Dental Offices: The room or rooms in which the dentist and dental staff provide care. Offices include all rooms in the dentist's office suite.Dental Waste: Any waste product generated by a dental office, surgery, clinic, or laboratory including amalgams, saliva, and rinse water.Practice Management, Dental: The organization and operation of the business aspects of a dental practice.Dentists: Individuals licensed to practice DENTISTRY.Dental Care: The total of dental diagnostic, preventive, and restorative services provided to meet the needs of a patient (from Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982).Medical Waste Disposal: Management, removal, and elimination of biologic, infectious, pathologic, and dental waste. The concept includes blood, mucus, tissue removed at surgery or autopsy, soiled surgical dressings, and other materials requiring special control and handling. Disposal may take place where the waste is generated or elsewhere.Dental Facilities: Use for material on dental facilities in general or for which there is no specific heading.Dental Hygienists: Persons trained in an accredited school or dental college and licensed by the state in which they reside to provide dental prophylaxis under the direction of a licensed dentist.Dentist-Patient Relations: The psychological relations between the dentist and patient.Dental Equipment: The nonexpendable items used by the dentist or dental staff in the performance of professional duties. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p106)Dental Staff: Personnel who provide dental service to patients in an organized facility, institution or agency.Education, Dental: Use for articles concerning dental education in general.Dentistry: The profession concerned with the teeth, oral cavity, and associated structures, and the diagnosis and treatment of their diseases including prevention and the restoration of defective and missing tissue.Gas Scavengers: Apparatus for removing exhaled or leaked anesthetic gases or other volatile agents, thus reducing the exposure of operating room personnel to such agents, as well as preventing the buildup of potentially explosive mixtures in operating rooms or laboratories.Anesthesia, Dental: A range of methods used to reduce pain and anxiety during dental procedures.Computer Peripherals: Various units or machines that operate in combination or in conjunction with a computer but are not physically part of it. Peripheral devices typically display computer data, store data from the computer and return the data to the computer on demand, prepare data for human use, or acquire data from a source and convert it to a form usable by a computer. (Computer Dictionary, 4th ed.)Tobacco Use Cessation: Ending the TOBACCO habits of smoking, chewing, or snuff use.Pediatric Dentistry: The practice of dentistry concerned with the dental problems of children, proper maintenance, and treatment. The dental care may include the services provided by dental specialists.Schools, Dental: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of dentistry.Students, Dental: Individuals enrolled a school of dentistry or a formal educational program in leading to a degree in dentistry.Radiography, Dental, Digital: A rapid, low-dose, digital imaging system using a small intraoral sensor instead of radiographic film, an intensifying screen, and a charge-coupled device. It presents the possibility of reduced patient exposure and minimal distortion, although resolution and latitude are inferior to standard dental radiography. A receiver is placed in the mouth, routing signals to a computer which images the signals on a screen or in print. It includes digitizing from x-ray film or any other detector. (From MEDLINE abstracts; personal communication from Dr. Charles Berthold, NIDR)Dental Caries: Localized destruction of the tooth surface initiated by decalcification of the enamel followed by enzymatic lysis of organic structures and leading to cavity formation. If left unchecked, the cavity may penetrate the enamel and dentin and reach the pulp.Emergency Treatment: First aid or other immediate intervention for accidents or medical conditions requiring immediate care and treatment before definitive medical and surgical management can be procured.Dental Care for Chronically Ill: Dental care for patients with chronic diseases. These diseases include chronic cardiovascular, endocrinologic, hematologic, immunologic, neoplastic, and renal diseases. The concept does not include dental care for the mentally or physically disabled which is DENTAL CARE FOR DISABLED.Dental Care for Children: The giving of attention to the special dental needs of children, including the prevention of tooth diseases and instruction in dental hygiene and dental health. The dental care may include the services provided by dental specialists.Dental Clinics: Facilities where dental care is provided to patients.Dental Pulp: A richly vascularized and innervated connective tissue of mesodermal origin, contained in the central cavity of a tooth and delimited by the dentin, and having formative, nutritive, sensory, and protective functions. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Faculty, Dental: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a dental school.Office Visits: Visits made by patients to health service providers' offices for diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up.Dental Care for Disabled: Dental care for the emotionally, mentally, or physically disabled patient. It does not include dental care for the chronically ill ( = DENTAL CARE FOR CHRONICALLY ILL).Dental Anxiety: Abnormal fear or dread of visiting the dentist for preventive care or therapy and unwarranted anxiety over dental procedures.Insurance, Dental: Insurance providing coverage for dental care.Dental Health Services: Services designed to promote, maintain, or restore dental health.Dental Auxiliaries: Personnel whose work is prescribed and supervised by the dentist.Dental Research: The study of laws, theories, and hypotheses through a systematic examination of pertinent facts and their interpretation in the field of dentistry. (From Jablonski, Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982, p674)Dental Care for Aged: The giving of attention to the special dental needs of the elderly for proper maintenance or treatment. The dental care may include the services provided by dental specialists.Dental Arch: The curve formed by the row of TEETH in their normal position in the JAW. The inferior dental arch is formed by the mandibular teeth, and the superior dental arch by the maxillary teeth.Dental Plaque: A film that attaches to teeth, often causing DENTAL CARIES and GINGIVITIS. It is composed of MUCINS, secreted from salivary glands, and microorganisms.Dental Records: Data collected during dental examination for the purpose of study, diagnosis, or treatment planning.General Practice, Dental: Nonspecialized dental practice which is concerned with providing primary and continuing dental care.Dental Amalgam: An alloy used in restorative dentistry that contains mercury, silver, tin, copper, and possibly zinc.Dental Assistants: Individuals who assist the dentist or the dental hygienist.Education, Dental, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform dentists of recent advances in their fields.Dental Implants: Biocompatible materials placed into (endosseous) or onto (subperiosteal) the jawbone to support a crown, bridge, or artificial tooth, or to stabilize a diseased tooth.Radiography, Dental: Radiographic techniques used in dentistry.Technology, Dental: The field of dentistry involved in procedures for designing and constructing dental appliances. It includes also the application of any technology to the field of dentistry.Dental Service, Hospital: Hospital department providing dental care.Dental Models: Presentation devices used for patient education and technique training in dentistry.Education, Dental, Graduate: Educational programs for dental graduates entering a specialty. They include formal specialty training as well as academic work in the clinical and basic dental sciences, and may lead to board certification or an advanced dental degree.Ethics, Dental: The principles of proper professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the dentist, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the dentist in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Societies, Dental: Societies whose membership is limited to dentists.Dental Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to dental or oral health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Fluorosis, Dental: A chronic endemic form of hypoplasia of the dental enamel caused by drinking water with a high fluorine content during the time of tooth formation, and characterized by defective calcification that gives a white chalky appearance to the enamel, which gradually undergoes brown discoloration. (Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p286)Licensure, Dental: The granting of a license to practice dentistry.Laboratories, Dental: Facilities for the performance of services related to dental treatment but not done directly in the patient's mouth.Dental Materials: Materials used in the production of dental bases, restorations, impressions, prostheses, etc.Specialties, Dental: Various branches of dental practice limited to specialized areas.Fees, Dental: Amounts charged to the patient as payer for dental services.

