structural component of plant cells. These fibers are typically spun into yarn or thread and used to make a wide variety of textiles, including clothing and other soft goods.

Cotton fibers have some unique properties that make them suitable for medical applications as well:

1. Hypoallergenic: Cotton is generally considered hypoallergenic, meaning it is less likely to cause an allergic reaction compared to other materials. This makes cotton a popular choice for medical bandages, swabs, and other products that come into contact with the skin.
2. Absorbent: Cotton fibers are highly absorbent, which can be useful in medical settings for managing wounds, incontinence, or excessive sweating.
3. Breathable: Cotton is a breathable material, allowing air to pass through and helping to maintain a comfortable body temperature. This property makes cotton an excellent choice for medical garments, bedding, and other products that require good ventilation.
4. Comfortable: Cotton fibers are soft, lightweight, and gentle on the skin, making them a preferred material for medical textiles and clothing designed for people with sensitive skin or medical conditions like eczema or dermatitis.
5. Durable: Although cotton fibers can be delicate when wet, they are relatively strong and durable in dry conditions. This makes cotton an appropriate choice for reusable medical products like gowns, scrubs, and linens.

Constipation is a condition characterized by infrequent bowel movements or difficulty in passing stools that are often hard and dry. The medical definition of constipation varies, but it is generally defined as having fewer than three bowel movements in a week. In addition to infrequent bowel movements, other symptoms of constipation can include straining during bowel movements, feeling like you haven't completely evacuated your bowels, and experiencing hard or lumpy stools.

Constipation can have many causes, including a low-fiber diet, dehydration, certain medications, lack of physical activity, and underlying medical conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome or hypothyroidism. In most cases, constipation can be treated with lifestyle changes, such as increasing fiber intake, drinking more water, and getting regular exercise. However, if constipation is severe, persistent, or accompanied by other symptoms, it's important to seek medical attention to rule out any underlying conditions that may require treatment.

Butyrates are a type of fatty acid, specifically called short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), that are produced in the gut through the fermentation of dietary fiber by gut bacteria. The name "butyrate" comes from the Latin word for butter, "butyrum," as butyrate was first isolated from butter.

Butyrates have several important functions in the body. They serve as a primary energy source for colonic cells and play a role in maintaining the health and integrity of the intestinal lining. Additionally, butyrates have been shown to have anti-inflammatory effects, regulate gene expression, and may even help prevent certain types of cancer.

In medical contexts, butyrate supplements are sometimes used to treat conditions such as ulcerative colitis, a type of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), due to their anti-inflammatory properties and ability to promote gut health. However, more research is needed to fully understand the potential therapeutic uses of butyrates and their long-term effects on human health.

A vegetarian diet is a type of eating pattern that excludes meat, poultry, and fish, and sometimes other animal products like eggs, dairy, or honey, depending on the individual's specific dietary choices. There are several types of vegetarian diets, including:

1. Ovo-vegetarian: This diet includes vegetables, fruits, grains, nuts, seeds, dairy products, and eggs but excludes meat, poultry, and fish.
2. Lacto-vegetarian: This diet includes vegetables, fruits, grains, nuts, seeds, dairy products, and eggs but excludes meat, poultry, fish, and sometimes eggs.
3. Ovo-lacto vegetarian: This is the most common type of vegetarian diet and includes vegetables, fruits, grains, nuts, seeds, dairy products, and eggs but excludes meat, poultry, and fish.
4. Vegan: This diet excludes all animal products, including meat, poultry, fish, dairy, eggs, and sometimes honey or other bee products.
5. Fruitarian: This is a more restrictive form of veganism that includes only fruits, nuts, seeds, and other plant foods that can be harvested without killing the plant.
6. Raw vegan: This diet includes only raw fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, and other plant foods that have not been cooked or processed above 115°F (46°C).

Vegetarian diets can provide a range of health benefits, including lower risks of heart disease, high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, and certain cancers. However, it is important to ensure that vegetarian diets are well-planned and nutritionally adequate to meet individual nutrient needs, particularly for nutrients like vitamin B12, iron, calcium, and omega-3 fatty acids.

A medical definition of 'food' would be:

"Substances consumed by living organisms, usually in the form of meals, which contain necessary nutrients such as carbohydrates, proteins, fats, vitamins, minerals, and water. These substances are broken down during digestion to provide energy, build and repair tissues, and regulate bodily functions."

It's important to note that while this is a medical definition, it also aligns with common understanding of what food is.

Gastrointestinal (GI) contents refer to the physical substances within the gastrointestinal tract, which includes the stomach, small intestine, and large intestine. These contents can vary depending on the time since the last meal and the digestive process that is underway. Generally, GI contents include food, fluids, digestive enzymes, secretions, bacteria, and other waste products.

In a more specific context, GI contents may also refer to the stomach contents, which are often analyzed during autopsies or in cases of suspected poisoning or overdose. Stomach contents can provide valuable information about the type and amount of substances that have been ingested within a few hours prior to the analysis.

It is important to note that GI contents should not be confused with gastrointestinal fluids, which specifically refer to the secretions produced by the gastrointestinal tract, such as gastric juice in the stomach or bile in the small intestine.

Intestinal absorption refers to the process by which the small intestine absorbs water, nutrients, and electrolytes from food into the bloodstream. This is a critical part of the digestive process, allowing the body to utilize the nutrients it needs and eliminate waste products. The inner wall of the small intestine contains tiny finger-like projections called villi, which increase the surface area for absorption. Nutrients are absorbed into the bloodstream through the walls of the capillaries in these villi, and then transported to other parts of the body for use or storage.

The large intestine, also known as the colon, is the lower part of the gastrointestinal tract that extends from the cecum, where it joins the small intestine, to the anus. It is called "large" because it has a larger diameter compared to the small intestine and is responsible for several important functions in the digestive process.

The large intestine measures about 1.5 meters (5 feet) long in adults and consists of four main regions: the ascending colon, transverse colon, descending colon, and sigmoid colon. The primary function of the large intestine is to absorb water and electrolytes from undigested food materials, compact the remaining waste into feces, and store it until it is eliminated through defecation.

The large intestine also contains a diverse population of bacteria that aid in digestion by breaking down complex carbohydrates, producing vitamins like vitamin K and some B vitamins, and competing with harmful microorganisms to maintain a healthy balance within the gut. Additionally, the large intestine plays a role in immune function and helps protect the body from pathogens through the production of mucus, antimicrobial substances, and the activation of immune cells.

Edible plants are those that can be safely consumed by humans and other animals as a source of nutrition. They have various parts (such as fruits, vegetables, seeds, roots, stems, and leaves) that can be used for food after being harvested and prepared properly. Some edible plants have been cultivated and domesticated for agricultural purposes, while others are gathered from the wild. It is important to note that not all plants are safe to eat, and some may even be toxic or deadly if consumed. Proper identification and knowledge of preparation methods are crucial before consuming any plant material.

"Swine" is a common term used to refer to even-toed ungulates of the family Suidae, including domestic pigs and wild boars. However, in a medical context, "swine" often appears in the phrase "swine flu," which is a strain of influenza virus that typically infects pigs but can also cause illness in humans. The 2009 H1N1 pandemic was caused by a new strain of swine-origin influenza A virus, which was commonly referred to as "swine flu." It's important to note that this virus is not transmitted through eating cooked pork products; it spreads from person to person, mainly through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes.

"Random allocation," also known as "random assignment" or "randomization," is a process used in clinical trials and other research studies to distribute participants into different intervention groups (such as experimental group vs. control group) in a way that minimizes selection bias and ensures the groups are comparable at the start of the study.

In random allocation, each participant has an equal chance of being assigned to any group, and the assignment is typically made using a computer-generated randomization schedule or other objective methods. This process helps to ensure that any differences between the groups are due to the intervention being tested rather than pre-existing differences in the participants' characteristics.

Gastrointestinal transit refers to the movement of food, digestive secretions, and waste products through the gastrointestinal tract, from the mouth to the anus. This process involves several muscles and nerves that work together to propel the contents through the stomach, small intestine, large intestine, and rectum.

The transit time can vary depending on factors such as the type and amount of food consumed, hydration levels, and overall health. Abnormalities in gastrointestinal transit can lead to various conditions, including constipation, diarrhea, and malabsorption. Therefore, maintaining normal gastrointestinal transit is essential for proper digestion, nutrient absorption, and overall health.

Polysaccharides are complex carbohydrates consisting of long chains of monosaccharide units (simple sugars) bonded together by glycosidic linkages. They can be classified based on the type of monosaccharides and the nature of the bonds that connect them.

Polysaccharides have various functions in living organisms. For example, starch and glycogen serve as energy storage molecules in plants and animals, respectively. Cellulose provides structural support in plants, while chitin is a key component of fungal cell walls and arthropod exoskeletons.

Some polysaccharides also have important roles in the human body, such as being part of the extracellular matrix (e.g., hyaluronic acid) or acting as blood group antigens (e.g., ABO blood group substances).

An ileostomy is a surgical procedure in which the end of the small intestine, called the ileum, is brought through an opening in the abdominal wall (stoma) to create a path for waste material to leave the body. This procedure is typically performed when there is damage or removal of the colon, rectum, or anal canal due to conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis), cancer, or trauma.

After an ileostomy, waste material from the small intestine exits the body through the stoma and collects in a pouch worn outside the body. The patient needs to empty the pouch regularly, typically every few hours, as the output is liquid or semi-liquid. Ileostomies can be temporary or permanent, depending on the underlying condition and the planned course of treatment. Proper care and management of the stoma and pouch are essential for maintaining good health and quality of life after an ileostomy.

Dietary sodium is a mineral that is primarily found in table salt (sodium chloride) and many processed foods. It is an essential nutrient for human health, playing a crucial role in maintaining fluid balance, transmitting nerve impulses, and regulating muscle contractions. However, consuming too much dietary sodium can increase blood pressure and contribute to the development of hypertension, heart disease, stroke, and kidney problems.

The recommended daily intake of dietary sodium is less than 2,300 milligrams (mg) per day for most adults, but the American Heart Association recommends no more than 1,500 mg per day for optimal heart health. It's important to note that many processed and restaurant foods contain high levels of sodium, so it's essential to read food labels and choose fresh, whole foods whenever possible to help limit dietary sodium intake.

In the context of nutrition and health, minerals are inorganic elements that are essential for various bodily functions, such as nerve impulse transmission, muscle contraction, maintaining fluid and electrolyte balance, and bone structure. They are required in small amounts compared to macronutrients (carbohydrates, proteins, and fats) and are obtained from food and water.

Some of the major minerals include calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, sodium, potassium, and chloride, while trace minerals or microminerals are required in even smaller amounts and include iron, zinc, copper, manganese, iodine, selenium, and fluoride.

It's worth noting that the term "minerals" can also refer to geological substances found in the earth, but in medical terminology, it specifically refers to the essential inorganic elements required for human health.

The small intestine is the portion of the gastrointestinal tract that extends from the pylorus of the stomach to the beginning of the large intestine (cecum). It plays a crucial role in the digestion and absorption of nutrients from food. The small intestine is divided into three parts: the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum.

1. Duodenum: This is the shortest and widest part of the small intestine, approximately 10 inches long. It receives chyme (partially digested food) from the stomach and begins the process of further digestion with the help of various enzymes and bile from the liver and pancreas.
2. Jejunum: The jejunum is the middle section, which measures about 8 feet in length. It has a large surface area due to the presence of circular folds (plicae circulares), finger-like projections called villi, and microvilli on the surface of the absorptive cells (enterocytes). These structures increase the intestinal surface area for efficient absorption of nutrients, electrolytes, and water.
3. Ileum: The ileum is the longest and final section of the small intestine, spanning about 12 feet. It continues the absorption process, mainly of vitamin B12, bile salts, and any remaining nutrients. At the end of the ileum, there is a valve called the ileocecal valve that prevents backflow of contents from the large intestine into the small intestine.

The primary function of the small intestine is to absorb the majority of nutrients, electrolytes, and water from ingested food. The mucosal lining of the small intestine contains numerous goblet cells that secrete mucus, which protects the epithelial surface and facilitates the movement of chyme through peristalsis. Additionally, the small intestine hosts a diverse community of microbiota, which contributes to various physiological functions, including digestion, immunity, and protection against pathogens.

Triglycerides are the most common type of fat in the body, and they're found in the food we eat. They're carried in the bloodstream to provide energy to the cells in our body. High levels of triglycerides in the blood can increase the risk of heart disease, especially in combination with other risk factors such as high LDL (bad) cholesterol, low HDL (good) cholesterol, and high blood pressure.

It's important to note that while triglycerides are a type of fat, they should not be confused with cholesterol, which is a waxy substance found in the cells of our body. Both triglycerides and cholesterol are important for maintaining good health, but high levels of either can increase the risk of heart disease.

Triglyceride levels are measured through a blood test called a lipid panel or lipid profile. A normal triglyceride level is less than 150 mg/dL. Borderline-high levels range from 150 to 199 mg/dL, high levels range from 200 to 499 mg/dL, and very high levels are 500 mg/dL or higher.

Elevated triglycerides can be caused by various factors such as obesity, physical inactivity, excessive alcohol consumption, smoking, and certain medical conditions like diabetes, hypothyroidism, and kidney disease. Medications such as beta-blockers, steroids, and diuretics can also raise triglyceride levels.

Lifestyle changes such as losing weight, exercising regularly, eating a healthy diet low in saturated and trans fats, avoiding excessive alcohol consumption, and quitting smoking can help lower triglyceride levels. In some cases, medication may be necessary to reduce triglycerides to recommended levels.

Stress fibers are specialized cytoskeletal structures composed primarily of actin filaments, along with myosin II and other associated proteins. They are called "stress" fibers because they are thought to provide cells with the ability to resist and respond to mechanical stresses. These structures play a crucial role in maintaining cell shape, facilitating cell migration, and mediating cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesions. Stress fibers form bundles that span the length of the cell and connect to focal adhesion complexes at their ends, allowing for the transmission of forces between the extracellular matrix and the cytoskeleton. They are dynamic structures that can undergo rapid assembly and disassembly in response to various stimuli, including changes in mechanical stress, growth factor signaling, and cellular differentiation.

Lipids are a broad group of organic compounds that are insoluble in water but soluble in nonpolar organic solvents. They include fats, waxes, sterols, fat-soluble vitamins (such as vitamins A, D, E, and K), monoglycerides, diglycerides, triglycerides, and phospholipids. Lipids serve many important functions in the body, including energy storage, acting as structural components of cell membranes, and serving as signaling molecules. High levels of certain lipids, particularly cholesterol and triglycerides, in the blood are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Nutritional Physiological Phenomena" is not a widely recognized or established medical term. It seems to be a very specific phrase that may refer to the physiological processes and phenomena related to nutrition.

Nutrition, in a medical context, refers to the process of providing or obtaining food necessary for health and growth. Physiological phenomena, on the other hand, refer to the functional manifestations of living organisms and their parts.

So, "Nutritional Physiological Phenomena" could hypothetically refer to the various physiological processes that occur in the body in relation to nutrition, such as digestion, absorption, metabolism, transportation, and storage of nutrients. However, I would recommend consulting the specific source or context where this term was used for a more accurate definition.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "soybeans" are not a medical term. They are a type of legume that is commonly used in agriculture and food production. The medical community might discuss soybeans in the context of nutrition or allergies, but there isn't a formal medical definition for this term.

Here's some general information: Soybeans, scientifically known as Glycine max, are native to East Asia and are now grown worldwide. They are a significant source of plant-based protein and oil. Soybeans contain various nutrients, including essential amino acids, fiber, B vitamins, and minerals like calcium, iron, magnesium, and zinc. They are used in various food products such as tofu, soy milk, tempeh, and miso. Additionally, soybeans are also used in the production of industrial products, including biodiesel, plastics, and inks. Some people may have allergic reactions to soybeans or soy products.

Carboxymethylcellulose sodium is a type of cellulose derivative that is widely used in the medical and pharmaceutical fields as an excipient or a drug delivery agent. It is a white, odorless powder with good water solubility and forms a clear, viscous solution.

Chemically, carboxymethylcellulose sodium is produced by reacting cellulose, which is derived from plant sources such as wood or cotton, with sodium hydroxide and chloroacetic acid. This reaction introduces carboxymethyl groups (-CH2COO-) to the cellulose molecule, making it more soluble in water and providing negative charges that can interact with positively charged ions or drugs.

In medical applications, carboxymethylcellulose sodium is used as a thickening agent, binder, disintegrant, and suspending agent in various pharmaceutical formulations such as tablets, capsules, liquids, and semisolids. It can also be used as a lubricant in the manufacture of tablets and capsules to facilitate their ejection from molds or dies.

Carboxymethylcellulose sodium has been shown to have good biocompatibility and low toxicity, making it a safe and effective excipient for use in medical and pharmaceutical applications. However, like any other excipient, it should be used with caution and in appropriate amounts to avoid any adverse effects or interactions with the active ingredients of the drug product.

The ileum is the third and final segment of the small intestine, located between the jejunum and the cecum (the beginning of the large intestine). It plays a crucial role in nutrient absorption, particularly for vitamin B12 and bile salts. The ileum is characterized by its thin, lined walls and the presence of Peyer's patches, which are part of the immune system and help surveil for pathogens.

Weight gain is defined as an increase in body weight over time, which can be attributed to various factors such as an increase in muscle mass, fat mass, or total body water. It is typically measured in terms of pounds or kilograms and can be intentional or unintentional. Unintentional weight gain may be a cause for concern if it's significant or accompanied by other symptoms, as it could indicate an underlying medical condition such as hypothyroidism, diabetes, or heart disease.

It is important to note that while body mass index (BMI) can be used as a general guideline for weight status, it does not differentiate between muscle mass and fat mass. Therefore, an increase in muscle mass through activities like strength training could result in a higher BMI, but this may not necessarily be indicative of increased health risks associated with excess body fat.

A Nutrition Assessment is a systematic and comprehensive evaluation of an individual's nutritional status, which is carried out by healthcare professionals such as registered dietitians or nutritionists. The assessment typically involves collecting and analyzing data related to various factors that influence nutritional health, including:

1. Anthropometric measurements: These include height, weight, waist circumference, blood pressure, and other physical measures that can provide insights into an individual's overall health status and risk of chronic diseases.
2. Dietary intake assessment: This involves evaluating an individual's dietary patterns, food preferences, and eating habits to determine whether they are meeting their nutritional needs through their diet.
3. Biochemical assessments: These include blood tests and other laboratory measures that can provide information about an individual's nutrient status, such as serum levels of vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients.
4. Clinical assessment: This involves reviewing an individual's medical history, current medications, and any symptoms or health conditions that may be impacting their nutritional health.
5. Social and economic assessment: This includes evaluating an individual's access to food, income, education level, and other social determinants of health that can affect their ability to obtain and consume a healthy diet.

The goal of a Nutrition Assessment is to identify any nutritional risks or deficiencies and develop a personalized nutrition plan to address them. This may involve making dietary recommendations, providing education and counseling, or referring the individual to other healthcare professionals for further evaluation and treatment.

