Abnormal fear or dread of visiting the dentist for preventive care or therapy and unwarranted anxiety over dental procedures.
True-false questionnaire made up of items believed to indicate anxiety, in which the subject answers verbally the statement that describes him.
The total of dental diagnostic, preventive, and restorative services provided to meet the needs of a patient (from Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982).
Feeling or emotion of dread, apprehension, and impending disaster but not disabling as with ANXIETY DISORDERS.
Dental methods involving the use of DENTAL HIGH-SPEED EQUIPMENT.
Persistent and disabling ANXIETY.
The psychological relations between the dentist and patient.
Pain in the adjacent areas of the teeth.
Use for articles concerning dental education in general.
Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of dentistry.
Individuals enrolled a school of dentistry or a formal educational program in leading to a degree in dentistry.
Removal of dental plaque and dental calculus from the surface of a tooth, from the surface of a tooth apical to the gingival margin accumulated in periodontal pockets, or from the surface coronal to the gingival margin.
Localized destruction of the tooth surface initiated by decalcification of the enamel followed by enzymatic lysis of organic structures and leading to cavity formation. If left unchecked, the cavity may penetrate the enamel and dentin and reach the pulp.
The practical application of physical, mechanical, and mathematical principles. (Stedman, 25th ed)
A subclass of alpha-amylase ISOENZYMES that are secreted into SALIVA.
A range of methods used to reduce pain and anxiety during dental procedures.
The optimal state of the mouth and normal functioning of the organs of the mouth without evidence of disease.
Techniques to reveal personality attributes by responses to relatively unstructured or ambiguous stimuli.
A drug-induced depression of consciousness during which patients respond purposefully to verbal commands, either alone or accompanied by light tactile stimulation. No interventions are required to maintain a patent airway. (From: American Society of Anesthesiologists Practice Guidelines)
A view of the world and the individual's environment as comprehensible, manageable, and meaningful, claiming that the way people view their life has a positive influence on their health.
An operation in which carious material is removed from teeth and biomechanically correct forms are established in the teeth to receive and retain restorations. A constant requirement is provision for prevention of failure of the restoration through recurrence of decay or inadequate resistance to applied stresses. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p239-40)
A state of increased receptivity to suggestion and direction, initially induced by the influence of another person.
Dental care for patients with chronic diseases. These diseases include chronic cardiovascular, endocrinologic, hematologic, immunologic, neoplastic, and renal diseases. The concept does not include dental care for the mentally or physically disabled which is DENTAL CARE FOR DISABLED.
"Decayed, missing and filled teeth," a routinely used statistical concept in dentistry.
Surgical procedures used to treat disease, injuries, and defects of the oral and maxillofacial region.
The surgical removal of a tooth. (Dorland, 28th ed)
The failure to retain teeth as a result of disease or injury.
Facilities where dental care is provided to patients.
The giving of attention to the special dental needs of children, including the prevention of tooth diseases and instruction in dental hygiene and dental health. The dental care may include the services provided by dental specialists.
A richly vascularized and innervated connective tissue of mesodermal origin, contained in the central cavity of a tooth and delimited by the dentin, and having formative, nutritive, sensory, and protective functions. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)
Persons trained in an accredited school or dental college and licensed by the state in which they reside to provide dental prophylaxis under the direction of a licensed dentist.
The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a dental school.
Dental care for the emotionally, mentally, or physically disabled patient. It does not include dental care for the chronically ill ( = DENTAL CARE FOR CHRONICALLY ILL).
Patterns of practice in dentistry related to diagnosis and treatment.
Insurance providing coverage for dental care.
Personnel whose work is prescribed and supervised by the dentist.
Services designed to promote, maintain, or restore dental health.
The study of laws, theories, and hypotheses through a systematic examination of pertinent facts and their interpretation in the field of dentistry. (From Jablonski, Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982, p674)
Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.
The giving of attention to the special dental needs of the elderly for proper maintenance or treatment. The dental care may include the services provided by dental specialists.
Pathological processes involving the PERIODONTIUM including the gum (GINGIVA), the alveolar bone (ALVEOLAR PROCESS), the DENTAL CEMENTUM, and the PERIODONTAL LIGAMENT.
The curve formed by the row of TEETH in their normal position in the JAW. The inferior dental arch is formed by the mandibular teeth, and the superior dental arch by the maxillary teeth.
Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.
A film that attaches to teeth, often causing DENTAL CARIES and GINGIVITIS. It is composed of MUCINS, secreted from salivary glands, and microorganisms.
The room or rooms in which the dentist and dental staff provide care. Offices include all rooms in the dentist's office suite.
Data collected during dental examination for the purpose of study, diagnosis, or treatment planning.
Anxiety experienced by an individual upon separation from a person or object of particular significance to the individual.
The nonexpendable items used by the dentist or dental staff in the performance of professional duties. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p106)
Personnel who provide dental service to patients in an organized facility, institution or agency.
Nonspecialized dental practice which is concerned with providing primary and continuing dental care.
An alloy used in restorative dentistry that contains mercury, silver, tin, copper, and possibly zinc.
Introduction of substances into the body using a needle and syringe.
Individuals who assist the dentist or the dental hygienist.
Anxiety disorders in which the essential feature is persistent and irrational fear of a specific object, activity, or situation that the individual feels compelled to avoid. The individual recognizes the fear as excessive or unreasonable.
Educational programs designed to inform dentists of recent advances in their fields.
Biocompatible materials placed into (endosseous) or onto (subperiosteal) the jawbone to support a crown, bridge, or artificial tooth, or to stabilize a diseased tooth.
Radiographic techniques used in dentistry.
Presentation devices used for patient education and technique training in dentistry.
Hospital department providing dental care.
Educational programs for dental graduates entering a specialty. They include formal specialty training as well as academic work in the clinical and basic dental sciences, and may lead to board certification or an advanced dental degree.
The principles of proper professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the dentist, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the dentist in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families. (From Stedman, 25th ed)
A self-reporting test consisting of items concerning fear and worry about taking tests and physiological activity, such as heart rate, sweating, etc., before, during, and after tests.
Individuals licensed to practice DENTISTRY.
Societies whose membership is limited to dentists.
A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)
The field of dentistry involved in procedures for designing and constructing dental appliances. It includes also the application of any technology to the field of dentistry.
A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to dental or oral health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.
A chronic endemic form of hypoplasia of the dental enamel caused by drinking water with a high fluorine content during the time of tooth formation, and characterized by defective calcification that gives a white chalky appearance to the enamel, which gradually undergoes brown discoloration. (Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p286)
The granting of a license to practice dentistry.
Facilities for the performance of services related to dental treatment but not done directly in the patient's mouth.
Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.
Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.
Materials used in the production of dental bases, restorations, impressions, prostheses, etc.
Studies in which a number of subjects are selected from all subjects in a defined population. Conclusions based on sample results may be attributed only to the population sampled.
Various branches of dental practice limited to specialized areas.
Amounts charged to the patient as payer for dental services.
Individuals responsible for fabrication of dental appliances.