Evaluation of environmental bacterial contamination and procedures to control cross infection in a sample of Italian dental surgeries. (1/46)

OBJECTIVES: To perform a pilot study on bacterial contamination in some dental surgeries (n=51) in a local health unit in Brescia (Lombardy Region, Italy) and to evaluate the procedures to control cross infection used by the personnel to reduce the risk of infection in dental practice. METHODS: A survey was carried out by interviewing 133 dental personnel with a questionnaire on the procedures used to control infection. The autoclaves, chemical baths (chemiclaves), and ovens present in the surgeries were tested for sterilisation efficiency with a spore test, and already packed and sterilised instruments were randomly sampled and tested for sterility. Microbial contamination of air, surface, and dental unit water samples were also studied. RESULTS: The dental personnel did not generally follow the principal procedures for infection control: 30% of personnel were not vaccinated against hepatitis B virus, infected instruments were often not decontaminated, periodic checks of autoclave efficiency were lacking, and the knowledge of disinfection mechanisms and procedures was incomplete. High bacteriological contamination of water at dental surgeries was often found and total bacteriological counts in air samples were high. Surface studies showed widespread bacterial contamination. CONCLUSIONS: On the basis of these results, an educational programme for the prevention of infective hazards has been prepared and carried out. The results of this pilot study will be used for planning a national survey.  (+info)