Fabaceae is the scientific name for a family of flowering plants commonly known as the legume, pea, or bean family. This family includes a wide variety of plants that are important economically, agriculturally, and ecologically. Many members of Fabaceae have compound leaves and produce fruits that are legumes, which are long, thin pods that contain seeds. Some well-known examples of plants in this family include beans, peas, lentils, peanuts, clover, and alfalfa.

In addition to their importance as food crops, many Fabaceae species have the ability to fix nitrogen from the atmosphere into the soil through a symbiotic relationship with bacteria that live in nodules on their roots. This makes them valuable for improving soil fertility and is one reason why they are often used in crop rotation and as cover crops.

It's worth noting that Fabaceae is sometimes still referred to by its older scientific name, Leguminosae.

Nutrition policy refers to a set of guidelines, regulations, or laws established by governmental or organizational bodies to promote healthy eating habits and reduce the risk of diet-related chronic diseases. These policies aim to create an environment that supports and encourages individuals to make healthier food choices. Nutrition policies can cover various aspects such as food labeling, nutrition education, food safety, agricultural practices, and access to affordable and nutritious foods. They may also address issues related to marketing and advertising of unhealthy food products, particularly to children. The ultimate goal of nutrition policy is to improve public health by creating a food environment that supports optimal nutrition and well-being.

Dietary iron is a vital nutrient that plays a crucial role in the production of hemoglobin, a protein in red blood cells responsible for carrying oxygen throughout the body. It is also essential for various other bodily functions, including energy production and immune function.

There are two forms of dietary iron: heme and non-heme. Heme iron is found in animal products such as meat, poultry, and fish, while non-heme iron is found in plant-based foods such as beans, lentils, tofu, spinach, and fortified cereals.

The recommended daily intake of dietary iron varies depending on age, sex, and other factors. For example, adult men typically require 8 milligrams (mg) per day, while adult women need 18 mg per day. Pregnant women may require up to 27 mg per day, while breastfeeding women need around 9-10 mg per day.

It is important to note that the absorption of non-heme iron from plant-based foods can be enhanced by consuming them with vitamin C-rich foods or drinks, such as citrus fruits, strawberries, and bell peppers. On the other hand, certain substances such as tannins (found in tea and coffee) and phytates (found in whole grains and legumes) can inhibit the absorption of non-heme iron.

Nutritional status is a concept that refers to the condition of an individual in relation to their nutrient intake, absorption, metabolism, and excretion. It encompasses various aspects such as body weight, muscle mass, fat distribution, presence of any deficiencies or excesses of specific nutrients, and overall health status.

A comprehensive assessment of nutritional status typically includes a review of dietary intake, anthropometric measurements (such as height, weight, waist circumference, blood pressure), laboratory tests (such as serum albumin, total protein, cholesterol levels, vitamin and mineral levels), and clinical evaluation for signs of malnutrition or overnutrition.

Malnutrition can result from inadequate intake or absorption of nutrients, increased nutrient requirements due to illness or injury, or excessive loss of nutrients due to medical conditions. On the other hand, overnutrition can lead to obesity and related health problems such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and certain types of cancer.

Therefore, maintaining a good nutritional status is essential for overall health and well-being, and it is an important consideration in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of various medical conditions.

"Food handling" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. However, in the context of public health and food safety, it generally refers to the activities involved in the storage, preparation, and serving of food in a way that minimizes the risk of contamination and foodborne illnesses. This includes proper hygiene practices, such as handwashing and wearing gloves, separating raw and cooked foods, cooking food to the correct temperature, and refrigerating or freezing food promptly. Proper food handling is essential for ensuring the safety and quality of food in various settings, including restaurants, hospitals, schools, and homes.

Functional food is a term used to describe food that has a potentially positive effect on health beyond basic nutrition. These foods contain bioactive components, such as vitamins, minerals, dietary fiber, proteins, peptides, fatty acids, or various types of carbohydrates, that may help to reduce the risk of chronic diseases and promote optimal health. Examples include fortified cereals, omega-3 enriched eggs, probiotic yogurts, and antioxidant-rich fruits and vegetables. It's important to note that functional foods should not replace a balanced diet and a healthy lifestyle but can be a part of it.

The liver is a large, solid organ located in the upper right portion of the abdomen, beneath the diaphragm and above the stomach. It plays a vital role in several bodily functions, including:

1. Metabolism: The liver helps to metabolize carbohydrates, fats, and proteins from the food we eat into energy and nutrients that our bodies can use.
2. Detoxification: The liver detoxifies harmful substances in the body by breaking them down into less toxic forms or excreting them through bile.
3. Synthesis: The liver synthesizes important proteins, such as albumin and clotting factors, that are necessary for proper bodily function.
4. Storage: The liver stores glucose, vitamins, and minerals that can be released when the body needs them.
5. Bile production: The liver produces bile, a digestive juice that helps to break down fats in the small intestine.
6. Immune function: The liver plays a role in the immune system by filtering out bacteria and other harmful substances from the blood.

Overall, the liver is an essential organ that plays a critical role in maintaining overall health and well-being.

Energy metabolism is the process by which living organisms produce and consume energy to maintain life. It involves a series of chemical reactions that convert nutrients from food, such as carbohydrates, fats, and proteins, into energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP).

The process of energy metabolism can be divided into two main categories: catabolism and anabolism. Catabolism is the breakdown of nutrients to release energy, while anabolism is the synthesis of complex molecules from simpler ones using energy.

There are three main stages of energy metabolism: glycolysis, the citric acid cycle (also known as the Krebs cycle), and oxidative phosphorylation. Glycolysis occurs in the cytoplasm of the cell and involves the breakdown of glucose into pyruvate, producing a small amount of ATP and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH). The citric acid cycle takes place in the mitochondria and involves the further breakdown of pyruvate to produce more ATP, NADH, and carbon dioxide. Oxidative phosphorylation is the final stage of energy metabolism and occurs in the inner mitochondrial membrane. It involves the transfer of electrons from NADH and other electron carriers to oxygen, which generates a proton gradient across the membrane. This gradient drives the synthesis of ATP, producing the majority of the cell's energy.

Overall, energy metabolism is a complex and essential process that allows organisms to grow, reproduce, and maintain their bodily functions. Disruptions in energy metabolism can lead to various diseases, including diabetes, obesity, and neurodegenerative disorders.

Blood glucose, also known as blood sugar, is the concentration of glucose in the blood. Glucose is a simple sugar that serves as the main source of energy for the body's cells. It is carried to each cell through the bloodstream and is absorbed into the cells with the help of insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas.

The normal range for blood glucose levels in humans is typically between 70 and 130 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) when fasting, and less than 180 mg/dL after meals. Levels that are consistently higher than this may indicate diabetes or other metabolic disorders.

Blood glucose levels can be measured through a variety of methods, including fingerstick blood tests, continuous glucose monitoring systems, and laboratory tests. Regular monitoring of blood glucose levels is important for people with diabetes to help manage their condition and prevent complications.

The Glycemic Index (GI) is a measure of how quickly a carbohydrate-containing food raises blood glucose levels, compared to a reference food (usually pure glucose). It is expressed as a percentage on a scale from 0 to 100. A food with a high GI raises blood glucose levels more rapidly and higher than a food with a low GI.

Foods are ranked based on the speed at which they cause an increase in blood sugar levels, with high GI foods causing a rapid spike and low GI foods causing a slower, more gradual rise. This can be useful for people managing diabetes or other conditions where maintaining stable blood glucose levels is important.

It's worth noting that the glycemic index of a food can vary depending on factors such as ripeness, cooking method, and the presence of fiber or fat in the meal. Therefore, it's best to consider GI values as a general guide rather than an absolute rule.

Purkinje fibers are specialized cardiac muscle fibers that are located in the subendocardial region of the inner ventricular walls of the heart. They play a crucial role in the electrical conduction system of the heart, transmitting electrical impulses from the bundle branches to the ventricular myocardium, which enables the coordinated contraction of the ventricles during each heartbeat.

These fibers have a unique structure that allows for rapid and efficient conduction of electrical signals. They are larger in diameter than regular cardiac muscle fibers, have fewer branching points, and possess more numerous mitochondria and a richer blood supply. These features enable Purkinje fibers to conduct electrical impulses at faster speeds, ensuring that the ventricles contract simultaneously and forcefully, promoting efficient pumping of blood throughout the body.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "flour" is not a medical term. It is a powder made by grinding raw grains, roots, beans, nuts, or seeds. The most common type is wheat flour, which is made from grinding wheat grains. Flour is a primary ingredient in many foods such as bread, pasta, and baked goods. I hope this clarifies any confusion! If you have any medical questions, I'd be happy to help.

Prebiotics are non-digestible dietary components that selectively stimulate the growth and/or activity of beneficial bacteria in the colon, thereby improving host health. They are typically carbohydrate-based food ingredients, such as fructooligosaccharides (FOS), galactooligosaccharides (GOS), inulin, and other oligosaccharides, that resist digestion in the upper gastrointestinal tract and are fermented by gut microbiota in the large intestine. Prebiotics promote the proliferation of probiotic bacteria, enhance the gut barrier function, modulate the immune system, and contribute to overall health maintenance and disease prevention.

A cross-over study is a type of experimental design in which participants receive two or more interventions in a specific order. After a washout period, each participant receives the opposite intervention(s). The primary advantage of this design is that it controls for individual variability by allowing each participant to act as their own control.

In medical research, cross-over studies are often used to compare the efficacy or safety of two treatments. For example, a researcher might conduct a cross-over study to compare the effectiveness of two different medications for treating high blood pressure. Half of the participants would be randomly assigned to receive one medication first and then switch to the other medication after a washout period. The other half of the participants would receive the opposite order of treatments.

Cross-over studies can provide valuable insights into the relative merits of different interventions, but they also have some limitations. For example, they may not be suitable for studying conditions that are chronic or irreversible, as it may not be possible to completely reverse the effects of the first intervention before administering the second one. Additionally, carryover effects from the first intervention can confound the results if they persist into the second treatment period.

Overall, cross-over studies are a useful tool in medical research when used appropriately and with careful consideration of their limitations.

Organ size refers to the volume or physical measurement of an organ in the body of an individual. It can be described in terms of length, width, and height or by using specialized techniques such as imaging studies (like CT scans or MRIs) to determine the volume. The size of an organ can vary depending on factors such as age, sex, body size, and overall health status. Changes in organ size may indicate various medical conditions, including growths, inflammation, or atrophy.

Myelinated nerve fibers are neuronal processes that are surrounded by a myelin sheath, a fatty insulating substance that is produced by Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system and oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system. This myelin sheath helps to increase the speed of electrical impulse transmission, also known as action potentials, along the nerve fiber. The myelin sheath has gaps called nodes of Ranvier where the electrical impulses can jump from one node to the next, which also contributes to the rapid conduction of signals. Myelinated nerve fibers are typically found in the peripheral nerves and the optic nerve, but not in the central nervous system (CNS) tracts that are located within the brain and spinal cord.

Dietary Potassium is a mineral and an essential electrolyte that is required in the human body for various physiological processes. It is primarily obtained through dietary sources. The recommended daily intake of potassium for adults is 4700 milligrams (mg).

Potassium plays a crucial role in maintaining normal blood pressure, heart function, and muscle and nerve activity. It also helps to balance the body's fluids and prevent kidney stones. Foods that are rich in dietary potassium include fruits such as bananas, oranges, and melons; vegetables such as leafy greens, potatoes, and tomatoes; legumes such as beans and lentils; dairy products such as milk and yogurt; and nuts and seeds.

It is important to maintain a balanced intake of dietary potassium, as both deficiency and excess can have negative health consequences. A deficiency in potassium can lead to muscle weakness, fatigue, and heart arrhythmias, while an excess can cause hyperkalemia, which can result in serious cardiac complications.

A diabetic diet is a meal plan that is designed to help manage blood sugar levels in individuals with diabetes. The main focus of this diet is to consume a balanced and varied diet with appropriate portion sizes, while controlling the intake of carbohydrates, which have the greatest impact on blood sugar levels. Here are some key components of a diabetic diet:

1. Carbohydrate counting: Monitoring the amount of carbohydrates consumed at each meal and snack is essential for maintaining stable blood sugar levels. Carbohydrates should be sourced from whole foods, such as fruits, vegetables, legumes, and whole grains, rather than refined or processed products.
2. Fiber-rich foods: Foods high in fiber, like fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, and whole grains, can help slow down the absorption of carbohydrates and minimize blood sugar spikes. Aim for at least 25 to 30 grams of fiber per day.
3. Lean protein sources: Choose lean protein sources such as chicken, turkey, fish, eggs, tofu, and low-fat dairy products. Limit red meat and processed meats, which can contribute to heart disease risk.
4. Healthy fats: Opt for monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats found in foods like avocados, olive oil, nuts, seeds, and fatty fish. These healthy fats can help reduce inflammation and improve insulin sensitivity.
5. Portion control: Pay attention to serving sizes and avoid overeating, especially when consuming high-calorie or high-fat foods.
6. Regular meals: Eating regularly spaced meals throughout the day can help maintain stable blood sugar levels and prevent extreme highs and lows.
7. Limit added sugars: Reduce or eliminate added sugars in your diet, such as those found in sweets, desserts, sugary drinks, and processed foods.
8. Monitoring: Regularly monitor blood sugar levels before and after meals to understand how different foods affect your body and adjust your meal plan accordingly.
9. Personalization: A diabetic diet should be tailored to an individual's specific needs, preferences, and lifestyle. Consult with a registered dietitian or certified diabetes educator for personalized guidance.

Fatty acids are carboxylic acids with a long aliphatic chain, which are important components of lipids and are widely distributed in living organisms. They can be classified based on the length of their carbon chain, saturation level (presence or absence of double bonds), and other structural features.

The two main types of fatty acids are:

1. Saturated fatty acids: These have no double bonds in their carbon chain and are typically solid at room temperature. Examples include palmitic acid (C16:0) and stearic acid (C18:0).
2. Unsaturated fatty acids: These contain one or more double bonds in their carbon chain and can be further classified into monounsaturated (one double bond) and polyunsaturated (two or more double bonds) fatty acids. Examples of unsaturated fatty acids include oleic acid (C18:1, monounsaturated), linoleic acid (C18:2, polyunsaturated), and alpha-linolenic acid (C18:3, polyunsaturated).

Fatty acids play crucial roles in various biological processes, such as energy storage, membrane structure, and cell signaling. Some essential fatty acids cannot be synthesized by the human body and must be obtained through dietary sources.

Medical Definition:

"Risk factors" are any attribute, characteristic or exposure of an individual that increases the likelihood of developing a disease or injury. They can be divided into modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors. Modifiable risk factors are those that can be changed through lifestyle choices or medical treatment, while non-modifiable risk factors are inherent traits such as age, gender, or genetic predisposition. Examples of modifiable risk factors include smoking, alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, and unhealthy diet, while non-modifiable risk factors include age, sex, and family history. It is important to note that having a risk factor does not guarantee that a person will develop the disease, but rather indicates an increased susceptibility.

"Formulated food" is a term used in the field of clinical nutrition to refer to foods that are specially manufactured and designed to meet the nutritional needs of specific patient populations. These foods often come in the form of shakes, bars, or pouches and are intended to be used as a sole source or supplementary source of nutrition for individuals who have difficulty meeting their nutritional needs through traditional food sources alone.

Formulated foods may be indicated for patients who have medical conditions that affect their ability to eat or digest regular food, such as dysphagia (swallowing difficulties), malabsorption syndromes, or chronic inflammatory bowel disease. They may also be used in patients who require additional nutritional support during times of illness, injury, or recovery from surgery.

Formulated foods are typically designed to provide a balance of macronutrients (carbohydrates, proteins, and fats) and micronutrients (vitamins and minerals) that meet the recommended dietary intakes for specific patient populations. They may also contain additional ingredients such as fiber, probiotics, or other nutraceuticals to provide additional health benefits.

It is important to note that formulated foods should only be used under the guidance of a healthcare professional, such as a registered dietitian or physician, to ensure that they are appropriate for an individual's specific medical and nutritional needs.

Viscosity is a physical property of a fluid that describes its resistance to flow. In medical terms, viscosity is often discussed in relation to bodily fluids such as blood or synovial fluid (found in joints). The unit of measurement for viscosity is the poise, although it is more commonly expressed in millipascals-second (mPa.s) in SI units. Highly viscous fluids flow more slowly than less viscous fluids. Changes in the viscosity of bodily fluids can have significant implications for health and disease; for example, increased blood viscosity has been associated with cardiovascular diseases, while decreased synovial fluid viscosity can contribute to joint pain and inflammation in conditions like osteoarthritis.

Bile acids and salts are naturally occurring steroidal compounds that play a crucial role in the digestion and absorption of lipids (fats) in the body. They are produced in the liver from cholesterol and then conjugated with glycine or taurine to form bile acids, which are subsequently converted into bile salts by the addition of a sodium or potassium ion.

Bile acids and salts are stored in the gallbladder and released into the small intestine during digestion, where they help emulsify fats, allowing them to be broken down into smaller molecules that can be absorbed by the body. They also aid in the elimination of waste products from the liver and help regulate cholesterol metabolism.

Abnormalities in bile acid synthesis or transport can lead to various medical conditions, such as cholestatic liver diseases, gallstones, and diarrhea. Therefore, understanding the role of bile acids and salts in the body is essential for diagnosing and treating these disorders.

The intestines, also known as the bowel, are a part of the digestive system that extends from the stomach to the anus. They are responsible for the further breakdown and absorption of nutrients from food, as well as the elimination of waste products. The intestines can be divided into two main sections: the small intestine and the large intestine.

The small intestine is a long, coiled tube that measures about 20 feet in length and is lined with tiny finger-like projections called villi, which increase its surface area and enhance nutrient absorption. The small intestine is where most of the digestion and absorption of nutrients takes place.

The large intestine, also known as the colon, is a wider tube that measures about 5 feet in length and is responsible for absorbing water and electrolytes from digested food, forming stool, and eliminating waste products from the body. The large intestine includes several regions, including the cecum, colon, rectum, and anus.

Together, the intestines play a critical role in maintaining overall health and well-being by ensuring that the body receives the nutrients it needs to function properly.

Dietary sucrose is a type of sugar that is commonly found in the human diet. It is a disaccharide, meaning it is composed of two monosaccharides: glucose and fructose. Sucrose is naturally occurring in many fruits and vegetables, but it is also added to a wide variety of processed foods and beverages as a sweetener.

In the body, sucrose is broken down into its component monosaccharides during digestion, which are then absorbed into the bloodstream and used for energy. While small amounts of sucrose can be part of a healthy diet, consuming large amounts of added sugars, including sucrose, has been linked to a variety of negative health outcomes, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, and heart disease. Therefore, it is recommended that people limit their intake of added sugars and focus on getting their sugars from whole foods, such as fruits and vegetables.

