Dental Equipment: The nonexpendable items used by the dentist or dental staff in the performance of professional duties. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p106)Dental Care: The total of dental diagnostic, preventive, and restorative services provided to meet the needs of a patient (from Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982).Education, Dental: Use for articles concerning dental education in general.Schools, Dental: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of dentistry.Students, Dental: Individuals enrolled a school of dentistry or a formal educational program in leading to a degree in dentistry.Orthodontics: A dental specialty concerned with the prevention and correction of dental and oral anomalies (malocclusion).Periapical Diseases: Diseases of the PERIAPICAL TISSUE surrounding the root of the tooth, which is distinguished from DENTAL PULP DISEASES inside the TOOTH ROOT.Periapical Periodontitis: Inflammation of the PERIAPICAL TISSUE. It includes general, unspecified, or acute nonsuppurative inflammation. Chronic nonsuppurative inflammation is PERIAPICAL GRANULOMA. Suppurative inflammation is PERIAPICAL ABSCESS.Periapical Tissue: Tissue surrounding the apex of a tooth, including the apical portion of the periodontal membrane and alveolar bone.Periapical Granuloma: Chronic nonsuppurative inflammation of periapical tissue resulting from irritation following pulp disease or endodontic treatment.Orthodontics, Corrective: The phase of orthodontics concerned with the correction of malocclusion with proper appliances and prevention of its sequelae (Jablonski's Illus. Dictionary of Dentistry).Laboratories, Dental: Facilities for the performance of services related to dental treatment but not done directly in the patient's mouth.Dental Technicians: Individuals responsible for fabrication of dental appliances.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Dental Auxiliaries: Personnel whose work is prescribed and supervised by the dentist.Technology, Dental: The field of dentistry involved in procedures for designing and constructing dental appliances. It includes also the application of any technology to the field of dentistry.Oral Medicine: A branch of dentistry dealing with diseases of the oral and paraoral structures and the oral management of systemic diseases. (Hall, What is Oral Medicine, Anyway? Clinical Update: National Naval Dental Center, March 1991, p7-8)Dentistry: The profession concerned with the teeth, oral cavity, and associated structures, and the diagnosis and treatment of their diseases including prevention and the restoration of defective and missing tissue.Practice Management, Dental: The organization and operation of the business aspects of a dental practice.General Practice, Dental: Nonspecialized dental practice which is concerned with providing primary and continuing dental care.Dental Offices: The room or rooms in which the dentist and dental staff provide care. Offices include all rooms in the dentist's office suite.Dentist's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice in dentistry related to diagnosis and treatment.Suction: The removal of secretions, gas or fluid from hollow or tubular organs or cavities by means of a tube and a device that acts on negative pressure.Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid: Liquid chromatographic techniques which feature high inlet pressures, high sensitivity, and high speed.Vacuum: A space in which the pressure is far below atmospheric pressure so that the remaining gases do not affect processes being carried on in the space.Blood Specimen Collection: The taking of a blood sample to determine its character as a whole, to identify levels of its component cells, chemicals, gases, or other constituents, to perform pathological examination, etc.Dental Care for Chronically Ill: Dental care for patients with chronic diseases. These diseases include chronic cardiovascular, endocrinologic, hematologic, immunologic, neoplastic, and renal diseases. The concept does not include dental care for the mentally or physically disabled which is DENTAL CARE FOR DISABLED.Interior Design and Furnishings: The planning of the furnishings and decorations of an architectural interior.Wood: A product of hard secondary xylem composed of CELLULOSE, hemicellulose, and LIGNANS, that is under the bark of trees and shrubs. It is used in construction and as a source of CHARCOAL and many other products.Rahnella: A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, small, rod-shaped bacteria occurring in fresh water.Dust: Earth or other matter in fine, dry particles. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Sterilization: The destroying of all forms of life, especially microorganisms, by heat, chemical, or other means.Steam: Water in its gaseous state. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Ethylene Oxide: A colorless and flammable gas at room temperature and pressure. Ethylene oxide is a bactericidal, fungicidal, and sporicidal disinfectant. It is effective against most micro-organisms, including viruses. It is used as a fumigant for foodstuffs and textiles and as an agent for the gaseous sterilization of heat-labile pharmaceutical and surgical materials. (From Reynolds, Martindale The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p794)Maintenance and Engineering, Hospital: Hospital department whose primary function is the upkeep and supervision of the buildings and grounds and the maintenance of hospital physical plant and equipment which requires engineering expertise.Capital Expenditures: Those funds disbursed for facilities and equipment, particularly those related to the delivery of health care.AustriaLuxembourgGermanyItalyDurable Medical Equipment: Devices which are very resistant to wear and may be used over a long period of time. They include items such as wheelchairs, hospital beds, artificial limbs, etc.Dental High-Speed Equipment: Tools used in dentistry that operate at high rotation speeds.Competitive Bidding: Pricing statements presented by more than one party for the purpose of securing a contract.Equipment and Supplies: Expendable and nonexpendable equipment, supplies, apparatus, and instruments that are used in diagnostic, surgical, therapeutic, scientific, and experimental procedures.Equipment and Supplies, Hospital: Any materials used in providing care specifically in the hospital.Counterfeit Drugs: Drugs manufactured and sold with the intent to misrepresent its origin, authenticity, chemical composition, and or efficacy. Counterfeit drugs may contain inappropriate quantities of ingredients not listed on the label or package. In order to further deceive the consumer, the packaging, container, or labeling, may be inaccurate, incorrect, or fake.Medicare Assignment: Concept referring to the standardized fees for services rendered by health care providers, e.g., laboratories and physicians, and reimbursement for those services under Medicare Part B. It includes acceptance by the physician.Economic Competition: The effort of two or more parties to secure the business of a third party by offering, usually under fair or equitable rules of business practice, the most favorable terms.Dental Caries: Localized destruction of the tooth surface initiated by decalcification of the enamel followed by enzymatic lysis of organic structures and leading to cavity formation. If left unchecked, the cavity may penetrate the enamel and dentin and reach the pulp.Health Care Sector: Economic sector concerned with the provision, distribution, and consumption of health care services and related products.Intelligence: The ability to learn and to deal with new situations and to deal effectively with tasks involving abstractions.Mesial Movement of Teeth: Migration of the teeth toward the midline or forward in the DENTAL ARCH. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Space MaintenanceEquipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Urology Department, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of diagnostic and therapeutic services for the urologic patient.Intelligence Tests: Standardized tests that measure the present general ability or aptitude for intellectual performance.Workplace: Place or physical location of work or employment.

