Prilocaine: A local anesthetic that is similar pharmacologically to LIDOCAINE. Currently, it is used most often for infiltration anesthesia in dentistry.Anesthetics, Local: Drugs that block nerve conduction when applied locally to nerve tissue in appropriate concentrations. They act on any part of the nervous system and on every type of nerve fiber. In contact with a nerve trunk, these anesthetics can cause both sensory and motor paralysis in the innervated area. Their action is completely reversible. (From Gilman AG, et. al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed) Nearly all local anesthetics act by reducing the tendency of voltage-dependent sodium channels to activate.Mepivacaine: A local anesthetic that is chemically related to BUPIVACAINE but pharmacologically related to LIDOCAINE. It is indicated for infiltration, nerve block, and epidural anesthesia. Mepivacaine is effective topically only in large doses and therefore should not be used by this route. (From AMA Drug Evaluations, 1994, p168)Lidocaine: A local anesthetic and cardiac depressant used as an antiarrhythmia agent. Its actions are more intense and its effects more prolonged than those of PROCAINE but its duration of action is shorter than that of BUPIVACAINE or PRILOCAINE.Carticaine: A thiophene-containing local anesthetic pharmacologically similar to MEPIVACAINE.Anesthesia, Local: A blocking of nerve conduction to a specific area by an injection of an anesthetic agent.Anesthesia, Dental: A range of methods used to reduce pain and anxiety during dental procedures.Felypressin: A synthetic analog of LYPRESSIN with a PHENYLALANINE substitution at residue 2. Felypressin is a vasoconstrictor with reduced antidiuretic activity.Maxillary Nerve: The intermediate sensory division of the trigeminal (5th cranial) nerve. The maxillary nerve carries general afferents from the intermediate region of the face including the lower eyelid, nose and upper lip, the maxillary teeth, and parts of the dura.Dental Pulp Test: Investigations conducted on the physical health of teeth involving use of a tool that transmits hot or cold electric currents on a tooth's surface that can determine problems with that tooth based on reactions to the currents.Anesthesia, Conduction: Injection of an anesthetic into the nerves to inhibit nerve transmission in a specific part of the body.Anesthetics, Combined: The use of two or more chemicals simultaneously or sequentially to induce anesthesia. The drugs need not be in the same dosage form.Mouth Rehabilitation: Process of restoring damaged or decayed teeth using various restorative and non-cosmetic materials so that oral health is improved.Methemoglobinemia: The presence of methemoglobin in the blood, resulting in cyanosis. A small amount of methemoglobin is present in the blood normally, but injury or toxic agents convert a larger proportion of hemoglobin into methemoglobin, which does not function reversibly as an oxygen carrier. Methemoglobinemia may be due to a defect in the enzyme NADH methemoglobin reductase (an autosomal recessive trait) or to an abnormality in hemoglobin M (an autosomal dominant trait). (Dorland, 27th ed)Anesthesia, Spinal: Procedure in which an anesthetic is injected directly into the spinal cord.Ambulatory Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on an outpatient basis. It may be hospital-based or performed in an office or surgicenter.Tetracaine: A potent local anesthetic of the ester type used for surface and spinal anesthesia.Ointments: Semisolid preparations used topically for protective emollient effects or as a vehicle for local administration of medications. Ointment bases are various mixtures of fats, waxes, animal and plant oils and solid and liquid hydrocarbons.Nerve Block: Interruption of NEURAL CONDUCTION in peripheral nerves or nerve trunks by the injection of a local anesthetic agent (e.g., LIDOCAINE; PHENOL; BOTULINUM TOXINS) to manage or treat pain.ToluidinesNordefrin: A norepinephrine derivative used as a vasoconstrictor agent.Bupivacaine: A widely used local anesthetic agent.Phlebotomy: The techniques used to draw blood from a vein for diagnostic purposes or for treatment of certain blood disorders such as erythrocytosis, hemochromatosis, polycythemia vera, and porphyria cutanea tarda.Lacerations: Torn, ragged, mangled wounds.Urination: Discharge of URINE, liquid waste processed by the KIDNEY, from the body.Femoral Nerve: A nerve originating in the lumbar spinal cord (usually L2 to L4) and traveling through the lumbar plexus to provide motor innervation to extensors of the thigh and sensory innervation to parts of the thigh, lower leg, and foot, and to the hip and knee joints.Ethyl Chloride: A gas that condenses under slight pressure. Because of its low boiling point ethyl chloride sprayed on skin produces an intense cold by evaporation. Cold blocks nerve conduction. Ethyl chloride has been used in surgery but is primarily used to relieve local pain in sports medicine.Skin Cream: A water-soluble medicinal preparation applied to the skin.Ice Cream: A frozen dairy food made from cream or butterfat, milk, sugar, and flavorings. Frozen custard and French-type ice creams also contain eggs.Vaccination: Administration of vaccines to stimulate the host's immune response. This includes any preparation intended for active immunological prophylaxis.