A diverticulum of the colon is a small sac or pouch that forms in the wall of the large intestine (colon). These sacs usually develop in areas where the blood vessels pass through the muscle layer of the colon, creating a weak spot that eventually bulges outward. Diverticula can occur anywhere along the length of the colon, but they are most commonly found in the lower part of the colon, also known as the sigmoid colon.

Diverticula themselves are not harmful and often do not cause any symptoms. However, when these sacs become inflamed or infected, it can lead to a condition called diverticulitis, which can cause pain, fever, nausea, vomiting, constipation, or diarrhea. Diverticulitis is usually treated with antibiotics and a liquid diet, but in severe cases, surgery may be required.

Risk factors for developing colonic diverticula include aging, obesity, smoking, low fiber intake, and lack of physical activity. Regular screening is recommended for individuals over the age of 50 to detect and prevent complications associated with diverticular disease.

A questionnaire in the medical context is a standardized, systematic, and structured tool used to gather information from individuals regarding their symptoms, medical history, lifestyle, or other health-related factors. It typically consists of a series of written questions that can be either self-administered or administered by an interviewer. Questionnaires are widely used in various areas of healthcare, including clinical research, epidemiological studies, patient care, and health services evaluation to collect data that can inform diagnosis, treatment planning, and population health management. They provide a consistent and organized method for obtaining information from large groups or individual patients, helping to ensure accurate and comprehensive data collection while minimizing bias and variability in the information gathered.

Colonic neoplasms refer to abnormal growths in the large intestine, also known as the colon. These growths can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). The two most common types of colonic neoplasms are adenomas and carcinomas.

Adenomas are benign tumors that can develop into cancer over time if left untreated. They are often found during routine colonoscopies and can be removed during the procedure.

Carcinomas, on the other hand, are malignant tumors that invade surrounding tissues and can spread to other parts of the body. Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States, and colonic neoplasms are a significant risk factor for developing this type of cancer.

Regular screenings for colonic neoplasms are recommended for individuals over the age of 50 or those with a family history of colorectal cancer or other risk factors. Early detection and removal of colonic neoplasms can significantly reduce the risk of developing colorectal cancer.

Uronic acids are a type of organic compound that are carboxylic acids derived from sugars (carbohydrates). They are formed by the oxidation of the primary alcohol group (-CH2OH) on a pentose sugar, resulting in a carboxyl group (-COOH) at that position.

The most common uronic acid is glucuronic acid, which is derived from glucose. Other examples include galacturonic acid (derived from galactose), iduronic acid (derived from glucose or galactose), and mannuronic acid (derived from mannose).

Uronic acids play important roles in various biological processes, such as the formation of complex carbohydrates like glycosaminoglycans, which are major components of connective tissues. They also serve as important intermediates in the metabolism of sugars and other carbohydrates.

A muscle is a soft tissue in our body that contracts to produce force and motion. It is composed mainly of specialized cells called muscle fibers, which are bound together by connective tissue. There are three types of muscles: skeletal (voluntary), smooth (involuntary), and cardiac. Skeletal muscles attach to bones and help in movement, while smooth muscles are found within the walls of organs and blood vessels, helping with functions like digestion and circulation. Cardiac muscle is the specific type that makes up the heart, allowing it to pump blood throughout the body.

A nutrition survey is not a medical term per se, but it is a research method used in the field of nutrition and public health. Here's a definition:

A nutrition survey is a study design that systematically collects and analyzes data on dietary intake, nutritional status, and related factors from a defined population or sample. It aims to describe the nutritional situation, identify nutritional problems, and monitor trends in a population over time. Nutrition surveys can be cross-sectional, longitudinal, or community-based and may involve various data collection methods such as interviews, questionnaires, observations, physical measurements, and biological samples. The results of nutrition surveys are used to inform nutrition policies, programs, and interventions aimed at improving the nutritional status and health outcomes of populations.

Nitrogen is not typically referred to as a medical term, but it is an element that is crucial to medicine and human life.

In a medical context, nitrogen is often mentioned in relation to gas analysis, respiratory therapy, or medical gases. Nitrogen (N) is a colorless, odorless, and nonreactive gas that makes up about 78% of the Earth's atmosphere. It is an essential element for various biological processes, such as the growth and maintenance of organisms, because it is a key component of amino acids, nucleic acids, and other organic compounds.

In some medical applications, nitrogen is used to displace oxygen in a mixture to create a controlled environment with reduced oxygen levels (hypoxic conditions) for therapeutic purposes, such as in certain types of hyperbaric chambers. Additionally, nitrogen gas is sometimes used in cryotherapy, where extremely low temperatures are applied to tissues to reduce pain, swelling, and inflammation.

However, it's important to note that breathing pure nitrogen can be dangerous, as it can lead to unconsciousness and even death due to lack of oxygen (asphyxiation) within minutes.

"Inbred strains of rats" are genetically identical rodents that have been produced through many generations of brother-sister mating. This results in a high degree of homozygosity, where the genes at any particular locus in the genome are identical in all members of the strain.

Inbred strains of rats are widely used in biomedical research because they provide a consistent and reproducible genetic background for studying various biological phenomena, including the effects of drugs, environmental factors, and genetic mutations on health and disease. Additionally, inbred strains can be used to create genetically modified models of human diseases by introducing specific mutations into their genomes.

Some commonly used inbred strains of rats include the Wistar Kyoto (WKY), Sprague-Dawley (SD), and Fischer 344 (F344) rat strains. Each strain has its own unique genetic characteristics, making them suitable for different types of research.

Animal nutrition sciences is a field of study that focuses on the nutritional requirements, metabolism, and digestive processes of non-human animals. It involves the application of basic scientific principles to the practice of feeding animals in order to optimize their health, growth, reproduction, and performance. This may include the study of various nutrients such as proteins, carbohydrates, fats, vitamins, and minerals, as well as how they are absorbed, utilized, and excreted by different animal species. The field also encompasses the development and evaluation of animal feeds and feeding strategies, taking into account factors such as animal age, sex, weight, production stage, and environmental conditions. Overall, the goal of animal nutrition sciences is to promote sustainable and efficient animal agriculture while ensuring the health and well-being of animals.

Flatulence is the medical term for the release of intestinal gas from the rectum, commonly known as passing gas or farting. It is a normal bodily function that occurs when the body digests food in the stomach and intestines.

During digestion, the body breaks down food into nutrients that can be absorbed into the bloodstream. However, not all food particles can be fully broken down, and some of them reach the large intestine, where they are fermented by bacteria. This fermentation process produces gases such as nitrogen, oxygen, carbon dioxide, hydrogen, and methane.

The buildup of these gases in the digestive tract can cause discomfort, bloating, and the urge to pass gas. The average person passes gas about 10-20 times a day, although this can vary widely from person to person.

While flatulence is a normal bodily function, excessive or frequent passing of gas can be a sign of an underlying digestive issue such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), lactose intolerance, or gastrointestinal infections. If you are experiencing persistent or severe symptoms, it is recommended to consult with a healthcare professional for further evaluation and treatment.

Mossy fibers in the hippocampus are a type of axon that originates from granule cells located in the dentate gyrus, which is the first part of the hippocampus. These fibers have a distinctive appearance and earn their name from the numerous small branches or "spines" that cover their surface, giving them a bushy or "mossy" appearance.

Mossy fibers form excitatory synapses with pyramidal cells in the CA3 region of the hippocampus, which is involved in memory and spatial navigation. These synapses are unique because they have a high degree of plasticity, meaning that they can change their strength in response to experience or learning. This plasticity is thought to be important for the formation and storage of memories.

Mossy fibers also release neurotransmitters such as glutamate and contribute to the regulation of hippocampal excitability. Dysfunction in mossy fiber function has been implicated in several neurological disorders, including epilepsy and Alzheimer's disease.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

"Secale cereale" is the scientific name for a type of grass that is more commonly known as rye or ergot. It is often used as a food grain and also in the production of certain medicines. However, it's worth noting that ergot, which is a fungus that infects rye and other grains, can produce harmful compounds that can cause serious health problems if ingested. Therefore, it's important to handle and consume rye grain properly to avoid any potential risks.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "menu planning" is not a medical term per se. However, it is a common term used in nutrition and dietetics, which can be a part of medical nutritional therapy. Here's a definition related to that field:

Menu planning in the context of nutrition and dietetics refers to the process of creating well-balanced and appropriate meals for individuals or groups, taking into account their specific dietary needs, restrictions, and preferences. This can be done on a short-term or long-term basis, and may involve determining portion sizes, food combinations, and meal timing to optimize nutrient intake, support health goals, and manage chronic conditions. Menu planning is often carried out by registered dietitians or nutritionists in various settings such as hospitals, long-term care facilities, schools, and wellness programs.

Sprague-Dawley rats are a strain of albino laboratory rats that are widely used in scientific research. They were first developed by researchers H.H. Sprague and R.C. Dawley in the early 20th century, and have since become one of the most commonly used rat strains in biomedical research due to their relatively large size, ease of handling, and consistent genetic background.

Sprague-Dawley rats are outbred, which means that they are genetically diverse and do not suffer from the same limitations as inbred strains, which can have reduced fertility and increased susceptibility to certain diseases. They are also characterized by their docile nature and low levels of aggression, making them easier to handle and study than some other rat strains.

These rats are used in a wide variety of research areas, including toxicology, pharmacology, nutrition, cancer, and behavioral studies. Because they are genetically diverse, Sprague-Dawley rats can be used to model a range of human diseases and conditions, making them an important tool in the development of new drugs and therapies.

Gastrointestinal motility refers to the coordinated muscular contractions and relaxations that propel food, digestive enzymes, and waste products through the gastrointestinal tract. This process involves the movement of food from the mouth through the esophagus into the stomach, where it is mixed with digestive enzymes and acids to break down food particles.

The contents are then emptied into the small intestine, where nutrients are absorbed, and the remaining waste products are moved into the large intestine for further absorption of water and electrolytes and eventual elimination through the rectum and anus.

Gastrointestinal motility is controlled by a complex interplay between the autonomic nervous system, hormones, and local reflexes. Abnormalities in gastrointestinal motility can lead to various symptoms such as bloating, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, or constipation.

Food labeling is the practice of providing written information about the characteristics and contents of food products, typically on the packaging or container in which they are sold. In a medical context, accurate and clear food labeling is essential for individuals with dietary restrictions due to medical conditions such as food allergies, intolerances, or chronic diseases (e.g., diabetes).

Standardized food labeling guidelines help consumers make informed decisions about the foods they consume, allowing them to avoid potential health risks and maintain a balanced diet. Components of food labels often include:

1. Product identity: The name of the food product and its intended use.
2. Net quantity declaration: The amount of the food product contained in the package, expressed in both metric and customary units (e.g., grams or ounces).
3. Ingredient list: A comprehensive list of all ingredients included in the food product, arranged in descending order by weight. This is particularly important for individuals with food allergies or intolerances, as it allows them to identify and avoid specific allergens (e.g., milk, eggs, peanuts).
4. Nutrition facts panel: A standardized format presenting the nutritional content of the food product per serving, including information on calories, total fat, saturated and trans fats, cholesterol, sodium, total carbohydrates, dietary fiber, sugars, protein, and various vitamins and minerals.
5. Nutrient content claims: Voluntary statements made by manufacturers regarding the level of a nutrient in a food product (e.g., "low fat," "high fiber"). These claims must adhere to strict guidelines established by regulatory bodies to ensure accuracy and consistency.
6. Health claims: Statements linking a specific food or food component to a reduced risk of a particular disease or health-related condition (e.g., "a diet rich in whole grains may reduce the risk of heart disease"). Like nutrient content claims, health claims are subject to strict regulatory oversight.
7. Special dietary statements: Labeling statements indicating that a food product is suitable for specific dietary uses or restrictions (e.g., "gluten-free," "kosher," "vegan"). These statements help consumers with special dietary needs quickly identify appropriate food options.
8. Allergen labeling: Mandatory identification of the presence of any of the eight major food allergens (milk, eggs, fish, crustacean shellfish, tree nuts, peanuts, wheat, and soybeans) in a food product. This information must be clearly displayed in the ingredient list or as a separate "contains" statement.
9. Warning statements: Required labeling of specific health risks associated with the consumption of certain food products (e.g., "consuming raw or undercooked meats, poultry, seafood, shellfish, or eggs may increase your risk of foodborne illness").
10. Country of origin labeling: Identification of the country where a food product was produced, grown, or packaged. This information helps consumers make informed decisions about their food purchases based on factors such as quality, safety, and environmental concerns.

Obesity is a complex disease characterized by an excess accumulation of body fat to the extent that it negatively impacts health. It's typically defined using Body Mass Index (BMI), a measure calculated from a person's weight and height. A BMI of 30 or higher is indicative of obesity. However, it's important to note that while BMI can be a useful tool for identifying obesity in populations, it does not directly measure body fat and may not accurately reflect health status in individuals. Other factors such as waist circumference, blood pressure, cholesterol levels, and blood sugar levels should also be considered when assessing health risks associated with weight.

Carotenoids are a class of pigments that are naturally occurring in various plants and fruits. They are responsible for the vibrant colors of many vegetables and fruits, such as carrots, pumpkins, tomatoes, and leafy greens. There are over 600 different types of carotenoids, with beta-carotene, alpha-carotene, lycopene, lutein, and zeaxanthin being some of the most well-known.

Carotenoids have antioxidant properties, which means they can help protect the body's cells from damage caused by free radicals. Some carotenoids, such as beta-carotene, can be converted into vitamin A in the body, which is important for maintaining healthy vision, skin, and immune function. Other carotenoids, such as lycopene and lutein, have been studied for their potential role in preventing chronic diseases, including cancer and heart disease.

In addition to being found in plant-based foods, carotenoids can also be taken as dietary supplements. However, it is generally recommended to obtain nutrients from whole foods rather than supplements whenever possible, as food provides a variety of other beneficial compounds that work together to support health.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Lignin" is not a medical term. It is a term used in the field of biology and chemistry, particularly in botany and wood science. Lignin is a complex organic polymer that binds cellulose fibers together, providing strength and rigidity to the cell walls of plants. It is a major component of wood and bark.

If you have any medical terms you would like defined or any other questions, please let me know!

Fat substitutes are substances that are used in food production to mimic the taste, texture, and other sensory properties of fat, while providing fewer calories or no calories at all. They can be derived from natural sources, such as carbohydrates or proteins, or synthesized in a lab.

Fat substitutes can be classified into three main categories:

1. Macronutrient-based fat substitutes: These are made up of carbohydrates, proteins, or fiber that provide fewer calories than fat. Examples include maltodextrin, modified food starch, and whey protein concentrate.
2. Fat-based fat substitutes: These are made up of fat molecules that have been chemically altered to reduce their calorie content. Examples include olestra (sucrose polyester) and caprenin.
3. Non-nutritive fat substitutes: These provide no calories or nutrients and are often used in small amounts to enhance the texture and taste of food. Examples include cellulose gel, microcrystalline cellulose, and silica.

Fat substitutes can be useful for people who are trying to reduce their calorie intake, maintain a healthy weight, or manage certain medical conditions such as diabetes or high cholesterol. However, it's important to note that fat substitutes should not replace all dietary fats, as some fats are essential for good health. It's also important to read food labels carefully and consume fat substitutes in moderation, as they may have other negative effects on health if consumed in excess.

'Zea mays' is the biological name for corn or maize, which is not typically considered a medical term. However, corn or maize can have medical relevance in certain contexts. For example, cornstarch is sometimes used as a diluent for medications and is also a component of some skin products. Corn oil may be found in topical ointments and creams. In addition, some people may have allergic reactions to corn or corn-derived products. But generally speaking, 'Zea mays' itself does not have a specific medical definition.

In a medical context, "meat" generally refers to the flesh of animals that is consumed as food. This includes muscle tissue, as well as fat and other tissues that are often found in meat products. However, it's worth noting that some people may have dietary restrictions or medical conditions that prevent them from consuming meat, so it's always important to consider individual preferences and needs when discussing food options.

It's also worth noting that the consumption of meat can have both positive and negative health effects. On the one hand, meat is a good source of protein, iron, vitamin B12, and other essential nutrients. On the other hand, consuming large amounts of red and processed meats has been linked to an increased risk of heart disease, stroke, and certain types of cancer. Therefore, it's generally recommended to consume meat in moderation as part of a balanced diet.

Prospective studies, also known as longitudinal studies, are a type of cohort study in which data is collected forward in time, following a group of individuals who share a common characteristic or exposure over a period of time. The researchers clearly define the study population and exposure of interest at the beginning of the study and follow up with the participants to determine the outcomes that develop over time. This type of study design allows for the investigation of causal relationships between exposures and outcomes, as well as the identification of risk factors and the estimation of disease incidence rates. Prospective studies are particularly useful in epidemiology and medical research when studying diseases with long latency periods or rare outcomes.

Skeletal muscle, also known as striated or voluntary muscle, is a type of muscle that is attached to bones by tendons or aponeuroses and functions to produce movements and support the posture of the body. It is composed of long, multinucleated fibers that are arranged in parallel bundles and are characterized by alternating light and dark bands, giving them a striped appearance under a microscope. Skeletal muscle is under voluntary control, meaning that it is consciously activated through signals from the nervous system. It is responsible for activities such as walking, running, jumping, and lifting objects.

The gastrointestinal (GI) tract, also known as the digestive tract, is a continuous tube that starts at the mouth and ends at the anus. It is responsible for ingesting, digesting, absorbing, and excreting food and waste materials. The GI tract includes the mouth, esophagus, stomach, small intestine (duodenum, jejunum, ileum), large intestine (cecum, colon, rectum, anus), and accessory organs such as the liver, gallbladder, and pancreas. The primary function of this system is to process and extract nutrients from food while also protecting the body from harmful substances, pathogens, and toxins.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but seaweed is not typically referred to in medical definitions. Seaweed is a common name for various marine macroalgae, which are multicellular aquatic plants found in the ocean. They are often consumed as food and have been used in traditional medicine in some cultures. However, there is no widely accepted medical definition for seaweed. If you're looking for information about a specific compound or substance derived from seaweed that might be relevant to medical definitions, I would be happy to help if you could provide more details.

In medicine, "absorption" refers to the process by which substances, including nutrients, medications, or toxins, are taken up and assimilated into the body's tissues or bloodstream after they have been introduced into the body via various routes (such as oral, intravenous, or transdermal).

The absorption of a substance depends on several factors, including its chemical properties, the route of administration, and the presence of other substances that may affect its uptake. For example, some medications may be better absorbed when taken with food, while others may require an empty stomach for optimal absorption.

Once a substance is absorbed into the bloodstream, it can then be distributed to various tissues throughout the body, where it may exert its effects or be metabolized and eliminated by the body's detoxification systems. Understanding the process of absorption is crucial in developing effective medical treatments and determining appropriate dosages for medications.

Satiation is a term used in the field of nutrition and physiology, which refers to the feeling of fullness or satisfaction that one experiences after eating food. It is the point at which further consumption of food no longer adds to the sensation of hunger or the desire to eat. This response is influenced by various factors such as the type and amount of food consumed, nutrient composition, energy density, individual appetite regulatory hormones, and gastric distension.