A pilot study of the efficacy of oral midazolam for sedation in pediatric dental patients. (1/130)

Oral midazolam is being used for conscious sedation in dentistry with little documentation assessing its efficacy. In order to accumulate preliminary data, a randomized, double-blind, controlled, crossover, multi-site pilot study was conducted. The objective was to determine if 0.6 mg/kg of oral midazolam was an equally effective or superior means of achieving conscious sedation in the uncooperative pediatric dental patient, compared with a commonly used agent, 50 mg/kg of oral chloral hydrate. Twenty-three children in three clinics who required dentistry with local anesthetic and were determined to exhibit behavior rated as "negative" or "definitely negative" based on the Frankl scale were assessed. They were evaluated with respect to acceptance of medication; initial level of anxiety at each appointment; level of sedation prior to and acceptance of local anesthetic; movement and crying during the procedure; and overall behavior. The results showed that the group randomly assigned to receive midazolam had a significantly greater initial level of anxiety for that appointment (P < 0.02), a finding that could clearly confound further determination of the efficacy of these drugs. Patients given oral midazolam had an increased level of sedation prior to the administration of local anesthetic compared with those given chloral hydrate (P < 0.015). No statistically significant differences were noted in any of the other parameters. The age of the patient was found to have no correlation with the difference in overall behavior (r = -0.09). These preliminary data warrant further clinical trials.  (+info)

Intranasal midazolam plasma concentration profile and its effect on anxiety associated with dental procedures. (2/130)

The objectives of this study were to describe the serum concentration time profile for midazolam following intranasal administration to adult dental surgery patients and to ascertain the effect of midazolam on anxiety. Six female patients received a single 20 mg (0.32 to 0.53 mg/kg) dose of midazolam. Blood samples were collected at 5, 10, 20, 30, 45, and 60 min following dose administration. Midazolam plasma concentrations were determined by gas chromatography. Anxiety was evaluated using a 100-mm visual analogue scale. The maximum concentration of midazolam was reached 25.8 min (range 18 to 35 min) following dose administration. Maximum concentrations were variable. However, there was no relationship between the weight-adjusted dose and maximal concentration. Patients experiencing baseline anxiety exhibited a trend toward reduction in their measured anxiety score (P = 0.06). Plasma concentrations above the hypothesized minimum effective concentration for sedative effects were attained when midazolam was administered intranasally to adult dental patients.  (+info)

