Intubation, Intratracheal: A procedure involving placement of a tube into the trachea through the mouth or nose in order to provide a patient with oxygen and anesthesia.Intubation: Introduction of a tube into a hollow organ to restore or maintain patency if obstructed. It is differentiated from CATHETERIZATION in that the insertion of a catheter is usually performed for the introducing or withdrawing of fluids from the body.Laryngoscopy: Examination, therapy or surgery of the interior of the larynx performed with a specially designed endoscope.Laryngoscopes: Endoscopes for examining the interior of the larynx.Intubation, Gastrointestinal: The insertion of a tube into the stomach, intestines, or other portion of the gastrointestinal tract to allow for the passage of food products, etc.Laryngeal Masks: A type of oropharyngeal airway that provides an alternative to endotracheal intubation and standard mask anesthesia in certain patients. It is introduced into the hypopharynx to form a seal around the larynx thus permitting spontaneous or positive pressure ventilation without penetration of the larynx or esophagus. It is used in place of a facemask in routine anesthesia. The advantages over standard mask anesthesia are better airway control, minimal anesthetic gas leakage, a secure airway during patient transport to the recovery area, and minimal postoperative problems.Anesthesia, General: Procedure in which patients are induced into an unconscious state through use of various medications so that they do not feel pain during surgery.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Device Approval: Process that is gone through in order for a device to receive approval by a government regulatory agency. This includes any required preclinical or clinical testing, review, submission, and evaluation of the applications and test results, and post-marketing surveillance. It is not restricted to FDA.Disposable Equipment: Apparatus, devices, or supplies intended for one-time or temporary use.ManikinsSuccinylcholine: A quaternary skeletal muscle relaxant usually used in the form of its bromide, chloride, or iodide. It is a depolarizing relaxant, acting in about 30 seconds and with a duration of effect averaging three to five minutes. Succinylcholine is used in surgical, anesthetic, and other procedures in which a brief period of muscle relaxation is called for.Androstanols: Androstanes and androstane derivatives which are substituted in any position with one or more hydroxyl groups.Anesthesiology: A specialty concerned with the study of anesthetics and anesthesia.Cricoid Cartilage: The small thick cartilage that forms the lower and posterior parts of the laryngeal wall.Anesthetics, Intravenous: Ultrashort-acting anesthetics that are used for induction. Loss of consciousness is rapid and induction is pleasant, but there is no muscle relaxation and reflexes frequently are not reduced adequately. Repeated administration results in accumulation and prolongs the recovery time. Since these agents have little if any analgesic activity, they are seldom used alone except in brief minor procedures. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p174)Neuromuscular Nondepolarizing Agents: Drugs that interrupt transmission at the skeletal neuromuscular junction without causing depolarization of the motor end plate. They prevent acetylcholine from triggering muscle contraction and are used as muscle relaxants during electroshock treatments, in convulsive states, and as anesthesia adjuvants.Airway Obstruction: Any hindrance to the passage of air into and out of the lungs.Device Removal: Removal of an implanted therapeutic or prosthetic device.Anesthesia, IntratrachealRespiration, Artificial: Any method of artificial breathing that employs mechanical or non-mechanical means to force the air into and out of the lungs. Artificial respiration or ventilation is used in individuals who have stopped breathing or have RESPIRATORY INSUFFICIENCY to increase their intake of oxygen (O2) and excretion of carbon dioxide (CO2).Intrauterine Devices: Contraceptive devices placed high in the uterine fundus.Laryngeal Edema: Abnormal accumulation of fluid in tissues of any part of the LARYNX, commonly associated with laryngeal injuries and allergic reactions.Larynx: A tubular organ of VOICE production. It is located in the anterior neck, superior to the TRACHEA and inferior to the tongue and HYOID BONE.Tracheostomy: Surgical formation of an opening into the trachea through the neck, or the opening so created.Thiopental: A barbiturate that is administered intravenously for the induction of general anesthesia or for the production of complete anesthesia of short duration.Anesthesia, Inhalation: Anesthesia caused by the breathing of anesthetic gases or vapors or by insufflating anesthetic gases or vapors into the respiratory tract.Equipment Safety: Freedom of equipment from actual or potential hazards.Respiratory Insufficiency: Failure to adequately provide oxygen to cells of the body and to remove excess carbon dioxide from them. (Stedman, 25th ed)Propofol: An intravenous anesthetic agent which has the advantage of a very rapid onset after infusion or bolus injection plus a very short recovery period of a couple of minutes. (From Smith and Reynard, Textbook of Pharmacology, 1992, 1st ed, p206). Propofol has been used as ANTICONVULSANTS and ANTIEMETICS.Nasolacrimal Duct: A tubular duct that conveys TEARS from the LACRIMAL GLAND to the nose.Video Recording: The storing or preserving of video signals for television to be played back later via a transmitter or receiver. Recordings may be made on magnetic tape or discs (VIDEODISC RECORDING).Tracheal StenosisNeuromuscular Depolarizing Agents: Drugs that interrupt transmission at the skeletal neuromuscular junction by causing sustained depolarization of the motor end plate. These agents are primarily used as adjuvants in surgical anesthesia to cause skeletal muscle relaxation.Preanesthetic Medication: Drugs administered before an anesthetic to decrease a patient's anxiety and control the effects of that anesthetic.Anesthetics, Combined: The use of two or more chemicals simultaneously or sequentially to induce anesthesia. The drugs need not be in the same dosage form.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Glottis: The vocal apparatus of the larynx, situated in the middle section of the larynx. Glottis consists of the VOCAL FOLDS and an opening (rima glottidis) between the folds.Equipment and Supplies: Expendable and nonexpendable equipment, supplies, apparatus, and instruments that are used in diagnostic, surgical, therapeutic, scientific, and experimental procedures.Colonoscopes: Specially designed endoscopes for visualizing the interior surface of the colon.Lacrimal Duct Obstruction: Interference with the secretion of tears by the lacrimal glands. Obstruction of the LACRIMAL SAC or NASOLACRIMAL DUCT causing acute or chronic inflammation of the lacrimal sac (DACRYOCYSTITIS). It is caused also in infants by failure of the nasolacrimal duct to open into the inferior meatus and occurs about the third week of life. In adults occlusion may occur spontaneously or after injury or nasal disease. (Newell, Ophthalmology: Principles and Concepts, 7th ed, p250)Anesthesia: A state characterized by loss of feeling or sensation. This depression of nerve function is usually the result of pharmacologic action and is induced to allow performance of surgery or other painful procedures.Methyl Ethers: A group of compounds that contain the general formula R-OCH3.Bronchoscopes: Endoscopes for the visualization of the interior of the bronchi.Fentanyl: A potent narcotic analgesic, abuse of which leads to habituation or addiction. It is primarily a mu-opioid agonist. Fentanyl is also used as an adjunct to general anesthetics, and as an anesthetic for induction and maintenance. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1078)Neuromuscular Blockade: The intentional interruption of transmission at the NEUROMUSCULAR JUNCTION by external agents, usually neuromuscular blocking agents. It is distinguished from NERVE BLOCK in which nerve conduction (NEURAL CONDUCTION) is interrupted rather than neuromuscular transmission. Neuromuscular blockade is commonly used to produce MUSCLE RELAXATION as an adjunct to anesthesia during surgery and other medical procedures. It is also often used as an experimental manipulation in basic research. It is not strictly speaking anesthesia but is grouped here with anesthetic techniques. The failure of neuromuscular transmission as a result of pathological processes is not included here.Emergency Medical Services: Services specifically designed, staffed, and equipped for the emergency care of patients.Immobilization: The restriction of the MOVEMENT of whole or part of the body by physical means (RESTRAINT, PHYSICAL) or chemically by ANALGESIA, or the use of TRANQUILIZING AGENTS or NEUROMUSCULAR NONDEPOLARIZING AGENTS. It includes experimental protocols used to evaluate the physiologic effects of immobility.Delivery Rooms: Hospital units equipped for childbirth.Alfentanil: A short-acting opioid anesthetic and analgesic derivative of FENTANYL. It produces an early peak analgesic effect and fast recovery of consciousness. Alfentanil is effective as an anesthetic during surgery, for supplementation of analgesia during surgical procedures, and as an analgesic for critically ill patients.Epiglottis: A thin leaf-shaped cartilage that is covered with LARYNGEAL MUCOSA and situated posterior to the root of the tongue and HYOID BONE. During swallowing, the epiglottis folds back over the larynx inlet thus prevents foods from entering the airway.Tracheal DiseasesAnesthesia, Intravenous: Process of administering an anesthetic through injection directly into the bloodstream.Septal Occluder Device: A CATHETER-delivered implant used for closing abnormal holes in the cardiovascular system, especially HEART SEPTAL DEFECTS; or passageways intentionally made during cardiovascular surgical procedures.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Hoarseness: An unnaturally deep or rough quality of voice.Video-Assisted Surgery: Endoscopic surgical procedures performed with visualization via video transmission. When real-time video is combined interactively with prior CT scans or MRI images, this is called image-guided surgery (see SURGERY, COMPUTER-ASSISTED).Bronchoscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the bronchi.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Monitoring, Intraoperative: The constant checking on the state or condition of a patient during the course of a surgical operation (e.g., checking of vital signs).Emergency Medicine: The branch of medicine concerned with the evaluation and initial treatment of urgent and emergent medical problems, such as those caused by accidents, trauma, sudden illness, poisoning, or disasters. Emergency medical care can be provided at the hospital or at sites outside the medical facility.Microfluidic Analytical Techniques: Methods utilizing the principles of MICROFLUIDICS for sample handling, reagent mixing, and separation and detection of specific components in fluids.Epistaxis: Bleeding from the nose.Premedication: Preliminary administration of a drug preceding a diagnostic, therapeutic, or surgical procedure. The commonest types of premedication are antibiotics (ANTIBIOTIC PROPHYLAXIS) and anti-anxiety agents. It does not include PREANESTHETIC MEDICATION.Anesthetics, Inhalation: Gases or volatile liquids that vary in the rate at which they induce anesthesia; potency; the degree of circulation, respiratory, or neuromuscular depression they produce; and analgesic effects. Inhalation anesthetics have advantages over intravenous agents in that the depth of anesthesia can be changed rapidly by altering the inhaled concentration. Because of their rapid elimination, any postoperative respiratory depression is of relatively short duration. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p173)Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Trachea: The cartilaginous and membranous tube descending from the larynx and branching into the right and left main bronchi.Neuromuscular Blocking Agents: Drugs that interrupt transmission of nerve impulses at the skeletal neuromuscular junction. They can be of two types, competitive, stabilizing blockers (NEUROMUSCULAR NONDEPOLARIZING AGENTS) or noncompetitive, depolarizing agents (NEUROMUSCULAR DEPOLARIZING AGENTS). Both prevent acetylcholine from triggering the muscle contraction and they are used as anesthesia adjuvants, as relaxants during electroshock, in convulsive states, etc.Pneumonia, Aspiration: A type of lung inflammation resulting from the aspiration of food, liquid, or gastric contents into the upper RESPIRATORY TRACT.Arytenoid Cartilage: One of a pair of small pyramidal cartilages that articulate with the lamina of the CRICOID CARTILAGE. The corresponding VOCAL LIGAMENT and several muscles are attached to it.Lidocaine: A local anesthetic and cardiac depressant used as an antiarrhythmia agent. Its actions are more intense and its effects more prolonged than those of PROCAINE but its duration of action is shorter than that of BUPIVACAINE or PRILOCAINE.Self-Help Devices: Devices, not affixed to the body, designed to help persons having musculoskeletal or neuromuscular disabilities to perform activities involving movement.Masks: Devices that cover the nose and mouth to maintain aseptic conditions or to administer inhaled anesthetics or other gases. (UMDNS, 1999)Adjuvants, Anesthesia: Agents that are administered in association with anesthetics to increase effectiveness, improve delivery, or decrease required dosage.Intraoperative Complications: Complications that affect patients during surgery. They may or may not be associated with the disease for which the surgery is done, or within the same surgical procedure.Conscious Sedation: A drug-induced depression of consciousness during which patients respond purposefully to verbal commands, either alone or accompanied by light tactile stimulation. No interventions are required to maintain a patent airway. (From: American Society of Anesthesiologists Practice Guidelines)Heart Rate: The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.Hypnotics and Sedatives: Drugs used to induce drowsiness or sleep or to reduce psychological excitement or anxiety.Capnography: Continuous recording of the carbon dioxide content of expired air.Equipment Failure: Failure of equipment to perform to standard. The failure may be due to defects or improper use.Tracheotomy: Surgical incision of the trachea.Positive-Pressure Respiration: A method of mechanical ventilation in which pressure is maintained to increase the volume of gas remaining in the lungs at the end of expiration, thus reducing the shunting of blood through the lungs and improving gas exchange.Etomidate: Imidazole derivative anesthetic and hypnotic with little effect on blood gases, ventilation, or the cardiovascular system. It has been proposed as an induction anesthetic.Chin: The anatomical frontal portion of the mandible, also known as the mentum, that contains the line of fusion of the two separate halves of the mandible (symphysis menti). This line of fusion divides inferiorly to enclose a triangular area called the mental protuberance. On each side, inferior to the second premolar tooth, is the mental foramen for the passage of blood vessels and a nerve.Piperidines: A family of hexahydropyridines.Bronchial Spasm: Spasmodic contraction of the smooth muscle of the bronchi.Emergency Medical Technicians: Paramedical personnel trained to provide basic emergency care and life support under the supervision of physicians