Satiation plays a crucial role in regulating food intake and maintaining energy balance. Understanding the mechanisms underlying satiation can help individuals make healthier food choices and prevent overeating, thereby reducing the risk of obesity and other related health issues.

I could not find a medical definition specifically for "Amaranth dye," as it is not a term that is typically used in the medical field. However, Amaranth is a type of plant that contains a red-colored pigment called "amaranth dye" or "red 2." It has been used as a food coloring and also in textiles.

In the context of medicine, amaranth dye may be mentioned in relation to its potential toxicity. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has classified amaranth dye as a food additive that is "generally recognized as safe" (GRAS), but it has been banned for use in foods in several countries due to concerns about its potential health effects. Some studies have suggested that amaranth dye may cause DNA damage, chromosomal aberrations, and mutations in laboratory animals, and it has been linked to cancer in some studies. However, more research is needed to confirm these findings and determine the safety of amaranth dye for human consumption.

It's worth noting that amaranth dye is not commonly used as a food coloring in the United States, and it is not approved for use in cosmetics or other personal care products. If you have any concerns about the safety of a particular product or ingredient, it's always a good idea to speak with your healthcare provider or consult with a trusted source of information.

A cohort study is a type of observational study in which a group of individuals who share a common characteristic or exposure are followed up over time to determine the incidence of a specific outcome or outcomes. The cohort, or group, is defined based on the exposure status (e.g., exposed vs. unexposed) and then monitored prospectively to assess for the development of new health events or conditions.

Cohort studies can be either prospective or retrospective in design. In a prospective cohort study, participants are enrolled and followed forward in time from the beginning of the study. In contrast, in a retrospective cohort study, researchers identify a cohort that has already been assembled through medical records, insurance claims, or other sources and then look back in time to assess exposure status and health outcomes.

Cohort studies are useful for establishing causality between an exposure and an outcome because they allow researchers to observe the temporal relationship between the two. They can also provide information on the incidence of a disease or condition in different populations, which can be used to inform public health policy and interventions. However, cohort studies can be expensive and time-consuming to conduct, and they may be subject to bias if participants are not representative of the population or if there is loss to follow-up.

Micronutrients are essential nutrients that our body requires in small quantities to support various bodily functions, such as growth, development, and overall health. They include vitamins and minerals, which are vital for the production of hormones, enzymes, and other substances necessary for optimal health.

Unlike macronutrients (carbohydrates, proteins, and fats), micronutrients do not provide energy or calories but play a crucial role in maintaining the balance and functioning of our body systems. They support immune function, bone health, wound healing, eyesight, skin health, and reproductive processes, among other functions.

Examples of micronutrients include vitamins A, C, D, E, and K, as well as minerals like calcium, iron, magnesium, zinc, and iodine. While our bodies need only small amounts of these nutrients, deficiencies in any of them can lead to serious health problems over time. Therefore, it's essential to consume a balanced and varied diet that includes adequate amounts of micronutrients to support overall health and well-being.

Body Mass Index (BMI) is a measure used to assess whether a person has a healthy weight for their height. It's calculated by dividing a person's weight in kilograms by the square of their height in meters. Here is the medical definition:

Body Mass Index (BMI) = weight(kg) / [height(m)]^2

According to the World Health Organization, BMI categories are defined as follows:

* Less than 18.5: Underweight
* 18.5-24.9: Normal or healthy weight
* 25.0-29.9: Overweight
* 30.0 and above: Obese

It is important to note that while BMI can be a useful tool for identifying weight issues in populations, it does have limitations when applied to individuals. For example, it may not accurately reflect body fat distribution or muscle mass, which can affect health risks associated with excess weight. Therefore, BMI should be used as one of several factors when evaluating an individual's health status and risk for chronic diseases.

Dimethylhydrazines are organic compounds that consist of two methyl groups (-CH3) bonded to a hydrazine molecule (N2H4). The most common dimethylhydrazine is 1,2-dimethylhydrazine, which is a colorless liquid with an unpleasant odor. It is used as a rocket fuel and in the synthesis of other chemicals.

Dimethylhydrazines are highly reactive and can be hazardous to handle. They can cause skin and eye irritation, and prolonged exposure can lead to more serious health effects such as damage to the respiratory system, liver, and kidneys. Ingestion or inhalation of large amounts of dimethylhydrazines can be fatal.

It is important to handle dimethylhydrazines with care and follow proper safety precautions when working with them. This may include wearing protective clothing, gloves, and eye protection, as well as using appropriate ventilation and storage methods.

Insulin is a hormone produced by the beta cells of the pancreatic islets, primarily in response to elevated levels of glucose in the circulating blood. It plays a crucial role in regulating blood glucose levels and facilitating the uptake and utilization of glucose by peripheral tissues, such as muscle and adipose tissue, for energy production and storage. Insulin also inhibits glucose production in the liver and promotes the storage of excess glucose as glycogen or triglycerides.

Deficiency in insulin secretion or action leads to impaired glucose regulation and can result in conditions such as diabetes mellitus, characterized by chronic hyperglycemia and associated complications. Exogenous insulin is used as a replacement therapy in individuals with diabetes to help manage their blood glucose levels and prevent long-term complications.

Vitamins are organic substances that are essential in small quantities for the normal growth, development, and maintenance of life in humans. They are required for various biochemical functions in the body such as energy production, blood clotting, immune function, and making DNA.

Unlike macronutrients (carbohydrates, proteins, and fats), vitamins do not provide energy but they play a crucial role in energy metabolism. Humans require 13 essential vitamins, which can be divided into two categories: fat-soluble and water-soluble.

Fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E, and K) are stored in the body's fat tissues and liver, and can stay in the body for a longer period of time. Water-soluble vitamins (B-complex vitamins and vitamin C) are not stored in the body and need to be replenished regularly through diet or supplementation.

Deficiency of vitamins can lead to various health problems, while excessive intake of certain fat-soluble vitamins can also be harmful due to toxicity. Therefore, it is important to maintain a balanced diet that provides all the essential vitamins in adequate amounts.

Beta-carotene is a type of carotenoid, which is a pigment found in plants that gives them their vibrant colors. It is commonly found in fruits and vegetables, such as carrots, sweet potatoes, and spinach.

Beta-carotene is converted into vitamin A in the body, which is an essential nutrient for maintaining healthy vision, immune function, and cell growth. It acts as an antioxidant, helping to protect cells from damage caused by free radicals.

According to the medical definition, beta-carotene is a provitamin A carotenoid that is converted into vitamin A in the body. It has a variety of health benefits, including supporting eye health, boosting the immune system, and reducing the risk of certain types of cancer. However, it is important to note that excessive consumption of beta-carotene supplements can lead to a condition called carotenemia, which causes the skin to turn yellow or orange.

Phytic acid, also known as phytate in its salt form, is a natural substance found in plant-based foods such as grains, legumes, nuts, and seeds. It's a storage form of phosphorus for the plant and is often referred to as an "anti-nutrient" because it can bind to certain minerals like calcium, iron, magnesium, and zinc in the gastrointestinal tract and prevent their absorption. This can potentially lead to mineral deficiencies if a diet is consistently high in phytic acid-rich foods and low in mineral-rich foods. However, it's important to note that phytic acid also has antioxidant properties and may have health benefits when consumed as part of a balanced diet.

The bioavailability of minerals from phytic acid-rich foods can be improved through various methods such as soaking, sprouting, fermenting, or cooking, which can help break down some of the phytic acid and release the bound minerals.

Propionates, in a medical context, most commonly refer to a group of medications that are used as topical creams or gels to treat fungal infections of the skin. Propionic acid and its salts, such as propionate, are the active ingredients in these medications. They work by inhibiting the growth of fungi, which causes the infection. Common examples of propionate-containing medications include creams used to treat athlete's foot, ringworm, and jock itch.

It is important to note that there are many different types of medications and compounds that contain the word "propionate" in their name, as it refers to a specific chemical structure. However, in a medical context, it most commonly refers to antifungal creams or gels.

The intestinal mucosa is the innermost layer of the intestines, which comes into direct contact with digested food and microbes. It is a specialized epithelial tissue that plays crucial roles in nutrient absorption, barrier function, and immune defense. The intestinal mucosa is composed of several cell types, including absorptive enterocytes, mucus-secreting goblet cells, hormone-producing enteroendocrine cells, and immune cells such as lymphocytes and macrophages.

The surface of the intestinal mucosa is covered by a single layer of epithelial cells, which are joined together by tight junctions to form a protective barrier against harmful substances and microorganisms. This barrier also allows for the selective absorption of nutrients into the bloodstream. The intestinal mucosa also contains numerous lymphoid follicles, known as Peyer's patches, which are involved in immune surveillance and defense against pathogens.

In addition to its role in absorption and immunity, the intestinal mucosa is also capable of producing hormones that regulate digestion and metabolism. Dysfunction of the intestinal mucosa can lead to various gastrointestinal disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, and food allergies.

A diverticulum is a small sac or pouch that forms as a result of a weakness in the wall of a hollow organ, such as the intestine. These sacs can become inflamed or infected, leading to conditions like diverticulitis. Diverticula are common in the large intestine, particularly in the colon, and are more likely to develop with age. They are usually asymptomatic but can cause symptoms such as abdominal pain, bloating, constipation, or diarrhea if they become inflamed or infected.

The postprandial period is the time frame following a meal, during which the body is engaged in the process of digestion, absorption, and assimilation of nutrients. In a medical context, this term generally refers to the few hours after eating when the body is responding to the ingested food, particularly in terms of changes in metabolism and insulin levels.

The postprandial period can be of specific interest in the study and management of conditions such as diabetes, where understanding how the body handles glucose during this time can inform treatment decisions and strategies for maintaining healthy blood sugar levels.

Medical Definition of Vitamin E:

Vitamin E is a fat-soluble antioxidant that plays a crucial role in protecting your body's cells from damage caused by free radicals, which are unstable molecules produced when your body breaks down food or is exposed to environmental toxins like cigarette smoke and radiation. Vitamin E is also involved in immune function, DNA repair, and other metabolic processes.

It is a collective name for a group of eight fat-soluble compounds that include four tocopherols and four tocotrienols. Alpha-tocopherol is the most biologically active form of vitamin E in humans and is the one most commonly found in supplements.

Vitamin E deficiency is rare but can occur in people with certain genetic disorders or who cannot absorb fat properly. Symptoms of deficiency include nerve and muscle damage, loss of feeling in the arms and legs, muscle weakness, and vision problems.

Food sources of vitamin E include vegetable oils (such as sunflower, safflower, and wheat germ oil), nuts and seeds (like almonds, peanuts, and sunflower seeds), and fortified foods (such as cereals and some fruit juices).

Biological availability is a term used in pharmacology and toxicology that refers to the degree and rate at which a drug or other substance is absorbed into the bloodstream and becomes available at the site of action in the body. It is a measure of the amount of the substance that reaches the systemic circulation unchanged, after administration by any route (such as oral, intravenous, etc.).

The biological availability (F) of a drug can be calculated using the area under the curve (AUC) of the plasma concentration-time profile after extravascular and intravenous dosing, according to the following formula:

F = (AUCex/AUCiv) x (Doseiv/Doseex)

where AUCex is the AUC after extravascular dosing, AUCiv is the AUC after intravenous dosing, Doseiv is the intravenous dose, and Doseex is the extravascular dose.

Biological availability is an important consideration in drug development and therapy, as it can affect the drug's efficacy, safety, and dosage regimen. Drugs with low biological availability may require higher doses to achieve the desired therapeutic effect, while drugs with high biological availability may have a more rapid onset of action and require lower doses to avoid toxicity.

"Fortified food" is a term used in the context of nutrition and dietary guidelines. It refers to a food product that has had nutrients added to it during manufacturing to enhance its nutritional value. These added nutrients can include vitamins, minerals, proteins, or other beneficial components. The goal of fortifying foods is often to address specific nutrient deficiencies in populations or to improve the overall nutritional quality of a food product. Examples of fortified foods include certain breakfast cereals that have added vitamins and minerals, as well as plant-based milk alternatives that are fortified with calcium and vitamin D to mimic the nutritional profile of cow's milk. It is important to note that while fortified foods can be a valuable source of essential nutrients, they should not replace whole, unprocessed foods in a balanced diet.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "life style" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. It generally refers to the way an individual or group lives, including their habits, behaviors, and preferences in areas such as diet, exercise, recreation, and stress management. Some lifestyle factors can have a significant impact on health outcomes and risk for certain diseases. However, it is not a medical term with a specific clinical meaning.

Ascorbic acid is the chemical name for Vitamin C. It is a water-soluble vitamin that is essential for human health. Ascorbic acid is required for the synthesis of collagen, a protein that plays a role in the structure of bones, tendons, ligaments, and blood vessels. It also functions as an antioxidant, helping to protect cells from damage caused by free radicals.

Ascorbic acid cannot be produced by the human body and must be obtained through diet or supplementation. Good food sources of vitamin C include citrus fruits, strawberries, bell peppers, broccoli, and spinach.

In the medical field, ascorbic acid is used to treat or prevent vitamin C deficiency and related conditions, such as scurvy. It may also be used in the treatment of various other health conditions, including common cold, cancer, and cardiovascular disease, although its effectiveness for these uses is still a matter of scientific debate.

"Wistar rats" are a strain of albino rats that are widely used in laboratory research. They were developed at the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia, USA, and were first introduced in 1906. Wistar rats are outbred, which means that they are genetically diverse and do not have a fixed set of genetic characteristics like inbred strains.

Wistar rats are commonly used as animal models in biomedical research because of their size, ease of handling, and relatively low cost. They are used in a wide range of research areas, including toxicology, pharmacology, nutrition, cancer, cardiovascular disease, and behavioral studies. Wistar rats are also used in safety testing of drugs, medical devices, and other products.

Wistar rats are typically larger than many other rat strains, with males weighing between 500-700 grams and females weighing between 250-350 grams. They have a lifespan of approximately 2-3 years. Wistar rats are also known for their docile and friendly nature, making them easy to handle and work with in the laboratory setting.

Solubility is a fundamental concept in pharmaceutical sciences and medicine, which refers to the maximum amount of a substance (solute) that can be dissolved in a given quantity of solvent (usually water) at a specific temperature and pressure. Solubility is typically expressed as mass of solute per volume or mass of solvent (e.g., grams per liter, milligrams per milliliter). The process of dissolving a solute in a solvent results in a homogeneous solution where the solute particles are dispersed uniformly throughout the solvent.

Understanding the solubility of drugs is crucial for their formulation, administration, and therapeutic effectiveness. Drugs with low solubility may not dissolve sufficiently to produce the desired pharmacological effect, while those with high solubility might lead to rapid absorption and short duration of action. Therefore, optimizing drug solubility through various techniques like particle size reduction, salt formation, or solubilization is an essential aspect of drug development and delivery.

Laxatives are substances or medications that are used to promote bowel movements or loosen the stools, thereby helping in the treatment of constipation. They work by increasing the amount of water in the stool or stimulating the muscles in the intestines to contract and push the stool through. Laxatives can be categorized into several types based on their mechanism of action, including bulk-forming laxatives, lubricant laxatives, osmotic laxatives, saline laxatives, stimulant laxatives, and stool softeners. It is important to use laxatives only as directed by a healthcare professional, as overuse or misuse can lead to serious health complications.

Muscle contraction is the physiological process in which muscle fibers shorten and generate force, leading to movement or stability of a body part. This process involves the sliding filament theory where thick and thin filaments within the sarcomeres (the functional units of muscles) slide past each other, facilitated by the interaction between myosin heads and actin filaments. The energy required for this action is provided by the hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Muscle contractions can be voluntary or involuntary, and they play a crucial role in various bodily functions such as locomotion, circulation, respiration, and posture maintenance.

Hypercholesterolemia is a medical term that describes a condition characterized by high levels of cholesterol in the blood. Specifically, it refers to an abnormally elevated level of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, also known as "bad" cholesterol, which can contribute to the development of fatty deposits in the arteries called plaques. Over time, these plaques can narrow and harden the arteries, leading to atherosclerosis, a condition that increases the risk of heart disease, stroke, and other cardiovascular complications.

Hypercholesterolemia can be caused by various factors, including genetics, lifestyle choices, and underlying medical conditions. In some cases, it may not cause any symptoms until serious complications arise. Therefore, regular cholesterol screening is essential for early detection and management of hypercholesterolemia. Treatment typically involves lifestyle modifications, such as a healthy diet, regular exercise, and weight management, along with medication if necessary.

Lipoproteins are complex particles composed of multiple proteins and lipids (fats) that play a crucial role in the transport and metabolism of fat molecules in the body. They consist of an outer shell of phospholipids, free cholesterols, and apolipoproteins, enclosing a core of triglycerides and cholesteryl esters.

There are several types of lipoproteins, including:

1. Chylomicrons: These are the largest lipoproteins and are responsible for transporting dietary lipids from the intestines to other parts of the body.
2. Very-low-density lipoproteins (VLDL): Produced by the liver, VLDL particles carry triglycerides to peripheral tissues for energy storage or use.
3. Low-density lipoproteins (LDL): Often referred to as "bad cholesterol," LDL particles transport cholesterol from the liver to cells throughout the body. High levels of LDL in the blood can lead to plaque buildup in artery walls and increase the risk of heart disease.
4. High-density lipoproteins (HDL): Known as "good cholesterol," HDL particles help remove excess cholesterol from cells and transport it back to the liver for excretion or recycling. Higher levels of HDL are associated with a lower risk of heart disease.

Understanding lipoproteins and their roles in the body is essential for assessing cardiovascular health and managing risks related to heart disease and stroke.

Zinc is an essential mineral that is vital for the functioning of over 300 enzymes and involved in various biological processes in the human body, including protein synthesis, DNA synthesis, immune function, wound healing, and cell division. It is a component of many proteins and participates in the maintenance of structural integrity and functionality of proteins. Zinc also plays a crucial role in maintaining the sense of taste and smell.

The recommended daily intake of zinc varies depending on age, sex, and life stage. Good dietary sources of zinc include red meat, poultry, seafood, beans, nuts, dairy products, and fortified cereals. Zinc deficiency can lead to various health problems, including impaired immune function, growth retardation, and developmental delays in children. On the other hand, excessive intake of zinc can also have adverse effects on health, such as nausea, vomiting, and impaired immune function.

'Medicago sativa' is the scientific name for a plant species more commonly known as alfalfa. In a medical context, alfalfa is often considered a herbal supplement and its medicinal properties include being a source of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. It has been used in traditional medicine to treat a variety of conditions such as kidney problems, asthma, arthritis, and high cholesterol levels. However, it's important to note that the effectiveness of alfalfa for these uses is not conclusively established by scientific research and its use may have potential risks or interactions with certain medications. Always consult a healthcare provider before starting any new supplement regimen.

