Body Patterning: The processes occurring in early development that direct morphogenesis. They specify the body plan ensuring that cells will proceed to differentiate, grow, and diversify in size and shape at the correct relative positions. Included are axial patterning, segmentation, compartment specification, limb position, organ boundary patterning, blood vessel patterning, etc.Sepia: A genus of cuttlefish in the family Sepiidae. They live in tropical, subtropical and temperate waters in most oceans.Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action during the developmental stages of an organism.Drosophila: A genus of small, two-winged flies containing approximately 900 described species. These organisms are the most extensively studied of all genera from the standpoint of genetics and cytology.Drosophila Proteins: Proteins that originate from insect species belonging to the genus DROSOPHILA. The proteins from the most intensely studied species of Drosophila, DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER, are the subject of much interest in the area of MORPHOGENESIS and development.Blood Pressure: PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.Hypertension: Persistently high systemic arterial BLOOD PRESSURE. Based on multiple readings (BLOOD PRESSURE DETERMINATION), hypertension is currently defined as when SYSTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently greater than 140 mm Hg or when DIASTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently 90 mm Hg or more.Homeodomain Proteins: Proteins encoded by homeobox genes (GENES, HOMEOBOX) that exhibit structural similarity to certain prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA-binding proteins. Homeodomain proteins are involved in the control of gene expression during morphogenesis and development (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION, DEVELOPMENTAL).Diastole: Post-systolic relaxation of the HEART, especially the HEART VENTRICLES.Embryo, Nonmammalian: The developmental entity of a fertilized egg (ZYGOTE) in animal species other than MAMMALS. For chickens, use CHICK EMBRYO.Hedgehog Proteins: A family of intercellular signaling proteins that play and important role in regulating the development of many TISSUES and organs. Their name derives from the observation of a hedgehog-like appearance in DROSOPHILA embryos with genetic mutations that block their action.Antihypertensive Agents: Drugs used in the treatment of acute or chronic vascular HYPERTENSION regardless of pharmacological mechanism. Among the antihypertensive agents are DIURETICS; (especially DIURETICS, THIAZIDE); ADRENERGIC BETA-ANTAGONISTS; ADRENERGIC ALPHA-ANTAGONISTS; ANGIOTENSIN-CONVERTING ENZYME INHIBITORS; CALCIUM CHANNEL BLOCKERS; GANGLIONIC BLOCKERS; and VASODILATOR AGENTS.Morphogenesis: The development of anatomical structures to create the form of a single- or multi-cell organism. Morphogenesis provides form changes of a part, parts, or the whole organism.In Situ Hybridization: A technique that localizes specific nucleic acid sequences within intact chromosomes, eukaryotic cells, or bacterial cells through the use of specific nucleic acid-labeled probes.Systole: Period of contraction of the HEART, especially of the HEART VENTRICLES.Blood Pressure Determination: Techniques for measuring blood pressure.Zebrafish: An exotic species of the family CYPRINIDAE, originally from Asia, that has been introduced in North America. They are used in embryological studies and to study the effects of certain chemicals on development.Zebrafish Proteins: Proteins obtained from the ZEBRAFISH. Many of the proteins in this species have been the subject of studies involving basic embryological development (EMBRYOLOGY).Mesoderm: The middle germ layer of an embryo derived from three paired mesenchymal aggregates along the neural tube.Ectoderm: The outer of the three germ layers of an embryo.Heart Rate: The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.Bone Morphogenetic Proteins: Bone-growth regulatory factors that are members of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily of proteins. They are synthesized as large precursor molecules which are cleaved by proteolytic enzymes. The active form can consist of a dimer of two identical proteins or a heterodimer of two related bone morphogenetic proteins.Embryonic Induction: The complex processes of initiating CELL DIFFERENTIATION in the embryo. The precise regulation by cell interactions leads to diversity of cell types and specific pattern of organization (EMBRYOGENESIS).Transcription Factors: Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.Extremities: The farthest or outermost projections of the body, such as the HAND and FOOT.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Rhombencephalon: The posterior of the three primitive cerebral vesicles of an embryonic brain. It consists of myelencephalon, metencephalon, and isthmus rhombencephali from which develop the major BRAIN STEM components, such as MEDULLA OBLONGATA from the myelencephalon, CEREBELLUM and PONS from the metencephalon, with the expanded cavity forming the FOURTH VENTRICLE.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory: Method in which repeated blood pressure readings are made while the patient undergoes normal daily activities. It allows quantitative analysis of the high blood pressure load over time, can help distinguish between types of HYPERTENSION, and can assess the effectiveness of antihypertensive therapy.Genes, Homeobox: Genes that encode highly conserved TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS that control positional identity of cells (BODY PATTERNING) and MORPHOGENESIS throughout development. Their sequences contain a 180 nucleotide sequence designated the homeobox, so called because mutations of these genes often results in homeotic transformations, in which one body structure replaces another. The proteins encoded by homeobox genes are called HOMEODOMAIN PROTEINS.Xenopus Proteins: Proteins obtained from various species of Xenopus. Included here are proteins from the African clawed frog (XENOPUS LAEVIS). Many of these proteins have been the subject of scientific investigations in the area of MORPHOGENESIS and development.Fibroblast Growth Factor 8: A fibroblast growth factor that preferentially activates FIBROBLAST GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR 4. It was initially identified as an androgen-induced growth factor and plays a role in regulating growth of human BREAST NEOPLASMS and