and/or nurses. These services may be carried out at the site of the emergency, in the ambulance, or in a health care institution.Cervical Vertebrae: The first seven VERTEBRAE of the SPINAL COLUMN, which correspond to the VERTEBRAE of the NECK.Manubrium: The upper or most anterior segment of the STERNUM which articulates with the CLAVICLE and first two pairs of RIBS.Prostheses and Implants: Artificial substitutes for body parts, and materials inserted into tissue for functional, cosmetic, or therapeutic purposes. Prostheses can be functional, as in the case of artificial arms and legs, or cosmetic, as in the case of an artificial eye. Implants, all surgically inserted or grafted into the body, tend to be used therapeutically. IMPLANTS, EXPERIMENTAL is available for those used experimentally.Optical Devices: Products or parts of products used to detect, manipulate, or analyze light, such as LENSES, refractors, mirrors, filters, prisms, and OPTICAL FIBERS.Nasal Cavity: The proximal portion of the respiratory passages on either side of the NASAL SEPTUM. Nasal cavities, extending from the nares to the NASOPHARYNX, are lined with ciliated NASAL MUCOSA.Hemodynamics: The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Intrauterine Devices, Copper: Intrauterine contraceptive devices that depend on the release of metallic copper.Anesthesia, Obstetrical: A variety of anesthetic methods such as EPIDURAL ANESTHESIA used to control the pain of childbirth.Equipment Failure Analysis: The evaluation of incidents involving the loss of function of a device. These evaluations are used for a variety of purposes such as to determine the failure rates, the causes of failures, costs of failures, and the reliability and maintainability of devices.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Lacrimal Apparatus Diseases: Diseases of the lacrimal apparatus.Silicones: A broad family of synthetic organosiloxane polymers containing a repeating silicon-oxygen backbone with organic side groups attached via carbon-silicon bonds. Depending on their structure, they are classified as liquids, gels, and elastomers. (From Merck Index, 12th ed)Respiratory Care Units: The hospital unit in which patients with respiratory conditions requiring special attention receive intensive medical care and surveillance.Dacryocystorhinostomy: Surgical fistulization of the LACRIMAL SAC for external drainage of an obstructed nasolacrimal duct.Laryngeal Diseases: Pathological processes involving any part of the LARYNX which coordinates many functions such as voice production, breathing, swallowing, and coughing.Blood Pressure: PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.Vecuronium Bromide: Monoquaternary homolog of PANCURONIUM. A non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking agent with shorter duration of action than pancuronium. Its lack of significant cardiovascular effects and lack of dependence on good kidney function for elimination as well as its short duration of action and easy reversibility provide advantages over, or alternatives to, other established neuromuscular blocking agents.Air Ambulances: Fixed-wing aircraft or helicopters equipped for air transport of patients.Single-Blind Method: A method in which either the observer(s) or the subject(s) is kept ignorant of the group to which the subjects are assigned.Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Atracurium: A non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking agent with short duration of action. Its lack of significant cardiovascular effects and its lack of dependence on good kidney function for elimination provide clinical advantage over alternate non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking agents.Esophagus: The muscular membranous segment between the PHARYNX and the STOMACH in the UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.Emergencies: Situations or conditions requiring immediate intervention to avoid serious adverse results.Neck: The part of a human or animal body connecting the HEAD to the rest of the body.Nitrous Oxide: Nitrogen oxide (N2O). A colorless, odorless gas that is used as an anesthetic and analgesic. High concentrations cause a narcotic effect and may replace oxygen, causing death by asphyxia. It is also used as a food aerosol in the preparation of whipping cream.Anesthesia, Dental: A range of methods used to reduce pain and anxiety during dental procedures.Laryngostenosis: Developmental or acquired stricture or narrowing of the LARYNX. Symptoms of respiratory difficulty depend on the degree of laryngeal narrowing.Dexmedetomidine: A imidazole derivative that is an agonist of ADRENERGIC ALPHA-2 RECEPTORS. It is closely-related to MEDETOMIDINE, which is the racemic form of this compound.Critical Care: Health care provided to a critically ill patient during a medical emergency or crisis.Anesthesia Recovery Period: The period of emergence from general anesthesia, where different elements of consciousness return at different rates.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Pneumothorax: An accumulation of air or gas in the PLEURAL CAVITY, which may occur spontaneously or as a result of trauma or a pathological process. The gas may also be introduced deliberately during PNEUMOTHORAX, ARTIFICIAL.Vocal Cords: A pair of cone-shaped elastic mucous membrane projecting from the laryngeal wall and forming a narrow slit between them. Each contains a thickened free edge (vocal ligament) extending from the THYROID CARTILAGE to the ARYTENOID CARTILAGE, and a VOCAL MUSCLE that shortens or relaxes the vocal cord to control sound production.Pressure: A type of stress exerted uniformly in all directions. Its measure is the force exerted per unit area. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Status Asthmaticus: A sudden intense and continuous aggravation of a state of asthma, marked by dyspnea to the point of exhaustion and collapse and not responding to the usual therapeutic efforts.Intensive Care Units: Hospital units providing continuous surveillance and care to acutely ill patients.Thyroid Cartilage: The largest cartilage of the larynx consisting of two laminae fusing anteriorly at an acute angle in the midline of the neck. The point of fusion forms a subcutaneous projection known as the Adam's apple.Orthotic Devices: Apparatus used to support, align, prevent, or correct deformities or to improve the function of movable parts of the body.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Pharyngitis: Inflammation of the throat (PHARYNX).Analgesics, Opioid: Compounds with activity like OPIATE ALKALOIDS, acting at OPIOID RECEPTORS. Properties include induction of ANALGESIA or NARCOSIS.Oral Surgical Procedures: Surgical procedures used to treat disease, injuries, and defects of the oral and maxillofacial region.Colonoscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the luminal surface of the colon.Surgery, Oral: A dental specialty concerned with the diagnosis and surgical treatment of disease, injuries, and defects of the human oral and maxillofacial region.Lab-On-A-Chip Devices: Microdevices that combine microfluidics technology with electrical and/or mechanical functions for analyzing very small fluid volumes. They consist of microchannels etched into substrates made of silicon, glass, or polymer using processes similar to photolithography. The test fluids in the channels can then interact with different elements such as electrodes, photodetectors, chemical sensors, pumps, and valves.Mouth: The oval-shaped oral cavity located at the apex of the digestive tract and consisting of two parts: the vestibule and the oral cavity proper.Vocal Cord Paralysis: Congenital or acquired paralysis of one or both VOCAL CORDS. This condition is caused by defects in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, the VAGUS NERVE and branches of LARYNGEAL