Body composition refers to the relative proportions of different components that make up a person's body, including fat mass, lean muscle mass, bone mass, and total body water. It is an important measure of health and fitness, as changes in body composition can indicate shifts in overall health status. For example, an increase in fat mass and decrease in lean muscle mass can be indicative of poor nutrition, sedentary behavior, or certain medical conditions.

There are several methods for measuring body composition, including:

1. Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA): This method uses low-level electrical currents to estimate body fat percentage based on the conductivity of different tissues.
2. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA): This method uses low-dose X-rays to measure bone density and body composition, including lean muscle mass and fat distribution.
3. Hydrostatic weighing: This method involves submerging a person in water and measuring their weight underwater to estimate body density and fat mass.
4. Air displacement plethysmography (ADP): This method uses air displacement to measure body volume and density, which can be used to estimate body composition.

Understanding body composition can help individuals make informed decisions about their health and fitness goals, as well as provide valuable information for healthcare providers in the management of chronic diseases such as obesity, diabetes, and heart disease.

A beverage is a drink intended for human consumption. The term is often used to refer to any drink that is not alcoholic or, in other words, non-alcoholic beverages. This includes drinks such as water, juice, tea, coffee, and soda. However, it can also include alcoholic drinks like beer, wine, and spirits.

In a medical context, beverages are often discussed in relation to their impact on health. For example, sugary drinks like soda and energy drinks have been linked to obesity, diabetes, and other health problems. On the other hand, drinks like water and unsweetened tea can help to keep people hydrated and may have other health benefits.

It's important for individuals to be mindful of their beverage choices and to choose options that are healthy and support their overall well-being. This may involve limiting sugary drinks, choosing water or unsweetened tea instead of soda, and avoiding excessive caffeine intake.

Lipid metabolism is the process by which the body breaks down and utilizes lipids (fats) for various functions, such as energy production, cell membrane formation, and hormone synthesis. This complex process involves several enzymes and pathways that regulate the digestion, absorption, transport, storage, and consumption of fats in the body.

The main types of lipids involved in metabolism include triglycerides, cholesterol, phospholipids, and fatty acids. The breakdown of these lipids begins in the digestive system, where enzymes called lipases break down dietary fats into smaller molecules called fatty acids and glycerol. These molecules are then absorbed into the bloodstream and transported to the liver, which is the main site of lipid metabolism.

In the liver, fatty acids may be further broken down for energy production or used to synthesize new lipids. Excess fatty acids may be stored as triglycerides in specialized cells called adipocytes (fat cells) for later use. Cholesterol is also metabolized in the liver, where it may be used to synthesize bile acids, steroid hormones, and other important molecules.

Disorders of lipid metabolism can lead to a range of health problems, including obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). These conditions may be caused by genetic factors, lifestyle habits, or a combination of both. Proper diagnosis and management of lipid metabolism disorders typically involves a combination of dietary changes, exercise, and medication.

Inulin is a soluble fiber that is not digestible by human enzymes. It is a fructan, a type of carbohydrate made up of chains of fructose molecules, and is found in various plants such as chicory root, Jerusalem artichokes, and onions.

Inulin has a number of potential health benefits, including promoting the growth of beneficial bacteria in the gut (prebiotic effect), slowing down the absorption of sugar to help regulate blood glucose levels, and increasing feelings of fullness to aid in weight management. It is often used as a functional food ingredient or dietary supplement for these purposes.

Inulin can also be used as a diagnostic tool in medical testing to measure kidney function, as it is excreted unchanged in the urine.

Medicinal plants are defined as those plants that contain naturally occurring chemical compounds which can be used for therapeutic purposes, either directly or indirectly. These plants have been used for centuries in various traditional systems of medicine, such as Ayurveda, Chinese medicine, and Native American medicine, to prevent or treat various health conditions.

Medicinal plants contain a wide variety of bioactive compounds, including alkaloids, flavonoids, tannins, terpenes, and saponins, among others. These compounds have been found to possess various pharmacological properties, such as anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anticancer activities.

Medicinal plants can be used in various forms, including whole plant material, extracts, essential oils, and isolated compounds. They can be administered through different routes, such as oral, topical, or respiratory, depending on the desired therapeutic effect.

It is important to note that while medicinal plants have been used safely and effectively for centuries, they should be used with caution and under the guidance of a healthcare professional. Some medicinal plants can interact with prescription medications or have adverse effects if used inappropriately.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Linear Models" is actually a term from the field of statistics and machine learning, rather than medicine. A linear model is a type of statistical model that is used to analyze the relationship between two or more variables. In a linear model, the relationship between the dependent variable (the outcome or result) and the independent variable(s) (the factors being studied) is assumed to be linear, meaning that it can be described by a straight line on a graph.

The equation for a simple linear model with one independent variable (x) and one dependent variable (y) looks like this:

y = β0 + β1*x + ε

In this equation, β0 is the y-intercept or the value of y when x equals zero, β1 is the slope or the change in y for each unit increase in x, and ε is the error term or the difference between the actual values of y and the predicted values of y based on the linear model.

Linear models are widely used in medical research to study the relationship between various factors (such as exposure to a risk factor or treatment) and health outcomes (such as disease incidence or mortality). They can also be used to adjust for confounding variables, which are factors that may influence both the independent variable and the dependent variable, and thus affect the observed relationship between them.

Satiety response is a term used in the field of nutrition and physiology to describe the feeling of fullness or satisfaction that follows food consumption. It is a complex process regulated by several factors, including the mechanical and chemical signals generated during digestion, hormonal responses, and psychological factors. The satiety response helps control food intake and energy balance by inhibiting further eating until the body has had enough time to metabolize and absorb the nutrients from the meal.

The satiety response can be influenced by various factors such as the type, volume, and texture of food consumed, as well as individual differences in appetite regulation and metabolism. Understanding the mechanisms underlying the satiety response is important for developing strategies to promote healthy eating behaviors and prevent overeating, which can contribute to obesity and other health problems.

Nutritional Sciences is a field of study that deals with the scientific examination and understanding of nutrients in food, how the body uses them, and the relationship between diet, health, and disease. It encompasses various disciplines including biochemistry, physiology, molecular biology, epidemiology, and clinical nutrition.

The field covers several key areas such as:

1. Nutrient metabolism: This involves studying how nutrients are digested, absorbed, transported, stored, and utilized in the body for energy production, growth, maintenance, and reproduction.
2. Diet and disease prevention: Nutritional sciences investigate the role of diet in preventing or managing various health conditions like obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer.
3. Functional foods and nutraceuticals: This area focuses on studying the potential health benefits of specific foods or food components beyond their basic nutritional value, including functional foods (foods that have demonstrated health benefits) and nutraceuticals (nutrient-rich supplements derived from food sources).
4. Public health nutrition: Nutritional sciences also address population-wide nutrition issues, such as malnutrition, food insecurity, and the development of public policies related to food and health.
5. Clinical nutrition: This subfield applies nutritional principles and research findings to patient care, focusing on developing individualized dietary plans for patients with various medical conditions.

Overall, Nutritional Sciences aims to provide a solid scientific foundation for making informed dietary choices and promoting optimal health outcomes across populations and individuals.

The digestive system is a complex group of organs and glands that process food. It converts the food we eat into nutrients, which the body uses for energy, growth, and cell repair. The digestive system also eliminates waste from the body. It is made up of the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract) and other organs that help the body break down and absorb food.

The GI tract includes the mouth, esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine, and anus. Other organs that are part of the digestive system include the liver, pancreas, gallbladder, and salivary glands.

The process of digestion begins in the mouth, where food is chewed and mixed with saliva. The food then travels down the esophagus and into the stomach, where it is broken down further by stomach acids. The digested food then moves into the small intestine, where nutrients are absorbed into the bloodstream. The remaining waste material passes into the large intestine, where it is stored until it is eliminated through the anus.

The liver, pancreas, and gallbladder play important roles in the digestive process as well. The liver produces bile, a substance that helps break down fats in the small intestine. The pancreas produces enzymes that help digest proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. The gallbladder stores bile until it is needed in the small intestine.

Overall, the digestive system is responsible for breaking down food, absorbing nutrients, and eliminating waste. It plays a critical role in maintaining our health and well-being.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Hordeum" is not a medical term. It is actually the genus name for barley in botany. If you have any medical terms or concepts that you would like me to explain, please let me know!

"Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena" is a broad term that refers to various physical and biological processes related to nutrition in children. While I couldn't find a precise medical definition for this specific phrase, I can provide you with some key physiological phenomena associated with child nutrition. These include:

1. Growth and Development: Proper nutrition is crucial for normal growth and development in children. Adequate intake of essential nutrients, vitamins, and minerals supports physical growth, brain development, and overall well-being.
2. Digestion and Absorption: The gastrointestinal tract undergoes significant changes during childhood, affecting the ability to digest and absorb various nutrients. For example, lactase production decreases in some children after weaning, leading to lactose intolerance.
3. Energy Metabolism: Children have higher energy requirements per unit of body weight compared to adults due to their rapid growth and development. Proper nutrition ensures efficient energy metabolism and prevents issues like obesity or undernutrition.
4. Immune Function: Nutrition plays a vital role in supporting the immune system. Adequate intake of nutrients like vitamin C, vitamin D, iron, zinc, and protein helps maintain immune function and resistance to infections.
5. Micronutrient Deficiencies: Inadequate nutrition can lead to micronutrient deficiencies, which may impair children's growth, cognitive development, and overall health. Examples include iron deficiency anemia, vitamin A deficiency, and iodine deficiency disorders.
6. Overnutrition and Obesity: Excessive energy intake, coupled with reduced physical activity, can lead to overweight and obesity in children. This increases the risk of developing non-communicable diseases like diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and certain types of cancer later in life.
7. Food Allergies and Intolerances: Children are more prone to food allergies and intolerances than adults. These can manifest as various symptoms, such as skin rashes, digestive issues, or respiratory problems, and may require dietary modifications.
8. Eating Behaviors and Preferences: Childhood is a critical period for shaping eating behaviors and food preferences. Exposure to a variety of healthy foods during this stage can help establish lifelong healthy eating habits.

Glucans are polysaccharides (complex carbohydrates) that are made up of long chains of glucose molecules. They can be found in the cell walls of certain plants, fungi, and bacteria. In medicine, beta-glucans derived from yeast or mushrooms have been studied for their potential immune-enhancing effects. However, more research is needed to fully understand their role and effectiveness in human health.

"Plantago" is the genus name for a group of plants commonly known as plantains. There are several species within this genus, including Plantago major (common plantain) and Plantago lanceolata (narrow-leaved plantain), which are found in many parts of the world. These plants have been used in traditional medicine for their alleged healing properties, such as soothing skin irritations, reducing inflammation, and promoting wound healing. However, it is important to note that the medical community's scientific evidence supporting these claims is limited, and further research is needed before any definitive health benefits can be attributed to Plantago species.

Isoflavones are a type of plant-derived compounds called phytoestrogens, which have a chemical structure similar to human estrogen. They are found in various plants, particularly in soybeans and soy products. Isoflavones can act as weak estrogens or anti-estrogens in the body, depending on the levels of natural hormones present. These compounds have been studied for their potential health benefits, including reducing menopausal symptoms, improving cardiovascular health, and preventing certain types of cancer. However, more research is needed to fully understand their effects and safety.

Fish oils are a type of fat or lipid derived from the tissues of oily fish. They are a rich source of omega-3 fatty acids, specifically eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). These fatty acids have been associated with various health benefits such as reducing inflammation, decreasing the risk of heart disease, improving brain function, and promoting eye health. Fish oils can be consumed through diet or taken as a dietary supplement in the form of capsules or liquid. It is important to note that while fish oils have potential health benefits, they should not replace a balanced diet and medical advice should be sought before starting any supplementation.

Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) is a statistical technique used to compare the means of two or more groups and determine whether there are any significant differences between them. It is a way to analyze the variance in a dataset to determine whether the variability between groups is greater than the variability within groups, which can indicate that the groups are significantly different from one another.

ANOVA is based on the concept of partitioning the total variance in a dataset into two components: variance due to differences between group means (also known as "between-group variance") and variance due to differences within each group (also known as "within-group variance"). By comparing these two sources of variance, ANOVA can help researchers determine whether any observed differences between groups are statistically significant, or whether they could have occurred by chance.

ANOVA is a widely used technique in many areas of research, including biology, psychology, engineering, and business. It is often used to compare the means of two or more experimental groups, such as a treatment group and a control group, to determine whether the treatment had a significant effect. ANOVA can also be used to compare the means of different populations or subgroups within a population, to identify any differences that may exist between them.

Coprophagia is a medical term that refers to the consumption or eating of feces. This behavior is generally considered abnormal in humans and most other animals, but it is a natural part of the life cycle for some species such as certain insects and rodents. In animals, coprophagia can sometimes be a sign of an underlying medical condition, nutritional deficiency, or behavioral issue. In humans, coprophagia is often associated with mental health disorders such as pica or obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). It's important to note that coprophagia can pose serious health risks, including the transmission of diseases and parasites, so it should be addressed with a healthcare professional if it occurs.

Lignans are a type of plant compound that have antioxidant and estrogen properties. They are found in various plants such as seeds, grains, fruits, and vegetables. Once consumed, some lignans can be converted by intestinal bacteria into enterolactone and enterodiol, which can have weak estrogenic or anti-estrogenic effects in the body. These compounds have been studied for their potential health benefits, including reducing the risk of cancer and heart disease. However, more research is needed to fully understand their effects and potential health benefits.

Omega-3 fatty acids are a type of polyunsaturated fats that are essential for human health. The "omega-3" designation refers to the location of a double bond in the chemical structure of the fatty acid, specifically three carbon atoms from the end of the molecule.

There are three main types of omega-3 fatty acids: eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and alpha-linolenic acid (ALA). EPA and DHA are primarily found in fatty fish, such as salmon, mackerel, and sardines, as well as in algae. ALA is found in plant sources, such as flaxseeds, chia seeds, walnuts, and some vegetable oils.

Omega-3 fatty acids have been shown to have numerous health benefits, including reducing inflammation, lowering the risk of heart disease, improving brain function, and supporting eye health. They are also important for fetal development during pregnancy and breastfeeding. It is recommended that adults consume at least 250-500 milligrams of combined EPA and DHA per day, although higher intakes may be beneficial for certain conditions. ALA can be converted to EPA and DHA in the body, but this process is not very efficient, so it is important to consume preformed EPA and DHA from dietary sources or supplements.

Glycosuria is a medical term that refers to the presence of glucose in the urine. Under normal circumstances, the kidneys are able to reabsorb all of the filtered glucose back into the bloodstream. However, when the blood glucose levels become excessively high, such as in uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, the kidneys may not be able to reabsorb all of the glucose, and some of it will spill over into the urine.

Glycosuria can also occur in other conditions that affect glucose metabolism or renal function, such as impaired kidney function, certain medications, pregnancy, and rare genetic disorders. It is important to note that glycosuria alone does not necessarily indicate diabetes, but it may be a sign of an underlying medical condition that requires further evaluation by a healthcare professional.

Cathartics are a type of medication that stimulates bowel movements and evacuates the intestinal tract. They are often used to treat constipation or to prepare the bowel for certain medical procedures, such as colonoscopies. Common cathartic medications include laxatives, enemas, and suppositories.

Cathartics work by increasing the muscle contractions of the intestines, which helps to move stool through the digestive tract more quickly. They may also increase the amount of water in the stool, making it softer and easier to pass. Some cathartics, such as bulk-forming laxatives, work by absorbing water and swelling in the intestines, which helps to bulk up the stool and stimulate a bowel movement.

While cathartics can be effective at relieving constipation, they should be used with caution. Overuse of cathartics can lead to dependence on them for bowel movements, as well as electrolyte imbalances and other complications. It is important to follow the instructions carefully when using cathartic medications and to speak with a healthcare provider if constipation persists or worsens.

Azoxymethane is a chemical compound that is used primarily in laboratory research. It is an organodihydroazoxy compound, and it is known to cause colon cancer in experimental animals, particularly rats and mice. As such, it is often used as a tool in studies of carcinogenesis and chemically induced colon tumors.

In scientific studies, azoxymethane is typically administered to laboratory animals in order to induce colon tumors. This allows researchers to study the mechanisms of cancer development and test potential therapies or preventive measures. It is important to note that while azoxymethane has been shown to cause cancer in laboratory animals, it does not necessarily mean that it poses the same risk to humans.

The use of azoxymethane in research is subject to strict regulations and guidelines, as with any potentially hazardous chemical. Researchers are required to follow safety protocols and take appropriate precautions when handling this compound to minimize risks to themselves and the environment.

A cross-sectional study is a type of observational research design that examines the relationship between variables at one point in time. It provides a snapshot or a "cross-section" of the population at a particular moment, allowing researchers to estimate the prevalence of a disease or condition and identify potential risk factors or associations.

In a cross-sectional study, data is collected from a sample of participants at a single time point, and the variables of interest are measured simultaneously. This design can be used to investigate the association between exposure and outcome, but it cannot establish causality because it does not follow changes over time.

Cross-sectional studies can be conducted using various data collection methods, such as surveys, interviews, or medical examinations. They are often used in epidemiology to estimate the prevalence of a disease or condition in a population and to identify potential risk factors that may contribute to its development. However, because cross-sectional studies only provide a snapshot of the population at one point in time, they cannot account for changes over time or determine whether exposure preceded the outcome.

Therefore, while cross-sectional studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying potential associations between variables, further research using other study designs, such as cohort or case-control studies, is necessary to establish causality and confirm any findings.

Aging is a complex, progressive and inevitable process of bodily changes over time, characterized by the accumulation of cellular damage and degenerative changes that eventually lead to increased vulnerability to disease and death. It involves various biological, genetic, environmental, and lifestyle factors that contribute to the decline in physical and mental functions. The medical field studies aging through the discipline of gerontology, which aims to understand the underlying mechanisms of aging and develop interventions to promote healthy aging and extend the human healthspan.

Nutritional requirements refer to the necessary amount of nutrients, including macronutrients (carbohydrates, proteins, and fats) and micronutrients (vitamins and minerals), that an individual requires to maintain good health, support normal growth and development, and promote optimal bodily functions. These requirements vary based on factors such as age, sex, body size, pregnancy status, and physical activity level. Meeting one's nutritional requirements typically involves consuming a balanced and varied diet, with additional consideration given to any specific dietary restrictions or medical conditions that may influence nutrient needs.

A dose-response relationship in the context of drugs refers to the changes in the effects or symptoms that occur as the dose of a drug is increased or decreased. Generally, as the dose of a drug is increased, the severity or intensity of its effects also increases. Conversely, as the dose is decreased, the effects of the drug become less severe or may disappear altogether.

The dose-response relationship is an important concept in pharmacology and toxicology because it helps to establish the safe and effective dosage range for a drug. By understanding how changes in the dose of a drug affect its therapeutic and adverse effects, healthcare providers can optimize treatment plans for their patients while minimizing the risk of harm.

