Coma: A profound state of unconsciousness associated with depressed cerebral activity from which the individual cannot be aroused. Coma generally occurs when there is dysfunction or injury involving both cerebral hemispheres or the brain stem RETICULAR FORMATION.Glasgow Coma Scale: A scale that assesses the response to stimuli in patients with craniocerebral injuries. The parameters are eye opening, motor response, and verbal response.Diabetic Coma: A state of unconsciousness as a complication of diabetes mellitus. It occurs in cases of extreme HYPERGLYCEMIA or extreme HYPOGLYCEMIA as a complication of INSULIN therapy.Insulin Coma: Severe HYPOGLYCEMIA induced by a large dose of exogenous INSULIN resulting in a COMA or profound state of unconsciousness from which the individual cannot be aroused.Coma, Post-Head Injury: Prolonged unconsciousness from which the individual cannot be aroused, associated with traumatic injuries to the BRAIN. This may be defined as unconsciousness persisting for 6 hours or longer. Coma results from injury to both cerebral hemispheres or the RETICULAR FORMATION of the BRAIN STEM. Contributing mechanisms include DIFFUSE AXONAL INJURY and BRAIN EDEMA. (From J Neurotrauma 1997 Oct;14(10):699-713)Myxedema: A condition characterized by a dry, waxy type of swelling (EDEMA) with abnormal deposits of MUCOPOLYSACCHARIDES in the SKIN and other tissues. It is caused by a deficiency of THYROID HORMONES. The skin becomes puffy around the eyes and on the cheeks. The face is dull and expressionless with thickened nose and lips.Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar Nonketotic Coma: A serious complication of TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS. It is characterized by extreme HYPERGLYCEMIA; DEHYDRATION; serum hyperosmolarity; and depressed consciousness leading to COMA in the absence of KETOSIS and ACIDOSIS.Brain Injuries: Acute and chronic (see also BRAIN INJURIES, CHRONIC) injuries to the brain, including the cerebral hemispheres, CEREBELLUM, and BRAIN STEM. Clinical manifestations depend on the nature of injury. Diffuse trauma to the brain is frequently associated with DIFFUSE AXONAL INJURY or COMA, POST-TRAUMATIC. Localized injuries may be associated with NEUROBEHAVIORAL MANIFESTATIONS; HEMIPARESIS, or other focal neurologic deficits.Craniocerebral Trauma: Traumatic injuries involving the cranium and intracranial structures (i.e., BRAIN; CRANIAL NERVES; MENINGES; and other structures). Injuries may be classified by whether or not the skull is penetrated (i.e., penetrating vs. nonpenetrating) or whether there is an associated hemorrhage.Hepatic Encephalopathy: A syndrome characterized by central nervous system dysfunction in association with LIVER FAILURE, including portal-systemic shunts. Clinical features include lethargy and CONFUSION (frequently progressing to COMA); ASTERIXIS; NYSTAGMUS, PATHOLOGIC; brisk oculovestibular reflexes; decorticate and decerebrate posturing; MUSCLE SPASTICITY; and bilateral extensor plantar reflexes (see REFLEX, BABINSKI). ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY may demonstrate triphasic waves. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1117-20; Plum & Posner, Diagnosis of Stupor and Coma, 3rd ed, p222-5)Malaria, Cerebral: A condition characterized by somnolence or coma in the presence of an acute infection with PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM (and rarely other Plasmodium species). Initial clinical manifestations include HEADACHES; SEIZURES; and alterations of mentation followed by a rapid progression to COMA. Pathologic features include cerebral capillaries filled with parasitized erythrocytes and multiple small foci of cortical and subcortical necrosis. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p136)Persistent Vegetative State: Vegetative state refers to the neurocognitive status of individuals with severe brain damage, in whom physiologic functions (sleep-wake cycles, autonomic control, and breathing) persist, but awareness (including all cognitive function and emotion) is abolished.Corneal Wavefront Aberration: Asymmetries in the topography and refractive index of the corneal surface that affect visual acuity.Aberrometry: The use of an aberrometer to measure eye tissue imperfections or abnormalities based on the way light passes through the eye which affects the ability of the eye to focus properly.Trauma Severity Indices: Systems for assessing, classifying, and coding injuries. These systems are used in medical records, surveillance systems, and state and national registries to aid in the collection and reporting of trauma.Glasgow Outcome Scale: A scale that assesses the outcome of serious craniocerebral injuries, based on the level of regained social functioning.Astigmatism: Unequal curvature of the refractive surfaces of the eye. Thus a point source of light cannot be brought to a point focus on the retina but is spread over a more or less diffuse area. This results from the radius of curvature in one plane being longer or shorter than the radius at right angles to it. (Dorland, 27th ed)Corneal Topography: The measurement of curvature and shape of the anterior surface of the cornea using techniques such as keratometry, keratoscopy, photokeratoscopy, profile photography, computer-assisted image processing and videokeratography. This measurement is often applied in the fitting of contact lenses and in diagnosing corneal diseases or corneal changes including keratoconus, which occur after keratotomy and keratoplasty.