NERVES. Common symptoms are VOICE DISORDERS including HOARSENESS or APHONIA.Lacerations: Torn, ragged, mangled wounds.Anesthetics, Local: Drugs that block nerve conduction when applied locally to nerve tissue in appropriate concentrations. They act on any part of the nervous system and on every type of nerve fiber. In contact with a nerve trunk, these anesthetics can cause both sensory and motor paralysis in the innervated area. Their action is completely reversible. (From Gilman AG, et. al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed) Nearly all local anesthetics act by reducing the tendency of voltage-dependent sodium channels to activate.Medical Device Legislation: Laws and regulations pertaining to devices used in medicine, proposed for enactment, or enacted by a legislative body.United States Food and Drug Administration: An agency of the PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to maintaining standards of quality of foods, drugs, therapeutic devices, etc.Foreign Bodies: Inanimate objects that become enclosed in the body.Point-of-Care Systems: Laboratory and other services provided to patients at the bedside. These include diagnostic and laboratory testing using automated information entry.Airway Extubation: Removal of an endotracheal tube from the patient.Anesthesia, Local: A blocking of nerve conduction to a specific area by an injection of an anesthetic agent.Monitoring, Physiologic: The continuous measurement of physiological processes, blood pressure, heart rate, renal output, reflexes, respiration, etc., in a patient or experimental animal; includes pharmacologic monitoring, the measurement of administered drugs or their metabolites in the blood, tissues, or urine.Suction: The removal of secretions, gas or fluid from hollow or tubular organs or cavities by means of a tube and a device that acts on negative pressure.Resuscitation: The restoration to life or consciousness of one apparently dead. (Dorland, 27th ed)Numismatics: Study of coins, tokens, medals, etc. However, it usually refers to medals pertaining to the history of medicine.Maxillofacial Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the face and jaw (either upper, lower, or both).Intrauterine Devices, Medicated: Intrauterine devices that release contraceptive agents.gamma-Cyclodextrins: Cyclic GLUCANS consisting of eight (8) glucopyranose units linked by 1,4-glycosidic bonds.Laboratory Animal Science: The science and technology dealing with the procurement, breeding, care, health, and selection of animals used in biomedical research and testing.Fluoroscopy: Production of an image when x-rays strike a fluorescent screen.Surgical Equipment: Nonexpendable apparatus used during surgical procedures. They are differentiated from SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS, usually hand-held and used in the immediate operative field.Internship and Residency: Programs of training in medicine and medical specialties offered by hospitals for graduates of medicine to meet the requirements established by accrediting authorities.Isoflurane: A stable, non-explosive inhalation anesthetic, relatively free from significant side effects.Silicone Elastomers: Polymers of silicone that are formed by crosslinking and treatment with amorphous silica to increase strength. They have properties similar to vulcanized natural rubber, in that they stretch under tension, retract rapidly, and fully recover to their original dimensions upon release. They are used in the encapsulation of surgical membranes and implants.Ventilators, Mechanical: Mechanical devices used to produce or assist pulmonary ventilation.Intensive Care: Advanced and highly specialized care provided to medical or surgical patients whose conditions are life-threatening and require comprehensive care and constant monitoring. It is usually administered in specially equipped units of a health care facility.Dilatation: The act of dilating.Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of prostheses in general or a specific prosthesis.Treatment Failure: A measure of the quality of health care by assessment of unsuccessful results of management and procedures used in combating disease, in individual cases or series.Microfluidics: The study of fluid channels and chambers of tiny dimensions of tens to hundreds of micrometers and volumes of nanoliters or picoliters. This is of interest in biological MICROCIRCULATION and used in MICROCHEMISTRY and INVESTIGATIVE TECHNIQUES.Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of a prosthesis.Emergency Treatment: First aid or other immediate intervention for accidents or medical conditions requiring immediate care and treatment before definitive medical and surgical management can be procured.Laryngopharyngeal Reflux: Back flow of gastric contents to the LARYNGOPHARYNX where it comes in contact with tissues of the upper aerodigestive tract. Laryngopharyngeal reflux is an extraesophageal manifestation of GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX.Electronics: The study, control, and application of the conduction of ELECTRICITY through gases or vacuum, or through semiconducting or conducting materials. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Pulmonary Atelectasis: Absence of air in the entire or part of a lung, such as an incompletely inflated neonate lung or a collapsed adult lung. Pulmonary atelectasis can be caused by airway obstruction, lung compression, fibrotic contraction, or other factors.Oxygen: An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight [15.99903; 15.99977]. It is the most abundant element on earth and essential for respiration.Embolic Protection Devices: Vascular filters or occlusive devices that provide mechanical protection of the distal end organ from blood clots or EMBOLISM-causing debri dislodged during ENDOVASCULAR PROCEDURES.Hemostatic Techniques: Techniques for controlling bleeding.Methohexital: An intravenous anesthetic with a short duration of action that may be used for induction of anesthesia.Dimethylpolysiloxanes: Silicone polymers which consist of silicon atoms substituted with methyl groups and linked by oxygen atoms. They comprise a series of biocompatible materials used as liquids, gels or solids; as film for artificial membranes, gels for implants, and liquids for drug vehicles; and as antifoaming agents.Protective Devices: Devices designed to provide personal protection against injury to individuals exposed to hazards in industry, sports, aviation, or daily activities.Adrenergic beta-1 Receptor Antagonists: Drugs that bind to and block the activation of ADRENERGIC BETA-1 RECEPTORS.Midazolam: A short-acting hypnotic-sedative drug with anxiolytic and amnestic properties. It is used in dentistry, cardiac surgery, endoscopic procedures, as preanesthetic medication, and as an adjunct to local anesthesia. The short duration and cardiorespiratory stability makes it useful in poor-risk, elderly, and cardiac patients. It is water-soluble at pH less than 4 and lipid-soluble at physiological pH.Operating Rooms: Facilities equipped for performing surgery.Consciousness Monitors: Devices used to assess the level of consciousness especially during anesthesia. They measure brain activity level based on the EEG.Apnea: A transient absence of spontaneous respiration.Glycopyrrolate: A muscarinic antagonist used as an antispasmodic, in some disorders of the gastrointestinal tract, and to reduce salivation with some anesthetics.