Photopolymerization of composite resin using the argon laser. (1/99)

Because of the dental profession's increased utilization of light-cured restorative materials, there has been a corresponding increase in research into the light sources used to initiate polymerization. The argon laser is one promising source, as the wavelength of light emitted by this laser is optimal for the initiation of polymerization of composite resins. The literature reflects a strong divergence of opinion about many aspects of the effectiveness of laser curing compared to conventional light curing. Research indicates that the argon laser offers a greater depth and degree of polymerization, less time required and an enhancement of the physical properties of composite resins polymerized. These advantages are offset by reports that the increased polymerization caused by the laser results in increased shrinkage, brittleness and marginal leakage. Dentists interested in the new technology need to monitor ongoing studies.  (+info)

An evaluation of sampling and laboratory procedures for determination of heterotrophic plate counts in dental unit waterlines. (2/99)

BACKGROUND: The high numbers of heterotrophic microorganisms that have been cultured from dental unit waterlines (DUWs) have raised concern that this water may exceed suggested limits for heterotrophic plate counts (HPCs). The main purpose of this investigation was to examine HPC variability in DUWs and to examine in detail the effect of laboratory processing of water samples on HPC values. METHODS: Water samples were collected from dental offices either at the beginning of or during the clinic day and were transported to the laboratory, where they were analyzed. RESULTS: Measuring HPC levels within an office would involve testing all units, because significant differences were found between units connected to the same municipal water supply. Within a unit, the average microbial count from high-speed lines was approximately twice the average count from air/water lines. The laboratory processing of water samples significantly affected the numbers of heterotrophic microorganisms that were recovered. Incubation temperature, time and media, as well as neutralization of residual chlorine, all had significant effects on the HPC values. However, no significant differences in microbial counts were found between samples plated with the spread plate method on R2A agar and those plated with the pour plate method with Plate Count Agar. CONCLUSIONS: Dental organizations have suggested target limits in terms of numbers of heterotrophic microorganisms recovered in water from dental units, but standards for laboratory handling must be established as well. A protocol for sample collection and laboratory handling is proposed.  (+info)