PROSTATIC NEOPLASMS.Gastrula: The developmental stage that follows BLASTULA or BLASTOCYST. It is characterized by the morphogenetic cell movements including invagination, ingression, and involution. Gastrulation begins with the formation of the PRIMITIVE STREAK, and ends with the formation of three GERM LAYERS, the body plan of the mature organism.Body Mass Index: An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.WingSomites: Paired, segmented masses of MESENCHYME located on either side of the developing spinal cord (neural tube). Somites derive from PARAXIAL MESODERM and continue to increase in number during ORGANOGENESIS. Somites give rise to SKELETON (sclerotome); MUSCLES (myotome); and DERMIS (dermatome).Cardiovascular Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM including the HEART; the BLOOD VESSELS; or the PERICARDIUM.Limb Buds: Distinct regions of mesenchymal outgrowth at both flanks of an embryo during the SOMITE period. Limb buds, covered by ECTODERM, give rise to forelimb, hindlimb, and eventual functional limb structures. Limb bud cultures are used to study CELL DIFFERENTIATION; ORGANOGENESIS; and MORPHOGENESIS.Blood Pressure Monitors: Devices for continuously measuring and displaying the arterial blood pressure.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Wnt Proteins: Wnt proteins are a large family of secreted glycoproteins that play essential roles in EMBRYONIC AND FETAL DEVELOPMENT, and tissue maintenance. They bind to FRIZZLED RECEPTORS and act as PARACRINE PROTEIN FACTORS to initiate a variety of SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION PATHWAYS. The canonical Wnt signaling pathway stabilizes the transcriptional coactivator BETA CATENIN.Pulse: The rhythmical expansion and contraction of an ARTERY produced by waves of pressure caused by the ejection of BLOOD from the left ventricle of the HEART as it contracts.Insect Proteins: Proteins found in any species of insect.Branchial Region: A region, of SOMITE development period, that contains a number of paired arches, each with a mesodermal core lined by ectoderm and endoderm on the two sides. In lower aquatic vertebrates, branchial arches develop into GILLS. In higher vertebrates, the arches forms outpouchings and develop into structures of the head and neck. Separating the arches are the branchial clefts or grooves.Chick Embryo: The developmental entity of a fertilized chicken egg (ZYGOTE). The developmental process begins about 24 h before the egg is laid at the BLASTODISC, a small whitish spot on the surface of the EGG YOLK. After 21 days of incubation, the embryo is fully developed before hatching.Wnt1 Protein: A proto-oncogene protein and member of the Wnt family of proteins. It is expressed in the caudal MIDBRAIN and is essential for proper development of the entire mid-/hindbrain region.Fibroblast Growth Factors: A family of small polypeptide growth factors that share several common features including a strong affinity for HEPARIN, and a central barrel-shaped core region of 140 amino acids that is highly homologous between family members. Although originally studied as proteins that stimulate the growth of fibroblasts this distinction is no longer a requirement for membership in the fibroblast growth factor family.Nodal Protein: The founding member of the nodal signaling ligand family of proteins. Nodal protein was originally discovered in the region of the mouse embryo primitive streak referred to as HENSEN'S NODE. It is expressed asymmetrically on the left side in chordates and plays a critical role in the genesis of left-right asymmetry during vertebrate development.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Genes, Insect: The functional hereditary units of INSECTS.Endoderm: The inner of the three germ layers of an embryo.Bone Morphogenetic Protein 4: A bone morphogenetic protein that is a potent inducer of bone formation. It also functions as a regulator of MESODERM formation during EMBRYONIC DEVELOPMENT.Nervous System: The entire nerve apparatus, composed of a central part, the brain and spinal cord, and a peripheral part, the cranial and spinal nerves, autonomic ganglia, and plexuses. (Stedman, 26th ed)Organizers, Embryonic: Cells in certain regions of an embryo that self-regulate embryonic development. These organizers have been found in dorsal and ventral poles of GASTRULA embryos, including Spemann organizer in amphibians, and Hensen node in chicken and mouse. These organizer cells communicate with each other via a network of secreted signaling proteins, such as BONE MORPHOGENETIC PROTEINS and their antagonists (chordin and noggin).Hydrochlorothiazide: A thiazide diuretic often considered the prototypical member of this class. It reduces the reabsorption of electrolytes from the renal tubules. This results in increased excretion of water and electrolytes, including sodium, potassium, chloride, and magnesium. It is used in the treatment of several disorders including edema, hypertension, diabetes insipidus, and hypoparathyroidism.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Trans-Activators: Diffusible gene products that act on homologous or heterologous molecules of viral or cellular DNA to regulate the expression of proteins.Head: The upper part of the human body, or the front or upper part of the body of an animal, typically separated from the rest of the body by a neck, and containing the brain, mouth, and sense organs.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Animals, Genetically Modified: ANIMALS whose GENOME has been altered by GENETIC ENGINEERING, or their offspring.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Embryonic Development: Morphological and physiological development of EMBRYOS.Obesity: A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).Neural Tube: A tube of ectodermal tissue in an embryo that will give rise to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, including the SPINAL CORD and the BRAIN. Lumen within the neural tube is called neural canal which gives rise to the central canal of the spinal cord and the ventricles of the brain. For malformation of the neural tube, see NEURAL TUBE DEFECTS.Vertebrates: Animals having a vertebral column, members of the phylum Chordata, subphylum Craniata comprising mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and fishes.Neural Crest: The two longitudinal ridges along the PRIMITIVE STREAK appearing near the end of GASTRULATION during development of nervous system (NEURULATION). The ridges are formed by folding of NEURAL PLATE. Between the ridges is a neural groove which deepens as the fold become elevated. When the folds meet at midline, the groove becomes a closed tube, the NEURAL TUBE.Drosophila melanogaster: A species of fruit fly much used in genetics because of the large size of its chromosomes.Notochord: A cartilaginous rod of mesodermal cells at the dorsal midline of all CHORDATE embryos. In lower vertebrates, notochord is the backbone of support. In the higher vertebrates, notochord is a transient structure, and segments of the vertebral column will develop around it. Notochord is also a source of midline signals that pattern surrounding tissues including the NEURAL TUBE development.Telencephalon: The anterior subdivision of the embryonic PROSENCEPHALON or the corresponding part of the adult prosencephalon that includes the cerebrum and associated structures.