Pattern Recognition, Visual: Mental process to visually perceive a critical number of facts (the pattern), such as characters, shapes, displays, or designs.Form Perception: The sensory discrimination of a pattern shape or outline.Photic Stimulation: Investigative technique commonly used during ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY in which a series of bright light flashes or visual patterns are used to elicit brain activity.Visual Perception: The selecting and organizing of visual stimuli based on the individual's past experience.Size Perception: The sensory interpretation of the dimensions of objects.Motion Perception: The real or apparent movement of objects through the visual field.Hand Strength: Force exerted when gripping or grasping.Attention: Focusing on certain aspects of current experience to the exclusion of others. It is the act of heeding or taking notice or concentrating.Reaction Time: The time from the onset of a stimulus until a response is observed.Weight Perception: Recognition and discrimination of the heaviness of a lifted object.Cues: Signals for an action; that specific portion of a perceptual field or pattern of stimuli to which a subject has learned to respond.Discrimination (Psychology): Differential response to different stimuli.Orientation: Awareness of oneself in relation to time, place and person.Concept Formation: A cognitive process involving the formation of ideas generalized from the knowledge of qualities, aspects, and relations of objects.Exploratory Behavior: The tendency to explore or investigate a novel environment. It is considered a motivation not clearly distinguishable from curiosity.Depth Perception: Perception of three-dimensionality.Touch: Sensation of making physical contact with objects, animate or inanimate. Tactile stimuli are detected by MECHANORECEPTORS in the skin and mucous membranes.Color Perception: Mental processing of chromatic signals (COLOR VISION) from the eye by the VISUAL CORTEX where they are converted into symbolic representations. Color perception involves numerous neurons, and is influenced not only by the distribution of wavelengths from the viewed object, but also by its background color and brightness contrast at its boundary.Temporal Lobe: Lower lateral part of the cerebral hemisphere responsible for auditory, olfactory, and semantic processing. It is located inferior to the lateral fissure and anterior to the OCCIPITAL LOBE.Memory: Complex mental function having four distinct phases: (1) memorizing or learning, (2) retention, (3) recall, and (4) recognition. Clinically, it is usually subdivided into immediate, recent, and remote memory.Occipital Lobe: Posterior portion of the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES responsible for processing visual sensory information. It is located posterior to the parieto-occipital sulcus and extends to the preoccipital notch.Distance Perception: The act of knowing or the recognition of a distance by recollective thought, or by means of a sensory process which is under the influence of set and of prior experience.Fixation, Ocular: The positioning and accommodation of eyes that allows the image to be brought into place on the FOVEA CENTRALIS of each eye.Face: The anterior portion of the head that includes the skin, muscles, and structures of the forehead, eyes, nose, mouth, cheeks, and jaw.Eye Movements: Voluntary or reflex-controlled movements of the eye.Hand: The distal part of the arm beyond the wrist in humans and primates, that includes the palm, fingers, and thumb.Visual Pathways: Set of cell bodies and nerve fibers conducting impulses from the eyes to the cerebral cortex. It includes the RETINA; OPTIC NERVE; optic tract; and geniculocalcarine tract.Optical Illusions: An illusion of vision usually affecting spatial relations.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Visual Cortex: Area of the OCCIPITAL LOBE concerned with the processing of visual information relayed via VISUAL PATHWAYS.Discrimination Learning: Learning that is manifested in the ability to respond differentially to various stimuli.Field Dependence-Independence: The ability to respond to segments of the perceptual experience rather than to the whole.Illusions: The misinterpretation of a real external, sensory experience.Learning: Relatively permanent change in behavior that is the result of past experience or practice. The concept includes the acquisition of knowledge.Image Processing, Computer-Assisted: A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.Functional Laterality: Behavioral manifestations of cerebral dominance in which there is preferential use and superior functioning of either the left or the right side, as in the preferred use of the right hand or right foot.Fingers: Four or five slender jointed digits in humans and primates, attached to each HAND.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Parietal Lobe: Upper central part of the cerebral hemisphere. It is located posterior to central sulcus, anterior to the OCCIPITAL LOBE, and superior to the TEMPORAL LOBES.Judgment: The process of discovering or asserting an objective or intrinsic relation between two objects or concepts; a faculty or power that enables a person to make judgments; the process of bringing to light and asserting the implicit meaning of a concept; a critical evaluation of a person or situation.Pattern Recognition, Physiological: The analysis of a critical number of sensory stimuli or facts (the pattern) by physiological processes such as vision (PATTERN RECOGNITION, VISUAL), touch, or hearing.Names: Personal names, given or surname, as cultural characteristics, as ethnological or religious patterns, as indications of the geographic distribution of families and inbreeding, etc. Analysis of isonymy, the quality of having the same or similar names, is useful in the study of population genetics. NAMES is used also for the history of names or name changes of corporate bodies, such as medical societies, universities, hospitals, government agencies, etc.Spatial Behavior: Reactions of an individual or groups of individuals with relation to the immediate surrounding area including the animate or inanimate objects within that area.Lighting: The illumination of an environment and the arrangement of lights to achieve an effect or optimal visibility. Its application is in domestic or in public settings and in medical and non-medical environments.Perceptual Masking: The interference of one perceptual stimulus with another causing a decrease or lessening in perceptual effectiveness.Semantics: The relationships between symbols and their meanings.Memory, Short-Term: Remembrance of information for a few seconds to hours.Agnosia: Loss of the ability to comprehend the meaning or recognize the importance of various forms of stimulation that cannot be attributed to impairment of a primary sensory modality. Tactile agnosia is characterized by an inability to perceive the shape and nature of an object by touch alone, despite unimpaired sensation to light touch, position, and other primary sensory modalities.Vision, Ocular: The process in which light signals are transformed by the PHOTORECEPTOR CELLS into electrical signals which can then be transmitted to the brain.Lifting: Moving or bringing something from a lower level to a higher one. The concept encompasses biomechanic stresses resulting from work done in transferring objects from one plane to another as well as the effects of varying techniques of patient handling and transfer.Color: The visually perceived property of objects created by absorption or reflection of specific wavelengths of light.