The dose-response relationship is typically depicted as a curve that shows the relationship between the dose of a drug and its effect. The shape of the curve may vary depending on the drug and the specific effect being measured. Some drugs may have a steep dose-response curve, meaning that small changes in the dose can result in large differences in the effect. Other drugs may have a more gradual dose-response curve, where larger changes in the dose are needed to produce significant effects.

In addition to helping establish safe and effective dosages, the dose-response relationship is also used to evaluate the potential therapeutic benefits and risks of new drugs during clinical trials. By systematically testing different doses of a drug in controlled studies, researchers can identify the optimal dosage range for the drug and assess its safety and efficacy.

In a medical context, "nuts" are typically referred to as a type of food that comes from dry fruits with one seed in them. They are often high in healthy fats, fiber, protein, and various essential nutrients. Examples include almonds, walnuts, hazelnuts, cashews, pistachios, and pecans. However, it's important to note that some people may have allergies to certain types of nuts, which can cause serious health problems.

Antioxidants are substances that can prevent or slow damage to cells caused by free radicals, which are unstable molecules that the body produces as a reaction to environmental and other pressures. Antioxidants are able to neutralize free radicals by donating an electron to them, thus stabilizing them and preventing them from causing further damage to the cells.

Antioxidants can be found in a variety of foods, including fruits, vegetables, nuts, and grains. Some common antioxidants include vitamins C and E, beta-carotene, and selenium. Antioxidants are also available as dietary supplements.

In addition to their role in protecting cells from damage, antioxidants have been studied for their potential to prevent or treat a number of health conditions, including cancer, heart disease, and age-related macular degeneration. However, more research is needed to fully understand the potential benefits and risks of using antioxidant supplements.

Butyric acid is a type of short-chain fatty acid that is naturally produced in the human body through the fermentation of dietary fiber in the colon. Its chemical formula is C4H8O2. It has a distinctive, rancid odor and is used in the production of perfumes, flavorings, and certain types of plasticizers. In addition to its natural occurrence in the human body, butyric acid is also found in some foods such as butter, parmesan cheese, and fermented foods like sauerkraut. It has been studied for its potential health benefits, including its role in gut health, immune function, and cancer prevention.

Medical definitions generally do not include plant oils as a specific term. However, in a biological or biochemical context, plant oils, also known as vegetable oils, are defined as lipid extracts derived from various parts of plants such as seeds, fruits, and leaves. They mainly consist of triglycerides, which are esters of glycerol and three fatty acids. The composition of fatty acids can vary between different plant sources, leading to a range of physical and chemical properties that make plant oils useful for various applications in the pharmaceutical, cosmetic, and food industries. Some common examples of plant oils include olive oil, coconut oil, sunflower oil, and jojoba oil.

'Citrus' is a genus of flowering plants in the rue family, Rutaceae. It includes several species of shrubs and trees that produce fruits known as citrus fruits. Some common examples of citrus fruits are oranges, lemons, limes, grapefruits, and pomelos. These fruits are popular for their juicy pulp and fragrant zest, which are used in a wide variety of culinary applications around the world.

Citrus fruits are also known for their high vitamin C content and other health benefits. They contain various bioactive compounds such as flavonoids and carotenoids, which have antioxidant properties and may help protect against chronic diseases like cancer and cardiovascular disease. Additionally, citrus fruits are a good source of dietary fiber, which can aid in digestion and help regulate blood sugar levels.

In medical terms, citrus fruits may be recommended as part of a healthy diet to help prevent nutrient deficiencies and promote overall health. However, it's important to note that some people may have allergies or sensitivities to citrus fruits, which can cause symptoms like mouth irritation, hives, or anaphylaxis in severe cases. Additionally, citrus fruits can interact with certain medications, so it's always a good idea to consult with a healthcare provider before making any significant changes to your diet.

In medical terms, "hunger" is not specifically defined as a clinical condition. However, it generally refers to the physiological need or desire for food and calories, driven by mechanisms in the brain and body that regulate energy balance. This sensation often arises when the body's energy stores are depleted, or when there has been a prolonged period without food intake.

Hunger is primarily mediated by hormones such as ghrelin, which stimulates appetite, and leptin, which signals satiety. The hypothalamus in the brain plays a crucial role in integrating these hormonal signals to regulate hunger and energy balance. Additionally, other factors like sleep deprivation, stress, and certain medical conditions can also influence feelings of hunger.

The jejunum is the middle section of the small intestine, located between the duodenum and the ileum. It is responsible for the majority of nutrient absorption that occurs in the small intestine, particularly carbohydrates, proteins, and some fats. The jejunum is characterized by its smooth muscle structure, which allows it to contract and mix food with digestive enzymes and absorb nutrients through its extensive network of finger-like projections called villi.

The jejunum is also lined with microvilli, which further increase the surface area available for absorption. Additionally, the jejunum contains numerous lymphatic vessels called lacteals, which help to absorb fats and fat-soluble vitamins into the bloodstream. Overall, the jejunum plays a critical role in the digestion and absorption of nutrients from food.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Japan" is not a medical term. Japan is the name of a country, officially known as Nippon-koku or Nihon-koku in Japanese, and is located in East Asia. It is an island nation in the Pacific Ocean with a population of about 126 million people.

If you have any medical questions or terms that you would like me to define, please let me know!

Unsaturated fatty acids are a type of fatty acid that contain one or more double bonds in their carbon chain. These double bonds can be either cis or trans configurations, although the cis configuration is more common in nature. The presence of these double bonds makes unsaturated fatty acids more liquid at room temperature and less prone to spoilage than saturated fatty acids, which do not have any double bonds.

Unsaturated fatty acids can be further classified into two main categories: monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). MUFAs contain one double bond in their carbon chain, while PUFAs contain two or more.

Examples of unsaturated fatty acids include oleic acid (a MUFA found in olive oil), linoleic acid (a PUFA found in vegetable oils), and alpha-linolenic acid (an omega-3 PUFA found in flaxseed and fish). Unsaturated fatty acids are essential nutrients for the human body, as they play important roles in various physiological processes such as membrane structure, inflammation, and blood clotting. It is recommended to consume a balanced diet that includes both MUFAs and PUFAs to maintain good health.

Amylose is a component of starch, which is a complex carbohydrate found in plants. Amylose is a long, straight chain polymer made up of thousands of glucose molecules linked together by α-1,4 glycosidic bonds. It is less abundant than the other major component of starch, amylopectin, which has branched chains due to α-1,6 glycosidic bonds.

Amylose is relatively resistant to digestion by human enzymes, making it less easily absorbed and providing a slower release of glucose into the bloodstream compared to amylopectin. This property has led to its use in some low-glycemic index foods and as a dietary supplement for people with diabetes.

In addition to its role in food, amylose has industrial applications, such as in the production of adhesives, textiles, and paper. It is also used in medical research as a material for drug delivery and tissue engineering.

In the context of medicine, growth generally refers to the increase in size or mass of an organism or a specific part of the body over time. This can be quantified through various methods such as measuring height, weight, or the dimensions of particular organs or tissues. In children, normal growth is typically assessed using growth charts that plot measurements like height and weight against age to determine whether a child's growth is following a typical pattern.

Growth can be influenced by a variety of factors, including genetics, nutrition, hormonal regulation, and overall health status. Abnormalities in growth patterns may indicate underlying medical conditions or developmental disorders that require further evaluation and treatment.

A case-control study is an observational research design used to identify risk factors or causes of a disease or health outcome. In this type of study, individuals with the disease or condition (cases) are compared with similar individuals who do not have the disease or condition (controls). The exposure history or other characteristics of interest are then compared between the two groups to determine if there is an association between the exposure and the disease.

Case-control studies are often used when it is not feasible or ethical to conduct a randomized controlled trial, as they can provide valuable insights into potential causes of diseases or health outcomes in a relatively short period of time and at a lower cost than other study designs. However, because case-control studies rely on retrospective data collection, they are subject to biases such as recall bias and selection bias, which can affect the validity of the results. Therefore, it is important to carefully design and conduct case-control studies to minimize these potential sources of bias.

Folic acid is the synthetic form of folate, a type of B vitamin (B9). It is widely used in dietary supplements and fortified foods because it is more stable and has a longer shelf life than folate. Folate is essential for normal cell growth and metabolism, and it plays a critical role in the formation of DNA and RNA, the body's genetic material. Folic acid is also crucial during early pregnancy to prevent birth defects of the brain and spine called neural tube defects.

Medical Definition: "Folic acid is the synthetic form of folate (vitamin B9), a water-soluble vitamin involved in DNA synthesis, repair, and methylation. It is used in dietary supplementation and food fortification due to its stability and longer shelf life compared to folate. Folic acid is critical for normal cell growth, development, and red blood cell production."

"Persea" is a botanical term that refers to a genus of plants in the family Lauraceae, which includes over 150 species. The most well-known member of this genus is Persea americana, which is commonly known as the avocado tree. The fruit of this tree, also called an avocado, is widely consumed for its rich, creamy texture and high nutritional value. Avocados are a good source of healthy fats, fiber, vitamins, and minerals, and have been linked to various health benefits.

Therefore, in a medical or nutritional context, "Persea" may refer specifically to the avocado fruit or its extracts, which have been used in traditional medicine for their anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and hypolipidemic properties. However, it is important to note that not all species of Persea have similar medicinal or nutritional benefits, so any medical or health claims should be specific to the particular species or extract being used.

F344 is a strain code used to designate an outbred stock of rats that has been inbreeded for over 100 generations. The F344 rats, also known as Fischer 344 rats, were originally developed at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and are now widely used in biomedical research due to their consistent and reliable genetic background.

Inbred strains, like the F344, are created by mating genetically identical individuals (siblings or parents and offspring) for many generations until a state of complete homozygosity is reached, meaning that all members of the strain have identical genomes. This genetic uniformity makes inbred strains ideal for use in studies where consistent and reproducible results are important.

F344 rats are known for their longevity, with a median lifespan of around 27-31 months, making them useful for aging research. They also have a relatively low incidence of spontaneous tumors compared to other rat strains. However, they may be more susceptible to certain types of cancer and other diseases due to their inbred status.

It's important to note that while F344 rats are often used as a standard laboratory rat strain, there can still be some genetic variation between individual animals within the same strain, particularly if they come from different suppliers or breeding colonies. Therefore, it's always important to consider the source and history of any animal model when designing experiments and interpreting results.

Sterols are a type of organic compound that is derived from steroids and found in the cell membranes of organisms. In animals, including humans, cholesterol is the most well-known sterol. Sterols help to maintain the structural integrity and fluidity of cell membranes, and they also play important roles as precursors for the synthesis of various hormones and other signaling molecules. Phytosterols are plant sterols that have been shown to have cholesterol-lowering effects in humans when consumed in sufficient amounts.

Trace elements are essential minerals that the body needs in very small or tiny amounts, usually less than 100 milligrams per day, for various biological processes. These include elements like iron, zinc, copper, manganese, fluoride, selenium, and iodine. They are vital for maintaining good health and proper functioning of the human body, but they are required in such minute quantities that even a slight excess or deficiency can lead to significant health issues.

Hydrogen-ion concentration, also known as pH, is a measure of the acidity or basicity of a solution. It is defined as the negative logarithm (to the base 10) of the hydrogen ion activity in a solution. The standard unit of measurement is the pH unit. A pH of 7 is neutral, less than 7 is acidic, and greater than 7 is basic.

In medical terms, hydrogen-ion concentration is important for maintaining homeostasis within the body. For example, in the stomach, a high hydrogen-ion concentration (low pH) is necessary for the digestion of food. However, in other parts of the body such as blood, a high hydrogen-ion concentration can be harmful and lead to acidosis. Conversely, a low hydrogen-ion concentration (high pH) in the blood can lead to alkalosis. Both acidosis and alkalosis can have serious consequences on various organ systems if not corrected.

"Cooking" is not a medical term, but it generally refers to the process of preparing and cooking food. In a medical or nutritional context, "cooking" may refer to the application of heat to food in order to make it safe and more palatable to eat, as well as to improve its nutritional value and digestibility.

Cooking can also have an impact on the nutrient content of food. For example, cooking certain vegetables can increase their bioavailability, or the amount of a nutrient that is available for absorption by the body. On the other hand, cooking some foods at high temperatures or for long periods of time can lead to the loss of certain nutrients, such as vitamins C and B.

It's important to note that the way food is cooked can also affect its safety. For example, undercooked meat, poultry, and seafood can harbor harmful bacteria, such as Salmonella and E. coli, which can cause foodborne illness. It's essential to cook these foods thoroughly to reduce the risk of infection.

In summary, while "cooking" is not a medical term, it has important implications for food safety, nutrition, and digestion.

Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are a class of diseases that affect the heart and blood vessels. They are the leading cause of death globally, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). The term "cardiovascular disease" refers to a group of conditions that include:

1. Coronary artery disease (CAD): This is the most common type of heart disease and occurs when the arteries that supply blood to the heart become narrowed or blocked due to the buildup of cholesterol, fat, and other substances in the walls of the arteries. This can lead to chest pain, shortness of breath, or a heart attack.
2. Heart failure: This occurs when the heart is unable to pump blood efficiently to meet the body's needs. It can be caused by various conditions, including coronary artery disease, high blood pressure, and cardiomyopathy.
3. Stroke: A stroke occurs when the blood supply to a part of the brain is interrupted or reduced, often due to a clot or a ruptured blood vessel. This can cause brain damage or death.
4. Peripheral artery disease (PAD): This occurs when the arteries that supply blood to the limbs become narrowed or blocked, leading to pain, numbness, or weakness in the legs or arms.
5. Rheumatic heart disease: This is a complication of untreated strep throat and can cause damage to the heart valves, leading to heart failure or other complications.
6. Congenital heart defects: These are structural problems with the heart that are present at birth. They can range from mild to severe and may require medical intervention.
7. Cardiomyopathy: This is a disease of the heart muscle that makes it harder for the heart to pump blood efficiently. It can be caused by various factors, including genetics, infections, and certain medications.
8. Heart arrhythmias: These are abnormal heart rhythms that can cause the heart to beat too fast, too slow, or irregularly. They can lead to symptoms such as palpitations, dizziness, or fainting.
9. Valvular heart disease: This occurs when one or more of the heart valves become damaged or diseased, leading to problems with blood flow through the heart.
10. Aortic aneurysm and dissection: These are conditions that affect the aorta, the largest artery in the body. An aneurysm is a bulge in the aorta, while a dissection is a tear in the inner layer of the aorta. Both can be life-threatening if not treated promptly.

It's important to note that many of these conditions can be managed or treated with medical interventions such as medications, surgery, or lifestyle changes. If you have any concerns about your heart health, it's important to speak with a healthcare provider.

Rectal diseases refer to conditions that affect the structure or function of the rectum, which is the lower end of the large intestine, just above the anus. The rectum serves as a storage area for stool before it is eliminated from the body. Some common rectal diseases include:

1. Hemorrhoids: Swollen veins in the rectum or anus that can cause pain, itching, bleeding, and discomfort.
2. Rectal cancer: Abnormal growth of cells in the rectum that can invade and destroy nearby tissue and spread to other parts of the body.
3. Anal fissures: Small tears in the lining of the anus that can cause pain, bleeding, and itching.
4. Rectal prolapse: A condition where the rectum slips outside the anus, causing discomfort, fecal incontinence, and other symptoms.
5. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD): A group of chronic inflammatory conditions that affect the digestive tract, including the rectum, such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.
6. Rectal abscess: A collection of pus in the rectum caused by an infection, which can cause pain, swelling, and fever.
7. Fistula-in-ano: An abnormal connection between the rectum and the skin around the anus, which can cause drainage of pus or stool.
8. Rectal foreign bodies: Objects that are accidentally or intentionally inserted into the rectum and can cause injury, infection, or obstruction.

These are just a few examples of rectal diseases, and there are many other conditions that can affect the rectum. If you experience any symptoms related to the rectum, it is important to seek medical attention from a healthcare professional for proper diagnosis and treatment.