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Ventilator Weaning: Techniques for effecting the transition of the respiratory-failure patient from mechanical ventilation to spontaneous ventilation, while meeting the criteria that tidal volume be above a given threshold (greater than 5 ml/kg), respiratory frequency be below a given count (less than 30 breaths/min), and oxygen partial pressure be above a given threshold (PaO2 greater than 50mm Hg). Weaning studies focus on finding methods to monitor and predict the outcome of mechanical ventilator weaning as well as finding ventilatory support techniques which will facilitate successful weaning. Present methods include intermittent mandatory ventilation, intermittent positive pressure ventilation, and mandatory minute volume ventilation.Oxygen Inhalation Therapy: Inhalation of oxygen aimed at restoring toward normal any pathophysiologic alterations of gas exchange in the cardiopulmonary system, as by the use of a respirator, nasal catheter, tent, chamber, or mask. (From Dorland, 27th ed & Stedman, 25th ed)Sufentanil: An opioid analgesic that is used as an adjunct in anesthesia, in balanced anesthesia, and as a primary anesthetic agent.Nose: A part of the upper respiratory tract. It contains the organ of SMELL. The term includes the external nose, the nasal cavity, and the PARANASAL SINUSES.Miniaturization: The design or construction of objects greatly reduced in scale.Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Catheterization: Use or insertion of a tubular device into a duct, blood vessel, hollow organ, or body cavity for injecting or withdrawing fluids for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. It differs from INTUBATION in that the tube here is used to restore or maintain patency in obstructions.Deglutition Disorders: Difficulty in SWALLOWING which may result from neuromuscular disorder or mechanical obstruction. Dysphagia is classified into two distinct types: oropharyngeal dysphagia due to malfunction of the PHARYNX and UPPER ESOPHAGEAL SPHINCTER; and esophageal dysphagia due to malfunction of the ESOPHAGUS.Tidal Volume: The volume of air inspired or expired during each normal, quiet respiratory cycle. Common abbreviations are TV or V with subscript T.Granuloma, Laryngeal: A tumor-like nodule or mass of inflammatory granulation tissue projecting into the lumen of the LARYNX.Carbon Dioxide: A colorless, odorless gas that can be formed by the body and is necessary for the respiration cycle of plants and animals.Respiratory Aspiration: Inhaling liquid or solids, such as stomach contents, into the RESPIRATORY TRACT. When this causes severe lung damage, it is called ASPIRATION PNEUMONIA.Cardiovascular Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the heart or blood vessels.Catheterization, Peripheral: Insertion of a catheter into a peripheral artery, vein, or airway for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes.Endoscopy: Procedures of applying ENDOSCOPES for disease diagnosis and treatment. Endoscopy involves passing an optical instrument through a small incision in the skin i.e., percutaneous; or through a natural orifice and along natural body pathways such as the digestive tract; and/or through an incision in the wall of a tubular structure or organ, i.e. transluminal, to examine or perform surgery on the interior parts of the body.EthersFeasibility Studies: Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.Pharynx: A funnel-shaped fibromuscular tube that conducts food to the ESOPHAGUS, and air to the LARYNX and LUNGS. It is located posterior to the NASAL CAVITY; ORAL CAVITY; and LARYNX, and extends from the SKULL BASE to the inferior border of the CRICOID CARTILAGE anteriorly and to the inferior border of the C6 vertebra posteriorly. It is divided into the NASOPHARYNX; OROPHARYNX; and HYPOPHARYNX (laryngopharynx).Noninvasive Ventilation: Techniques for administering artificial respiration without the need for INTRATRACHEAL INTUBATION.Thoracic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the thoracic organs, most commonly the lungs and the heart.Critical Illness: A disease or state in which death is possible or imminent.
... airway isolation devices, endotracheal intubation, end-tidal CO2 monitoring, external jugular vein cannulation, transcutaneous ... use of airway management techniques including oropharyngeal airways, oral suction devices and oxygen-supplemented mask devices ... The ITT practitioner also has adult ACLS guidelines and intubation in the event they encounter an adult cardiac arrest. Their ... intubation electrocardiogram acquisition initiation and maintenance of non-invasive positive pressure airway devices ...
The device functions as a bite block and a mechanical guide for transoral intubation, as it awakens intubations in ways that ... ROTIGS is a medical device that facilitates intubation. ROTIGS is an acronym for Rapid Oral Tracheal Intubation Guidance System ... The device does not rest on the tongue and does not cause gagging. By creating a gag free approach to the larynx, ROTIGS ... facilitates safe, awake, guided transoral intubation for the infrequent endoscopist.[citation needed] "ROTIGS Intubation Device ...
In these circumstances, endotracheal intubation is generally preferred. The most commonly used extraglottic device is the ... Extraglottic devices are another family of supraglottic devices that are inserted through the mouth to sit on top of the larynx ... Tracheal intubation, often simply referred to as intubation, is the placement of a flexible plastic or rubber tube into the ... In contrast to supraglottic devices, infraglottic devices create a conduit between the mouth, passing through the glottis, and ...
He also designed a simple device for blind tracheal intubation and paediatricendotracheal tube. (manufactured by Portex Ltd; ... He has also devised a simple device for teaching controlled ventilation of lungs. The device is helpful for training of young ... He also devised a simple device for teaching controlled ventilation of the patient's lungs. The device is helpful for training ... Magnetic vacuum and high pressure Information on patient due for anaesthesia Non-Kink Catheter Mount A simple device for ...
At first, O'Dwyer experimented with his device on cadavers. The use of a tube for intubation had often been attempted but ... He developed a valuable system of intubation in diphtheria cases. O'Dwyer is often cited as the "father of laryngeal intubation ... O'Dwyer was among the early practitioners to switch from intubation where appropriate. W.P. Northrup wrote, "Intubation is ... The O'Dwyer Method was first published in the N. Y. Medical Journal in 1888, as "Intubation of the Larynx". O'Dwyer's design ...
This may be accomplished with other medical transport devices such as a Kendrick extrication device, before moving the person. ... In general, the method of intubation used is rapid sequence intubation followed by ventilation. Assessment of circulation in ... Indications for intubation include airway obstruction, inability to protect the airway, and respiratory failure. Examples of ... Conditions such as impending airway obstruction, enlargening neck hematoma, or unconsciousness require intubation. It is ...
Performance and skill retention of intubation by paramedics using seven different airway devices--a manikin study. ... Endotracheal intubation remains the gold standard in airway maintenance. However, endotracheal intubation may be impossible due ... Frass is the inventor of the Combitube, a twin lumen device designed for use in emergency situations and difficult airways. He ... Furthermore, Frass has investigated devices designed for securing the airway under emergency conditions. He has performed ...
Some devices can have an endotracheal tube passed through them into the trachea. Tracheal intubation, often simply referred to ... Supraglottic airways (or extraglottic devices) are a family of devices that are inserted through the mouth to sit on top of the ... Other variations include devices with oesophageal access ports, so that a separate tube can be inserted from the mouth to the ... Surgical airway management is often performed as a last resort in cases where orotracheal and nasotracheal intubation are ...