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Cell Differentiation: Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.Embryo, Mammalian: The entity of a developing mammal (MAMMALS), generally from the cleavage of a ZYGOTE to the end of embryonic differentiation of basic structures. For the human embryo, this represents the first two months of intrauterine development preceding the stages of the FETUS.Blood Glucose: Glucose in blood.Xenopus: An aquatic genus of the family, Pipidae, occurring in Africa and distinguished by having black horny claws on three inner hind toes.African Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Africa.DNA-Binding Proteins: Proteins which bind to DNA. The family includes proteins which bind to both double- and single-stranded DNA and also includes specific DNA binding proteins in serum which can be used as markers for malignant diseases.Atenolol: A cardioselective beta-1 adrenergic blocker possessing properties and potency similar to PROPRANOLOL, but without a negative inotropic effect.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Organogenesis: Formation of differentiated cells and complicated tissue organization to provide specialized functions.T-Box Domain Proteins: Proteins containing a region of conserved sequence, about 200 amino acids long, which encodes a particular sequence specific DNA binding domain (the T-box domain). These proteins are transcription factors that control developmental pathways. The prototype of this family is the mouse Brachyury (or T) gene product.Hemodynamics: The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Cholesterol: The principal sterol of all higher animals, distributed in body tissues, especially the brain and spinal cord, and in animal fats and oils.Gastrulation: A process of complicated morphogenetic cell movements that reorganizes a bilayer embryo into one with three GERM LAYERS and specific orientation (dorsal/ventral; anterior/posterior). Gastrulation describes the germ layer development of a non-mammalian BLASTULA or that of a mammalian BLASTOCYST.
There is some recent evidence that a depression takes place in this phase, with blood pooling ('diastolic phase') mainly into ... Slow changes in hoof shape occur under any consistent change in the horse's movement pattern and under a wide variety of ... The resulting conformation allows a heavy, strong body to move with high speed on any ground, and most efficiently on open, ... hard, flat areas like prairies and deserts (i.e., 'cursorial specialisation'). There are several disorders and injuries that ...
Insufficient blood flow may be evident by low blood pressure, high blood lactate, or low urine output. Septic shock is low ... A target tidal volume of 6 mL/kg of predicted body weight (PBW) and a plateau pressure less than 30 cm H2O is recommended for ... These PAMPs are recognized by the pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) of the innate immune system, which may be membrane-bound ... Invariably, the association of a PAMP and a PRR will cause a series of intracellular signalling cascades. Consequentially, ...
Gaskin, PR; Owens SE; Talner NS; Sanders SP; Li JS (2000). "Clinical auscultation skills in pediatric residents". Pediatrics. ... Heart murmurs (or cardiac murmurs) are audible noises through a stethoscope, generated by a turbulent flow of blood. Heart ... Bishop, Christopher (1995). Neural Networks for Pattern Recognition. Oxford University Press, Oxford. Pretorius, Eugene; Thys ... systolic murmur and diastolic murmur), shape, location, radiation, intensity, pitch and quality. CAA systems typically ...
SIRS is the presence of two or more of the following: abnormal body temperature, heart rate, respiratory rate, or blood gas, ... Immune cells not only recognise pathogen-associated molecular patterns, but also damage-associated molecular patterns from ... Heart: systolic and diastolic heart failure, likely due to chemical signals that depress myocyte function, cellular damage, ... Shukla P, Rao GM, Pandey G, Sharma S, Mittapelly N, Shegokar R, Mishra PR (November 2014). "Therapeutic interventions in sepsis ...
The diastolic blood pressure however should not be lower than 60 mmHg.[vague] Beta blockers are recommended first line for this ... A 2015 Cochrane Review found some evidence that such an approach might help with blood pressure, body mass index, and waist ... Esdaile, JM; Abrahamowicz, M; Grodzicky, T; Li, Y; Panaritis, C; du Berger, R; Côte, R; Grover, SA; Fortin, PR; Clarke, AE; ... Having a type A behavior pattern, a group of personality characteristics including time urgency, competitiveness, hostility, ...
As in central apnea, pauses are followed by a relative decrease in blood oxygen and an increase in the blood carbon dioxide. ... Many people benefit from sleeping at a 30-degree elevation of the upper body[34] or higher, as if in a recliner. Doing so helps ... Diastolic function of the heart also becomes affected.[53] Elevated arterial pressure (i.e., hypertension) can be a consequence ... There are patterns of unusual facial features that occur in recognizable syndromes. Some of these craniofacial syndromes are ...
... tend to produce a lowering of the diastolic blood pressure during exercise, due to the improved blood flow. Conversely, static ... CONCLUSIONS: A limited body of evidence supports a positive effect of PA on CF in young to middle-aged adults. Further research ... Wilmore, JH; Stanforth, PR; Gagnon, J; Leon, AS; Rao, DC; Skinner, JS; Bouchard, C (July 1996). "Endurance exercise training ... "Diverse patterns of myocardial fibrosis in lifelong, veteran endurance athletes". J Appl Physiol. 110 (6): 1622-26. doi ...