Dental fear among university students: implications for pharmacological research. (3/130)

University students are often subjects in randomized clinical trials involving anxiolytic and analgesic medications used during clinical dental and medical procedures. The purpose of this study was to describe a typical university student population available for research by using data from a mail survey. Subjects were 350 students chosen randomly from all enrolled, full-time, traditional students on the main campus at the University of Washington in Seattle, WA. The aim was to determine the extent and nature of dental anxiety in this population. In addition, the relationships between subject willingness to receive dental injections and general and mental health and medical avoidance and medical fears were examined. The Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS) was used to measure dental anxiety. Dental anxiety was prevalent in this population; 19% of students reported high rates of dental fear. Thirteen percent of students had never had a dental injection. Students with no experience with dental injections were more reluctant than those with experience to receive an injection if one were needed. DAS scores were correlated with injection reluctance. Students who were reluctant to go ahead with a dental injection also reported poorer general and mental health than those who were less reluctant. These students also reported higher medical avoidance and medical anxiety scores. University students provide a rich source of potential subjects for clinical research. The student population, like the community at large, contains people with high levels of dental and medical fear.  (+info)

Dental anesthetic management of a patient with ventricular arrhythmias. (4/130)

During routine deep sedation for endodontic therapy, a dentist-anesthesiologist observed premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) on a 62-yr-old woman's electrocardiogram (EKG) tracing. The dentist was able to complete the root canal procedure under intravenous (i.v.) sedation without any problems. The dentist-anesthesiologist referred the patient for medical evaluation. She was found to be free from ischemic cardiac disease with normal ventricular function. The patient was cleared to continue her dental treatment with deep sedation. She subsequently continued to undergo dental treatment with deep intravenous sedation without incident, although her EKG exhibited frequent PVCs, up to 20 per minute, including couplets and episodes of trigeminy. This article will review indications for medical intervention, antiarrhythmic medications, and anesthetic interventions for perioperative PVCs.  (+info)

Factors predictive of anxiety before oral surgery: efficacy of various subject screening measures. (5/130)

Recruiting anxious people for analgesic and anxiolytic studies allows greater opportunities to study the positive effects of anxiolytic medication. The purpose of this study is to describe a population recruited for a study of anxiolytic medication using the third molar model and to evaluate the relative efficacy of different measures of dental anxiety as recruitment tools. A concerted effort was made to recruit anxious subjects. The following measures were tested: Corah's Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS), Kleinknecht's Dental Fear Survey (DFS), Litt's Oral Surgery Confidence Questionnaire (OSCQ), and Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. The influence of prior experience with tooth extractions on anxiety was also assessed. Subjects who had previously experienced tooth extraction reported higher anxiety before oral surgery than did subjects without such experience. DAS, DFS and state anxiety scores correlated with anxiety reported before oral surgery. However, OSCQ scores and trait anxiety were not related to anxiety reported before surgery. Linear regression indicated that the DFS predicted anxiety before oral surgery best of all measures that were used. Kleinknecht's DFS is thus recommended for use as a tool for recruiting anxious patients.  (+info)

Dental attendance in 1998 and implications for the future. (6/130)

The 1998 survey of Adult Dental Health in the UK was carried out under the auspices of the Office of National Statistics together with the Universities of Birmingham, Dundee, Newcastle-upon-Tyne and Wales. A key behavioural indicator in these decennial surveys is whether people say they go to a dentist for a regular dental check-up, an occasional dental check-up or only when they have trouble with their teeth. The proportion of dentate adults in the UK who report attending for regular dental check-ups has risen from 43% in 1978 to 59% in 1998. Older adults (over 55 years old) in 1998 were the most likely to say they attend for regular dental check-ups. Many younger adults (16-24) in 1998 said they went to a dentist less often than 5 years previously, they were also the least likely to say they attend for regular dental check-ups. Dental anxiety remains a problem for many dental patients but another factor of importance to many is their want to be involved in the treatment process and especially to be given an estimate of treatment costs.  (+info)

A joint approach to treating dental phobics between community dental services and specialist psychotherapy services--a single case report. (7/130)

A 41-year-old male patient presented at the local dental hospital requesting treatment under IV sedation, a treatment that he had had for the past 25 years. The patient was referred to the specialist psychotherapy services for cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), and received a 1 hour course of therapy. He was then introduced to dental services, and at this visit had a check-up, OPG, and treatment planning discussion. At a subsequent visit he had local anaesthetic, three fillings, and a scale and polish. The patient is now able to return to general dental practice, after only a brief therapeutic intervention, and subsequent dental treatment. The present and future cost saving to the NHS is substantial compared with the treatment method initially sought by the patient.  (+info)