Newer devices feature esophageal ports for suctioning or ports for tube exchange to allow intubation. Supraglottic airways ... The prominent device used is a smaller device known as the cuirass. The cuirass is a shell-like unit, creating negative ... A tube is inserted through the nose (nasotracheal intubation) or mouth (orotracheal intubation) and advanced into the trachea. ... as an alternative to endotracheal intubation. Most devices work via masks or cuffs that inflate to isolate the trachea for ...
Murphy, P (July 1967). "A fibre-optic endoscope used for nasal intubation". Anaesthesia. 22 (3): 489-91. doi:10.1111/j.1365- ... Similar to Jackson's device, Janeway's instrument incorporated a distal light source. Unique however was the inclusion of ... In the 20th century, the safety and efficacy of general anesthesia was improved by the routine use of tracheal intubation and ... The concept of using a fiberoptic endoscope for tracheal intubation was introduced by Peter Murphy, an English anesthetist, in ...
Since the tube does not extend far into the trachea, it is easy to breathe and speak with the device in place. Laryngeal tube ... Tracheal intubation "Equipment Sizing Chart". University of Iowa Children's Hospital. Retrieved 2015-11-07. Varshney, Manu; ... A tracheal button is generally used in people with severe obstructive sleep apnea, who often wear this device during waking ...
The device is around 3 metres (9.8 ft) long and has a distal balloon at one end. It is made up of two tubes, one for inflating ... A Miller-Abbott tube is a tube used to treat obstructions in the small intestine through intubation. It was developed in 1934 ... "A NEW RAPID METHOD OF INTUBATION WITH THE MILLER-ABBOTT TUBE". Journal of the American Medical Association. 125. doi:10.1001/ ...
Making nuvistors requires special equipment, since there is no intubation to pump gases out of the envelope. Instead, the ... sealed and processed in a large vacuum chamber with simple robotic devices. Nuvistors are among the highest performing small ...
... also described as rapid sequence intubation or as rapid sequence induction and intubation (RSII) - is a special process for ... Such devices include the combitube and the laryngeal mask airway. Invasive techniques such as cricothyrotomy must also be ... The typical dose is 1.5 mg/kg IV given three minutes prior to intubation. Atropine may also be used as a premedication agent in ... Alternative airway management devices must be immediately available, in the event the trachea cannot be intubated using ...
The bag-valve-mask device has a self-inflating bag with a soft mask that rests on the face. When the bag is connected to an ... Laryngoscopy and intubation are uncomfortable procedures, so etomidate may be delivered. Etomidate is a short-acting IV drug ... Before intubation, patients need correct patient positioning and ventilation with 100% oxygen. The purpose of ventilation with ... The foreign body can be extracted during laryngoscopy for endotracheal intubation. The first step to diagnosing patient is to ...
... is a fibreoptic intubation device used for indirect (video or optic assisted) tracheal intubation in difficult airway ... and laryngeal axes as an advantage over direct endotracheal intubation and allows for intubation with minimal head manipulation ... The light source of the Airtraq is turned on at least 30 seconds before use to allow the anti-fogging device and lightsource to ... Maharaj, Chrisen H.; Buckley, Elma; Harte, Brian H.; Laffey, John G. (1 July 2007). "Endotracheal Intubation in Patients with ...
... use of intermediate Blind Insertion Airway Devices (i.e. King Laryngeal Tube), Nasogastric Intubation, and simple suturing; ... and perform endotracheal intubation), cardiac monitoring, tracheal intubation, pericardiocentesis, cardioversion, needle ... Ambulances in this model tend to be better equipped with more advanced medical devices, in essence, bringing the emergency ... endotracheal intubation) and the victim is transported as fast as possible to a trauma centre. The aim in "Scoop and Run" ...
The eponymous "Ewald tube" is named after him, a device that serves as a gastric tube for emptying the contents of the stomach ... Ewald is remembered for investigations of gastric secretions, and the introduction of intubation as a medical aid in gastric ...
These devices are widely employed for tracheal intubation, especially in the setting of the difficult intubation (see below). ... Other "noninvasive" devices which can be employed to assist in tracheal intubation are the laryngeal mask airway (Some types of ... Intubation was successful in 128/133 (96%) of Glidescope laryngoscopy patients. These early results suggest that this device ... Due to the widespread availability of such devices, the technique of blind digital intubation of the trachea is rarely ...
Devices that combine nasal pressure with maxillary advancement devices (MAD) also exist. Humidified high flow nasal airway ... Prior to the advent of HFT, when high FiO2 was required for respiratory support, special face masks or intubation were required ... But while PEEP refers to devices that impose positive pressure only at the end of the exhalation, CPAP devices apply continuous ... "CPAP Machine - Devices Reviews & Costs - American Sleep Assoc". Morley, C. J.; Davis, P. G.; Doyle, L. W.; Brion, L. P.; ...
A device called the Positube, which allows for esophageal intubation detection, can be used on tube number two to rule out the ... The simplicity of placement is the main advantage of the Combitube over endotracheal intubation. When intubating with a ... 115-125 Ron Walls, Michael Murphy, Extraglottic devices, Manual of Emergency Airway Management, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, ... intubation of the Combitube in the trachea. The Positube checks for air flow resistance on tube number two and is very helpful ...
The laryngeal tube is also recommended for medical personnel not experienced in tracheal intubation, and as a rescue device ... and tracheal intubation. This device can be inserted blindly through the oropharynx into the hypopharynx to create an airway ... accepts its use as an alternate airway device for medical personnel who are not experienced in tracheal intubation. Various ... The laryngeal tube (known as the King LT in the U.S.) is an airway management device designed as an alternative to other airway ...
For example, stylets used to facilitate tracheal intubation - see Tracheal_intubation#Stylets. ... sharp anatomical structure In the medical industry a stylet is a slender medical probe or device. ...
... performing intubations and using monitoring devices. In the common situation where premature and sick newborns' lungs are not ... Oxygen administration began with a metal forked device in the nostrils, it is now administered through thin plastic tubes in ...
The device is inserted until the flared end rests against the nostril. Some tubes contain a safety pin to prevent inserting the ... but tracheal intubation is impossible, inadvisable, or outside the practitioner's scope of practice. An NPA is often used in ... Typical sizes include: 6.5 mm/28FR, 7.0 mm/30FR, 7.5 mm/32FR, 8.0 mm/34FR, and 8.5 mm/36FR These devices are used by emergency ... The purpose of the flared end is to prevent the device from becoming lost inside the patient's nose. As with other catheters, ...
"Miles Shootback Device (MSD)". lockheedmartin.com. 2008. Retrieved November 30, 2008.. *^ a b c "Multiple Integrated Laser ... Responds to airway trauma or obstruction: esophageal, nasal and oral intubation, and BVM ventilation and laryngoscopic ... Airway trauma features: upper airway obstruction, laryngospasm and bronchial occlusion for intubation ... "simulation's ability to address skilful device handling as well as purposive aspects of technology provides a potential for ...