... tend to produce a lowering of the diastolic blood pressure during exercise, due to the improved blood flow. Conversely, static ... "It's possible to exercise too much - here's what it can do to your body and brain". Business Insider. Retrieved 16 April 2019. ... Wilmore, JH; Stanforth, PR; Gagnon, J; Leon, AS; Rao, DC; Skinner, JS; Bouchard, C (July 1996). "Endurance exercise training ... "Diverse patterns of myocardial fibrosis in lifelong, veteran endurance athletes". J Appl Physiol. 110 (6): 1622-26. doi ...
and the diastolic pressure P. dias. {\displaystyle \!P_{\text{dias}}}. [68] MAP. ≊. P. dias. +. 1. 3. (. P. sys. −. P. dias. ) ... 500 ml of blood to be relocated from the chest and upper body. This results in a rapid decrease in central blood volume and a ... Smolensky MH, Hermida RC, Portaluppi F (June 2017). "Circadian mechanisms of 24-hour blood pressure regulation and patterning ... Disorders of blood pressure[edit]. Disorders of blood pressure control include high blood pressure, low blood pressure, and ...
Blood pressure. *Pulse pressure *Systolic. *Diastolic. *Mean arterial pressure. *Jugular venous pressure ... with vessels from both hypertensive and diabetic patients displaying altered flow patterns as compared to normotensive vessels. ... Vasomotion is the spontaneous oscillation in tone of blood vessel walls, independent of heart beat, innervation or respiration. ... Vasomotion could also be a mechanism of increasing the reactivity of a blood vessel by avoiding the "latch state", a low ATP ...
A systematic review reported that alcohol has bi-phasic effect on blood pressure. Both systolic and diastolic blood pressure ... On average, for equal body weight, women have a higher body fat percentage than men. Since alcohol is absorbed into body water ... doi:10.1124/pr.111.005538 *^ a b c Adams KE, Rans TS (2013). "Adverse reactions to alcohol and alcoholic beverages". Ann. ... During abstinence, residual disruptions in sleep regularity and sleep patterns[clarification needed] are the greatest ...
Rosen JC, Reiter J, Orosan P (1995). "Assessment of body image in eating disorders with the body dysmorphic disorder ... Gendall KA, Joyce PR, Carter FA, McIntosh VV, Jordan J, Bulik CM (2006). "The psychobiology and diagnostic significance of ... Larsson JO, Hellzén M (2004). "Patterns of personality disorders in women with chronic eating disorders". Eating and Weight ... Ernst AA, Haynes ML, Nick TG, Weiss SJ (1999). "Usefulness of the blood urea nitrogen/creatinine ratio in gastrointestinal ...
In this case, the patient's blood is normally diverted to an artificial heart-lung machine to maintain the body's blood supply ... When the heart is not beating in a regular pattern, this is referred to as an arrhythmia. Abnormalities of heart rate sometimes ... In those beats following a shorter diastolic interval left ventricle doesn't fill properly, stroke volume is lower and pulse ... The last variable is body temperature. Elevated body temperature is called hyperthermia, and suppressed body temperature is ...
Changes in the structure of the heart and its surroundings (including blood composition) change the patterns of these four ... PR interval The PR interval is measured from the beginning of the P wave to the beginning of the QRS complex. This interval ... and LL to give an average potential of the body: V. W. =. 1. 3. (. R. A. +. L. A. +. L. L. ). {\displaystyle V_{W}={\frac {1}{3 ... Fractional shortening = (End-diastolic dimension. *End-systolic dimension) / End-diastolic dimension. *Aortic valve area ...
It is recommended that blood pressure typically be reduced to less than 140/90 mmHg.[90] The diastolic blood pressure however ... A 2015 Cochrane Review found some evidence that such an approach might help with blood pressure, body mass index, and waist ... Esdaile, JM; Abrahamowicz, M; Grodzicky, T; Li, Y; Panaritis, C; du Berger, R; Côte, R; Grover, SA; Fortin, PR; Clarke, AE; ... Having a type A behavior pattern, a group of personality characteristics including time urgency, competitiveness, hostility, ...
... but it can occur after acute myocardial infarction and can also occur in the setting of low blood potassium or low blood ... The P-waves and P-R intervals are variable due to a phenomenon called wandering atrial pacemaker (WAP). The electrical impulse ... Theophylline toxicity often occurs following acute or chronic overtreatment or factors lowering its clearance from the body.[5] ... strip with 3 or more P-waves of variable morphology and varying P-R intervals, plus tachycardia, which is a heart rate ...
... which pumps blood through the blood vessels of the circulatory system.[1] Blood provides the body with oxygen and nutrients, as ... This complex swirling pattern allows the heart to pump blood more effectively.[7] ... end-diastolic volume).[77] Echocardiograms can also be conducted under circumstances when the body is more stressed, in order ... concluded that it provided heat to the body.[84] The heart did not pump blood around, the heart's motion sucked blood in during ...
Systolic blood pressure showed no change (128±10 versus 126±12 mm Hg; NS), but diastolic blood pressure increased mildly (78±7 ... and normal diastolic filling pattern.7,14⇓ DCM was excluded in athletes with LV cavity dimension ≥60 mm on the basis of normal ... body surface area, blood pressure, heart rate, duration of deconditioning, and persistent physical activity) on LV dimensional ... Resting heart rate, PR and QTc intervals, and R- and S-wave voltages in precordial leads showed significant reduction after ...
Controlled AP was considered when the systolic blood pressure (SBP) was , 140 mmHg and the diastolic blood pressure (DAP) was ... The WC and WHR were obtained in order to evaluate the pattern of body fat distribution. The WHR was obtained through the ratio ... Similarly, for the other group, only age , 65 years (PR = 5.10; p = 0.005) and smoking status (PR = 2.86; p = 0.073) remained ... A blood sample was also collected and the 24-hour urine sample was received. Subsequently, the biological material (blood and ...
PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The internally-driven daily cycle of blood pressure changes doesnt appear to be linked to the known ... Researchers sought to identify the role of the internal human body clock in the daily rise and fall in blood pressure. In the ... Copyright © 2019 PR Newswire Association LLC. All Rights Reserved. A Cision company. ... All three protocols revealed almost identical systolic and diastolic circadian rhythms, which were unrelated to other internal ...