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Task Performance and Analysis: The detailed examination of observable activity or behavior associated with the execution or completion of a required function or unit of work.Saccades: An abrupt voluntary shift in ocular fixation from one point to another, as occurs in reading.Macaca mulatta: A species of the genus MACACA inhabiting India, China, and other parts of Asia. The species is used extensively in biomedical research and adapts very well to living with humans.Perceptual Closure: The tendency to perceive an incomplete pattern or object as complete or whole. This includes the Gestalt Law of Closure.Behavior, Animal: The observable response an animal makes to any situation.Evoked Potentials, Visual: The electric response evoked in the cerebral cortex by visual stimulation or stimulation of the visual pathways.Models, Neurological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of the neurological system, processes or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Cognition: Intellectual or mental process whereby an organism obtains knowledge.Rotation: Motion of an object in which either one or more points on a line are fixed. It is also the motion of a particle about a fixed point. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Motion: Physical motion, i.e., a change in position of a body or subject as a result of an external force. It is distinguished from MOVEMENT, a process resulting from biological activity.Touch Perception: The process by which the nature and meaning of tactile stimuli are recognized and interpreted by the brain, such as realizing the characteristics or name of an object being touched.Stereognosis: Perception of shape and form of objects by TOUCH, via tactile stimuli.Contrast Sensitivity: The ability to detect sharp boundaries (stimuli) and to detect slight changes in luminance at regions without distinct contours. Psychophysical measurements of this visual function are used to evaluate visual acuity and to detect eye disease.Sensory Thresholds: The minimum amount of stimulus energy necessary to elicit a sensory response.Neuropsychological Tests: Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.Motor Skills: Performance of complex motor acts.Individuation: A process of differentiation having for its goal the development of the individual personality.Imaging, Three-Dimensional: The process of generating three-dimensional images by electronic, photographic, or other methods. For example, three-dimensional images can be generated by assembling multiple tomographic images with the aid of a computer, while photographic 3-D images (HOLOGRAPHY) can be made by exposing film to the interference pattern created when two laser light sources shine on an object.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Object Attachment: Emotional attachment to someone or something in the environment.Infant Behavior: Any observable response or action of a neonate or infant up through the age of 23 months.Auditory Perception: The process whereby auditory stimuli are selected, organized, and interpreted by the organism.Vision, Binocular: The blending of separate images seen by each eye into one composite image.Association Learning: The principle that items experienced together enter into a connection, so that one tends to reinstate the other.Tool Use Behavior: Modifying, carrying, or manipulating an item external to itself by an animal, before using it to effect a change on the environment or itself (from Beck, Animal Tool Behavior, 1980).Foreign Bodies: Inanimate objects that become enclosed in the body.Phantoms, Imaging: Devices or objects in various imaging techniques used to visualize or enhance visualization by simulating conditions encountered in the procedure. Phantoms are used very often in procedures employing or measuring x-irradiation or radioactive material to evaluate performance. Phantoms often have properties similar to human tissue. Water demonstrates absorbing properties similar to normal tissue, hence water-filled phantoms are used to map radiation levels. Phantoms are used also as teaching aids to simulate real conditions with x-ray or ultrasonic machines. (From Iturralde, Dictionary and Handbook of Nuclear Medicine and Clinical Imaging, 1990)Models, Psychological: Theoretical representations that simulate psychological processes and/or social processes. These include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Cerebral Cortex: The thin layer of GRAY MATTER on the surface of the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES that develops from the TELENCEPHALON and folds into gyri and sulchi. It reaches its highest development in humans and is responsible for intellectual faculties and higher mental functions.Vision Disparity: The difference between two images on the retina when looking at a visual stimulus. This occurs since the two retinas do not have the same view of the stimulus because of the location of our eyes. Thus the left eye does not get exactly the same view as the right eye.Mental Recall: The process whereby a representation of past experience is elicited.Parahippocampal Gyrus: A convolution on the inferior surface of each cerebral hemisphere, lying between the hippocampal and collateral sulci.Optic Flow: The continuous visual field seen by a subject through space and time.Perceptual Disorders: Cognitive disorders characterized by an impaired ability to perceive the nature of objects or concepts through use of the sense organs. These include spatial neglect syndromes, where an individual does not attend to visual, auditory, or sensory stimuli presented from one side of the body.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Perceptual Distortion: Lack of correspondence between the way a stimulus is commonly perceived and the way an individual perceives it under given conditions.Comprehension: The act or fact of grasping the meaning, nature, or importance of; understanding. (American Heritage Dictionary, 4th ed) Includes understanding by a patient or research subject of information disclosed orally or in writing.Generalization, Stimulus: The tendency to react to stimuli that are different from, but somewhat similar to, the stimulus used as a conditioned stimulus.Mental Processes: Conceptual functions or thinking in all its forms.Retention (Psychology): The persistence to perform a learned behavior (facts or experiences) after an interval has elapsed in which there has been no performance or practice of the behavior.Maze Learning: Learning the correct route through a maze to obtain reinforcement. It is used for human or animal populations. (Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 6th ed)Computer Simulation: Computer-based representation of physical systems and phenomena such as chemical processes.Acoustic Stimulation: Use of sound to elicit a response in the nervous system.Transfer (Psychology): Change in learning in one situation due to prior learning in another situation. The transfer can be positive (with second learning improved by first) or negative (where the reverse holds).Symbolism: A concept that stands for or suggests something else by reason of its relationship, association, convention, or resemblance. The symbolism may be mental or a visible sign or representation. (From Webster, 3d ed)Memory Disorders: Disturbances in registering an impression, in the retention of an acquired impression, or in the recall of an impression. Memory impairments are associated with DEMENTIA; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; ENCEPHALITIS; ALCOHOLISM (see also ALCOHOL AMNESTIC DISORDER); SCHIZOPHRENIA; and other conditions.Color Vision: Function of the human eye that is used in bright illumination or in daylight (at photopic intensities). Photopic vision is performed by the three types of RETINAL CONE PHOTORECEPTORS with varied peak absorption wavelengths in the color spectrum (from violet to red, 400 - 700 nm).Neurons: The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.Association: A functional relationship between psychological phenomena of such nature that the presence of one tends to evoke the other; also, the process by which such a relationship is established.Vocabulary: The sum or the stock of words used by a language, a group, or an individual. (From Webster, 3d ed)Gestures: Movement of a part of the body for the purpose of communication.Electroencephalography: Recording of electric currents developed in the brain by means of electrodes applied to the scalp, to the surface of the brain, or placed within the substance of the brain.Child Psychology: The study of normal and abnormal behavior of children.Vision, Monocular: Images seen by one eye.Pursuit, Smooth: Eye movements that are slow, continuous, and conjugate and occur when a fixed object is moved slowly.Gymnotiformes: An order of neotropical electric fish found chiefly in the waters of South America. They continually emit weak electric discharges, which they use in object location and communication. A most popular species of research interest is the electric eel, ELECTROPHORUS electricus.Echolocation: An auditory orientation mechanism involving the emission of high frequency sounds which are reflected back to the emitter (animal).Kinesthesis: Sense of movement of a part of the body, such as movement of fingers, elbows, knees, limbs, or weights.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Child Development: The continuous sequential physiological and psychological maturing of an individual from birth up to but not including ADOLESCENCE.Play and Playthings: Spontaneous or voluntary recreational activities pursued for enjoyment and accessories or equipment used in the activities; includes games, toys, etc.Knowledge: The body of truths or facts accumulated in the course of time, the cumulated sum of information, its volume and nature, in any civilization, period, or country.Generalization (Psychology): The phenomenon of an organism's responding to all situations similar to one in which it has been conditioned.User-Computer Interface: The portion of an interactive computer program that issues messages to and receives commands from a user.Gestalt Theory: A system which emphasizes that experience and behavior contain basic patterns and relationships which cannot be reduced to simpler components; that is, the whole is greater than the sum of its parts.Habituation, Psychophysiologic: The disappearance of responsiveness to a repeated stimulation. It does not include drug habituation.Evoked Potentials: Electrical responses recorded from nerve, muscle, SENSORY RECEPTOR, or area of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM following stimulation. They range from less than a microvolt to several microvolts. The evoked potential can be auditory (EVOKED POTENTIALS, AUDITORY), somatosensory (EVOKED POTENTIALS, SOMATOSENSORY), visual (EVOKED POTENTIALS, VISUAL), or motor (EVOKED POTENTIALS, MOTOR), or other modalities that have been reported.Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted: Methods developed to aid in the interpretation of ultrasound, radiographic images, etc., for diagnosis of disease.Rats, Long-Evans: An outbred strain of rats developed in 1915 by crossing several Wistar Institute white females with a wild gray male. Inbred strains have been derived from this original outbred strain, including Long-Evans cinnamon rats (RATS, INBRED LEC) and Otsuka-Long-Evans-Tokushima Fatty rats (RATS, INBRED OLETF), which are models for Wilson's disease and non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, respectively.Hippocampus: A curved elevation of GRAY MATTER extending the entire length of the floor of the TEMPORAL HORN of the LATERAL VENTRICLE (see also TEMPORAL LOBE). The hippocampus proper, subiculum, and DENTATE GYRUS constitute the hippocampal formation. Sometimes authors include the ENTORHINAL CORTEX in the hippocampal formation.Telescopes: Instruments used to observe distant objects.Feedback, Sensory: A mechanism of communicating one's own sensory system information about a task, movement or skill.Solar System: The group of celestial bodies, including the EARTH, orbiting around and gravitationally bound by the sun. It includes eight planets, one minor planet, and 34 natural satellites, more than 1,000 observed comets, and thousands of lesser bodies known as MINOR PLANETS (asteroids) and METEOROIDS. (From Academic American Encyclopedia, 1983)Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Signal Detection, Psychological: Psychophysical technique that permits the estimation of the bias of the observer as well as detectability of the signal (i.e., stimulus) in any sensory modality. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)Imitative Behavior: The mimicking of the behavior of one individual by another.Repetition Priming: A type of procedural memory manifested as a change in the ability to identify an item as a result of a previous encounter with the item or stimuli.Choice Behavior: The act of making a selection among two or more alternatives, usually after a period of deliberation.Memory, Long-Term: Remembrance of information from 3 or more years previously.Thumb: The first digit on the radial side of the hand which in humans lies opposite the other four.Macaca: A genus of the subfamily CERCOPITHECINAE, family CERCOPITHECIDAE, consisting of 16 species inhabiting forests of Africa, Asia, and the islands of Borneo, Philippines, and Celebes.Perception: The process by which the nature and meaning of sensory stimuli are recognized and interpreted.Time Perception: The ability to estimate periods of time lapsed or duration of time.Entorhinal Cortex: Cerebral cortex region on the medial aspect of the PARAHIPPOCAMPAL GYRUS, immediately caudal to the OLFACTORY CORTEX of the uncus. The entorhinal cortex is the origin of the major neural fiber system afferent to the HIPPOCAMPAL FORMATION, the so-called PERFORANT PATHWAY.Pattern Recognition, Automated: In INFORMATION RETRIEVAL, machine-sensing or identification of visible patterns (shapes, forms, and configurations). (Harrod's Librarians' Glossary, 7th ed)Optics and Photonics: A specialized field of physics and engineering involved in studying the behavior and properties of light and the technology of analyzing, generating, transmitting, and manipulating ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION in the visible, infrared, and ultraviolet range.Friction: Surface resistance to the relative motion of one body against the rubbing, sliding, rolling, or flowing of another with which it is in contact.Eye Movement Measurements: Methods and procedures for recording EYE MOVEMENTS.