Microbial aerosols in general dental practice. (2/46)

OBJECTIVE: To measure the concentration of microbial aerosols in general dental practices and to use this information to carry out quantitative microbiological risk assessments. METHODOLOGY: Microbial air sampling was carried out continuously during 12 treatment sessions in 6 general dental practices in the South West of England. RESULTS: The microbial aerosol concentration in treatment rooms was generally less than 10(3) colony forming units per cubic metre of air (cfu x m(-3)). However, in 6 out of the 12 visits, at least one peak concentration with much higher numbers of bacteria was detected. The peak concentrations were associated with increased recoveries of presumptive oral streptococci suggesting these aerosols originated from the mouths of patients. These aerosol peaks dissipated within 30 minutes and no dissemination into waiting areas was detected. The peak concentrations were associated with mechanical scaling procedures (47% of procedures giving rise to a peak) and to a lesser extent by cavity preparation (11%). No aerosolised blood was detected. CONCLUSIONS: The data have been used to generate a framework for quantifying risk of exposure of staff to aerosolised microbial pathogens in general dental practice. For example, dentists and their assistants may have a slightly higher risk of exposure to Mycobacterium tuberculosis than the general public. The use of face seal masks that have been shown to protect against aerosolised micro-organisms may reduce this exposure.  (+info)

A practical guide to tobacco cessation in dental offices. (3/46)

Tobacco use is an important risk factor for advanced periodontitis, poor response to periodontal therapy, oral neoplasms, and dental implant failure. Given the effect of tobacco use on oral health, the dental office may be an ideal place for tobacco cessation intervention, especially since a large proportion of smokers visit their dentist on a regular basis. This paper reviews various tobacco cessation strategies for the dental office and provides practical information on assessing patients' readiness to quit and choosing appropriate tobacco cessation interventions.  (+info)

Tobacco cessation through dental office settings. (4/46)

There is increasing interest in broadly inclusive public health interventions that involve low-cost, self-help materials and minimal support from professionals. Dental health care workers (DHCWs) are a largely untapped resource for providing advice and brief counseling to tobacco-using patients, and there are good reasons to believe that they can be effective in this role. The results of our randomized clinical trials have shown that a brief dental office-based intervention can be effective in helping smokeless tobacco users to quit and smokers to reduce their use and become more ready to quit. A third clinical trial tested the effectiveness of two methods of disseminating the smokeless tobacco intervention to DHCWs throughout the western United States. Workshops were more effective than self-study in effecting behavior change, although our analyses indicate that self-study was more cost-efficient. These studies have demonstrated the viability of using dentists and dental hygienists to provide brief cessation advice and supportive materials in the context of regular oral health visits to encourage their patients to quit. The results of these studies also support the timeliness of further dissemination and diffusion of this program to practitioners, dental schools, and dental hygiene programs.  (+info)

Potential risk for lead exposure in dental offices. (5/46)

In December 2000, the Washington State Health Department discovered white powder that was found to be lead oxide in boxes used to store dental intraoral radiograph film. The Washington State Health Department alerted state health departments throughout the United States. Subsequently, the Wisconsin Division of Public Health (WDPH) conducted an investigation of dental offices in the state. This report summarizes the investigation, which indicated that similar storage boxes are used in Wisconsin. The findings indicate that patients are at risk for exposure to a substantial amount of lead during a dental radiograph procedure if the office stores dental film in these boxes.  (+info)

Disability part 3: improving access to dental practices in Merseyside. (6/46)