Changes in blood pressure during the study , measured as systolic and diastolic blood pressure (in mmHg) ... Physical examination: pulse rate, blood pressure, temperature, body weight and height, body mass index (BMI), neurological exam ... Change in Electrocardiogram (ECG): Ventricular rate, PR interval, qRS duration, QT, QTc [safety-tolerability] [ Time Frame: ... Changes in sleeping pattern; Irritability; Changes in appetite; Concentration difficulty; Tiredness or fatique; Loss of ...
Significant falls in systolic blood pressure/diastolic blood pressure of 4.2/2.5 mm Hg for daytime and 2.9/1.9 mm Hg for night ... The average body weight in the group who followed the modified diet fell by 1.3 kg whilst that in the control group rose by 0.6 ... For more information, please contact Jenny Gimpel, PR Manager (Health) in the Kings College London press office on tel: +44 (0 ... We show that adherence to current dietary guidelines which advocate a change in dietary pattern from the traditional British ...
Blood supply to the AV node is derived from the AV nodal artery, which is a branch of the right coronary artery in 85%-90% of ... The right bundle branch block pattern seen in patients with this syndrome is not actually right bundle branch block but is a ... It penetrates the central fibrous body at the attachment of the tendon of Todaro, runs between the membranous septum and the ... PR segment). After the impulse passes through the compact AV node, it is rapidly conducted through the crux of the heart to the ...
The aim of the current study was to investigate the diurnal blood... ... The aim of the current study was to investigate the diurnal blood pressure pattern and its relation to structural and ... Distribution of 24-h ambulatory blood pressure in children: normalized reference values and role of body dimensions. J ... Mitsnefes MM, Kimball TR, Border WL, Witt SA, Glascock BJ, Khoury PR, Daniels SR (2004) Abnormal cardiac function in children ...
Pattern analysis revealed a unique sound signature, which could be used in non-invasive screening tools. ... First sinusoid formant entropy reduction of heart sounds in PAH subjects suggests the existence of a vowel-like pattern. ... Increased blood pressure in the pulmonary artery is referred to as pulmonary hypertension and often is linked to loud pulmonic ... Systolic Blood Pressure. 92.5 (20.4). 93.2 (22.7). 0.89. Diastolic Blood Pressure. 53.0 (17.5). 54.2 (15.3). 0.78. ...
There is some recent evidence that a depression takes place in this phase, with blood pooling (diastolic phase) mainly into ... Slow changes in hoof shape occur under any consistent change in the horses movement pattern and under a wide variety of ... The resulting conformation allows a heavy, strong body to move with high speed on any ground, and most efficiently on open, ... hard, flat areas like prairies and deserts (i.e., cursorial specialisation). There are several disorders and injuries that ...
An impressive body of evidence supports the concept that multiple dietary factors affect blood pressure.1 Typically, the blood ... Block G, Mangels AR, Norkus EP, Patterson BH, Lavander OA, Taylor PR. Ascorbic acid status and subsequent diastolic and ... A clinical trial of the effects of dietary patterns on blood pressure. N Engl J Med. 1997;336:1117-1124. ... Blood pressure, systolic and diastolic, and cardiovascular risks: US population data. Arch Intern Med. 1993;153:598-615. ...
Hypertension was defined as systolic blood pressure ≥140 mmHg or diastolic blood pressure ≥90 mmHg based on sixth report of the ... 2007) Dietary patterns, insulin resistance, and prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in women. Am J Clin Nutr 85, 910-918. ... Energy Density, Energy Intake, and Body Weight Regulation in Adults. Advances in Nutrition, Vol. 5, Issue. 6, p. 835. ... PR, prevalence ratio; ALORF, at least one risk factor; ALTRF, at least two risk factors. ...
... because the left ventricle is not able to eject blood into the body and blood will consequently stagnate in the left atrium and ... The diastolic dysfunction could be a result of prolonged PR interval, i.e. the P-wave to QRS interval or too long an AV ... The filing pattern of the left atrium can be disturbed due to mitral regurgitation caused by either diastolic or systolic ... Since blood is resistive a high degree of blood filling results in a small phase angle. On the contrary, if more heart tissue ...
Effect of recreational football on blood lipid profile and body composition. Blood lipid profile. A typical finding, though not ... and diastolic pressure, from 92 to 84 mm Hg.15 Three quarters of the participants reached systolic and diastolic blood pressure ... Resting heart rate pattern during follow-up and mortality in hypertensive patients. Hypertension 2010;55:567-74. doi:10.1161/ ... Hansen PR, *Andersen TR, et al. . Cardiovascular adaptations to 4 and 12 months of football and strength training in 65-75-year ...
E. Biological patterns in hypertension by race, sex, body, weight and skin colour. JAMA 1970; 213: 1640. (19.) Paffenbarger RS ... 160mmHg and diastolic blood pressure , 95mmHg). Also there was a higher prevalence of blacks (48.9%) than whites (37.5%) and ... 23.) Cavanagh PR, Ulbrecht JS. Biochemical aspects of foot problems in diabetes. In: Boulton AJ, Connor H, Canagh PR (eds.) The ... 17) In the non-diabetic patient, evidence shows a positive relationship between body mass index and blood pressure, (18) which ...
... and diastolic dysfunction are seen. In general, the patterns of a restrictive cardiomyopathy accompanied with valvular ... Prolonged PR Interval Electrocardiogram depicted low voltage in limb leads and a prolonged PR interval. Echocardiogram revealed ... with alterations in pulmonary and transmitral blood flow that influence ejection fraction and diastolic dysfunction. ... Because amyloidosis is a systemic disease, and deposition of misfolded proteins occurs throughout the body, including the ...