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Software: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.Robotics: The application of electronic, computerized control systems to mechanical devices designed to perform human functions. Formerly restricted to industry, but nowadays applied to artificial organs controlled by bionic (bioelectronic) devices, like automated insulin pumps and other prostheses.Artifacts: Any visible result of a procedure which is caused by the procedure itself and not by the entity being analyzed. Common examples include histological structures introduced by tissue processing, radiographic images of structures that are not naturally present in living tissue, and products of chemical reactions that occur during analysis.Nerve Net: A meshlike structure composed of interconnecting nerve cells that are separated at the synaptic junction or joined to one another by cytoplasmic processes. In invertebrates, for example, the nerve net allows nerve impulses to spread over a wide area of the net because synapses can pass information in any direction.Language Development: The gradual expansion in complexity and meaning of symbols and sounds as perceived and interpreted by the individual through a maturational and learning process. Stages in development include babbling, cooing, word imitation with cognition, and use of short sentences.Motor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.Sound: A type of non-ionizing radiation in which energy is transmitted through solid, liquid, or gas as compression waves. Sound (acoustic or sonic) radiation with frequencies above the audible range is classified as ultrasonic. Sound radiation below the audible range is classified as infrasonic.Prefrontal Cortex: The rostral part of the frontal lobe, bounded by the inferior precentral fissure in humans, which receives projection fibers from the MEDIODORSAL NUCLEUS OF THE THALAMUS. The prefrontal cortex receives afferent fibers from numerous structures of the DIENCEPHALON; MESENCEPHALON; and LIMBIC SYSTEM as well as cortical afferents of visual, auditory, and somatic origin.Language: A verbal or nonverbal means of communicating ideas or feelings.Vibrissae: Stiff hairs projecting from the face around the nose of most mammals, acting as touch receptors.Nature: The system of all phenomena in space and time; the totality of physical reality. It is both a scientific and philosophic concept appearing in all historic eras. (Webster 2d; Dr. James H. Cassedy, NLM History of Medicine Division)Frontal Lobe: The part of the cerebral hemisphere anterior to the central sulcus, and anterior and superior to the lateral sulcus.Physical Stimulation: Act of eliciting a response from a person or organism through physical contact.Astronomy: The science concerned with celestial bodies and the observation and interpretation of the radiation received in the vicinity of the earth from the component parts of the universe (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed)Apraxia, Ideomotor: A form of apraxia characterized by an acquired inability to carry out a complex motor activity despite the ability to mentally formulate the action. This condition has been attributed to a disruption of connections between the dominant parietal cortex and supplementary and premotor cortical regions in both hemispheres. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p57)Psycholinguistics: A discipline concerned with relations between messages and the characteristics of individuals who select and interpret them; it deals directly with the processes of encoding (phonetics) and decoding (psychoacoustics) as they relate states of messages to states of communicators.Programming Languages: Specific languages used to prepare computer programs.Practice (Psychology): Performance of an act one or more times, with a view to its fixation or improvement; any performance of an act or behavior that leads to learning.Electric Fish: Fishes which generate an electric discharge. The voltage of the discharge varies from weak to strong in various groups of fish. The ELECTRIC ORGAN and electroplax are of prime interest in this group. They occur in more than one family.Behavior: The observable response of a man or animal to a situation.Holography: The recording of images in three-dimensional form on a photographic film by exposing it to a laser beam reflected from the object under study.Video Recording: The storing or preserving of video signals for television to be played back later via a transmitter or receiver. Recordings may be made on magnetic tape or discs (VIDEODISC RECORDING).Transducers, Pressure: Transducers that are activated by pressure changes, e.g., blood pressure.Arm: The superior part of the upper extremity between the SHOULDER and the ELBOW.Image Enhancement: Improvement of the quality of a picture by various techniques, including computer processing, digital filtering, echocardiographic techniques, light and ultrastructural MICROSCOPY, fluorescence spectrometry and microscopy, scintigraphy, and in vitro image processing at the molecular level.Macaca fascicularis: A species of the genus MACACA which typically lives near the coast in tidal creeks and mangrove swamps primarily on the islands of the Malay peninsula.Oxygen: An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight [15.99903; 15.99977]. It is the most abundant element on earth and essential for respiration.Neural Pathways: Neural tracts connecting one part of the nervous system with another.Lenses: Pieces of glass or other transparent materials used for magnification or increased visual acuity.Man-Machine Systems: A system in which the functions of the man and the machine are interrelated and necessary for the operation of the system.Neptune: The eighth planet in order from the sun. It is one of the five outer planets of the solar system. Its two natural satellites are Nereid and Triton.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Problem Solving: A learning situation involving more than one alternative from which a selection is made in order to attain a specific goal.Verbal Behavior: Includes both producing and responding to words, either written or spoken.Human Body: The human being as a non-anatomical and non-zoological entity. The emphasis is on the philosophical or artistic treatment of the human being, and includes lay and social attitudes toward the body in history. (From J. Cassedy, NLM History of Medicine Division)Linguistics: The science of language, including phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, and historical linguistics. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Radiographic Image Enhancement: Improvement in the quality of an x-ray image by use of an intensifying screen, tube, or filter and by optimum exposure techniques. Digital processing methods are often employed.Action Potentials: Abrupt changes in the membrane potential that sweep along the CELL MEMBRANE of excitable cells in response to excitation stimuli.Somatosensory Cortex: Area of the parietal lobe concerned with receiving sensations such as movement, pain, pressure, position, temperature, touch, and vibration. It lies posterior to the central sulcus.Meteoroids: Any solid objects moving in interplanetary space that are smaller than a planet or asteroid but larger than a molecule. Meteorites are any meteoroid that has fallen to a planetary surface. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Language Tests: Tests designed to assess language behavior and abilities. They include tests of vocabulary, comprehension, grammar and functional use of language, e.g., Development Sentence Scoring, Receptive-Expressive Emergent Language Scale, Parsons Language Sample, Utah Test of Language Development, Michigan Language Inventory and Verbal Language Development Scale, Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Abilities, Northwestern Syntax Screening Test, Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, Ammons Full-Range Picture Vocabulary Test, and Assessment of Children's Language Comprehension.