Evaluation of environmental bacterial contamination and procedures to control cross infection in a sample of Italian dental surgeries. (3/99)

OBJECTIVES: To perform a pilot study on bacterial contamination in some dental surgeries (n=51) in a local health unit in Brescia (Lombardy Region, Italy) and to evaluate the procedures to control cross infection used by the personnel to reduce the risk of infection in dental practice. METHODS: A survey was carried out by interviewing 133 dental personnel with a questionnaire on the procedures used to control infection. The autoclaves, chemical baths (chemiclaves), and ovens present in the surgeries were tested for sterilisation efficiency with a spore test, and already packed and sterilised instruments were randomly sampled and tested for sterility. Microbial contamination of air, surface, and dental unit water samples were also studied. RESULTS: The dental personnel did not generally follow the principal procedures for infection control: 30% of personnel were not vaccinated against hepatitis B virus, infected instruments were often not decontaminated, periodic checks of autoclave efficiency were lacking, and the knowledge of disinfection mechanisms and procedures was incomplete. High bacteriological contamination of water at dental surgeries was often found and total bacteriological counts in air samples were high. Surface studies showed widespread bacterial contamination. CONCLUSIONS: On the basis of these results, an educational programme for the prevention of infective hazards has been prepared and carried out. The results of this pilot study will be used for planning a national survey.  (+info)

A survey of perceived problems in orthodontic education in 23 European countries. (4/99)

This paper reports on a survey of perceived problems in the provision of orthodontic education at the stages of undergraduate, postgraduate, and continuing professional education (CPE) in 23 European countries in 1997. A questionnaire, together with an explanatory letter, was mailed to all members of the EUROQUAL II BIOMED project. Answers were validated during a meeting of project participants and by further correspondence, when necessary. The topics covered in the questionnaire were adequacy of funding, numbers of orthodontic teachers, availability of equipment, regulations, training centres, numbers of orthodontists, availability of books, journals, and information technology. Completed questionnaires were returned by orthodontists from all 23 countries. Respondents from seven countries did not answer all questions. Respondents reported a perceived almost universal lack of adequate funding for postgraduate orthodontic training (from 18 out of 20 countries) and, to a lesser extent, at undergraduate (13 out of 20 countries) and CPE levels (17 out of 21 countries). Respondents from 12 of the 20 countries reported adequate numbers of qualified teachers at undergraduate level, but only seven out of 18 at postgraduate level and eight out of 19 for CPE. Lack of suitable equipment was reported as a more frequent problem by central and eastern European countries (six out of 20 countries at undergraduate level, eight out of 20 countries at postgraduate level, and 12 out of 19 at CPE level). Too few or too many regulations were only perceived to be a problem by the respondent from one country out of 19 at undergraduate level, by seven out of 19 at postgraduate level, and by eight out of 16 at CPE level). Lack of training centres was more frequently reported as a problem by respondents from central and eastern European countries, but was generally not perceived as a problem by respondents from west European countries. Respondents from seven countries reported a lack of training centres for CPE. Respondents from six countries reported that they perceived there to be too many orthodontists at postgraduate level, from seven countries that there were an appropriate number, and from seven that there were too few. A lack of books, journals, and information technology was reported to be a problem by respondents from four out of 19 countries at undergraduate level, eight out of 20 at postgraduate level, and 10 out of 20 at CPE level. At both undergraduate and postgraduate level, the majority of respondents from central and eastern European countries reported problems with books, journals, and information technology. The results of the survey confirmed many anecdotal impressions and provided an extremely useful background against which to formulate quality guidelines for orthodontic education in Europe.  (+info)

Users' demands regarding dental safety glasses. Combining a quantitative approach and grounded theory for the data analysis. (5/99)