A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, comparative study of topical skin analgesics and the anxiety and discomfort associated with venous cannulation. (8/130)

OBJECTIVES: To compare the effect of topical skin anaesthetic agents on the discomfort and anxiety associated with venous cannulation. DESIGN: Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, within subject, volunteer trial. METHODS: 20 healthy volunteers underwent venous cannulation on three separate occasions having received topical skin application of either 4% amethocaine gel (Ametop), 5% eutectic mixture of lidocaine and prilocaine (EMLA) or E45 cream (placebo). Visual analogue and verbal rating scales were used to assess pain and anxiety associated with the venous cannulation, and anticipated anxiety for future cannulation, under each drug condition. RESULTS: Subjects were aged 22-53 years (mean 32.8 years). The mean visual analogue scores (VAS) for discomfort were found to be significantly lower (p< 0.001) with Ametop (VAS = 18mm) and EMLA (VAS = 29mm) compared with the control (VAS = 38mm). There was a positive correlation (R2 = 72%, p<0.001) between discomfort and the predicted anxiety if cannulation was to be repeated with the same cream. With the placebo a positive correlation (R2 = 19.8%, p = 0.05) was found between the level of anxiety before cannulation and the level of discomfort recorded. CONCLUSIONS: Ametop and EMLA topical anaesthetic agents produce effective skin analgesia for venous cannulation. The use of topical analgesia can reduce perceived anxiety about future cannulation procedures. This has application in the management of anxious patients undergoing intravenous sedation, suggesting that topical analgesia prior to venous cannulation may significantly aid anxiolysis.  (+info)