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Computer Graphics: The process of pictorial communication, between human and computers, in which the computer input and output have the form of charts, drawings, or other appropriate pictorial representation.Normal Distribution: Continuous frequency distribution of infinite range. Its properties are as follows: 1, continuous, symmetrical distribution with both tails extending to infinity; 2, arithmetic mean, mode, and median identical; and 3, shape completely determined by the mean and standard deviation.Anticipation, Psychological: The ability to foresee what is likely to happen on the basis of past experience. It is largely a frontal lobe function.Figural Aftereffect: A perceptual phenomenon used by Gestalt psychologists to demonstrate that events in one part of the perceptual field may affect perception in another part.Neuropsychology: A branch of psychology which investigates the correlation between experience or behavior and the basic neurophysiological processes. The term neuropsychology stresses the dominant role of the nervous system. It is a more narrowly defined field than physiological psychology or psychophysiology.Torque: The rotational force about an axis that is equal to the product of a force times the distance from the axis where the force is applied.Verbal Learning: Learning to respond verbally to a verbal stimulus cue.Awareness: The act of "taking account" of an object or state of affairs. It does not imply assessment of, nor attention to the qualities or nature of the object.Retina: The ten-layered nervous tissue membrane of the eye. It is continuous with the OPTIC NERVE and receives images of external objects and transmits visual impulses to the brain. Its outer surface is in contact with the CHOROID and the inner surface with the VITREOUS BODY. The outer-most layer is pigmented, whereas the inner nine layers are transparent.Artificial Intelligence: Theory and development of COMPUTER SYSTEMS which perform tasks that normally require human intelligence. Such tasks may include speech recognition, LEARNING; VISUAL PERCEPTION; MATHEMATICAL COMPUTING; reasoning, PROBLEM SOLVING, DECISION-MAKING, and translation of language.MuseumsGravity Sensing: Process whereby a cell, bodily structure, or organism (animal or plant) receives or detects a gravity stimulus. Gravity sensing plays an important role in the directional growth and development of an organism (GRAVITROPISM).Light: That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum in the visible, ultraviolet, and infrared range.Word Association Tests: Lists of words to which individuals are asked to respond ascertaining the conceptual meaning held by the individual.Database Management Systems: Software designed to store, manipulate, manage, and control data for specific uses.Weight-Bearing: The physical state of supporting an applied load. This often refers to the weight-bearing bones or joints that support the body's weight, especially those in the spine, hip, knee, and foot.Skin Physiological Processes: Biological activities and functions of the SKIN.Feedback: A mechanism of communication within a system in that the input signal generates an output response which returns to influence the continued activity or productivity of that system.
Changes the ownership of an object. @create [=. ]. Creates a thing with the specified name. @describe [=. ]. @dig . Creates a ... One of the important features of TinyMud was the ability of players to build and create their own rooms, objects, and puzzles ...
Object definitions describe managed objects. An ASN.1 macro, OBJECT-TYPE, is used to concisely convey the syntax and semantics ... object definitions, and notification definitions. Module definitions are used when describing information modules. An ASN .1 ... of a managed object. Notification definitions (aka "traps") are used when describing unsolicited transmissions of management ... of related managed objects in a Management Information Base (MIB). SMI subdivides into three parts: module definitions, ...
This is similar to the everything is an object philosophy used by some object-oriented programming languages. An actor is a ... Describes Janus. Carl Hewitt. Open Information Systems Semantics Journal of Artificial Intelligence. January 1991. Carl Hewitt ... much as the objects in Simula and other object-oriented languages may also be relationally composed into variable topologies of ... Objects with locks (e.g., as in Java and C#) can be modeled as a Serializer, provided that their implementations are such that ...
ABCL: An Object-Oriented Concurrent System MIT Press. 1990. K. Kahn and Vijay A. Saraswat, "Actors as a special case of ... Describes Janus. Carl Hewitt. Open Information Systems Semantics Journal of Artificial Intelligence. January 1991. Carl Hewitt ... An Object Calculus for Asynchronous Communication ECOOP 91. José Meseguer. Conditional rewriting logic as a unified model of ... Coordinating Distributed Objects: An Actor-Based Approach for Synchronization MIT Press. November 1996. W. Kim. ThAL: An Actor ...
Caunus became the object of his own sister's passionate love. From some accounts it appears that Caunus was the first to ... develop the affection towards her; others describe Byblis' feelings as unrequited. All sources agree, however, that Caunus ...
The naturalist's miscellany: or coloured figures of natural objects; drawn and described ... from Nature. Figures by F. P. ... An example of the American 1825 edition is described as having its images uncoloured. When describing prints "hand-coloured" ... The Armadillo - Catton describes the armadillo generally. Plate 32. The Bombay Squirrel - if Catton is referring merely to a ... The thirty-six animals described, all mammals except for the crocodile, were from both the New World and the Old World. At the ...
They are: Objects - The actual distinct objects which make up the medium/space. The objects thus effectively describe the space ... Different types of objects present in the space the total number of objects and the relationships between objects and the space ... Topology - The way objects are placed and positioned. Volatility - Frequency with which the objects change. Agency - Medium of ... Agents - Correspondents/users inside the space who interact with it through the objects. For presence in a blended space, there ...
import org.forgerock.cuppa.Cuppa.*; @Test public class ListTest { { describe("List", () -> { describe("#indexOf", () -> { it(" ... A Cuppa test class is a Java object annotated with the @Test annotation. ...
... well-known GoF design patterns that describe how to solve recurring design problems to design flexible and reusable object- ... The Abstraction1 object delegates implementation to the Implementor1 object (by calling operationImp() on Implementor1), which ... In fact, the bridge pattern is often implemented using the object adapter pattern, e.g. in the Java code below. Variant: The ... This enables to configure an Abstraction with an Implementor object at run-time. See also the UML class and sequence diagram ...
that popularized the concept of using design patterns to describe how to design flexible and reusable object-oriented software ... The Context object delegates an algorithm to different Strategy objects. First, Context calls algorithm() on a Strategy1 object ... What solution does the Strategy design pattern describe? Define a separate (strategy) object that encapsulates an algorithm. ... A class can be configured with a strategy object, which is used to perform an algorithm. Moreover, the strategy object can be ...