Eye infections are common among dentists and many are concerned, but few are using proper eye protection. To understand users' demands behind the low use of safety glasses, all dental teams in Sweden were asked which factors they found most important when choosing dental safety glasses, and rate the importance of 31 statements regarding ergonomic aspects of dental safety glasses in a questionnaire. Data were analysed using the Grounded Theory and a quantitative approach. Results showed that dentists ranked the visual aspects as most important and chair assistants the protective aspects. The highly visual demanding work performed by dentists requires safety glasses that are not yet available on the market, which might explain the low use.  (+info)

Mercury vapour release from a dental aspirator. (6/99)

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the release of mercury vapour from a dental aspirator which vented its waste air through its base directly into the surgery environment. METHODOLOGY: Mercury vapour in air concentrations were measured at the breathing zone of the dentist during continuous operation of the aspirator. Further series of mercury vapour measurements taken at the aspirator exhaust vent were carried out to determine the sources of mercury vapour from this particular device. RESULTS: At the dentist's breathing zone, mercury vapour concentrations of ten times the current occupational exposure limit of 25 micrograms/m3 were recorded after 20 minutes of continuous aspirator operation. A build up of amalgam contamination within the internal corrugated tubing of the aspirator was found to be the main source of mercury vapour emissions followed by particulate amalgam trapped within the vacuum motor. As the vacuum motor heated up with run time, mercury vapour emissions increased. It was found that the bacterial air exhaust filter (designed to clean the contaminated waste air entering the surgery) offered no protection to mercury vapour. In this case the filter trapped particulate amalgam which contributed to further mercury vapour contamination as high volume air was vented through it. CONCLUSION: It is not known how many dental aspirators are in use that vent their waste air directly into the surgery or if this aspirator is representative of others in existence. The safety of dental aspirating systems with regard to mercury vapour exposure requires further investigation.  (+info)

An evaluation of the flammability of five dental gloves. (7/99)

OBJECTIVE: To assess the flammability of five brands of dental procedure glove. DESIGN: A total of ten gloves of each brand (Biogel-D, Premier Protectors, Roeko-D, Safeskin Satin Plus and Schottlander Low Allergy) underwent flammability testing. Five of these were tested as supplied (unwashed) and five following the application of the hand disinfectant Hydrex (washed). Each glove was stretched over a metal frame and the time to ignition, when exposed to a standardised butane flame, recorded. In addition, the thickness of each glove was also assessed by micrometer measurement. RESULTS: All the gloves tested ignited in less than 2.5 seconds. Two way analysis of variance revealed significant effects of glove type (P< 0.001) and treatment (P< 0.05), together with a significant interaction of these factors (P < 0.05), upon the ignition time. Washing Roeko-D gloves with Hydrex significantly (P< 0.01) retarded the ignition time compared with those in the unwashed state. Both the glove thickness and material type appeared to be related to ignition time. CONCLUSION: The work presented here demonstrates the acute and varying flammability of a range of dental procedure gloves. It should serve as a reminder to those who routinely use open flames whilst gloved of the dangers of this practice.  (+info)

Dental products devices; reclassification of endosseous dental implant accessories. Food and Drug Administration, HHS. Final rule. (8/99)

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is reclassifying the manually powered drill bits, screwdrivers, countertorque devices, placement and removal tools, laboratory pieces used for fabrication of dental prosthetics, trial abutments, and other manually powered endosseous dental implant accessories from class III to class I. These devices are intended to aid in the placement or removal of endosseous dental implants and abutments, prepare the site for placement of endosseous dental implants or abutments, aid in the fitting of endosseous dental implants or abutments, aid in the fabrication of dental prosthetics, and be used as an accessory with endosseous dental implants when tissue contact will last less than an hour. FDA is also exempting these devices from premarket notification. This reclassification is on the Secretary of Health and Human Services' own initiative based on new information. This action is being taken under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act), as amended by the Medical Device Amendments of 1976 (the 1976 amendments), the Safe Medical Devices Act of 1990 (the SMDA), and the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997 (FDAMA).  (+info)