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)MedlinePlus: NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE service for health professionals and consumers. It links extensive information from the National Institutes of Health and other reviewed sources of information on specific diseases and conditions.Posture: The position or attitude of the body.Wrist: The region of the upper limb between the metacarpus and the FOREARM.Gross Domestic Product: Value of all final goods and services produced in a country in one year.EncyclopediasZinc Fingers: Motifs in DNA- and RNA-binding proteins whose amino acids are folded into a single structural unit around a zinc atom. In the classic zinc finger, one zinc atom is bound to two cysteines and two histidines. In between the cysteines and histidines are 12 residues which form a DNA binding fingertip. By variations in the composition of the sequences in the fingertip and the number and spacing of tandem repeats of the motif, zinc fingers can form a large number of different sequence specific binding sites.Dictionaries, MedicalDictionaries as Topic: Lists of words, usually in alphabetical order, giving information about form, pronunciation, etymology, grammar, and meaning.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Dictionaries, ChemicalSocial Sciences: Disciplines concerned with the interrelationships of individuals in a social environment including social organizations and institutions. Includes Sociology and Anthropology.Oral Ulcer: A loss of mucous substance of the mouth showing local excavation of the surface, resulting from the sloughing of inflammatory necrotic tissue. It is the result of a variety of causes, e.g., denture irritation, aphthous stomatitis (STOMATITIS, APHTHOUS); NOMA; necrotizing gingivitis (GINGIVITIS, NECROTIZING ULCERATIVE); TOOTHBRUSHING; and various irritants. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p842)Hospitals, AnimalBehcet Syndrome: Rare chronic inflammatory disease involving the small blood vessels. It is of unknown etiology and characterized by mucocutaneous ulceration in the mouth and genital region and uveitis with hypopyon. The neuro-ocular form may cause blindness and death. SYNOVITIS; THROMBOPHLEBITIS; gastrointestinal ulcerations; RETINAL VASCULITIS; and OPTIC ATROPHY may occur as well.Stomatitis, Aphthous: A recurrent disease of the oral mucosa of unknown etiology. It is characterized by small white ulcerative lesions, single or multiple, round or oval. Two to eight crops of lesions occur per year, lasting for 7 to 14 days and then heal without scarring. (From Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p742)Stomach Ulcer: Ulceration of the GASTRIC MUCOSA due to contact with GASTRIC JUICE. It is often associated with HELICOBACTER PYLORI infection or consumption of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS).Duodenal Ulcer: A PEPTIC ULCER located in the DUODENUM.Dental Clinics: Facilities where dental care is provided to patients.Cold-Shock Response: A constellation of responses that occur when an organism is exposed to excessive cold. In humans, a fall in skin temperature triggers gasping, hypertension, and hyperventilation.Amnesia: Pathologic partial or complete loss of the ability to recall past experiences (AMNESIA, RETROGRADE) or to form new memories (AMNESIA, ANTEROGRADE). This condition may be of organic or psychologic origin. Organic forms of amnesia are usually associated with dysfunction of the DIENCEPHALON or HIPPOCAMPUS. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp426-7)Critical Illness: A disease or state in which death is possible or imminent.Friends: Persons whom one knows, likes, and trusts.Social Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Amnesia, Retrograde: Loss of the ability to recall information that had been previously encoded in memory prior to a specified or approximate point in time. This process may be organic or psychogenic in origin. Organic forms may be associated with CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; CEREBROVASCULAR ACCIDENTS; SEIZURES; DEMENTIA; and a wide variety of other conditions that impair cerebral function. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp426-9)Heart Failure: A heterogeneous condition in which the heart is unable to pump out sufficient blood to meet the metabolic need of the body. Heart failure can be caused by structural defects, functional abnormalities (VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION), or a sudden overload beyond its capacity. Chronic heart failure is more common than acute heart failure which results from sudden insult to cardiac function, such as MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Pneumonia: Infection of the lung often accompanied by inflammation.Heart: The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.Hepatitis C: INFLAMMATION of the LIVER in humans caused by HEPATITIS C VIRUS, a single-stranded RNA virus. Its incubation period is 30-90 days. Hepatitis C is transmitted primarily by contaminated blood parenterally, and is often associated with transfusion and intravenous drug abuse. However, in a significant number of cases, the source of hepatitis C infection is unknown.Pneumonia, Bacterial: Inflammation of the lung parenchyma that is caused by bacterial infections.Heart Rate: The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.Ventriculostomy: Surgical creation of an opening in a cerebral ventricle.Craniotomy: Any operation on the cranium or incision into the cranium. (Dorland, 28th ed)Cerebral Ventriculitis: Inflammation of CEREBRAL VENTRICLES.Surgical Fixation Devices: Devices used to hold tissue structures together for repair, reconstruction or to close wounds. They may consist of adsorbable or non-adsorbable, natural or synthetic materials. They include tissue adhesives, skin tape, sutures, buttons, staples, clips, screws, etc., each designed to conform to various tissue geometries.Intracranial Pressure: Pressure within the cranial cavity. It is influenced by brain mass, the circulatory system, CSF dynamics, and skull rigidity.Cerebrospinal Fluid Shunts: Tubes inserted to create communication between a cerebral ventricle and the internal jugular vein. Their emplacement permits draining of cerebrospinal fluid for relief of hydrocephalus or other condition leading to fluid accumulation in the ventricles.
It consists of three massive galaxy superclusters: Hercules, Coma and Leo. The CfA2 Great Wall includes Coma Filament. It was ... The CfA2 Great Wall has the maximum dimensions of either 500 million or 750 million light years; depending upon the figure and ... The Great Wall (also called Coma Wall), sometimes specifically referred to as the CfA2 Great Wall, is an immense galaxy ...
Treatment is variable depending on individuals. Some treatments work extremely well with some patients and not at all with ... There are two clinical subtypes of MBD Type A- Stupor and coma predominate. Radiological imaging shows involvement of the ... coma, etc. There will also be lesions in the corpus callosum. It is classically associated with chronic alcoholism and ...
Affected patients may have normal, low, or slightly elevated TSH depending on the spectrum of illness. Total T4 and T3 levels ... Allostatic overload may result in wasting syndrome and myxedema coma. Thyroid storm, on the other hand, represents allostatic ...
In extreme cases the hyperglycemia may be severe enough to cause nonketotic hyperosmolar coma. Treatment depends on the ...
A coma suspension is a suspension in which the hooks are placed in the chest, torso and legs, usually in two rows, such that ... Depending on the position in which the body is to be suspended, multiple hooks are sometimes located around the shoulders, ... A superman suspension is the opposite of a coma suspension - the hooks are placed in the back and legs, usually in two rows, ... The name of this position comes from the similar imagery in the movie Coma. This suspension takes place hooked from the knees ...
Coma, as it is closely related to severity, is a strong predictor of poor outcome. Prognosis differs depending on the severity ... Treatment depends on the recovery stage of the patient. In the acute stage the primary aim of the medical personnel is to ... In addition, outcome depends heavily on the cause of head injury. In the US, patients with fall-related TBIs have an 89% ... "Coma" at Dorland's Medical Dictionary . Cassidy JD, Carroll LJ, Peloso PM, Borg J, von Holst H, Holm L, et al. (2004). " ...
Symptoms vary depending on the location and the size of the area of involvement of the stroke. Edema, or swelling, of the brain ... A stroke may result in coma or death if it involves key areas of the brain. Other symptoms of cerebrovascular disease include ...
If this overdose is not treated with chelation therapy, it can lead to death or permanent coma. The term 'overdose' is often ... Signs and symptoms of an overdose vary depending on the drug or toxin exposure. The symptoms can often be divided into ...
... may depend on hereditary disorders consisting of degeneration of the cerebellum and/or of the spine; most cases feature ... These include reversible cerebellar ataxia, dementia, peripheral neuropathy, psychosis and coma. Most of the neurological ... The effectiveness of the treatment depends on the elapsed time from the onset of the ataxia until diagnosis. The death of ... Peripheral neuropathies may cause generalised or localised sensory ataxia (e.g. a limb only) depending on the extent of the ...
Depending on the rate of severity, it can cause a skin reactions, bronchoconstriction, swelling, low blood pressure, coma, and ... Depending on the country about 1-18% of people have asthma. Anaphylaxis occurs in between 0.05-2% of people. Rates of many ... Depending on the individual, allergen, and mode of introduction, the symptoms can be system-wide (classical anaphylaxis), or ...