Intubation with a laryngoscope often turns from a routine procedure into a life threatening situation when the anesthesiologist ... Autonomous Robotic Intubation Device from Ohio State. December 7th, 2015 Medgadget Editors Anesthesiology, Emergency Medicine, ... Now a new device being developed by a team led by a mechanical engineering professor with help from an anesthesiologist at Ohio ... These are detected by sensors near the tip of the device while it is inside the patient, which are converted into 3D images of ...
1000 prize winner of last months BMEIdea competition was a team from Georgia Tech and their Magnetic Assisted Intubation ... The device utilizes a magnet held over the trachea to guide the endotracheal tube during intubation. The device aims to make ... BMEIdea 2012: MAID, Magnetic Assisted Intubation Device (interview). June 14th, 2012 Justin Barad Anesthesiology, Critical Care ... Georgia Tech: The emergency medical professionals we have spoken to have shown a lot of interest in our device. This device has ...
In both cases, the use of an intubation device equipped with a charge-coupled device camera, the endotracheal intubation device ... Tracheal intubation using a new CCD camera-equipped device: a report of two cases with a difficult intubation ...
... developers of smart intubation devices for use in intensive care, has raised $20 million in a round led by Advanced Medical ... The primary aim of the FDA-cleared devices is to mitigate the dangerous complications that can arise from intubation devices. ... Israel and Palo Alto-based Art Medical, developers of smart intubation devices for use in intensive care, has raised $20 ... Currently, ICU nurses and doctors must monitor for such complications, but due to the constant nature of intubation, the risk ...
... upon contact with water in less than about 5 minutes and preferably less than about 5 to 10 seconds to be used in intubation ... The present invention is a lubricant coating composed of hydrophylic polymer and surfactant for intubation devices such as ... Intubation devices and methods of use thereof WO2008112662A2 (en) * 2007-03-09. 2008-09-18. Seydel Anna S. Intubation devices ... 1, 2 and 3 illustrate an intubation device in the form of a nasogastric intubation device 10 coated with a lubricant ...
... has helped procure a state-of-the-art device for area EMS providers that is reducing intubation time and improving patient ... A.O. Fox Hospital Acquires State-of-the-Art Intubation Device for Area EMS Providers. Bassett Healthcare Network, A.O. Fox ... A.O. Fox Hospital Acquires State-of-the-Art Intubation Device for Area EMS Providers ... has helped procure a state-of-the-art device for area EMS providers that is reducing intubation time and improving patient ...
... surfaces from endotracheal intubation devices. The adhesion of the different strains to untreated PVC varied widely, ... and colonize the endotracheal intubation device. New strategies to prevent or reduce these nosocomial infections are greatly ... aeruginosa colonization of endotracheal intubation devices. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved. Balazs, D. J.; ... surfaces from endotracheal intubation devices. The adhesion of the different strains to untreated PVC varied widely, ...
In a deflated state, the cuff assumes an edge-free outer configuration to facilitate intubation of the device into the patient ... The tapered end of the sleeve carries a suture loop for use in intubating the device. The tube seals the ambient air port ... A unique device for intubating an ostomy, formed by a percutaneous endoscopic technique including a multi-lumen tube, having at ... US4900306A - Device for intubation of percutaneous endoscopic ostomy - Google Patents. Device for intubation of percutaneous ...
This innovative supraglottic intubation device is fully adapted to reanimation of birds, rabbits or cats. Specially designed ... V-Gel is an innovative supraglottic intubation device, fully adapted to reanimation of birds, rabbits or cats. Specially ... it is meant to replace the usual endotracheal intubation probe and in turn simplifies the animal intubation operation and is ... More informations on this supraglottic device?. Do not hesitate to contact us. Free non-binding quote upon request. ...
Find your intubation cannula easily amongst the 132 products from the leading brands (MEBER, American Diagnostic, Fisher & ... the angle cut design helps reduce the risk of injury during intubation. Size Colour Coding Available in 11 sizes with colour ... Size 6 Box of 10 The nasopharyngeal airway size 6 has a unique rectangular flange design, which means the device sits ... The Naso-Flo® award winning* nasopharyngeal airway device allows for direct oxygen delivery, while humidification vents ...
The extendable lighted intubation stylet includes a handle, a switch, a sheath, an extension member, and a light source. The ... In its extended configuration, the extendable intubation stylet is immediately available in the case of an unanticipated ... An extendable lighted intubation stylet enables a clinician or emergency medical personnel to introduce a breathing tube into a ... extended or retracted relative to the sheath thereby increasing or decreasing the length of the extendable lighted intubation ...
... imaging system Examples of some devices for facilitation of tracheal intubation Diagram of performance of the Sellick maneuver ... Tracheal intubation (usually simply referred to as intubation), an invasive medical procedure, is the placement of a flexible ... This device had numerous lenses positioned throughout the tube and a miniature light bulb at the distal tip. The tube of this ... Using this device, he was able to observe the function of his own glottic apparatus and the uppermost portion of his trachea. ...
Other "noninvasive" devices which can be employed to assist in tracheal intubation are the laryngeal mask airway (used as a ... Previous experiences with tracheal intubation, especially difficult intubation, intubation for prolonged duration (e.g., ... Initially used in upper GI endoscopy, this device was first used for laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation by Peter Murphy, an ... Due to the widespread availability of such devices, the technique of blind intubation of the trachea is rarely practiced today ...
Select 2017 high quality Wholesale Medical Device Surgical products in best price from certified Chinese Medical manufacturers ... Medical Device suppliers, wholesalers and factory on Made-in-China.com ... Surgical Disposable Products Endotracheal Intubation&; Fixation Medical Device FOB Price: $0.2 - $0.4 / Piece Min. Order: 100 ... Medical Devices High Torque Acetabular Reaming Drill Instrument/Polishing Drill Device ... FOB Price: $450 - $500 / Piece Min. ...
Intubation; Difficult. Interventions: Device: Macintosh laryngoscope. Device: GVL selected by weight. Device: smaller sized GVL ... GlideScope®Video Laryngoscope for Difficult Intubation: Implication of the Size of Blade. The safety and scientific validity of ...
endotracheal intubation success rate of each device [ Time Frame: TOTI (up to 1 hour) ]. *Degree of satisfaction [ Time Frame: ... Time Frame: Time of Orotracheal intubation (TOTI) (up to 1 hour) ]. Secondary Outcome Measures : *IDS Scale [ Time Frame: TOTI ... A Comparison of Tracheal Intubation Using the Totaltrack vs the Macintosh Laryngoscope in Routine Airway Management. The safety ... Fiberoptic intubation is the gold standard in this scenario, however sometimes it is not possible due to failure or ...
esophageal intubation detector device. A syringe attached to the endotracheal tube immediately after an intubation attempt. ... See: oxygen-powered ventilation device. Flutter device. See: Flutter device. head immobilization device. A device that attaches ... personal assistive mobility device. Personal mobility device.. personal mobility device. Any assistive device that facilitates ... pointing device. A type of input device for sending commands to a computer. Moving the device results in movement of a cursor ...