  • Dental infection control specialists, Dental Hygienics & Decontamination are a leading UK supplier of Medisafe, Prestige, Sterling, Steri Products and Eschmann autoclaves and Johnson & Johnson gas plasma decontamination units. (approvedbusiness.co.uk)
  • Bone Expander Drills/Kit are an alternate to OSTEOTOMES for the EXPANSION and Condensing of the ATROPHIC MANDIBLE and MAXILLA in Preparation for Dental Implant Placement. (ebay.com.au)
  • Adam Dental has been providing the best value dental supplies in Australia for over a 10 years, to dental professionals like dentists and dental surgeon, including specialists in the fields of endodontics, periodontics, oral surgery, oral hygiene and orthodontics. (adamdental.com.au)
  • Our sterilization procedures are complex, monitored by an outside agency, and, not incidentally, much more than OSHA, the American Dental Association, the Centers for Disease Control, and local agencies require. (dentist-stlouis.com)
  • Their unmatched performance combined with the practitioner's clinical expertise paves the way for more precise, faster and painless dental surgeries. (acteongroup.com)
  • It has been observed that most of the developed economies have been witnessing a massive spike in the number of dental surgeries and implants lately, thereby leading to a rise in the demand for high quality dental components. (fractovia.org)
  • An increase in the edentulous population is also increasing demand for dental imaging and surgeries. (tmcnet.com)
  • Additionally, increase in the geriatric population and ability to spend on dental care and surgeries in the high-income countries impels the global market growth. (marketresearch.com)
  • Henry Schein Nationwide Dental Opportunities has a professional recruiting staff that will relieve you of the stress that can be associated with hiring. (henryschein.com)
  • As a member, you can earn Award Points for virtually 100% of your Henry Schein Dental purchases! (henryschein.com)
  • Henry Schein Halas was formed in 2006, when two of Australia's most innovative and successful dental businesses joined together. (medicalsearch.com.au)
  • Built on decades of service to the profession by Halas Dental Ltd and Henry Schein Regional Ltd, our company maintains strong Australian management together with the commitment and investment of Henry Schein, the world's leading dental distributor. (medicalsearch.com.au)
  • The rubber once set is placed on top of the tooth to be treated, so that, the dental crown runs through the drilling and remain isolated from the rest. (aboutdentalschools.com)
  • Plan treatment for cavities, root canal therapy, placement of dental implants, and tooth removals. (laserdentistry.co.nz)
  • Dental loupes are not only used for dental checkups or examinations, and tooth extraction procedures, they can also be used when performing delicate procedures like cosmetic bonding, anterior composite restoration, and posterior composite restoration. (loupedirect.com)
  • Midmark is the only clinical environmental design company that enables a better care experience at the point of care in medical, dental and animal health. (midmark.com)
  • It is prudent to mention that the Midmark Dental Health Clinic, on an annual basis, provides patient care worth USD 500,000 to around 1,500 uninsured children, adults, senior citizens, and veterans. (fractovia.org)
  • Dentsply International, Inc. Gendex Orthoralix 9000 Panoramic Dental X-Ray $500. (mndental.org)
  • Aligned with KaVo's focus on ergonomics, the new KaVo PHYSIO™ Evo is precisely designed according to the needs and workflows of dentists and dental assistants. (kavo.com)
  • BIOLASE, Inc. is a medical device company and global market leader in the manufacturing and marketing of proprietary dental laser systems that enable dentists and dental specialists to perform a broad range of minimally invasive dental procedures , including cosmetic, restorative, and surgical applications. (biolase.com)
  • ACTEON ® Equipment (由 SATELEC ® 製造) 生產和銷售超音波治療儀,噴砂潔牙機和光固 (acteongroup.com)
  • From dental matrices to composite modelling instruments, the all-important dental dam and clamps, interdental wedges, multi-functional floss and any other accessory you have come to rely on for your daily work, discover our Kerr Restorative range of quality, smart and versatile dental restoration accessories. (kerrdental.com)
  • Furthermore, rising geriatric population and their demand for preventive, restorative and surgical services for dental care is likely to boost the market growth in the coming years. (grandviewresearch.com)