In some cases coma can give the brain an opportunity to heal and regenerate, but, in general, the longer a coma, the greater ... The method of restoration depends on the cause of the hypoxia. For mild-to-moderate cases of hypoxia, removal of the cause of ... Families of coma victims often have idealized images of the outcome based on Hollywood movie depictions of coma. Adjusting to ... A deep coma will interfere with body's breathing reflexes even after the initial cause of hypoxia has been dealt with; ...
Coma and seizures represent the most advanced stage; cerebral oedema (swelling of the brain tissue) leads to death. ... The treatment of hepatic encephalopathy depends on the suspected underlying cause (types A, B or C) and the presence or absence ... In the advanced stages it can result in a coma. Hepatic encephalopathy can occur in those with acute or chronic liver disease. ... The fourth stage is marked by a progression to coma. More severe forms of hepatic encephalopathy lead to a worsening level of ...
Massa's condition continued to improve over the course of the weekend, the Brazilian having been sedated in a coma for 48 hours ... Massa could be released from hospital within a week to ten days, depending on how well he progresses. Massa's doctor, Dino ... Noble, Jonathan (2009-07-26). "Massa to remain in coma for 48 hours". autosport.com. Haymarket Publications. Retrieved 2009-07- ...
Coma-inducing drugs may be used during surgery to reduce impairments and restore blood flow. Brain injuries have far-reaching ... This can be issues with either long or short term memories depending on the location and severity of the injury. Sometimes ... Medicines used for traumatic injuries are diuretics, anti-seizure or coma-inducing drugs. Diuretics reduce the fluid in tissues ...
Such polarization is the result of solar radiation getting scattered by the dust particles in the coma of the comet and depends ... The dust production rate of the comet was very high (up to 2.0×106 kg/s), which may have made the inner coma optically thick. ... It further confirms that the dust grains in the coma of comet Hale-Bopp were smaller than inferred in any other comet. One of ... Rodgers, S. D.; Charnley, S. B. (2002). "Organic synthesis in the coma of Comet Hale-Bopp?". Monthly Notices of the Royal ...
... memory access time depends on the memory location relative to a processor; cache-only memory architecture (COMA): the local ... Depending on context, programs may run on a single processor or on multiple separate processors. Using memory for communication ...
These consequences depend in part on the volume, chemical composition, particle size, presence or absence of infectious agents ... coma, drug overdose, sedation or general anesthesia). In intensive care, sitting patients up reduces the risk of pulmonary ... The location of abscesses caused by aspiration depends on the position one is in. If one is sitting or standing up, the ... Measures to prevent aspiration depend on the situation and the patient. In patients at imminent risk of aspiration, tracheal ...
Depending on the location of the brain lesion different symptoms are more frequent: Brainstem tegmentum. - Ocular: pupillary ... Torviket al., 1982; Blansjaar and Van Dijk, 1992 Lana-Peixoto MA, Dos Santos EC, Pittella JE (September 1992). "Coma and death ... depending on the cause. Wernicke's encephalopathy may be present in the general population with a prevalence of around 2%, and ... choreic dyskinesias and coma. Because of the frequent involvement of heart, eyes and peripheral nervous system, several authors ...
Depending on the dose, the drug can produce paradoxical effects, including CNS stimulation or depression. Most antihistamines ... In adults, overdose usually leads to CNS depression, ranging from drowsiness to coma.[medical citation needed] Clemastine is an ...
... coma and cerebral oedema. It can also cause central pontine myelinolysis. Treatment for psychogenic polydipsia depends on ...
He was in a coma for two days after having had a stroke with doctors planning to transfer him to a French hospital for further ... He's a good person to talk to because of his experience in England and I can ask him anything, depending on situations." On 3 ... Gibson, Sean (4 October 2016). "Rigobert Song: Former Liverpool and Cameroon defender out of coma after stroke". The Guardian. ...
166P/NEAT was discovered while it exhibited a coma, and so is classified as a comet, though its orbit is that of a centaur. ... The spectra observed vary depending on the period of the observation. Water ice signature was detected during a period of low ... 60558 Echeclus was discovered without a coma but recently became active, and so it too is now classified as both a comet and an ... The faint comet 38P/Stephan-Oterma would probably not show a coma if it had a perihelion distance beyond Jupiter's orbit at 5 ...
A small percentage of affected people may develop hepatic coma. Yellow discoloration of the skin (jaundice) can occur, but is ... The mechanism of ischemic hepatitis depends on the etiopathogenetic origin, be it a cardiomyopathy, cardiac tamponade, trauma, ...