RESULTS After following the DASH eating pattern, body weight (P = 0.007) and waist circumference (P = 0.002) reduced ... 3.1 ± 2.7 mmHg; P = 0.02) and diastolic blood pressure (−9.5 ± 2.6 vs. −0.7 ± 3.3 mmHg; P = 0.04). ... it is now recommended as an ideal eating pattern for all adults (3). Effects of the DASH eating pattern in patients with ... Fasting blood glucose levels and A1C decreased after adoption of the DASH diet (−29.4 ± 6.3 mg/dl; P = 0.04 and −1.7 ± 0.1%; P ...
Change in fat mass and loss of body energy were affected by order of meal pattern ingestion. The PM pattern resulted in greater ... reducing both systolic and diastolic blood pressure, insulin resistance and glucose metabolism. Long chain omega-3 PUFA has ... 8) Trumbo PR. The level of evidence for permitting a qualified health claim: FDAs review of the evidence for selenium and ... 2.7+/-3.7 percent of body weight; P=0.001) and 6 months (-7.0+/-6.5 vs. -3.2+/-5.6 percent of body weight, P=0.02), but the ...
Based on GTEx data, coronary artery disease (CAD), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and systolic blood pressure (SBP) showed the ... PR showed stronger association with cardiac muscular cells in heart and smooth vascular cells than endothelial cells (Table 1 ... 12o). Body fat percentage and chronic kidney disease did not show any significant association with any cell type (Supplementary ... Similarity of cell type association patterns across 26 traits. a Pair-wise Spearmans rank correlation of cell type association ...
MMSE and ADAS-cog score after 1 year were found to be associated with legumes pattern (B = 0.25, p = 0.007; 95% CI 0.07/0.44; ... We demonstrated an association between legumes pattern with cognitive performances. ... and B = −0.10, p = 0.006; CI −0.79/−0.30, respectively). A dietary pattern including plant proteins was independently ... The Principal Components Analysis identified four food and four nutrient patterns. ...
Browse over 1 million classes created by top students, professors, publishers, and experts, spanning the worlds body of " ... What is the effect of an increase in viscosity of blood on vascular resistance? ... PR interval is the same before and after the block. (block is below the His-purkinje system) ... Diastolic pericardial knock. *Elevated venous pressure *Edema. *Hepatomegaly. *Ascites. *Elevated jugular venous pressue ( ...
Ergometrine raises blood pr essure and is contraindicated.. One of the following is false... The following are associated with ... a A body mass index of more than 30 kg/m2 at booking is a risk factor for gestat ional diabetes. b Screening for gestational ... One of the following is true... When categorising fetal rate pattern features in to reassuring, non-reassuring and abnormal: a ... 2 cm is abnormal c a cardiotocograph showing no accelerations over a period of 40 minutes is abno rmal d absent end diastolic ...
Girls with irregular sleep patterns had decreased HDL-c levels (OR = 0.71, 95%CI [0.55-0.91]; p = 0.009). Recommended sleep ... Logistic regression analysis showed that boys who meet recommended duration of sleep had a decreased risk of elevated blood ... Body mass index. DBP:. Diastolic blood pressure. HDL-c:. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol ... Best Pr Res Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2010;24:731-43. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.beem.2010.07.001.Sleep. ...
... diastolic blood pressure (P = 0·010), body weight (P = 0·002), BMI (P = 0·006), waist and hip circumferences (P , 0·01), fat ... Dietary pattern-specific prevalence ratios (PR) of CVD risk factors were assessed adjusting for confounders with or without BMI ... In fully adjusted models (adjusting for age, current smoking, BMI, waist:hip ratio, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood ... In models adjusted for age, sex, race, fasting blood glucose, blood pressure, adiposity, hypertension and diabetes status, mean ...
For meta-analyses of randomised controlled trials, outcomes were limited to systolic and diastolic blood pressure, total ... A third researcher, PR, arbitrated any differences that could not be resolved by consensus. We also performed a manual search ... A similar pattern was seen in stratification by smoking for coffee consumption and mortality from cancer in the recent meta- ... Our summation of the existing body of evidence should therefore be viewed in this context and suggests that the association of ...
Insufficient blood flow may be evident by low blood pressure, high blood lactate, or low urine output. Septic shock is low ... A target tidal volume of 6 mL/kg of predicted body weight (PBW) and a plateau pressure less than 30 cm H2O is recommended for ... These PAMPs are recognized by the pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) of the innate immune system, which may be membrane-bound ... Invariably, the association of a PAMP and a PRR will cause a series of intracellular signalling cascades. Consequentially, ...