Background: A growing body of literature describes the performance of dental fear questionnaires in various countries. We describe the psychometric properties of Greek versions of the Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS) and the Dental Fear Survey (DFS) in adult Greek patients. Methods: Greek versions of the MDAS and DFS were administered to two samples of adult dental patients. In the first sample, 195 patients attending one of three private practice dental offices in a large city in Greece completed the questionnaires in the waiting room before dental treatment. After treatment, their dentists (who did not know how the patients had answered the questionnaire) rated their anxiety during dental treatment. In the second sample, 41 patients attending a Greek university dental school clinic completed the questionnaire twice at two separate visits, in order to provide test-retest data. Cronbachs alpha was used to compute the internal consistencies, while Spearmans rho was used to compute the ...
Background Dental anxiety is a widespread problem in many populations. This problem can be a barrier to dental care and may lead to poor oral health. Dental anxiety may be related to psychological status. Aims The aim of the present study was to assess the levels of dental anxiety, dental fear, Beck Depression, and state-trait anxiety according to age, gender and education level in patients at the periodontology clinic in the Diyarbakır Mouth and Dental Health Center. Study Design A total of 231 patients (115 males, 116 females) filled out dental fear scale (DFS), dental anxiety scale (DAS), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), state-trait anxiety inventory-state (STAI-S), and state-trait anxiety inventory-trait (STAI-T) questionnaires, and evaluations of DFS, DAS, BDI, STAI-S, and STAI-T were conducted according to age, gender, and education level. Results The mean DFS, DAS, BDI, STAI-T, and STAI -S were 45.64, 9.15, 13.16, 38.90, and 40.18, respectively. There was a significant association among DFS, DAS
The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between childhood dental experiences and dental fear in adulthood among dentistry, psychology and mathematics undergraduate students. A cross-sectional study of 1,256 students from the city of Belo Horizonte, Brazil, was performed. Students responded to the Brazilian version of the Dental Fear Survey (DFS) and a questionnaire regarding previous dental experiences. Both the DFS and the questionnaire were self-administered. Association was tested using descriptive, bivariate and multivariate linear regression analysis, with a 5% significance level. Dentistry undergraduates reported lower scores than psychology (p < 0.001) and mathematics undergraduates (p < 0.05) for all three dimensions of the DFS. Negative dental experiences in childhood was associated with dimensions of Avoidance (B = 2.70, p < 0.001), Physiological arousal (B = 1.42, p < 0.001) and Fears of specific stimuli/situations (B = 3.44, p < 0.001). The reason for
The aim is to investigate the prevalence of dental anxiety and its association with pain and other related factors in adult patients with irreversible pulpitis. One hundred and thirty patients with irreversible pulpitis were included in this cross-sectional study. Participants were asked to fill out an information table and a battery of questionnaires to assess their level of dental anxiety, pain at their first and most recent dental experience, and pain intensity before/during the present endodontic treatment. The level of anxiety that participants displayed during the present treatment was also evaluated by the dentists using an anxiety rating scale. Data were analyzed by t-test, ANOVA, and Spearman correlation tests. 83.1% of participants suffered from moderate or high dental anxiety, and 16.2% met criteria for specific phobia. Subjects who had higher MDAS scores were more likely to postpone their dental visits (P | 0.05). Subjects who had bad experiences at their most recent dental visit were more
Purpose: To compare parental perceptions before and after viewing an animation demonstrating a dental injection. Also, parental dental fears were compared with perceptions of their childs dental fears before viewing the animation. Methods: Fifty caregivers of healthy children between 4 to 12 years old seen at a University based pediatric dental clinic were asked to assess their own and their childs dental fears by completing surveys. Surveys were completed before and after watching an animation about dental injections prior to dental treatment. Caregivers rated their childs fears in Dental Subscale of the Childrens Fear Survey Schedule (CFSS-DS). The CFSS-DS consists of 15 questions measuring fear-related items on a Likert scale from 1 to 5, producing a fear score out of 75 points. Caregivers rated their own fears in Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS) consisting of 5 questions measuring fear in dental situations, producing a fear score out of 25 points. Results: Parental fears corresponded ...
Little is known about the longitudinal course of dental anxiety in relation to age, mental health and personality factors. In 1968 69 a representative sample of 778 women aged 38 to 54 yr took part in a psychiatric examination. Three hundred and ten were followed up in 1992-93. A phobia questionnaire, including assessment of dental fear, and the Eysenck Personality Inventory were distributed to the participants at both occasions. High dental fear was reported by 16.8% of the women at baseline and was associated with a higher number of other phobias, a higher level of neuroticism, more psychiatric impairment, more social disability due to phobic disorder, and a higher anxiety level. Among women who reported high dental fear in 1968 69 (n=36), 64% remitted and 36% remained fearful. Among women with low dental fear in 1968 69 (n = 274), 5% reported high dental fear in 1992-93. Chronicity was associated with higher neuroticism, lower extraversion, and more psychiatric impairment at base-line. ...
There were no regional differences in dental anxiety. Girls felt more dental anxiety than boys did. Adolescents who did not receive treatment even when they needed it felt more dental anxiety than those who did receive treatment. There were also statistically significant differences in dental anxiety according to the type of treatment received. Adolescents who received extraction treatment or underwent oral surgery experienced more dental anxiety than those who received orthodontic or aesthetic treatment. Those who had a toothache or who experienced gingival bleeding felt more dental anxiety than those who did not have those conditions. Subjects with poor perceived oral health also had more dental anxiety. The number of decayed teeth and filled teeth was significantly correlated with dental anxiety ...