... which affect how fibers are processed in the body. Dietary fiber has two main components: soluble fiber and insoluble fiber, ... The effects of dietary fiber in the colon are on bacterial fermentation of some dietary fibers thereby an increase in bacterial ... Different fibers have different effects, suggesting that a variety of dietary fibers contribute to overall health. Some fibers ... Many foods contain varying types of dietary fibers, all of which contribute to health in different ways. Dietary fibers make ...
Several forms of meat are also high in vitamin K. Muscle tissue is very low in carbohydrates and does not contain dietary fiber ... "Dietary Fiber". Ext.colostate.edu. Archived from the original on June 28, 2013. Retrieved May 1, 2010. Horowitz, Roger. " ... The 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans asked men and teenage boys to increase their consumption of vegetables or other ... Jewish dietary rules (Kashrut) allow certain (kosher) meat and forbid other (treif). The rules include prohibitions on the ...
... dietary fiber 3.024%; fat 0.368%; and protein 1.581%. The free fatty acid content of dried fruit bodies was 4.5%, slightly more ...
and dietary fiber. Canning is a process during which the enzymes in vegetables are deactivated and the micro-organisms present ... They supply dietary fiber and are important sources of essential vitamins, minerals, and trace elements. Particularly important ... minerals and dietary fiber. Many nutritionists encourage people to consume plenty of fruit and vegetables, five or more ... The USDA Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends consuming five to nine servings of fruit and vegetables daily. The total ...
... and dietary fiber. If military planners had used modest amounts of the canned vegetables and fruit available in 1915, this ... In some militaries, the adoption of plant-based meals may not be for dietary reasons, but out of other concerns. In 2018, the ... Throughout the history of U.S. military nutrition, the main issue with military food has not been dietary quality, but rather ... Taking this into account and finding ways to better the dietary plans of military members will not only better their physical ...
Dietary factors associated with reduced cancer mortality included raw vegetable intake; dietary fiber intake; the Mediterranean ... The different dietary patterns in the different countries should enable reliable associations to be made between particular ... May 2003). "Dietary fibre in food and protection against colorectal cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into ... 2008) Subsequent findings from 2012 and 2013 are: Dietary flavonoid intake is associated with reduced gastric carcinoma risk in ...
... and dietary fiber. One study of various cultivars of J. regia in Turkey showed the fatty acid composition included about 6% ... including the dietary minerals manganese (162% DV), phosphorus (49% DV), magnesium (45% DV), zinc (33% DV), and iron (22% DV), ...
... (chufa OR tiger). Cho, Susan; Almeida, Nelson (29 May 2012). Dietary Fiber and Health. CRC Press. ISBN 9781439899298 ... Dietary Fiber and Health. CRC Press. ISBN 9781439899373 - via Google Books. Grigson, Jane (1 January 1983). Jane Grigson's book ...
Cho, Susan; Almeida, Nelson (29 May 2012). Dietary Fiber and Health. CRC Press. ISBN 9781439899373 - via Google Books. "Milk: ... Plant-based milks have emerged as an alternative to dairy in response to consumer dietary requests and changing attitudes about ... A key dietary reason for the increase in popularity of plant-based milks is lactose intolerance. For example, the most common ...
ISBN 978-0-387-68489-5. Almeida, edited by Susan S. Cho, Nelson (2012). Dietary fiber and health. Boca Raton: CRC Press. ISBN ...
... dietary fiber 10 g; soluble fiber 2 g; insoluble fiber 8 g; sugars less than 1 g. It contains the following daily values: ... This high-fiber, ready-to-eat cereal has a low glycemic index and has an exceptionally high amount of omega-3 per serving ...
29 May 2012). Dietary Fiber and Health. CRC Press. ISBN 9781439899373 - via Google Books. Linné T, McCrow-Young A (2017). " ... However, plant based milks tend to contain more dietary fiber. In calcium, some nut milks and soy milk have a comparable level ... For this reason and personal dietary restrictions such as plant-based diets, many people turn to milk substitutes. In ... Infant formula is usually fortified with dietary nutrients optimized for babies and toddlers, such as iron, to ensure survival ...
... and other low carbohydrate diets lack dietary fiber. Fiber is generally considered to aid weight loss and to ... Slavin JL (March 2005). "Dietary fiber and body weight". Nutrition (Review). 21 (3): 411-8. doi:10.1016/j.nut.2004.08.018. PMID ... minerals and fiber. The NHS reports that dietary restrictions during stage one may cause side effects including "bad breath, a ... Nevertheless, some aspects of the diet correspond with dietary advice which is recognized as sensible: its last two stages are ...
... also supplies dietary fiber. Other nutrients are in low amounts (table). Wikibooks Cookbook has a recipe/module on ... Finally, in addition to providing a source of dietary calcium, the lye or lime reacts with the corn so that the nutrient niacin ...
Dietary insoluble fiber has long been shown to exacerbate Irritable Bowel Syndrome symptoms. It has been suggested that the ... 2005). "Dietary Reference Intakes for energy, carbohydrates, fiber, fat, fatty acids, cholesterol, protein and animo acids". ... Vitanzo PC, Hong ES (July 2000). "Does a high-fiber dietary supplement of wheat bran reduce the recurrence rate of colorectal ... Fibre supplements (also spelled fiber supplements) are considered to be a form of a subgroup of functional dietary fibre, and ...
William Shurtleff (1996). Aoyagi, Akiko (ed.). Soy Fiber and Dietary Fiber. Soyfoods Center. p. 45. Krystina Castella (2012). A ...
It is recommended to increase dietary fiber intake to 25-30 grams daily. This may be slowly increased up to a level of 50 grams ... This is usually achieved with high-fiber cereal and fiber powder supplements such as psyllium, methylcellulose, polycarbophil, ... Dietary measures, especially high fiber diet. Bulking laxatives. Rectal irrigation. Transanal electrostimulation. Yoga. ... Dietary measures are frequently used for ODS as the first line treatment. The aim is to improve stool texture. It has been ...
Undigested lactose acts as dietary fiber. It also has positive effects on absorption of minerals, such as calcium and magnesium ...
Most polyphenols are bound to the plant fibers, and constitute the major portion of dietary polyphenols. There is therefore a ... Bravo, Laura; Abia, Rocio; Saura-Calixto, Fulgencio (2002-05-01). "Polyphenols as dietary fiber associated compounds. ... Re-adding fiber to the juice cannot be equated to whole fruits. There is a loss in non-extracted polyphenols, a class of ... Juicing removes the fiber content of the fruit or vegetable, and the full benefits of the plant is thus not experienced. ...
Polymers, such as Polyethylene glycol (PEG), Polyallylamine hydrochloride (PAH) coating; dietary fibers, such as chitosan; or ...
Whole grains contain more dietary fiber than refined grains. After processing, fiber is not added back to enriched grains. ... "Whole Grains, Refined Grains, and Dietary Fiber". heart.org. Retrieved 16 November 2022. Poutanen, Kaisa S; Kårlund, Anna O; ... Korczak, Renee; Slavin, Joanne L. (2020). "Definitions, regulations, and new frontiers for dietary fiber and whole grains". ... The dietary guidance of many countries is to replace refined grains with whole grains. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans ( ...
... is thus a soluble dietary fiber. In non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice pectin has been shown to increase the incidence of ... and as a source of dietary fiber. Pectin is composed of complex polysaccharides that are present in the primary cell walls of a ...
Additionally, food contains water and dietary fiber. As previously discussed, the body is designed by natural selection to ... Others choose a healthier diet, avoiding sugars or animal fats and increasing consumption of dietary fiber and antioxidants. ... Dietary choices can also define cultures and play a role in religion. For example, only kosher foods are permitted by Judaism, ... Dietary habits play a significant role in the health and mortality of all humans. Imbalances between the consumed fuels and ...
... and thus can be classified as dietary fiber. However, not all dietary fiber can be classified as a prebiotic source. In ... Other dietary fibers also fit the definition of prebiotics, such as pectin, beta-glucans, and xylooligosaccharides. The ... Dietary prebiotics are typically nondigestible fiber compounds that pass undigested through the upper part of the ... Delcour JA, Aman P, Courtin CM, Hamaker BR, Verbeke K (January 2016). "Prebiotics, Fermentable Dietary Fiber, and Health Claims ...
"Food sources and uses of dietary fiber". In Cho, Susan Sungsoo; Prosky, Leon; Dreher, Mark (eds.). Complex Carbohydrates in ... A good source of protein, fiber, phosphorus, and other nutrients, they are a useful fodder for livestock and pets. They are ... When used in feed for livestock or horses, middlings can be a good source of protein, fiber, phosphorus, and other nutrients. ... leaving behind the germ and the bran or fiber part. In addition to marketing the bran and germ as products in their own right, ...
... are high in dietary fiber. The consumption of dietary fiber can reduce the rate of increase in blood sugar and ...
ISBN 978-0-12-556352-9. Joshi, S; Agte, V (1995). "Digestibility of dietary fiber components in vegetarian men". Plant Foods ... Panel on Macronutrients; Panel on the Definition of Dietary Fiber; Subcommittee on Upper Reference Levels of Nutrients; ... and no dietary fiber, protein or fat (table). Brown sugar contains a moderate amount of iron (15% of the Reference Daily Intake ... and the dietary fiber.[why?] ^B The fructose to fructose plus glucose ratio is calculated by including the fructose and glucose ...
Called dietary fiber, these carbohydrates enhance digestion. The main action of dietary fiber is to change the nature of the ... The inulins belong to a class of dietary fibers known as fructans. Inulin is used by some plants as a means of storing energy ... In the United States in 2018, the Food and Drug Administration approved inulin as a dietary fiber ingredient used to improve ... "Dietary Reference Intakes for Energy, Carbohydrate, Fiber, Fat, Fatty Acids, Cholesterol, Protein, and Amino Acids ( ...
Increasing dietary fiber is also commonly recommended. Anal sacs may be removed surgically in a procedure known as anal ...
Dietary fiber Mussatto, Solange I (May 2014). "Brewer's spent grain: a valuable feedstock for industrial applications: Brewer's ... BSG is also naturally high in fiber, making it of great interest as a food additive, replacing low-fiber ingredients. The high ... BSG can be ground and then sifted into a powder that can increase fiber and protein content while decreasing caloric content, ... Öztürk, S.; Özboy, Ö.; Cavidoğlu, İ; Köksel, H. (2002). "Effects of Brewer's Spent Grain on the Quality and Dietary Fibre ...
Learn more about fiber and high fiber foods. ... Fiber helps control your weight by making you feel full faster ... Most Americans dont eat enough dietary fiber. But add it to your diet slowly. Increasing dietary fiber too quickly can lead to ... Dietary fiber is the kind you eat. Its a type of carbohydrate. You may also see it listed on a food label as soluble fiber or ... The primary NIH organization for research on Dietary Fiber is the NIH Office of Dietary Supplements ...
... which affect how fibers are processed in the body. Dietary fiber has two main components: soluble fiber and insoluble fiber, ... The effects of dietary fiber in the colon are on bacterial fermentation of some dietary fibers thereby an increase in bacterial ... Different fibers have different effects, suggesting that a variety of dietary fibers contribute to overall health. Some fibers ... Many foods contain varying types of dietary fibers, all of which contribute to health in different ways. Dietary fibers make ...
Dietary fiber is emerging as yet another promising candidate addressing this issue. It is a well-known fact that dietary ... Hypertension and the Role of Dietary Fiber Curr Probl Cardiol. 2022 Jul;47(7):101203. doi: 10.1016/j.cpcardiol.2022.101203. ... focusing on dietary fibers and their role in hypertension management. ... Hence, we feel the need to focus on dietary interventions in managing hypertension. This review aims to bring to light the ...
A fiber supplement during pregnancy in high-risk women cut the incidence of gestational diabetes and preterm delivery in a ... This is a summary of a preprint research study " The Role of Dietary Fiber on Preventing Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in an At ... During gestational weeks 20-24, 97 women received a 12-g dose of oral dietary fiber powder twice daily, and 197 served as ... Cite this: Dietary Fiber Cut Gestational Diabetes, Preterm Birth - Medscape - May 22, 2023. ...
"Traditionally, dietary fibers, by and large, come from plant-based foods." These include certain grains, fruits and vegetables ... Promoting beneficial gut microbes with whole-food dietary fiber. Americans generally consume about half the recommended daily ... dietary fiber requirement.. "Theres a public health need to increase dietary fiber intake," said Bruce Hamaker, Distinguished ... In their new study, Hamaker and Cantu-Jungles seek to clearly establish whether cell-wall-based plant fibers have a key dietary ...
Treatments included a control diet containing low amounts of dietary fiber, a diet containing a fiber-prebiotic-probiotic blend ... Interpretive Summary: Dietary supplementation with fiber, "biotics," and spray-dried plasma affects apparent total tract ... Interpretive Summary: Dietary supplementation with fiber, "biotics," and spray-dried plasma affects apparent total tract ... This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of diets containing blends of dietary fibers and other functional ingredients ...
... which affect how fibers are processed in the body.[2] Dietary fiber has two main components: soluble fiber and insoluble fiber ... Dietary fibers are diverse in chemical composition, and can be grouped generally by their solubility, viscosity, and ... Dietary fiber consists of non-starch polysaccharides and other plant components such as cellulose, resistant starch, resistant ... A diet high in regular fiber consumption is generally associated with supporting health and lowering the risk of several ...
DRXIFIBE - Dietary fiber (gm). Variable Name: DRXIFIBE. SAS Label: Dietary fiber (gm). English Text: Dietary fiber (gm). Target ... DRDDRSTZ - Dietary recall status. Variable Name: DRDDRSTZ. SAS Label: Dietary recall status. English Text: Dietary recall ... WTDR4YR - Dietary day one 4-Year sample weight Variable Name: WTDR4YR. SAS Label: Dietary day one 4-Year sample weight English ... WTDRD1 - Dietary day one 2-Year sample weight. Variable Name: WTDRD1. SAS Label: Dietary day one 2-Year sample weight. English ...
Chicory root fiber is a prebiotic. But what exactly is a prebiotic? ...
Office Of Dietary Supplements Fiber The man turned a blind eye to her angry look, and said indifferently Is echinacea a dietary ... Jou Tranquility Dietary Supplement Review? He knew that They was Office of dietary supplements fiber for The boy, but he gnc ... Ariix dietary supplement speaking, and now waits for He to decide He takes The pen Office of dietary supplements fiber stopped ... Glycerin In Dietary Supplements. It is acceptable Office of dietary supplements fiber even die in a warthe battlefield is ...
Learn about the number of calories and nutritional and diet information for Kirkland Signature Dietary Supplement Quick ... Comprehensive nutrition resource for Kirkland Signature Dietary Supplement Quick Dissolve Tablets, B12 Fast-Acting Cherry ... Dietary Supplement Quick Dissolve Tablets, B12 Fast-Acting Cherry Flavor from Kirkland Signature ...
Dietary Fiber. *Citrus Fruits: Citrus fruits are moderate sources of dietary fiber, with a medium-sized orange containing ... Dietary fiber is important for promoting digestive health and maintaining regularity.. Calories and Carbohydrates. *Citrus ... Peaches: Peaches are slightly higher in dietary fiber than citrus fruits, with a medium-sized peach providing approximately 3.5 ... Rich in vitamin C, dietary fiber, and antioxidants like beta-carotene, peaches offer immune-boosting benefits and support ...
Increasing health consciousness drives dietary fibers uptake in APAC industry share. Asia Pacific food dietary fibers market ... Significant health benefits of soluble dietary fibers may attract customer attention. Global soluble food dietary fibers market ... 3.16 Impact of COVID-19 on Food Dietary Fibers Industry, by application. 3.17 Insight on combinations of fibers within baked ... 3.10.2.1 Harmful effects of excessive dietary fiber intake along with stringent regulations. 3.11 Global dietary products ...
Fiber is an important part of a healthy diet because it helps keep your digestive system running smoothly. Dietary fiber comes ... ColonBroom consists of dietary fiber, essential nutrients, and soluble fiber that makes your gut health stronger. The natural ... When you eat foods high in dietary fiber, your body has to expend more energy digesting them. As a result, you burn more ... It is a natural colon cleanser that uses dietary fibers and other natural elements to strengthen your gut health. It is a ...
Dietary Fiber 0g. 0%. Sugars ,1g. Added Sugars 0g. 0%. Protein 6g ...
Conclusion: The findings of this study do not indicate that consumption of dietary fiber or fiber rich foods are associated ... New article: Association between dietary fiber intake and risk of incident aortic stenosis. We have recently published an ... The aim of this study was consequently to investigate the association between dietary fiber intake as well as the main food ... No associations were found between incident aortic stenosis and intake of dietary fiber (HR for the highest vs lowest quintile ...
Dietary Fiber 6 g Vitamin D (no value on present label). 0.0 0.0 % Calcium. ... Fiber may also help to decrease appetite by providing a feeling of fullness. Americans average only 15 grams of fiber a day, ... Per gram, high in naturally occurring fiber. Fiber is important for overall health and may reduce the risk of cardiovascular ... Good sources of fiber are beans, split peas, fruits, vegetables, whole grains and nuts. ...
Dietary Fiber. 9 grams Protein. 29 grams Let kids help squeeze the limes: Show them that if you roll the fruit against the ...
Dietary Fiber. 10.29 g. 41. Calories. 445.71. MACRONUTRIENT AND CALORIE DETAIL. nutrient. amount. DRI/DV. (%). ...
Fiber, total dietary. Nutrient Val: 6 g. Additional Fortification: Tag Name: FIBTG. Rounded to dec points: 1. Sugars, total. ... Dietary Fiber 6 g24%. Sugars 14 g. Protein 2 g. Vitamin A. 16%. . Calcium. 2%. ... Fiber: 6 out of 25 g. Important Note: Many vitamin RDAs vary based on your age and gender. Because we are a womens website, we ... Dietary Studies? Inedible Parts? Refuse Percent (percent you cant eat): 0. Scientific Name: Pangium edule. Factor for Cnvt ...
Protein powders are a popular dietary supplement available to buy online and over the counter. People often associate them with ... 5 g of dietary fiber. *1 g of sugar. *5 g of erythritol ... unregulated dietary supplements. , such as energy and so-called ... According to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2020-2025, protein may make up 10-35%. of an adults daily calorie intake. ... Protein powders are a popular dietary supplement available to buy online and over the counter. People often associate them with ...
Calories: 230 , Total Fat: 10g , Carbohydrate: 35g , Dietary Fiber: 6g , Protein: 7g ...
Dietary Interests: High Fiber , Low Cholesterol , Vegan , Vegetarian Share:. * Pinterest * Facebook * Twitter ...
Dietary Fiber. 2g. 8%. Sugars. 10g. Protein. 75g. % Daily Value*:. Vitamin A. 4%. 4%. Vitamin C. 4%. 4%. Calcium. 10%. 10%. ...
Dietary Fiber. 1.0 g. Total Sugars. 16.5 g. Sodium. 209.9 mg. Protein. 1.4 g. ...
Dietary Fiber. 2.00g. 5%. Sugars. 1.00g. 0%. Added Sugars. 0.00g. 0%. Protein. 5.00g. 0%. Vitamin D. 0.00mcg. 0%. Calcium. ...
Dietary Fiber 2. g5%. Sugars 5. g. Added Sugars 4. g8%. ...
Dietary Fiber. 0.49 g. 2. Calories. 20.32. 1. MACRONUTRIENT AND CALORIE DETAIL. ... This profile includes information on a full array of nutrients, including carbohydrates, sugar, soluble and insoluble fiber, ...
Fiber Up Your Meals. A high fiber diet and good water intake are essential for a stress free body. High-fiber foods prevent ... Your daily protein chart provides the amount of dietary protein essential for different age groups. It also displays a guide of ... Fiber in Diet Calculator. Use this calculator to find out your daily fiber intake and see if it meets the international standa ... Vital info about vitamin B9, its molecular structure, dietary sources, beneficial aspects, symptoms of deficiency and toxicity ...
  • Consumers have come to prefer eating refined-grain foods that are missing the fibers from whole foods, noted Hamaker, who directs the Whistler Center for Carbohydrate Research . (purdue.edu)
  • Fiber is a type of carbohydrate that cannot be digested. (touro.com)
  • Dietary starch and related high-molecular carbohydrate incapable of enzymatic hydrolysis in the SMALL INTESTINE and instead ferments in the COLON, producing SHORT-CHAIN FATTY ACIDS by-products. (bvsalud.org)
  • Sugars are one of three types of carbohydrates, along with starch and fiber. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Fiber Supplements: Safe to Take Every Day? (medlineplus.gov)
  • Soluble fiber supplements also significantly lower LDL cholesterol. (wikipedia.org)
  • The amounts of fiber contained in common foods are listed in the following table: Dietary fiber is found in plants, typically eaten whole, raw or cooked, although fiber can be added to make dietary supplements and fiber-rich processed foods. (wikipedia.org)
  • The functional, sensory neutral and storage stable dietary fiber supplements obtained in the project can be used in a variety of ways in food products and thus contribute to a healthy diet rich in dietary fiber. (fraunhofer.de)
  • These Futurebiotics dietary fiber supplements provide 500mg of Apple Pectin and are water-soluble, which helps them act as a bulking agent in the stomach. (futurebiotics.com)
  • Nutrient intakes reported in these files do not include those obtained from dietary supplements, medications or plain drinking water. (cdc.gov)
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  • There are various dietary supplements available on the market that help people with an unhealthy gut, and today in this article, we will be discussing one such dietary supplement in detail called ColonBroom . (outlookindia.com)