It depends on the type of primary cancer, the age of the patient, the absence or presence of extracranial metastases, and the ... Neurological symptoms are often caused by increased intracranial pressure, with severe cases resulting in coma. The most common ... Because different parts of the brain are responsible for different functions, symptoms vary depending on the site of metastasis ...
Depending on the file system, operating system, and other circumstances, it is possible for data loss to occur if the disk ... the term is sometimes used to describe similar hardware design flaws such as the Cyrix coma bug. No permanent hardware damage ...
... the distinction depends on our way to appreciate and read will depend on a serial linguistics facts. Some another time, I will ... santificado sexa o teu nome, veña a nós o teu reino e fágase a túa vontade aquí na terra coma no ceo.. santificado seja o Teu ...
Prognosis depends on all the factors involved. Your veterinarian will let you know what your particular pet needs and will be ... How big these changes are depends on how far things have gone out of whack when the problem is discovered. Early detection of ... Hydration of the body depends not only on water consumed but on water removed. In times of dehydration, the kidney must respond ... Recommended treatment is different depending on which jobs the kidneys are not keeping up with and how bad the function loss ...
Therapy of oral ulcers depends on the cause. If due to periodontal disease, teeth cleaning, polishing, and strict home care may ...
Uhhnnn... It depends.... In a forum, like this, we have to listen (read to give a answer), and the fact its not exactly real ... To fix a bad culture can take many years, and depending of how is the basic culture, how strong iot is connected or pride of ...
Insulin-coma treatment. The principle of insulin-shock treatment lies in the production of the deep coma that results from a ... Depending heavily on measurement and replication, it is precise and highly plausible in the face of the evidence. But it is ... Insulin-coma therapy of schizophrenia is most effective in patients who have been sick for not more than six months to a year. ... Within one to two hours they fall asleep and eventually go into a deep coma from which, at the end of three or four hours, they ...
The degree of impairment depends on the extent of damage to critical brain areas. The majority of… ... and severe-based on the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). The GCS is a 15-point scale designed to measure the patients ability to ... moderate, and severe-based on the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). The GCS is a 15-point scale designed to measure the patients ... The degree of impairment depends on the extent of damage to critical brain areas. The majority of… ...
The outlook depends on the cause. There may be brain and nervous system injury and permanent brain damage, which can lead to:. ... Altered mental status and coma. In: Markovchick VJ, Pons PT, Bakes KM, Buchanan JA, eds. Emergency Medicine Secrets. 6th ed. ...
The outlook depends on the cause. There may be brain and nervous system injury and permanent brain damage, which can lead to:. ...
Different patterns of coma depend on the origin of the injury. Concussions may cause losses of consciousness of short duration ... Coma. Coma, state of unconsciousness, characterized by loss of reaction to external stimuli and absence of spontaneous nervous ... Coma may accompany a number of metabolic disorders or physical injuries to the brain from disease or trauma. ... For most metabolic comas, the first step in treatment is to protect the brain cells and attempt to eliminate the cause of coma ...
While it rarely lasts longer than a few weeks, some people never wake from a coma. ... Coma is a state of prolonged unconsciousness with many possible causes. ... Treatment varies, depending on the cause of the coma. A procedure or medications to relieve pressure on the brain due to brain ... A coma is an emergency medical condition. If you are with a person who develops signs and symptoms of a coma, call 911 or your ...
A coma can look different depending on the situation. Some people will lie completely still and be unresponsive. Others will ... The Soap Opera Coma. Unfortunately, the soap opera coma bears little resemblance to a real-life coma. When a team of ... In reality, coma survival rates are 50 percent or less, and less than 10 percent of people who come out of a coma completely ... identifies the degree of mental impairment by assigning a score ranging from three to 15, with three being the deepest coma and ...
... a diabetic coma can result. This is a medical emergency, but with rapid treatment, a person can usually recovery quickly. ... A diabetic coma needs immediate treatment.. A doctor can reverse a diabetic coma quickly, but the treatment depends on the type ... Without treatment, the coma can be fatal.. Even if a diabetic coma does not occur, the long-term impact of having blood sugar ... Hypoglycemic diabetic coma: Treatment is with glucose and injected glucagon.. Hyperglycemic diabetic coma: The doctor will ...