The aim of this chapter is to introduce the reader to the nature and development of dental anxiety and to provide an understanding of how and why patients behave in the way they do. This forms the basis for the practice of conscious sedation in the management of dental anxiety. The latter part of the chapter explains the development of conscious sedation, the accepted definition and the current guidelines relating to the practice of the technique in dental practice.. One of the main indications for the use of conscious sedation for dental care is anxiety. The prevalence of dental anxiety and phobia is high. The 2009 United Kingdom Adult Dental Health Survey indicated that 36% of adults had moderate dental anxiety and a further 12% reported extreme dental anxiety. The significance of dental anxiety as a barrier towards obtaining dental care, particularly as a result of avoidance, is well recognised. It has also been reported that dental anxiety does not just affect the patient but can have a ...
How can one overcome dental anxiety?. Dental anxiety and fear can become completely overwhelming. It is estimated that as many as 35 million people do not visit the dental office at all because they are too afraid. Receiving regular dental check ups and cleanings is incredibly important. Having regular routine check ups is the easiest way to maintain excellent oral hygiene and reduce the need for more complex treatments.. Here are some tips to help reduce dental fear and anxiety:. Talk to the dentist - The dentist is not a mind reader. Though it can be hard to talk about irrational fears with a stranger, the dentist can take extra precautions during visits if fears and anxiety are communicated.. Bring a portable music player - Music acts as a relaxant and also drowns out any fear-producing noises. Listening to calming music throughout the appointment will help to reduce anxiety.. Agree on a signal - Many people are afraid that the dentist will not know they are in significant pain during the ...
How can one overcome dental anxiety?. Dental anxiety and fear can become completely overwhelming. It is estimated that as many as 35 million people do not visit the dental office at all because they are too afraid. Receiving regular dental check ups and cleanings is incredibly important. Having regular routine check ups is the easiest way to maintain excellent oral hygiene and reduce the need for more complex treatments.. Here are some tips to help reduce dental fear and anxiety:. Talk to the dentist - The dentist is not a mind reader. Though it can be hard to talk about irrational fears with a stranger, the dentist can take extra precautions during visits if fears and anxiety are communicated.. Bring a portable music player - Music acts as a relaxant and also drowns out any fear-producing noises. Listening to calming music throughout the appointment will help to reduce anxiety.. Agree on a signal - Many people are afraid that the dentist will not know they are in significant pain during the ...
How can one overcome dental anxiety?. Dental anxiety and fear can become completely overwhelming. It is estimated that as many as 35 million people do not visit the dental office at all because they are too afraid. Receiving regular dental check-ups and cleanings is incredibly important. Having regular routine check-ups is the easiest way to maintain excellent oral hygiene and reduce the need for more complex treatments.. Here are some tips to help reduce dental fear and anxiety:. Talk to us - We cant read minds. Though it can be hard to talk about irrational fears with a stranger, we can take extra precautions during visits if fears and anxiety are communicated.. Bring a portable music player - Music acts as a relaxant and also drowns out any fear-producing noises. Listening to calming music throughout the appointment will help to reduce anxiety.. Agree on a signal - Many people are afraid that the dentist will not know they are in significant pain during the appointment and will continue with ...
Research suggests that there is a complex set of factors that lead to the development and maintenance of significant dental anxiety or dental phobia, which can be grouped as genetic, behavioural and cognitive factors.[6] In comparison to other phobias, literature on odontophobia is relatively limited. There are several theories been proposed, however a 2014 review describes 5 pathways which relate specifically to development dental fear and anxiety: Cognitive Conditioning, Vicarious, Verbal Threat, Informative, and Parental. It is important to note, however, that there may be a variety of background factors common to all general fear and anxiety conditions that may be at play and affect these more specific pathways.[6] Conditioning Conditioning is defined as the process by which a person learns through personal experience that an event or stimulus will result in a detrimental outcome, e.g. if I visit the dentist, it is going to be sore. As, expected dental fear is associated with previous ...
Is the fear of going to the dentist keeping patients from getting critical healthcare? According to recent studies, the answer is yes. Statistics show that between 9% and 20% of Americans (between 30 and 40 million people) avoid going to the dentist regularly because of Dental Anxiety, the fear of seeking or receiving dental care.. This avoidance can lead to more serious health issues such as gum disease and tooth decay as reported in a JADA (Journal of the American Dental Association) study which found that a patients perception of a dental care experience as painful … can not only result in poor satisfaction with the therapy but also in the avoidance of necessary treatments, resulting in the deterioration of oral health. This can lead to negative impact on a dentists business, such as revenue loss, lower patient retention rates, and fewer referrals.. With this in mind, one way dentists are increasingly looking to fight the growing problem of dental anxiety is by creating a more calming ...
Have you ever heard of dental anxiety? Dental anxiety, although common, can be a debilitating condition in which an individual is too afraid to visit their