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Societies, Medical: Societies whose membership is limited to physicians.Health Personnel: Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)United States Food and Drug Administration: An agency of the PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to maintaining standards of quality of foods, drugs, therapeutic devices, etc.Pharmacology: The study of the origin, nature, properties, and actions of drugs and their effects on living organisms.Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions: Disorders that result from the intended use of PHARMACEUTICAL PREPARATIONS. Included in this heading are a broad variety of chemically-induced adverse conditions due to toxicity, DRUG INTERACTIONS, and metabolic effects of pharmaceuticals.Pharmacology, Clinical: The branch of pharmacology that deals directly with the effectiveness and safety of drugs in humans.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems: Systems developed for collecting reports from government agencies, manufacturers, hospitals, physicians, and other sources on adverse drug reactions.Pseudocholinesterase: An aspect of cholinesterases.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Diflucortolone: A topical glucocorticoid used in various DERMATOSES. It is absorbed through the skin, bound to plasma albumin, and may cause adrenal suppression. It is also administered as the valerate.Skin Absorption: Uptake of substances through the SKIN.Nanoparticles: Nanometer-sized particles that are nanoscale in three dimensions. They include nanocrystaline materials; NANOCAPSULES; METAL NANOPARTICLES; DENDRIMERS, and QUANTUM DOTS. The uses of nanoparticles include DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEMS and cancer targeting and imaging.Drug Carriers: Forms to which substances are incorporated to improve the delivery and the effectiveness of drugs. Drug carriers are used in drug-delivery systems such as the controlled-release technology to prolong in vivo drug actions, decrease drug metabolism, and reduce drug toxicity. Carriers are also used in designs to increase the effectiveness of drug delivery to the target sites of pharmacological actions. Liposomes, albumin microspheres, soluble synthetic polymers, DNA complexes, protein-drug conjugates, and carrier erythrocytes among others have been employed as biodegradable drug carriers.Lipids: A generic term for fats and lipoids, the alcohol-ether-soluble constituents of protoplasm, which are insoluble in water. They comprise the fats, fatty oils, essential oils, waxes, phospholipids, glycolipids, sulfolipids, aminolipids, chromolipids (lipochromes), and fatty acids. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Administration, Cutaneous: The application of suitable drug dosage forms to the skin for either local or systemic effects.
  • What are dermal fillers? (maylips.com)
  • Dermal fillers are an increasingly popular type of cosmetic products that can be used to correct a number of aesthetic imperfections. (maylips.com)
  • The most popular material used in dermal fillers is the natural ingredient hyaluronic acid. (maylips.com)
  • Teosyal® is a full range of injectable dermal fillers made of non-animal origin and biodegradable hyaluronic acid. (l1p.co.uk)
  • Juvederm is a family of injectable hyaluronic acid dermal fillers used to provide correction for moderate to severe facial wrinkles and folds. (l1p.co.uk)
  • As well, some dermal fillers may be available with an anesthetic already in the formula. (medicadepot.com)
  • Dermal Fillers are a non-surgical treatment to reduce fine lines and wrinkles. (purebeau.ie)
  • Dermal fillers involve the injection of a natural substance - hyaluronic acid, which is already contained within the body, in order to add volume to the treated area. (purebeau.ie)
  • Dermal Fillers are an increasingly popular option for people who wish to reduce signs of ageing, without having to resort to expensive, complicated plastic surgery. (purebeau.ie)
  • Dermal fillers are an extremely popular and successful method of treating these concerns and deliver a fresher, more youthful appearance. (purebeau.ie)
  • A perfect alternative to a surgical chin implant, is a non-surgical chin augmentation which is achieved with dermal fillers. (purebeau.ie)
  • Other commonly treated areas with dermal fillers include nose reshaping for those who do not want to undergo surgery, and also just under the eyebrows to give an eyebrow lift or to fill out any hollows there. (purebeau.ie)
  • Dermal fillers can be used to outline the border of the lips to enhance the definition of lips or in the body of the lips to enhance lip size and pout. (purebeau.ie)