  • In the third or fourth decade of life, later symptoms in patients with an ASD that is not closed include congestive heart failure (CHF), fatigue, dyspnea on exertion, recurrent pulmonary infections, increased pulmonary blood flow, pulmonary vascular disease, atrial arrhythmias, thrombosis of large pulmonary arteries, and strokes from paradoxical embolism. (renalandurologynews.com)
  • P=0.001) and 6 months (-7.0+/-6.5 vs. -3.2+/-5.6 percent of body weight, P=0.02), but the difference at 12 months was not significant (-4.4+/-6.7 vs. -2.5+/-6.3 percent of body weight, P=0.26). (rebirthofreason.com)
  • A presented rare iatrogenic acute caffeine poisoning occured due to massive absorption of caffeine from the subcutaneous adipose tissue into the circulation when injected directly into the tiny blood vessels, as evidenced by hematoma formation. (statescale.cf)
  • This means that it does not have sensory nerve cells that are activated by chemicals, but only pressure-sensitive nerve endings, that stimulate reflex mechanisms that allow the body to adapt to changes in blood pressure by dilating or constricting the blood vessels. (medirabbit.com)
  • Later work by medical researchers Schmorl and Junghans, and many more who followed, verified the complex role of the "vertebral motor unit," consisting of bones, muscles, ligaments, blood vessels, and nerves. (healthy.net)
  • Normally when someone stands up, processes regulated by the autonomic nervous system make the heart beat faster and the blood vessels narrow, which increases blood pressure and blood flow in the body to compensate for gravity's effect on blood movement. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Certain medications can also contribute to non-neurogenic orthostatic hypotension, such as antipsychotic or antidepressant drugs, drugs that treat high blood pressure by widening blood vessels (vasodilators), or drugs that help remove water and salt from the body (diuretics). (medlineplus.gov)
  • Other potential causes of similar signs and symptoms include anaphylaxis, adrenal insufficiency, low blood volume, heart failure, and pulmonary embolism, among others. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mitral, tricuspid, and pulmonary flow variation and superior vena caval flow pattern showing decrease in forward flow in inspiration, reflecting Kussmaul sign. (ahajournals.org)
  • The left and right pulmonary veins, that bring oxygenated blood from the lungs, open together into the cavity, on the dorsal side of the left auricle. (medirabbit.com)
  • It can detect heart failure, emphysema, the possible presence of pulmonary edema, the vascular pattern, the presence of abscesses or neoplasia (e.g. thymoma, lung cancer), and other medical conditions. (medirabbit.com)
  • Pulmonary embolism (blood clots to the lungs) is not seen either, and require additional study. (medirabbit.com)
  • A clinical population of 331 untreated hypertensive Italians was used as a test series to verify distribution of LV geometric pattern according to traditional or new criteria. (ahajournals.org)
  • Yet, schools are also frequently viewed as a prime venue grade students participating in WRTC for the first time, with par- for interventions aimed at reversing the trends in physical inactiv- ticular interest in the program's effect on overweight (85th-94th ity and obesity (7,8), with growing evidence of the effectiveness body mass index percentile) or obese (95th percentile) students. (cdc.gov)
  • The objective of the present study was to evaluate, over the long term, all-cause and cause-specific mortality in older subjects who had high blood pressure and who participated in randomized controlled trials that included the TM program and other behavioral stress-decreasing interventions. (kanker-actueel.nl)
  • Patient data were pooled from 2 published randomized controlled trials that compared TM, other behavioral interventions, and usual therapy for high blood pressure. (kanker-actueel.nl)
  • statistics Do activated to analogs between Neural and Diastolic interventions. (memphisinspector.com)
  • In order to evaluate the role of the hyperparathyroid state for blood pressure and volume homeostasis, eight patients with primary hyperparathyroidism were studied before and after corrective surgery. (biomedsearch.com)
  • In the subgroup of patients with diabetes, inverse associations between NT-proBNP levels and body mass index or body composition were not observed. (biomedcentral.com)
  • In the very young, old, and people with a weakened immune system, there may be no symptoms of a specific infection and the body temperature may be low or normal, rather than high. (wikipedia.org)
  • In addition to symptoms related to the provoking cause, sepsis is frequently associated with either fever, low body temperature, rapid breathing, elevated heart rate, confusion, and edema. (wikipedia.org)
  • These works by blocking the effects of histamine, a substance in the body that causes allergy symptoms. (statescale.cf)
  • When signs and symptoms of orthostatic hypotension do occur, they are usually the result of a reduction in blood flow (hypoperfusion) to tissues, particularly the brain. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Light to moderate alcohol use (one to two drinks per day) reduces the risk of having the type of stroke that is caused by a clot in the blood vessel (ischemic stroke), but increases the risk of having the type of stroke caused by a broken blood vessel (hemorrhagic stroke). (webmd.com)
  • Increases in diastolic pressure during ischaemia were smaller and the recovery of developed pressure during reperfusion was generic viagra name greater in the chronically hypoxic group than in the normoxic group. (beervague.site)
  • Assisted technique pregnancy, such as IVF - Using assistive technologies, such as in vitro fertilization, during the conception process also increases the risk of high blood pressure in a pregnant woman, according to a study published in the Journal of Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine . (top10homeremedies.com)
  • Neurogenic orthostatic hypotension often occurs along with nervous system disorders such as Parkinson disease , dementia with Lewy bodies , multiple system atrophy , pure autonomic failure, diabetes, Guillain-Barré syndrome , dopamine beta-hydroxylase deficiency , or infections that cause disturbances in nerve function (neuropathy). (medlineplus.gov)
  • Thus, we performed a study with the aim to analyse the choices and consumption of foods among elderly Italian individuals and to investigated the association between their dietary patterns and cognitive function. (biomedcentral.com)
  • A few studies examining foods and dietary patterns suggested a beneficial effect of a diet rich in fruit and vegetables on pre-eclampsia, although not all the results were statistically significant. (biomedcentral.com)
  • As a dietitian, she is interested in dietary patterns and whole foods. (annals.org)
  • In addition to sodium intake, potassium intake, weight, and alcohol consumption, other diet-related factors likely affect blood pressure. (ahajournals.org)