Studies suggest that half of the US population never go to the dentist, most people go only to fix a major problem, and 80% of the adult population has periodontal disease (gum disease). Now that we know gum disease places you at risk for heart disease, diabetes and many other systemic illnesses, it is safe to say that if we can find a way to get people to come to the dentist, we can find a way to make them healthier overall.. Why do people avoid coming to the dentist? The #1 reason people wont go is due to dental anxiety and fear of experiencing pain. Luckily, Dr. Donnelly and his team have learned the tricks to performing gentle dentistry without causing pain. Most notably, everyday patients with dental anxiety are surprised that they could not feel the shot. Frequently, after giving a shot (delivering anesthesia), a patient starts to get really numb, and they look at the assistant and ask, How did they get me numb without giving me a shot? Dr. Donnelly has spent years perfecting his ...
The aim of the present study was to compare self-reported dental fear among dental students and patients at a School of Dentistry in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Eighty students ranging in age from 20 to 29 years and 80 patients ranging in age from 18 to 65 years participated in the study. A self-administered pre-tested questionnaire consisting of 13 items was used for data acquisition. The city of Belo Horizonte Social Vulnerability Index (SVI) was employed for socioeconomic classification. The chi-square test and binary and multinomial logistic regression were employed in the statistical analysis, with the significance level set at 0.05. The majority of dental students (76.5%) sought the dentist for the first time for a routine exam, while patients (77.3%) mostly sought a dentist for the treatment of dental pain. Dental fear was more prevalent among the patients (72.5%) than the students (27.5%). A total of 47.1% of the students and 52.9% of the patients reported having had negative dental experiences in
If you are terrified of the dental office, dentist, and the dental tools that poke and prod your oral cavity, we are here to help you feel better in the dental chair! Dental anxiety and dental fear are very common and they are also treatable. To feel more comfortable and.... ...
Dental anxiety is definitely an affliction endured by millions. Although some instances tend to be more severe than the others, most of the people impacted by dental anxiety dread their biannual dental professional visits. Regardless of how skilled their particular dentists are, dental sufferers of anxiety find standard checkups and cleanings deeply uncomfortable. While most of them simply bite the bullet and obtain their teeth washed every six several weeks, a considerable quantity of them elect to not receive regular checkups. Its hardly unusual for those who have extreme dental anxiety to visit years - sometimes decades - between dental professional visits.. When battling with dental anxiety, its vital that you avoid letting your fear overtake you. Doing this not just stands to break into the healthiness of the teeth - but additionally your whole mouth. After skipping a couple of cleanings and suffering no readily apparent effects, certain people arrived at this misguided conclusion they no ...
Objective. To evaluate quality-of-life (QoL), before and after cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in patients diagnosed with intra-oral injection phobia according to DSM-IV and to compare with the general population. This study also aimed to evaluate if QoL was associated with self-reported injection anxiety, dental anxiety, time since last dental treatment and oral health. Materials and methods. Subjects were 55 patients (mean age 35.5 +/- 12.2, 78.2% women) who participated in a treatment study in which 89% managed an intra-oral injection at 1 year follow-up. The patients completed a set of questionnaires including Quality of Life Inventory (QOLI), Injection Phobia Scale-Anxiety, Dental Anxiety Scale and a single-item question assessing self-perceived oral health. Objective measures of oral health and treatment needs were based on clinical examination. QOLI-scores from a non-clinical sample were used for comparison. Results. Before treatment the general and health specific QoL were lower among ...
Simple tips and strategies to help with dental anxiety from Sunwest Dental in Chandler, AZ. Learn how to manage your anxiety and dental phobia
It appears that if a father is nervous about dental visits, his children pick up on his cues (no surprise there)-even unintentional ones-and may follow suit.. The findings include you too, mom. The International Journal of Pediatric Dentistry confirms that the higher the level of dental anxiety in any family member, the higher the level in the rest of the family. Other studies show that women more often demonstrate positive habits and attitudes towards dentistry-so it may be up to you to set the good example! ...
www.dentalfearcentral.org - Dental Phobia Information: The worlds biggest dentist phobia and dental anxiety resource, with a busy dental phobia support forum, tips for dentists, and dentist reviews and recommendations.
Do you suffer from fear, anxiety or stress when visiting the dentist? Dental anxiety is common and can affect people of any age. Being anxious during a visit to the dentist can result in worsening of dental related disease, a greater need for emergency or complex treatment and ongoing health problems. Regular visits can actually help prevent these more stressful occurrences so that it doesnt feed into your anxiety and create even more stress and trauma on your body. If anxiety is preventing you from caring for your teeth, please know there are strategies we can put in place to help ease the stress of visiting us.. ...
Even as a young child, I suffered with severe anxiety about the dentist. It made routine visits difficult and specialty treatments a real challenge. Over the years, Ive tried every form of sedation dentistry that there is. After finding that some work better than others, theres finally a solution for me to get the routine dental care that I need. I created this site to share my extensive experience with the various sedation options in the hopes that I can help others who struggle with dental anxiety as well. I hope the information here helps you to brave your fears and go get that routine cleaning done.
Simple tips and strategies to help with dental anxiety from Active Dental in Irving, TX. Learn how to manage your anxiety and dental phobia