... hyperglycemic coma), or when our blood sugar range falls too low (hypoglycemic coma). ... What is diabetic coma? It occurs when our blood sugar range rises too high ( ... It all depends on the cause. What is Diabetes?. Simply, diabetes is a condition where sugar intake is not processed properly by ... What is Diabetic Coma?. Diabetic coma is when our body and brain shut down. It is caused when the blood sugar range rises above ...
What can I do for a friend in a coma and in critical condition? Support. I am guessing the friend is already in the icu. While ... Depends...: In general, surviving coma depends on the reason for the coma and whether the etiology of the coma is reversible or ... Coma: If one is going to recover from coma it may last days to weeks. If recovery is not going to occur, people move from coma ... It depends if the underlying reason that caused the coma is reversible or correctable. Even then it is difficult as it depends ...
Washburn on induced coma septic shock: There is a very rare problem where patients develop intra abdominal compartment syndrome ... then lapse into coma, and finally step into eternity. What is the pace of dying? It heavily depends upon the availability of ... Depends: Only people with diabetes can develop diabetic ketoacidosis. If someone who already has diabetes has a septic abortion ... Pharmacologically induced coma may be used to treat seizures, i.e. Uncontrolled seizures, i.e. Status epilepticus. The idea is ...
... coma, heart - Answer: Having been HCV positive for years before Harvoni cured me, Ill ... ... I have been tested this time negative depending on the doctor. Some say I have it,others no, so Im very confused? ... heart failure, pneumonia, hepatitis c, coma, heart, liver, liver disease. Details:. ... later I had hepatitis c enzymes in me. ... Does anyone know of a person being in a hepatic coma for more than a month who has come out ok?. Posted 4 Mar 2013 • 1 answer ...
Coma There may be other risks depending on your specific medical condition. Be sure to discuss any concerns with your doctor ... Depending on your situation, you may be given liquids to drink a few hours after surgery. Your diet may be gradually changed to ... Depending on your status, you may be transferred to a rehabilitation facility for a period of time to regain your strength. ... There are various types of incisions that may be used, depending on the affected area of the brain. An incision may be made ...
Coma. There may be other risks depending on your specific health condition. Discuss any concerns with your healthcare provider ... Depending on your case, you may be given liquids to drink a few hours after surgery. Your diet may be gradually changed to ... Depending on your status, you may be moved to a rehabilitation facility for a period to regain your strength. ... A craniotomy generally requires a hospital stay of 3 to 7 days or more, depending on your condition. You may also go to a ...
... vigil coma explanation free. What is vigil coma? Meaning of vigil coma medical term. What does vigil coma mean? ... Looking for online definition of vigil coma in the Medical Dictionary? ... Neurological status is monitored with the Glasgow Coma Scale. Frequency of assessment depends on protocol and the patients ... alcoholic coma. A coma due to ingestion of alcohol. apoplectic coma. A coma produced by intracranial hemorrhage and its ...
coma. *development of various cancers. Specific symptoms will depend on which infections and complications affect the body. ...
Scores for the same patient vary depending on when they were collected, e.g., GCS scores collected by Emergency Medical ... Is a modification of the Glasgow Coma Score designed to be used in children aged 3 years and younger. ... Measures the time from when a patient emerges from coma until he or she is no longer disoriented. ...
coma depending on the severity.. In rare instances, obstetrical accidents during particularly difficult deliveries can cause ... Physical therapy: The extent of physical therapy depends on the degree of spasticity, hypotonia, and motor impairment. The main ... The symptoms of seizures can vary depending on where in the brain they originate. Generalized seizures engage the entire ... Once the examination is complete, depending on the findings, the practitioner may order laboratory tests to help in the ...
A coma is a deep state of unconsciousness. It can result from an injury or illness. It can last for a few days, but sometimes ... Depending on the cause and the extent of damage, a coma can occur rapidly or gradually, and it can last from several days to ... A coma is a state of deep unconsciousness. A person who is experiencing a coma cannot be awakened, and they do not react to the ... Treatment will depend on the underlying cause of the coma, for example, kidney failure, liver disease, diabetes, poisoning, and ...
Most organs and tissues depend on blood glucose providing energy for various functions. In most organs, a shortage of blood ... Diabetic hypoglycaemic coma. The brain is more vulnerable to hypoglycaemia and the consequences of hypoglycemia than any other ... Unlike other organs however, the brain depends on a continuous supply of glucose while having a very limited glycogen store ( ... http://www.diabetes.co.uk/diabetes-complications/diabetic-coma.html. * http://diabetes.niddk.nih.gov/dm/pubs/america/pdf/ ...