What solution does the Memento design pattern describe? Make an object (originator) itself responsible for saving its internal ... Here one can see that the memento object is actually used to revert the changes made in the object. //original object public ... The internal state of an object should be saved externally so that the object can be restored to this state later. The object's ... The object can also be accessed via a proxy, which can achieve any save/restore operation on the object. The memento pattern ...
... and notation of Mizar to describe it. Mizar's basic objects and processes are fully formal; they are described informally below ...
Object: an instance of a class. It is often used in analysis to represent an artifact or other item. Table: a stereotyped class ... Classes usually describe the logical structure of the system. Interface: a specification of behavior. An implementation class ... Class: a representation of an object that reflects its structure and behavior within the system. It is a template from which ...
... which describe ownership of objects, institutions, etc.; Demonstrative pronouns; Determinative pronouns; Reflexive pronouns, in ... There are also genitive direct objects. But the genitive object, other than accusative or dative objects, is somewhat outdated ... is always used for an object. In German, objects always have a relevant gender to consider. In the above examples, both ... German pronouns describe a set of German words with specific functions. As with other pronouns, they are frequently employed as ...
Consequently there are different terminologies to describe these objects. In graph theory they are called hypergraphs, and in ... A generalized n-gon contains no ordinary m-gon for 2 ≤ m < n and for every pair of objects (two points, two lines or a point ... The distance between two objects of an incidence structure - two points, two lines or a point and a line - can be defined to be ... It sometimes happens that authors blur the distinction between a study and the objects of that study, so it is not surprising ...
An object's properties are said to describe the object. When the NIEM XML Schemas are generated from the NIEM data model, data ... In NIEM, we interpret that object to be the real-world object. (An object class refers to a group of objects that share the ... which may represent a real-world object but may also represent any conceptual object, such as relationships and messages. ... Object Class Term: Represents the object to which the property is applicable. ...
... s are useful to describe objects after segmentation. Simple properties of the image which are found via image ... J. Flusser and T. Suk, "Rotation Moment Invariants for Recognition of Symmetric Objects", IEEE Trans. Image Proc., vol. 15, pp ... These invariants therefore are only approximately invariant when describing a shape in a discrete image. The central moments μi ...
Special cataloguing rules are available to describe these objects. Objects of realia, due to their diverse and compound nature ... is used to describe those mass-produced objects which incorporate documents or significant amounts of text (such as world ... Some large libraries can have a special mandate of keeping objects related to a literary collection or very large libraries can ... When accepting large bequests of mixed objects they normally have the donors sign legal documents giving permission to the ...
D and E describe the interaction between charged objects. D is related to the charge densities associated with this interaction ... More specifically, permittivity describes the amount of charge needed to generate one unit of electric flux in a particular ... The mechanism of dipoles relaxing is called dielectric relaxation and for ideal dipoles is described by classic Debye ... The response of a medium to static electric fields is described by the low-frequency limit of permittivity, also called the ...
Spells are described in the Speech; the wizard tells the object/subject what he/she wants to happen to it. With a final word, ... It is incredibly detailed and describes things which other languages cannot. Describing something inaccurately in the Speech ... The written characters of the Speech have been described in several of the books as resembling written Arabic. In Deep Wizardry ... "A glossary of people, places & objects in Earthsea: O". The Isolate Tower: An Earthsea Compendium. Retrieved 7 December 2014. ...
In this setup, researchers also observed objects that completely vanish for several seconds from user's attention. Describes ... Describes the FOV. The User's eye has a viewing angle of 94° from the center and 62° on the nose side. The vertical angle is ... Describes a muscle state of the eye, when the eyes are not focusing on a spe- cific point. There are three different states, ... Describes the phenomenon, which occurs when dissimilar images are presented to the human eye. As the two images captured by ...
What solution does the Command design pattern describe? Define separate (command) objects that encapsulate a request. A class ... Invoker object(s), command objects and receiver objects are held by a client object, the client decides which receiver objects ... Command Object, Routed Command Object, Action Object: a singleton object (e.g. there is only one CopyCommand object), which ... the target object will be a different object entirely. Command Object, routed event arguments, event object: the object that is ...
The food web described here based solely on prey-predator roles; Organisms active in the carbon and nitrogen cycles (such as ... It depends on the scope of the analysis and the complexity of the study object. Because these is always varies degrees of ... It describes a finding that in many (perhaps most) networks the mean path distances between vertices are surprisingly small. It ... Establish and describe the risk picture. Report the analysis. Evaluate the risk against risk acceptance criteria Suggest and ...
What solution does the State design pattern describe? Define separate (state) objects that encapsulate state-specific behavior ... objects that are easier to implement, change, test, and reuse. What problems can the State design pattern solve? An object ... The Context object delegates state-specific behavior to different State objects. First, Context calls operation(this) on its ... A class can change its behavior at run-time by changing its current state object. See also the UML class and sequence diagram ...
Alexander described 'a type of neurosis in which...the patient's entire life consists of actions not adapted to reality but ... is through alloplastic experiment with objects outside his own body....Unlike autoplastic experiments, alloplastic ones are ... Alloplasticity has also been used to describe humanity's cultural "evolution". Man's 'evolution by culture... ...
In the epilogue, it is implied Bast's fears are well-founded, as the present-day Kvothe is described as just a man "waiting to ... a discipline that creates links from one physical object to allow manipulation of another. Kvothe also witnesses Abenthy ...
It uses object recognition technology to produce an audio description of whats shown in photos that are posted on… ... Facebook is using its object recognition AI technology to describe photos to blind users. By Rob Thubron on Apr 5, 2016, 4:30 ... It uses object recognition technology to produce an audio description of whats shown in photos that are posted on the social ... But the object-recognition software is remarkably accurate most of the time, and the team is working on getting AAT to ...
Lightweight Information Describing Objects eine praktische Einführung in die Zusammenführung von Sammlungsdaten in Portalen ... LIDO - Lightweight Information Describing Objects Version 1.0 LIDO - Lightweight Information Describing Objects Version 1.0 ... 29 Structure Object Classification - Object Classifications Object / Work Type (mandatory) Classification -Object ... 31 Structure Object Identification - Object Classifications Object / Work Type (mandatory) Classification -Object ...