Several Merseyside dental practices took part in disability access audits of practice premises and practice staff took part in disability awareness training. Grants were awarded to part-fund improvements to practice facilities in line with the recommendations in the audit reports. The dental teams reported that the awareness training was very valuable and many common issues arose from the audits. Access for disabled people needs to be considered in all practice developments to ensure that dental practices comply with Part III of the Disability Discrimination Act by 2004.  (+info)

Risk of exposure to Legionella in dental practice. (7/46)

Aerosols generated in dental operations are a source of exposure to microorganisms proliferated within dental unit waterlines (DUWL) biofilm. It has been suggested that presence of Legionella species in these aerosols may contribute to potential health hazards for dental staff and patients. The article attempts to provide a brief overview of the current knowledge about Legionella, its prevalence in DUWL, immunological reactions of the dentists and concepts for prophylaxis of Legionella in dentists' work place.  (+info)

Designing your office for technology. (8/46)

BACKGROUND: To practice efficiently, dentists need to consider the successful integration of technologies, which can benefit their practice of dentistry. The physical environment of the office must be developed to accommodate not only the appropriate placement of computer hardware and high-tech dental devices, but their interconnectivity, as well. CONCLUSION: Dentists need to make appropriate decisions regarding the types of technology they choose to integrate into their offices, and they need to understand how the technology will be installed and integrated. An office designed to optimize the use of technology will produce ongoing benefits for dentists, their staff members and their patients throughout the lives of their practices. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: A dentist's practice must be planned to accommodate networks of systems hidden below floors, above ceilings and within walls, as well as to support and connect diverse technology items throughout the office.  (+info)

  • A Marriottsville dental office is holding a free dental clinic this weekend for those in Carroll and Howard counties who don't have insurance, and it's expected to be a popular event. (yahoo.com)
  • WASHINGTON - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) today proposed standards under the Clean Water Act to help cut discharges of dental amalgam to the environment. (epa.gov)
  • In response, many states and localities have implemented amalgam discharge-cutting programs requiring amalgam separators and other Best Management Practices in dentist offices. (epa.gov)
  • The American Dental Association (ADA) also recommends separators and other Best Management Practices for amalgam. (epa.gov)
  • It would declare dental practices whose existing separators do not remove the percentage of amalgam in the proposed requirements as meeting the proposed requirements for the life of the existing separator. (epa.gov)
  • Wed, Dec 13: Twice a year Anaida Deti, CEO and registered dental hygienist of DentalX, brings smiles to the faces of those in need. (globalnews.ca)
  • It was holiday smiles on Tuesday as Deti and her staff provided no-cost preventative dental hygiene services to children and adults staying at the Red Door Shelter. (globalnews.ca)
  • The Global Compressors for Dental Offices and Laboratories Industry 2016 Deep Market Research Report is a professional and in-depth study on the current state of the Compressors for Dental Offices and Laboratories industry. (bigmarketresearch.com)
  • Haller Dental takes the time to speak with each patient and discuss ways that they can improve their oral health. (dentistinrolla.com)
  • A review of your medical history can help us stay informed of your overall health, any new medications, and any illnesses that may impact your dental health. (qdcdental.ca)
  • As your dental health professionals, we want you to be confident knowing that we are a team of highly trained and skilled clinicians. (qdcdental.ca)
  • Studies show about half the mercury that enters Publicly Owned Treatment Works (POTWs) comes from dental offices. (epa.gov)
  • It is also helpful that dental officer receptionists have an understanding of dental procedures and treatment methods. (reference.com)
  • Improving Indoor Air Quality in Hospital Environments and Dental Practices with Modular Stand-Alone Air Cleaning Devices. (iqair.com)
  • EPA's proposed rule supports a Convention measure to promote the use of best environmental practices in dental facilities to reduce releases of mercury compounds to water and land. (epa.gov)
  • The IQAir Dental Series was specifically developed to provide flexible, effective and affordable air cleaning solutions for dental offices. (iqair.com)
  • Five filtration stages provide superior control of the full range of dental office contaminants. (iqair.com)