  • Dermal fillers can be injected into this area to plump out the face with natural volume and a gentle lift. (purebeau.ie)
  • By using an advanced technique, dermal fillers can be placed in either tear trough itself, slightly lower in the cheek area, or indeed a combination of both to achieve brighter, more rejuvenated eyes. (purebeau.ie)
  • Dermal fillers act to replace underlying supportive tissue that reduces with age. (purebeau.ie)
  • View current promotions and reviews of Muscle Pain Relief Cream and get free shipping at $35.Pmma Dermal Fillers Injectable Hyaluronic Acid Gel, sells online to all professionals, from labs to customers with free shipping, and discount codes. (mentalwealthza.org.za)
  • I have someone overseas uses the patches and she gets lot of pain relief, unfortunately they do not have lidocaine in that country, I need to buy her few boxes, I know the box has 30 patches .Buy our most popular dermal fillers designed to minimise fine to deep wrinkles, alongside creating volume in lips and cheeks.Lidocaine.org is tracked by us since February, 2014. (glamspot.pl)
  • Unlike other topical products, lidocaine is absorbed by the skin allowing for maximum efficacy without transferring to your partner.Buy orthopedic injectables, dermal fillers and dermatology supplies like Synvisc and Juvederm at the best wholesale price online!Buy Sculptra online. (glamspot.pl)
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  • Injection of dermal fillers for soft tissue augmentation is one of the most popular cosmetic procedures. (jcadonline.com)
  • The present specification generally relates to injectable dermal fillers including multifunctional polyethylene glycol-based crosslinking agents, hydrogel compositions comprising a matrix polymer crosslinked with such crosslinking agents, and methods of treating a soft tissue condition using such hydrogel compositions. (patentsencyclopedia.com)
  • This loss of materials results in various skin conditions such as, e.g ., wrinkling, hollowness, loss of moisture and other undesirable conditions that contribute to the appearance of aging Injectable dermal fillers have been successfully used in treating the aging skin. (google.com.au)
  • Commercially available dermal fillers are generally prepared by the crosslinking of hydroxyl groups of HA a chemical crosslinker. (google.com.au)
  • The softness and tissue augmentation effect of dermal fillers can be controlled by changing the cross-linking density with various crosslinkers. (google.com.au)
  • The anticipated and procedural pain of injection of neurotoxin and dermal fillers is of concern and anxiety to patients. (eplasty.com)
  • At 20 minutes, mean arterial blood pressure was lower and use of vasopressor drugs was higher (22.7 versus 10 percent) in the chloroprocaine versus the prilocaine group. (medicalxpress.com)
  • Although the incidence of systemic adverse reactions with lidocaine and prilocaine cream, 2.5%/2.5% is very low, caution should be exercised, particularly when applying it over large areas and leaving it on for longer than 2 hours. (drugs.com)
  • 2019;52(11):e8567 Authors: Peng L, Zheng HY, Dai Y Abstract The aim of this study was to explore the analgesic effect of local application of compound lidocaine/prilocaine cream on cancer wounds during wound care in order to reduce the amount of morphine intake or completely replace the systemic morphine administration and optimize the protocol for cancer wound pain management. (medworm.com)
  • Factors such as acidosis and the use of CNS stimulants and inhibitors affect CNS levels of prilocaine required to produce significant systemic effects. (steroidrug.com)
  • The aim of this study was to explore the analgesic effect of local application of compound lidocaine/prilocaine cream on cancer wounds during wound care in order to reduce the amount of morphine intake or completely replace the systemic morphine administration and optimize the protocol for cancer wound pain management. (bvsalud.org)
  • Local dermal application of the compound lidocaine cream can be used as an alternative to the systemic morphine administration in cancer wound care for its safety and effectiveness. (bvsalud.org)
  • Rolland A. Particulate carriers in dermal and transdermal drug delivery: myth or reality? (springer.com)
  • Unfortunately, a significant obstacle to dermal and transdermal drug delivery alike is the resilient barrier that the epidermal layers of the skin, primarily the stratum corneum, presents for the diffusion of exogenous chemical agents. (wiley.com)
  • Dermal filler injections also require less downtime, and though they are a temporary procedure, they offer results that can last from months to years. (maylips.com)
  • Numbing cream used by UK healthcare professionals for years to relieve pain caused by minor burns, sunburn, and insect bites, as well as tattoo application and removal, waxing, and dermal injections.GOLD BOND IS EVERYWHERE YOU ARE. (mentalwealthza.org.za)