It can also cause apnea, coma, convulsions; dizziness, headache, weakness, irritability, insomnia; stomach upset, and if liquid ... It can also cause apnea, coma, convulsions; dizziness, headache, weakness, irritability, insomnia; stomach upset, and if liquid ... The level of exposure depends upon the dose, duration, and work being done. ...
Arousal depends on an intact ascending reticular activating system and connections with dien- cephalic structures. Like ... CAUSES OF COMA BY ANATOMICAL SITE The causes of coma by anatomical site are summarised in fig 1, and can be simply divided into ... c Coma without focal signs or meningism. This is the most common form of coma and results from anoxic-ischaemic, metabolic, ... lack precision and coma can be more objectively assessed using measures such as the Glasgow coma scale (GCS) (table 1). This ...
  • moderate, and severe-based on the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). (britannica.com)
  • Doctors evaluate potentially comatose patients based on one of two scales: The Glasgow Coma Scale and the Rancho Los Amigos Scale. (howstuffworks.com)
  • The glasgow coma scale is the most widely used measure of a patient's mental status. (healthtap.com)
  • Neurological status is monitored with the Glasgow Coma Scale. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Such terms lack precision and coma can be more objectively assessed using measures such as the Glasgow coma scale (GCS) (table 1). (scribd.com)
  • Clinical findings of comatose patients can be rated according to the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). (epnet.com)
  • There was younger age, lower Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) and more significant incidence of unfavourable outcome (death, disability) in patients of surgical coma (group 1). (omicsonline.org)
  • The Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) has several important limitations as a predictor of survival in the general critically ill population while CT brain is mostly important for diagnostic rather than prognostic factor in comatosed children. (omicsonline.org)
  • Generally, a person who is unable to voluntarily open the eyes, does not have a sleep-wake cycle, is unresponsive in spite of strong tactile (painful) or verbal stimuli, and who generally scores between 3 and 8 on the Glasgow Coma Scale is considered in a coma. (wikipedia.org)
  • What is the Glasgow Coma Scale? (medicinenet.com)
  • The Glasgow Coma Scale was developed to provide healthcare professionals with a simple way of measuring the depth of coma based upon observations of eye opening, speech, and movement. (medicinenet.com)
  • The Glasgow Coma Scale is used as part of the initial evaluation of a patient, but does not assist in making the diagnosis as to the cause of coma. (medicinenet.com)
  • Since it 'scores' the level of coma, the Glasgow Coma Scale can be used as a standard method for any healthcare professional, from EMT, paramedic, nurse, or neurosurgeon, to assess change in the patient's mental status over time. (medicinenet.com)
  • The best use of the Glasgow Coma Scale is to allow healthcare professionals of different clinical skills and training to consistently assess a patient over longer periods of time in order to determine whether the patient is improving, deteriorating, or remaining the same. (medicinenet.com)
  • The Glasgow Coma Scale allows a standard assessment that can be shared. (medicinenet.com)
  • A person who is dead has a Glasgow Coma Scale of 3 (there is no lower score). (medicinenet.com)
  • For most metabolic comas, the first step in treatment is to protect the brain cells and attempt to eliminate the cause of coma. (britannica.com)
  • Although soap operas veer far from reality in many other aspects, the authors of the study were concerned that 'soap opera comas' can lead to unrealistic expectations by the families and loved ones of people who are in a real-life coma. (howstuffworks.com)
  • Sometimes people who come out of comas are just as they were before - they can remember what happened to them before the coma and can do everything they used to do. (kidshealth.org)
  • Does anyone know of a person being in a hepatic coma for more than a month who has come out ok? (drugs.com)
  • However, as the liver is central to the body's functions, removal of too much of the liver at once may result in coma or death. (encyclopedia.com)
  • For example, alcohol-induced liver damage (alcoholic cirrhosis) can result in involuntary hand tremors (asterixis), while severe anoxia (lack of oxygen) may result in coma with no movement. (rxlist.com)
  • To compare the predictive values of clinical examinations combined with the recordings of Electroencephalography (EEG) and Brainstem Auditory-Evoked Potentials (BAEP) and computed tomography (CT) of the brain in the evaluation of coma outcome in children. (omicsonline.org)
  • Medical investigations for coma, EEG, CT brain and auditory brainstem evoked potential (BAEP) measurements were performed for all patients. (omicsonline.org)
  • It occurs when our blood sugar range rises too high (hyperglycemic coma), or when our blood sugar range falls too low (hypoglycemic coma). (wizzley.com)
  • What is Hypoglycemic Coma? (wizzley.com)