What is leave to their own devices? Meaning of leave to their own devices medical term. What does leave to their own devices ... Looking for online definition of leave to their own devices in the Medical Dictionary? leave to their own devices explanation ... esophageal intubation detector device. A syringe attached to the endotracheal tube immediately after an intubation attempt. ... See: oxygen-powered ventilation device. Flutter device. See: Flutter device. head immobilization device. A device that attaches ...
Endotracheal intubation for surfactant administration, following morphine and atropine pre-medication. Device: Endotracheal ... Number of Intubation Episodes Per Patient [ Time Frame: 7 days ]. *Mortality Rate [ Time Frame: 2 months ]. ... Device: Laryngeal mask airway insertion Laryngeal mask airway insertion after premedication with atropine (0.02 mg/kg) ... Randomized Controlled Trial of Surfactant Delivery Via Laryngeal Mask Airway (LMA) Versus Endotracheal Intubation. This study ...
A method for endotracheal intubation is also disclosed in which a suction stylet (10) is telescopically disposed within an ... aspirating unwanted oral secretions from the operators field of view during intubation. Once the trachea is intubated, the ... aspirating unwanted secretions from the operators field of view during the intubation procedure. ... comprises a connector for releasably axially fixing the suction stylet with respect to the endotracheal tube during intubation ...
The present invention provides an intubation assembly for nasogastric intubation comprising a catheter and a plastic sheath ... Medical tube retaining device. 1984-11-06. Peterson et al.. 128/DIG.26. ... The assembled intubation assembly A for nasogastric intubation (which comprises the catheter 1 encased in the sheath tube 3) ... The present invention relates to a catheter for nasogastric intubation. Normally, a catheter for nasogastric intubation to be ...
Energid Technologies to develop robotic device for endotracheal intubation The US Army, through the Telemedicine and Advanced ... New tool developed to easily place assisted breathing devices under difficult circumstances A new tool developed by a Medical ... Physicians at UT Southwestern Medical Center soon will begin implanting a new device designed to improve breathing in patients ... College of Georgia resident and faculty member may make it easier to place assisted breathing devices under difficult ...
HubPages Device ID. This is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for ... Would you rather choose NO CPR/intubation /ER meds than with CPR/Intubation/ER meds?. I worked in a healthcare facility and ... Would you rather choose NO CPR/intubation /ER meds than with CPR/Intubation/ER m. ... Most of the time CPR/intubation/ER meds helps. However , sometimes it leaves a person in agony. What would you rather choose if ...
... quantitative feedback of the airway management trainer brings no measurable advantage in training for endotracheal intubation. ... Endotracheal intubation is still the gold standard in airway management. For medical students and young professionals, it is ... Sorbello, M.; Afshari, A.; de Hert, S. Device or target? A paradigm shift in airway management: Implications for guidelines, ... Forces applied to the maxillary incisors during tracheal intubation and dental injury risks of intubation by beginners: A ...
Device: vv-ECCO2R (Novalung GmbH, Germany) Treatment with the extracorporeal lung assist (ECLA) The ECLA is a pump driven ( ... Rate of intubation for invasive mechanical ventilation [ Time Frame: 21 days ]. Rate of intubation for invasive mechanical ... Extracorporeal Lung Assist to Avoid Intubation in Patients Failing NIV for Hypercapnic ARF (ECLAIR). The safety and scientific ... At blood flows of 2 l/min and higher the device also oxygenates the patients blood. The diameter and length of cannulas and the ...
  • A single-center, retrospective study was carried out to compare the outcomes of patients with severe sepsis and septic shock who received a ketamine or non-ketamine agent for rapid sequence intubation (RSI). (signavitae.com)
  • Several studies have demonstrated that the rapid sequence intubation (RSI) technique, in which a potent sedative agent, followed by a rapidly acting neuromuscular blocking agent administered to facilitate endotracheal intubation, provides optimal intubating conditions while minimizing untoward complications even in emergency airway situations. (signavitae.com)
  • Time to intubation was greater in the group L than Group A during attempts 1, 2 and three and there was no different between groups thereafter (Figure I). The stabilisation point occurred at the fourth and fifth attempts for Airtraq and Levitan respectively (Figure 1). (soap.org)
  • There was no difference in time to intubation for the 3 devices, but first-pass success was highest for DL (with or without biohazard gear). (lvhn.org)
  • However, we observe that this practice is found ineffective to attenuate the hemodynamic responses to intubation and rescue treatment is frequently required. (hindawi.com)
  • The supplement of an inhaled anesthetic agent during anesthetic induction and intubation using a nondepolarizing muscle relaxant is a normal practice at our hospital. (hindawi.com)
  • After uneventful induction and intubation he was prepped and draped. (aapc.com)
  • Proper intubation is one of the key factors that influences the intratracheal delivery of dry powder formulation to the deep lung region of the mouse. (jove.com)
  • Skillful use of BiPAP and high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) can avoid intubation and improve outcomes. (emcrit.org)
  • Methods: After informed consent, participants (anaesthetists who had not previously used the devices) were given standardised teaching and asked to perform seven consecutive tracheal intubations on a C&L 1 manikin (Bill II, VBM Medical) using a preassembled Airtraq (Group A) and Levitan (Group L) devices. (soap.org)
  • During intubation the distal end 14 of the endotracheal tube is inserted into a person's mouth and slidably positioned into the person's trachea such that proximal end 15 projects outward from person's mouth. (google.ca)
  • An apparatus for endotracheal intubation comprises a suction stylet (10) telescopically disposed within an endotracheal tube (30) such that the suction stylet (10) is operative to aspirate fluids from the vicinity of the distal end (16) of the endotracheal tube. (google.es)
  • 5. The guide device of claim 1 , further including a ramp located at a distal end of the guide region the ramp directing the distal end of the guide region at least partially radially outward from the guide axis. (google.com)
  • 7. The guide device of claim 5 , wherein the shield portion is located at a distal end of the mandrel and substantially covers the distal opening of the sheath in the first state when the mandrel is fully inserted in the sheath. (google.com)
  • 9. The guide device of claim 1 , wherein the shield portion is formed at a distal end of the axial portion. (google.com)
  • the providing step is carried out with the cutting element being movable to a position away from the distal end of the aortic occlusion device. (google.com.au)
  • the inserting step is carried out with the distal end of the aortic occlusion device having a conical shape. (google.com.au)