Example: describe(AppComponent(Integration Testing), () =, { it(should pass selectedHero object to heroDetailComponent, ... Simple Jasmine example: describe(FizzBuzz, () =, { it(should say Fizz when input can be divided 3, () =, { expect(fizzBuzz( ... Example: describe(AppComponent(Shallow testing), () =, { it(should render hero-detail element when selectedHero is set ... Example: describe(AppComponent(Isolated testing), () =, { it(should be set selectedHero when onSelect called, () =, { const ...
Students describe the positions and apparent motions of different objects in and beyond our solar system and how these objects ... D4.c: Describe the path of an object.. Distance-Time Graphs. Free Fall Tower. ... D3: Students describe properties of objects and materials before and after they undergo a change or interaction.. D3.f: Explain ... D4.b: Describe how fast things move by how long it takes them to go a certain distance.. Free Fall Tower. Measuring Motion. ...
Can the overall process be described as a business "object"?. Answering this question can be difficult as it is common for the ... A business object translates into the case, it often is a large business process. Examples of business objects as cases include ... With Case Manager, work no longer needs to be thought of in a linear process, users are now free to describe the work the way ... Eletron- A negatively charged content object. Tasks. In the lifecycle of an atom several activities can occur, these activities ...
Here is some text that describes the object and its operation.,/p, ,/object,. ... Example 1: An object includes a long description that describes it. Example Code: ... The body of the object element can be used to provide a complete text alternative for the object or may contain additional non- ... object data="companylogo.gif" type="image/gif", ,p,Company Name,/p, ,/object,. ...
Here is some text that describes the object and its operation.,/p, ,/object,. Example 2: An object includes non-text content ... object classid="java:Press.class" width="500" height="500", ,object data="Pressure.mpeg" type="video/mpeg", ,object data=" ... object, Example 3: The image object has content that provides a brief description of the function of the image ,object data=" ... "Pressure.gif" type="image/gif", As temperature increases, the molecules in the balloon... ,/object, ,/object, ,/object, ...
Notice And Describe Concrete Objects Around You. Another trick you can try if youre having trouble maintaining your calm is to ... silently describe simple objects in your environment. For example, talk to yourself about the carpet: "This carpet has a low ... It goes nicely with the cream-coloured walls." Sometimes it can help to make physical contact with an object. Touch the table ... By describing your surroundings, you ground yourself in the present, preventing your anxiety from escalating any further. ...
pg_describe_object(). function (Alvaro Herrera). This function is used to obtain a human-readable string describing an object, ... OID, object OID, and sub-object ID. It can be used to help interpret the contents of pg_depend. . ... E.76.3.4. Object Manipulation. * Add extensions which simplify packaging of additions to PostgreSQL (Dimitri Fontaine, Tom Lane ... Object. * Add RESTRICT. /. CASCADE. to ALTER TYPE. operations on typed tables (Peter Eisentraut) ...
pg_describe_object. returns a textual description of a database object specified by catalog OID, object OID, and sub-object ID ... pg_identify_object. or pg_describe_object. . classid. is the OID of the system catalog containing the object; objid. is the OID ... pg_describe_object(. classid. oid. , objid. oid. , objsubid. integer. ). text. get description of a database object. ... object_oid. , catalog_name. ). text. get comment for a database object. obj_description(. object_oid. ). text. get comment for ...
Object Oriented Software Software. Free, secure and fast downloads from the largest Open Source applications and software ... Briefly describe the problem (required): Upload screenshot of ad (required):. Select a file, or drag & drop file here. ... Object Brokering (1) * Templates (1) * Usability (1) * User Interfaces (3) * Internet (6) * WWW/HTTP (6) * Dynamic Content (6) ... PerlORM - Object relational mapper (ORM) for Perl. PerlORM is Perl library that implements object-relational mapping. Its ...
Factor the Object, Event, Condtion, etc.. as the status quo,. *Then describe its potential loss. This bias is triggered by the ... the Object, Event, Condtion, etc.. NOT part the status quo,. *Then describe its potential gain. This bias is triggered by the ... I can intuitively grasp it but poorly describe it. Basic Understanding. I can describe it but its not really a good description ... Pace describes the performance level Same goes for Horses. In AERC they have a certain pace for the horse relative to its BPM. ...
Briefly describe the problem (required): Upload screenshot of ad (required):. Select a file, or drag & drop file here. ... Enzyme: PHP profile/object community mgr. Status: Alpha. Brought to you by: clark, eries ...
Core Data describes entities with a Managed Object Model * Build your Fugitive entity ... Whether youre a seasoned Mac developer who wants to jump into the App store, or someone with strong object-oriented ...
This assessment describes activity that has occurred. 2. potential. This assessment describes potential activity that might ... Unlike XML, which is self-describing, atomic data must be documented to convey its meaning. This information is described in ... The Incident Object Description Exchange Format v2 draft-ietf-mile-rfc5070-bis-04 Abstract The Incident Object Description ... Watch for the described activity and share if seen. 16. defined-coa. Perform a predefined course of action (COA). The COA is ...
Chapter 4 Temperature describes how hot or cold an object is.. - Describing Temperature. - Measuring Temperature. - Chapter 4 ... Chapter 5 Scientists use the particle theory of matter to describe temperature.. - Particle Theory of Matter. - States of ...
Object oriented, responsive, free, and platform independent.. mothur is written in C++ using modern object-oriented programming ... Rarefaction curves describing the dependence of discovering novel OTUs as a function of sampling effort for OTUs defined at a ... Phylogenetic approaches for describing and comparing the diversity of microbial communities. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 68:3673- ... 1) to describe the similarities in membership and structure of the eight samples. Several interesting observations can be made ...
11.2 DESCRIBE The DESCRIBE method is used to retrieve the description of a presentation or media object from a server. The ... The sections describing how to register an item uses some of the requirements level described in RFC 2434 [20], namely "First ... By forcing a DESCRIBE response to contain all media initialization for the set of streams that it describes, and discouraging ... This response is independent for the DESCRIBE and SETUP requests. That is, a 304 response to DESCRIBE does NOT imply that the ...