  • Nevertheless, the use of diet and dietary supplements for reducing the risk of developing prostate cancer or for treating prostate cancer continues to engage the interest of patients and researchers. (medscape.com)
  • Additionally, with any general dietary and lifestyle recommendations, the maxim "first do no harm" should also apply, given the history of some past recommendations-especially in the area of dietary supplements whose risk was ultimately found to outweigh their benefit. (medscape.com)
  • The largest clinical trial ever conducted on the use of dietary supplements to prevent cancer was the selenium and vitamin E supplementation randomized trial (SELECT). (medscape.com)
  • We are amending our regulations for the nutrition labeling of conventional foods and dietary supplements to help consumers maintain healthy dietary practices. (who.int)
  • Some plants contain significant amounts of soluble and insoluble fiber. (wikipedia.org)
  • The whole-food fibers it replaces naturally contain both soluble and insoluble fibers that promote Clostridia, which supports anti-inflammatory health outcomes. (purdue.edu)
  • The beneficial Clostridia, however, prefers to feed on soluble and insoluble fibers that are entrapped in the plant cell wall matrix. (purdue.edu)
  • Legumes represent a valuable source of protein, dietary fiber and starch and are thus very suitable for a balanced human diet. (fraunhofer.de)
  • While protein and starch components are already used in many ways, fiber-rich components often remain in non-utilized side streams. (fraunhofer.de)
  • During the extraction of protein isolates and concentrates, as well as starch from legumes, peels and extraction residues remain as side streams with high fiber content. (fraunhofer.de)
  • Adjusted odds ratios for the highest quartile of intake versus the lowest were 2.43 for saturated fat, 2.25 for animal protein, 2.12 for polyunsaturated fat, 1.88 for cholesterol and 2.69 for total energy from dietary intake. (who.int)
  • The Role of Dietary Fiber on Preventing Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in an At-Risk Group of High Triglyceride-Glucose Index Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial," by researchers at Shanghai General Hospital, China on Research Square provided to you by Medscape. (medscape.com)
  • You may also see it listed on a food label as soluble fiber or insoluble fiber. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Dietary fiber has two main components: soluble fiber and insoluble fiber, which are components of plant-based foods, such as legumes, whole grains and cereals, vegetables, fruits, and nuts or seeds. (wikipedia.org)
  • Food sources of dietary fiber have traditionally been divided according to whether they provide soluble or insoluble fiber. (wikipedia.org)
  • Insoluble fiber - which does not dissolve in water - is inert to digestive enzymes in the upper gastrointestinal tract. (wikipedia.org)
  • Coarsely ground insoluble fiber triggers the secretion of mucus in the large intestine, providing bulking. (wikipedia.org)
  • Finely ground insoluble fiber does not have this effect and can actually have a constipating effect. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some forms of insoluble fiber, such as resistant starches, can be fermented in the colon. (wikipedia.org)
  • The skin is a source of insoluble fiber, whereas soluble fiber is in the pulp. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2. The other type of fiber is insoluble fiber. (touro.com)
  • What happens to insoluble fiber when you eat it? (touro.com)
  • Insoluble fiber does not dissolve in water. (touro.com)
  • But simply switching to healthy alternatives is not enough and must happen in tandem with dietary supplementation. (nih.gov)
  • Effect of dietary resveratrol supplementation on muscle fiber types and meat quality in beef cattle. (bvsalud.org)
  • In order to investigate the effect of dietary resveratrol supplementation on muscle fiber types and meat quality in beef cattle , a feeding experiment was undertaken. (bvsalud.org)
  • The USDA's Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends that adults get 14 grams of fiber for every 1,000 calories consumed. (touro.com)
  • Inulin (in chicory root), wheat dextrin, oligosaccharides, and resistant starches (in legumes and bananas), are soluble non-viscous fibers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Medical authorities, such as the Mayo Clinic, recommend adding fiber-rich products to the Standard American Diet (SAD) because it is rich in processed and artificially sweetened foods, with minimal intake of vegetables and legumes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pregnant women who had a high level of insulin resistance according to their triglyceride and glucose (TyG) index prior to 20 weeks' gestation showed improved glucose metabolism, a reduced risk for gestational diabetes, and significantly fewer preterm births when treated daily with an oral fiber supplement for 5 weeks (gestational weeks 20-24) compared with untreated controls in a single-center, randomized study with 295 women. (medscape.com)
  • The fiber supplement intervention did not affect lipid profiles or other maternal and neonatal outcomes. (medscape.com)
  • During gestational weeks 20-24, 97 women received a 12-g dose of oral dietary fiber powder twice daily, and 197 served as controls and received usual care without the fiber supplement. (medscape.com)
  • The incidence of gestational diabetes among women in the group who ingested the fiber supplement was 11.2%, significantly less than the 23.7% rate among women who served as controls. (medscape.com)
  • The average 2-hour blood glucose levels during the oral glucose tolerance test was 6.45 mmol/L among the women using the fiber supplement and 6.69 mmol/L among the control group, a significant difference. (medscape.com)
  • Mean gestational age at delivery among women who received the fiber supplement was 39.07 weeks, significantly greater than the 38.58-week average among the controls. (medscape.com)
  • The incidence of preterm delivery at less than 37 weeks was 2.3% among women who used the fiber supplement, significantly less than the 9.4% rate among the controls. (medscape.com)
  • Directions: As a dietary supplement for adults take 1 capsule, 1 to 3 times daily, with a large glass of water, or as directed by a healthcare professional. (futurebiotics.com)
  • Liquid Redline Dietary Supplement? (edu.ng)
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  • It is a dietary supplement that helps maintain your gut health by acting as a natural colon cleanser. (outlookindia.com)
  • ColonBroom is a dietary supplement that takes care of your gut health by bringing positive changes to your daily routine through its formulation. (outlookindia.com)
  • It is a powerful fiber supplement that reduces inflammation in your digestive tract, helps relieve constipation, promotes regular bowel movements, and also aids in weight loss. (outlookindia.com)
  • The analysis covered a period starting in 1970 (first scientific report published discussing on the association between dietary fibers and colorectal cancer) until nowadays - 2015. (umbalk.org)
  • The aim of this study was consequently to investigate the association between dietary fiber intake as well as the main food sources of fiber, i.e. fruit and vegetables and whole grains, and risk of incident aortic stenosis. (lu.se)
  • Cox regression was used to estimate the association between dietary intakes and incident aortic stenosis. (lu.se)
  • ABSTRACT A case-control study investigated the association between dietary fat and breast cancer in Saudi Arabian women attending a specialist hospital in Riyadh. (who.int)
  • Regular intake of soluble fibers, such as beta-glucans from oats or barley, has been established to lower blood levels of LDL cholesterol, a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Is the cholesterol-perfluoroalkyl substance association confounded by dietary fiber intake? (biomedcentral.com)
  • Fiber is known to decrease serum cholesterol and a recent report based on National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) showed that PFAS and fiber are inversely associated. (biomedcentral.com)
  • We hypothesized that confounding by dietary fiber may account for some of the association between cholesterol and PFAS. (biomedcentral.com)
  • We implemented a Bayesian correction for measurement error in estimated intake of dietary fiber to evaluate whether fiber confounds the cholesterol-PFAS association. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The results indicated that the association of serum cholesterol with PFAS was not substantially confounded by fiber intake. (biomedcentral.com)
  • This explanation is plausible because an inverse relationship between dietary fiber and serum cholesterol has been suggested for many years [ 17 ], and a recent report based on National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) provided evidence of an inverse association between serum PFAS and fiber intake among adults aged 20 years and older [ 18 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • At the same time, the daily consumption of dietary fiber is significantly below the recommended intake of at least 30 g (DGE) despite health benefits. (fraunhofer.de)
  • The findings of this study do not indicate that consumption of dietary fiber or fiber rich foods are associated with incident aortic stenosis. (lu.se)
  • Dietary fiber (in Commonwealth English fibre) or roughage is the portion of plant-derived food that cannot be completely broken down by human digestive enzymes. (wikipedia.org)
  • The U.S.-Japan Cooperative Medical Sciences Program (USJCMSP) was established in 1965 by Prime Minister Eisaku Sato of Japan and President Lyndon B. Johnson of the United States to strengthen Japan's research capacity and address public health concerns in the Asia-Pacific region ( https://www.amed.go.jp/en/program/list/03/01/007.html ). (cdc.gov)
  • Fermentable fibers - such as resistant starch, xanthan gum, and inulin - feed the bacteria and microbiota of the large intestine, and are metabolized to yield short-chain fatty acids, which have diverse roles in gastrointestinal health. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the late 20th century, only lignin and some polysaccharides were known to satisfy this definition, but in the early 21st century, resistant starch and oligosaccharides were included as dietary fiber components. (wikipedia.org)
  • [7] Viscous fibers - such as beta-glucan and psyllium - thicken the fecal mass. [7] Fermentable fibers - such as resistant starch , xanthan gum , and inulin - feed the bacteria and microbiota of the large intestine , and are metabolized to yield short-chain fatty acids, which have diverse roles in gastrointestinal health. (wikiwand.com)
  • Dietary fiber is found in fruits, vegetables and whole grains. (wikipedia.org)
  • The principal message from nutritional studies in humans has been an endorsement of the benefits of a diet consisting mainly of vegetables, fruits, fiber, and fish, combined with restricted caloric intake and/or exercise to maintain or achieve a healthy weight. (medscape.com)
  • Plant foods contain both types of fiber in varying amounts, according to the fiber characteristics of viscosity and fermentability. (wikipedia.org)
  • Grain bran products have the highest fiber contents, such as crude corn bran (79 g per 100 g) and crude wheat bran (43 g per 100 g), which are ingredients for manufactured foods. (wikipedia.org)
  • The production of processed foods often involves removing the original fiber content and sometimes replacing it with a different kind of fiber. (purdue.edu)
  • This study is a comparison between inulin and a fiber blend from whole foods that is more suitable to promote this specific group of bacteria," Cantu-Jungles said. (purdue.edu)
  • Most fibers that come from whole foods are cell-wall-based plant fibers. (purdue.edu)
  • The dietary intake data are used to estimate the types and amounts of foods and beverages consumed during the 24-hour period prior to the interview (midnight to midnight), and to estimate intakes of energy, nutrients, and other food components from those foods and beverages. (cdc.gov)
  • Viscous fibers - such as beta-glucan and psyllium - thicken the fecal mass. (wikipedia.org)
  • Our results demonstrate that feeding a fiber-prebiotic-probiotic blend may provide many benefits to canine health, including improved stool quality, beneficial shifts to fecal bacteria and metabolite profiles, reduced blood lipids, and enhanced gut immunity. (asas.org)
  • A 2,000-calorie daily diet would call for 28 grams of fiber, the equivalent of a combination of one cup of cooked beans, two cups of brown rice, one cup of broccoli and one banana. (purdue.edu)
  • But inulin is a soluble fiber that is ill suited for supporting a particular group of beneficial gut bacteria, Clostridia. (purdue.edu)
  • Now, Hamaker and Thaisa Cantu-Jungles , research assistant professor of food science at Purdue, have launched a project to compare the gut-health impact of whole-food fibers and inulin. (purdue.edu)
  • We predict that trying to compensate for the lack of fibers in the diet with inulin could further marginalize that important group of health-related microbes," he said. (purdue.edu)
  • We don't want to make inulin out to be the bad guy here, but it does not do the same thing as whole-food fibers," Hamaker said. (purdue.edu)
  • It is a well-known fact that dietary modification alone can significantly impact a patient's health, with a noticeable effect on BP as well. (nih.gov)
  • This release of the dietary intake data represents, for the first time, the integration of two nationwide dietary intake surveys - USDA's Continuing Survey of Food Intakes by Individuals (CSFII) and DHHS's National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). (cdc.gov)
  • Soluble fiber (fermentable fiber or prebiotic fiber) - which dissolves in water - is generally fermented in the colon into gases and physiologically active by-products, such as short-chain fatty acids produced in the colon by gut bacteria. (wikipedia.org)
  • The role of fibers on the development of microbiota in the colon is outlined, focusing on the metabolism of bile acids, changes in pH and production of short-chain fatty acids. (umbalk.org)
  • It is a natural colon cleanser that uses dietary fibers and other natural elements to strengthen your gut health. (outlookindia.com)
  • Almidón e hidratos de carbono de alto peso molecular relacionados procedentes de la dieta que no pueden sufrir hidrólisis enzimática en el INTESTINO DELGADO y que, en cambio, fermentan en el COLON, produciendo subproductos de ÁCIDOS GRASOS DE CADENA CORTA. (bvsalud.org)
  • Wheat bran has a high content of dietary fiber. (wikiwand.com)
  • It is a natural source of water-soluble fiber, meaning it attracts water while forming a gel-like substance in the digestive tract. (futurebiotics.com)
  • Citrus fruit and plant-based fibers are used in the production of anti-aging and whitening creams due to their detoxifying and antioxidant qualities. (infoaboutdiabetes.net.au)
  • We examined adherence to dietary recommendations on fruit/vegetable and fat intake and identified correlates with acculturation indicators as well as with family, lifestyle, and occupational factors in a farm worker cohort in central California. (cdc.gov)
  • We assessed fruit/vegetable consumption and fat intake using the Block Fruit/Vegetable/Fiber Screener and the Block Dietary Fat Screener, respectively. (cdc.gov)
  • Treatments included a control diet containing low amounts of dietary fiber, a diet containing a fiber-prebiotic-probiotic blend, and a diet containing the fiber-prebiotic-probiotic blend as well as immune-modulating ingredients. (asas.org)
  • Besides making sure you get adequate amounts of fiber in your diet, increasing liquids in your diet and regular exercise help prevent constipation. (touro.com)
  • Almonds also contain good amounts of fiber, which helps improve cardiovascular health , and vitamin E, which helps reduce cell damage and boosts the immune system . (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Intervention with supplemental dietary fiber was for only 5 weeks during pregnancy. (medscape.com)
  • In contrast, mice on a fiber-rich diet were completely protected from irradiation-induced bacterial infiltration and exhibited a similar serum cytokine profile as sham-irradiated mice on a fiber-rich diet. (lu.se)
  • 7. Fiber helps prevent constipation. (touro.com)
  • The standard advice of increasing dietary fibers, fluids, and exercise for relieving chronic constipation will only benefit patients with true deficiency. (medscape.com)
  • Through sustainable utilization, innovative and healthy food ingredients such as dietary fiber preparations can be obtained. (fraunhofer.de)
  • However, the utilization of the resulting dietary fiber by-products is currently limited due to a lack of knowledge on stabilization and drying. (fraunhofer.de)
  • Stool samples will be analyzed at Purdue for gut bacterial community shifts and metabolites from bacterial utilization of fiber. (purdue.edu)
  • This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of diets containing blends of dietary fibers and other functional ingredients on nutrient digestibility and the stool characteristics and immune health outcomes of adult dogs consuming them. (asas.org)
  • To evaluate whether a fiber-rich diet can ameliorate the long-lasting pathophysiological hallmarks of the irradiated mucosa, C57BL/6J mice on a fiber-rich bioprocessed oat bran diet or a fiber-free diet received 32 Gray in four fractions to the distal colorectum using a linear accelerator and continued on the diets for one, six or 18 weeks. (lu.se)
  • The pathophysiology of aortic stenosis is however similar to other cardiovascular diseases that fiber intake has been associated with. (lu.se)
  • Advantages of consuming fiber depend upon which type of fiber is consumed and which benefits may result in the gastrointestinal system. (wikipedia.org)
  • The mix of several essential nutrients and dietary fibers helps you lose weight, reduce abdominal pain, strengthen gastrointestinal health, lower high blood pressure and blood sugar, eliminate irregular bowel movements, and improve your overall gut health. (outlookindia.com)
  • The selection of scientific publications was realized with the help of Scopus and PubMed, searching for the key words colorectal cancer, nutrition, dietary fibers. (umbalk.org)
  • Further studies are necessary in the various dimensions of the nutrition-colorectal cancer issue, focusing on dietary fibers. (umbalk.org)
  • The addition of dietary fibers in breakfast cereals helps in reducing the calorie and fat content, thereby improving the nutrition value of the product. (infoaboutdiabetes.net.au)
  • Before discussing or recommending a dietary or lifestyle pattern that may help prevent prostate cancer or inhibit its progression, it would seem prudent to touch on probability, which should inform discussions of the role of nutrition in the prevention of any disease. (medscape.com)
  • Many trillions of the bacteria that make their home in the human gut depend on dietary fibers for their food. (purdue.edu)
  • Increasing dietary fiber too quickly can lead to gas , bloating, and cramps. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Furthermore, the application of the developed dietary fiber preparations in food and the integration of the developed processes into the industrial process chains shall be evaluated. (fraunhofer.de)
  • There's a public health need to increase dietary fiber intake," said Bruce Hamaker , Distinguished Professor of Food Science at Purdue University. (purdue.edu)
  • The project will entail putting together an optimized combination of whole-food fibers, then testing it in the laboratory and in a clinical study. (purdue.edu)
  • Expanded food descriptions can be found in the food descriptions component of the USDA Food and Nutrient Database for Dietary Studies (FNDDS). (cdc.gov)
  • Selbyville, Delaware, Dec. 20, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) - As per the report published by Global Market Insights Inc., the global Food Dietary Fibers Market was estimated at USD 2.5 billion in 2022 and is expected to surpass a valuation of $ 7 billion by 2032, progressing at a CAGR of 9.5% from 2023 to 2032. (infoaboutdiabetes.net.au)
  • Most of the fibers used in the cosmetic business are a byproduct of the food processing sector. (infoaboutdiabetes.net.au)
  • Global soluble food dietary fibers market was valued USD 1 billion in 2022. (infoaboutdiabetes.net.au)
  • Food dietary fibers industry share from breakfast cereals & snacks applications will witness over 9.5% CAGR through 2032. (infoaboutdiabetes.net.au)
  • The robust demand for breakfast products in Asia Pacific owing to evolving dietary patterns and the influence of food trends in developed regions will drive dietary fiber consumption in the region. (infoaboutdiabetes.net.au)
  • Asia Pacific food dietary fibers market will witness 10% CAGR through the forecast timeframe. (infoaboutdiabetes.net.au)
  • Dietary habits were recorded through seven-day food diaries, 168-item diet questionnaires, and interviews, and data on incident aortic stenosis was collected through national registers. (lu.se)
  • 1. Fiber is classified in 2 main types. (touro.com)
  • Research findings demonstrate a set of key benefits offered by different types of dietary fiber, which are directly related to their physicochemical properties. (infoaboutdiabetes.net.au)
  • 3. How much fiber should adults consume each day? (touro.com)
  • A diet high in regular fiber consumption is generally associated with supporting health and lowering the risk of several diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • In their new study, Hamaker and Cantu-Jungles seek to clearly establish whether cell-wall-based plant fibers have a key dietary role in supporting the Clostridia bacteria that are critical for good gut health. (purdue.edu)
  • Restricted data, such as the 2002 Day 2 dietary data, may be made available at the Research Data Center located at the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) headquarters in Hyattsville, MD. A research proposal for using the restricted data must be submitted to NCHS for review and approval. (cdc.gov)
  • Bacterial infiltration was a late phenomenon, evident in the fiber-deprived animals and intensified manyfold after irradiation. (lu.se)
  • Therefore, in the project Legufiber, industrially relevant and cost-effective drying and milling methods of the dietary fiber side streams, and their effect on shelf life, composition and functionality will be investigated. (fraunhofer.de)
  • 5. Which of these methods is a good way to increase your daily fiber intake? (touro.com)