  • It can take little time for a hypoglycemic coma to ensue. (wizzley.com)
  • The study findings, appearing in the May 1, 2005 issue of Diabetes, have direct implications for the treatment of diabetic patients in hypoglycemic coma, according to the researchers. (innovations-report.com)
  • Another group received glucose only, which is the current standard treatment for hypoglycemic coma. (innovations-report.com)
  • Hypoglycemic coma was induced using insulin and ended 30 minutes later with glucose only. (innovations-report.com)
  • Arousal depends on an intact ascending reticular activating system and connections with dien- cephalic structures. (scribd.com)
  • Coma is characterized by the total absence of both arousal and awareness. (omicsonline.org)
  • Because people in a coma can't express themselves, doctors must rely on physical clues and information provided by families and friends. (mayoclinic.org)
  • This test is often used to diagnose and determine the cause of a coma. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Sometimes the cause of a coma can be completely reversed and the affected person will regain normal function. (mayoclinic.org)
  • In some cases, surgery may correct the cause of a coma. (epnet.com)
  • Given that drug poisoning is the cause for a large portion of patients in a coma, hospitals first test all comatose patients by observing pupil size and eye movement, through the vestibular-ocular reflex. (wikipedia.org)
  • Tupac Shakur, who fell into a coma after being shot on September 7, 1996, American actor Eric Roberts, who fell into a coma after a car accident in Westport, Connecticut, and Johnny Cash, who apparently went into a coma after a degenerative nerve disease gave him problems. (listverse.com)
  • Little is written about Cash's coma, but in an interview with Larry King he was quoted: "I went into a coma and I was there for 12 days. (listverse.com)
  • alcohol combined with barbiturates is a common cause of coma in suicide attempts. (britannica.com)
  • The second most common cause of coma, which makes up about 25% of comatose patients, occurs from lack of oxygen, generally resulting from cardiac arrest. (wikipedia.org)
  • Large doses of barbiturates alone will also produce coma by suppressing cerebral blood flow, thus causing anoxia. (britannica.com)
  • A coma is caused by injury to either the cerebral cortex or the reticular activating system. (listverse.com)
  • After a traffic accident with swelling or cerebral inflammation, it is very difficult to specify the recovery time, since each organism responds completely differently, the speed of fluid absorption is relative, and also depends on whether there is any brain injury, such as strokes. (justanswer.com)
  • During coma, the cerebral cortex or the gray matter is usually damaged, which makes it difficult for patients to communicate verbally or engage in reflexive responses. (essaysexperts.com)
  • In reality, coma survival rates are 50 percent or less, and less than 10 percent of people who come out of a coma completely recover from it [ ref ]. (howstuffworks.com)
  • People may come out of a coma with physical, intellectual, and psychological problems. (icd9data.com)
  • Smythies: BIOCHEMICAL BASIS OF COMA The target article below has just appeared in PSYCOLOQUY, a refereed journal of Open Peer Commentary sponsored by the American Psychological Association. (bio.net)
  • research suggests that EEG recordings potentially can be used to predict whether a patient will emerge from coma. (britannica.com)
  • Physical therapy may also be used to prevent contractures (permanent muscular contractions) and deformities of the bones, joints, and muscles that would limit recovery for those who emerge from coma. (childneurologyfoundation.org)
  • Individuals may emerge from coma with a combination of physical, intellectual, and psychological difficulties that need special attention. (childneurologyfoundation.org)
  • Most organs and tissues depend on blood glucose providing energy for various functions. (news-medical.net)
  • Unlike other organs however, the brain depends on a continuous supply of glucose while having a very limited glycogen store (around 0.1% of total brain weight). (news-medical.net)
  • It's a mixture of thiamin (a vitamin that can help in alcoholic or nutritionally starved patients), glucose (a sugar that can help diabetics who have developed a coma due to low sugar level), and naloxene (a substance that reverses the action of many narcotics and is used to treat overdoses). (healthcommunities.com)
  • In research studies with rats, senior investigator Raymond A. Swanson, MD, and lead author Sang Won Suh, PhD, demonstrated the effectiveness of pyruvate, a naturally-occurring byproduct of glucose, when administered along with glucose after 30 minutes of diabetic coma. (innovations-report.com)
  • Extensive bilateral damage or disturbance of the hemisphere function is required to produce coma. (scribd.com)
  • Drugs and metabolic disease produce coma by a depression of both cortex and ascending reticular activating system function. (scribd.com)
  • Drawing the name from the Greek word koma , which means deep sleep, a coma can result from a number of different events. (wisegeek.com)