Describe the object. Make the connection to your culture. Express the significance of the object to you. Symbolic Associations ... View each object/image on the board and write down the name of the object/image in the left column of your graphic organizer.. ...
Describe the object.. Figure 2 shows a model of a human torso.. Q1. What parts of the human body do you see?. Q2. To which ...
Read chapter 2 Describing the Problem: Each year, child protective services receive reports of child abuse and neglect ... and localized marks caused by pinching or slapping to significant marks caused by whipping or hitting with an object that may ... Describing the Problem. Child abuse and neglect is well established as an important societal concern with significant ... To be eligible to receive funding under Section 1062 of the act, states must, at a minimum, include the conduct described in ...
How can one describe the process of cell division in plants and animals?. ... How does the kinetic energy of a moving object change if its speed is halved?. ...
... objects/structures. So from that perspective this will Read data from RDBMS, , If the utility can push Arrow objects to RDBMS ... described here - , https://arrow.apache.org/docs/cpp/md_tutorials_row_wise_conversion.html , The utility will read data from ... over JDBC and get the JDBC objects converted to Arrow objects/structures. The , upstream utility can then work with Arrow ... that are quite often awful or use JDBC ones but have a high cost of serialization between the JVM and the Python objects. By ...
2.c: Investigate and describe the effects of forces acting on objects.. 2.c.1: Gravity, friction, magnetism, drag, lift, and ... 3.d: Describe and summarize how an egg and sperm unite in the reproduction of angiosperms and gymnosperms.. 3.d.1: The path of ... Inclined Plane - Sliding Objects. 2.d.3: Chemical energy transformed to another form of energy (e.g., light wands, lightning ... 4.f: Differentiate between objects in the universe (e.g., stars, moons, solar systems, asteroids, galaxies).. Solar System. ...
  • Given a set of entity classes, and a set of entity relationships, what is the best means of expressing and managing the object model across a set of Coherence named caches? (oracle.com)
  • Returns a Boolean value that indicates whether a given object is a date that is exactly equal the receiver. (apple.com)
  • Cocoa is a collection of object-oriented components written in the Objective-C language. (informit.com)
  • Objective-C is a flexible and dynamic language that adds object-oriented extensions to ANSI standard C. Because of the flexibility of Objective-C, the Cocoa components can be used by a wide variety of languages besides Objective-C. The key language elements needed to use Cocoa are support for dynamic object orientation and compatibility with the C programming language. (informit.com)
  • Text-based object-oriented class code, located in either local or remote machines is converted into proxy components which can be used in existing visual builders. (google.com)
  • 6. The apparatus of claim 1 further comprising a transport mechanism which is responsive to the proxy components for controlling the object-oriented class code. (google.com)
  • Code Components extracted from this document must include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as described in the Simplified BSD License. (ietf.org)
  • 118 ] describe components as 'the locus of computation and state. (uci.edu)
  • In his just-released book, ActionScript: The Definitive Guide (O'Reilly, US $39.95), author Colin Moock introduces both programmers and non-programmers to the new language by first describing fundamental programming concepts and then delineating in detail the components, syntax, and usage of ActionScript. (oreilly.com)
  • One of the important features of TinyMud was the ability of players to build and create their own rooms, objects, and puzzles in the game. (wikipedia.org)
  • The paper then argues that the consciousness can only perceive change since it is due to the continual influx of light reflecting off an object that causes new neurotransmitters to fire and activate the Neural Correlates of Consciousness (NCC) to be able to create an image in the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • can save and restore class instances transparently, however the class definition must be importable and live in the same module as when the object was stored. (python.org)
  • Usage is simple: schemagen -i MyOntology.owl -o MyJavaFile.java All the Ontology Class types are defined as Jena Resource object instances, and all the Ontology Predicate types are defined as Jena Property. (ibm.com)
  • The reaction object represents a reaction , which describes a transformation, transport, or binding process that changes one or more species. (mathworks.com)
  • See Property Summary for links to reaction object property reference pages. (mathworks.com)
  • Classes have constructors and destructors that are called when an object based on the class is created or destructors. (codeproject.com)
  • Flash 5 now includes a new object-oriented programming language called "ActionScript," used to control animation and multimedia within Flash. (oreilly.com)
  • most sorting algorithms can also handle objects that are "the same" but it complicates the problem. (uci.edu)
  • Bucket sort shows how abstraction is not always a good idea -- we can derive improved sorting algorithms for both numbers and alphabetical words by looking more carefully at the details of the objects being sorted. (uci.edu)
  • Students describe ways organisms depend upon, interact within, and change the living and non-living environment as well as ways the environment affects organisms. (explorelearning.com)
  • I'm sorry, but my reference was a UseNet discussion that is about a decade old now, when I asked for a review of my original 1995 'Stubbed T.O.E.' essay, which described a falling object as converting its own mass into the kinetic energy it acquired --- and access to the discussion appears to no longer be available. (thenakedscientists.com)
  • The Incident Object Description Exchange Format (IODEF) is a format for representing computer security information commonly exchanged between Computer Security Incident Response Teams (CSIRTs). (ietf.org)
  • This free course, Looking at, describing and identifying objects, will enable you to practise and develop your skills of observation and description of objects. (nottingham.ac.uk)
  • Binocular rivalry as a quantum formalism was first proposed by Efstratios Manousakis in his paper Quantum Formalism to Describe Binocular Rivalry in which he theorizes a mathematical description of the increase in dominance duration in binocular rivalry to make quantum predictions in which the observer affects the outcome for the distribution of perceptual alteration in time. (wikipedia.org)
  • Date objects are immutable, representing an invariant time interval relative to an absolute reference date (00:00:00 UTC on 1 January 2001). (apple.com)
  • In one embodiment, the technique is realized by identifying a portion of an image, and then filtering the portion of the image based upon an object characteristic and a reference within the image. (google.com)