  • In addition, dietary modifications and the importance of regular exercise, taking medications regularly, weight loss, and avoiding medications and foods that can potentially elevate blood pressure should be emphasized. (medscape.com)
  • The results of that review were published in the 2010 DGACs, in Nutrition Reviews (Slavin J. Beverages and body weight: challenges in the evidence-based review process of the Carbohydrate Subcommittee from the 2010 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee. (annals.org)
  • A total of 25 studies were located with 12 focusing on body weight and diet quality. (frontiersin.org)
  • There was emerging evidence suggestive of benefits for body weight, improved markers of metabolic health, blood pressure, and reduced risk of type 2 diabetes. (frontiersin.org)
  • v.) administered through the caudal vein with a sterile PBS solution (1 mL/100 g of body weight) or ALS (1 mL/100 g of body weight). (thrombininhibitors.com)
  • The Clinique La Prairie Weight Management Program offers a multidisciplinary approach with the assistance of a nutritionist, dietician, personal fitness trainer, psychologist, massage therapist and aesthetician. (losebellyfatforwomen.co.uk)
  • The trajectory of changes in body weight among total participants is shown in S1 Fig. (losebellyfatforwomen.co.uk)
  • Participants were randomized to rehydrate with an electrolyzed, high-pH (alkaline) water or standard water of equal volume (2% body weight) and assessed for an additional 2-h recovery period following exercise in order to assess any potential variations in measured parameters. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Finally, blood pressure measurement, complete dietary records and parent-reported height and weight were obtained for 223 boys and 194 girls. (biomedcentral.com)
  • At 24 h after the treatments, blood was collected to measure biochemical and hematological markers of tissue damage. (thrombininhibitors.com)
  • For the coagulation and hematological assays, the blood samples were collected in 1:10 (v/v) 3.8% trisodium citrate (Merck, Darmstadt, Germany) or 1:16 HIF inhibitor (v/v) 10% Na2-EDTA (Merck, Darmstadt, Germany), respectively, while for the biochemical assays, no anticoagulants were used. (thrombininhibitors.com)
  • Immunological and biochemical characterization of the keratin-related component of Mallory bodies: a pathological pattern of hepatocytic cytokeratins. (beervague.site)
  • Severe sepsis is sepsis causing poor organ function or insufficient blood flow. (wikipedia.org)
  • Normally, the body quickly counteracts the force of gravity and maintains stable blood pressure and blood flow. (medlineplus.gov)
  • This causes a dilation of the ocular capillaries, increasing the blood flow through the eyes and causing them to turn red. (thehbpsolution.com)
  • METHODS: We measured pain, blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR) and skin blood flow (BF) during and after controlled low-grade cognitive stress in 22 migraineurs during headache-free periods, 18 patients with tension-type headache (TTH) and 44 healthy controls. (biomedsearch.com)
  • In the present study, the authors hypothesized that either the α-receptor agonist phenylephrine or the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor L-NMMA may alter the choroidal blood flow response during a transition from light to dark. (arvojournals.org)
  • Neither phenylephrine nor placebo altered basal choroidal blood flow or choroidal blood flow responses to the light/dark transitions. (arvojournals.org)
  • The present study indicates that NO plays a role in the choroidal blood flow decrease during a transition from light to dark. (arvojournals.org)
  • 2 We have shown in an earlier study that there is evidence for a neural mechanism behind this effect, 3 but neither β-receptor blockade with propranolol nor muscarinic receptor blockade with atropine altered the response of choroidal blood flow to a light/dark transition. (arvojournals.org)
  • Nitric oxide (NO) is a major determinant of choroidal blood flow, as evidenced from numerous animal and human studies. (arvojournals.org)
  • In the present study, we hypothesized that NO may also be involved in the choroidal blood flow response to light/dark transitions. (arvojournals.org)
  • Signs of established sepsis include confusion, metabolic acidosis (which may be accompanied by faster breathing and lead to a respiratory alkalosis), low blood pressure due to decreased systemic vascular resistance, higher cardiac output, and dysfunctions of blood coagulation (where clotting may lead to organ failure). (wikipedia.org)
  • If the pumping ability of the left ventricle is reduced the volume of the left atrium will increase due to the excessive filling of blood. (google.com)
  • Investigations revealed the white blood cell count to be 14 600 cells/mL with a left shift. (ahajournals.org)
  • On the dorsoventral film, the body of the canine left atrium lies immediately caudal to the hilus between the two caudal mainstem bronchi. (vin.com)
  • When the left atrium is enlarged, the body of the left atrium may displace the left mainstem bronchus cranially, giving a bow-legged cowboy appearance to the mainstem bronchi. (vin.com)
  • Variability in border limits criteria, left ventricular mass formulas, body size indexing and other adjustments affects the comparability among these studies and may influence both the clinical and epidemiologic use of echocardiography in the investigation of the left ventricular structure. (biomedcentral.com)
  • c. and wherein said measured acceleration forms a pattern indicative of global dyssynchrony of the left ventricle. (patentsencyclopedia.com)
  • 196-hour 'forced desynchrony' (forcing a sleep/wake cycle to conflict with participants' normal pattern) consisting of recurring 28-hour sleep/wake cycles with 18 hours, 40 minutes awake and 9 hours, 20 minutes asleep. (prnewswire.com)
  • For 8 weeks, participants were randomly assigned to a control diet or the DASH eating pattern. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Participants are randomly allocated to be treated with LPS or a placebo (dummy drug) over 2 days, undergo a series of pain tests and provide blood samples. (isrctn.com)
  • Methods- The distribution of baseline measures of P-wave terminal force, P-wave duration, P-wave area, and PR duration (referred to as AF predictors) were compared by ethnicity in 15 429 participants (27% black) from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study by unpaired t test, χ 2 , and logistic-regression analysis, as appropriate. (ahajournals.org)
  • Early signs are a rapid heart rate, decreased urination, and high blood sugar. (wikipedia.org)
  • The rhythm of the heart is set by a small region of cardiac muscle cells in the right atrium called the sinoatrial (SA) node that acts as a spontaneous pacemaker, but is under the control of nerves and circulating hormones that affect the heart rate via a host of control circuits that maintain adequate blood pressure and oxygenation. (scholarpedia.org)
  • De studie volgde 18 jaar lang 202 volwassenen zowel mannen als vrouwen, vanaf 55 jaar oud en gemiddelde leeftijd 71 jaar, met een mild verhoogde bloeddruk bij aanvang van de studie. (kanker-actueel.nl)