Dental fear of Japanese residents in the United States.: The purpose of this study was to investigate dental fear in a sample of Japanese adults and to make pre
Simple tips and strategies to help with dental anxiety from your trusted team at Casa Dental of Santa Ana in Santa Ana, CA. Learn how to manage your anxiety
Welcome to our Dental Anxiety and Fear page. Contact Salkeld Family Dental, LLC today at (260) 637-4648 or visit our office servicing Fort Wayne, IN
Written By Anita Ginsburg / Reviewed By Ray Spotts Dental anxiety is distressingly common in both children and adults. After all, going to a dentist isnt particularly fun, and it can be hard to understand exactly what needs to be done when you go in. However, your oral and dental health plays a big role in your overal
If you experience fear and anxiety just thinking about the dentist, youre not alone. According to recent surveys, dental anxiety may affect up to 60% of...
Relieve dental anxiety with sedation dentistry in Park City, UT, including nitrous oxide laughing gas and oral conscious sedatives, from the trusted dentist and Park City Dentistry team.
Varying levels of dental anxiety are common among your patients. Heres why you should pay close attention to women in their 40s. A Sydney University study says that this specific age group is likely to have a perceived traumatic dental experience that keeps them from following through with treatment procedures.
Have a fear of the dentist? This article goes explains why some people suffer from dental phobia and dental anxiety and provides a list of solutions
Dental anxiety is something you can overcome. Speak up about your concerns, find ways to distract yourself, and consider sedation dentistry.
Simple tips and strategies to help with dental anxiety from your trusted team at Abbadent Family & Cosmetic Dentistry in Dubuque, IA. Learn how to manage your anxiety
Many children (and adults) are plagued by dental anxiety. But overcoming these fears is essential to maintaining healthy teeth and gums. To that end, Dr. Amanda
Dont let fear stand in your way of good dental care! Advanced Family Dentistry can help you overcome your dental anxiety. 973-263-7300
Sedation dentistry is an ideal alternative for patients who struggle with dental anxiety. Call our Shawnee, OK office today and never fret over another visit!
Below are our articles on the subject of Dental Anxiety. If you cant see what you are looking for our other categories are displayed on the left under Our Quick Links ...
Dental Anxiety in Relation to Emotional and Behavioral Problems in Croatian Adolescents. . Biblioteca virtual para leer y descargar libros, documentos, trabajos y tesis universitarias en PDF. Material universiario, documentación y tareas realizadas por universitarios en nuestra biblioteca. Para descargar gratis y para leer online.
Adult, Arousal, Attitude to Health, Dental Anxiety/physiopathology/*psychology, Dental Care/psychology, Dental Instruments, Factor Analysis; Statistical, Female, Humans, Male, Multivariate Analysis, Personality Inventory/statistics & numerical data, Psychometrics, Reproducibility of Results, Sex Factors ...
If you are Afraid, Fearful, Anxious or Phobic of the Dentist try our FREE 7 day Beat Your Fear eCourse. Let us help you beat your fear.
The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of one and five sessions of treatment for intra-oral injection phobia in 55 subjects fulfilling the DSM-IV criteria for specific phobia. The subjects were randomly assigned to one or five sessions of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) performed by dentists. Assessments included behavioural tests and self-report instruments used pretreatment, post-treatment, and at 1 yr of follow-up. The dental anxiety scale (DAS), the injection phobia scale-anxiety, and the mutilation questionnaires were applied. Mean avoidance duration of intra-oral injections before treatment was 7.0 yr. The results showed that 89% of the subjects had received intra-oral injections from a regular dentist during the 1-yr follow-up. The only significant difference between the one- and the five-session groups was that the five-session group reported less anxiety (as measured using the DAS) at 1 yr of follow-up. It was concluded that both treatments performed by dentists specially ...
Sedation Dentistry Austin TX - A light sedative allows you to relax through you dental appointment with Austin Sedation Dentist AnnMarie Olson. Providing care for dental fears, phobias and anxiety in Austin, Arboretum Area, Seton Northwest Area, Round Rock, Northwest Austin and Travis County.
Dental fear can be passed on from parents to their children. To claim your FREE dental consultation call us on (02) 9365 7187 today!
How to Ease Your Childs Dental Fear - Do you notice your child showing disinterest or crowing back at the mention of visiting the dentists office? It is very natural for children to be
Several years ago I decided to take a trip to the dentist after skipping multiple appointments for over 15 years. I truly had a dental anxiety and had a hard time getting over my fears. Thankfully, my dental visit went smoothly with only four cavities identified. What I did find from this dental visit was that there was a great deal of new information and technology that I had been missing out on. Laser-based technology and digital imaging are just a few examples. With this blog, I want you to understand that you can get over your fears and learn about this new technology like I did, so enjoy the information.
Several years ago I decided to take a trip to the dentist after skipping multiple appointments for over 15 years. I truly had a dental anxiety and had a hard time getting over my fears. Thankfully, my dental visit went smoothly with only four cavities identified. What I did find from this dental visit was that there was a great deal of new information and technology that I had been missing out on. Laser-based technology and digital imaging are just a few examples. With this blog, I want you to understand that you can get over your fears and learn about this new technology like I did, so enjoy the information.
At Kirchner Dental, we put even the most anxious patients at ease. Call our Jeffersonville, IN office at 812-406-0914 to book an appointment.
According to recent surveys 56% of patients find the dental injection to be the least pleasant part of their dental visit. Whether you have a dental emergency or about to get a composite filling, a CEREC crown, or a dental veneer the anesthetic is a necessary part of the procedure for your comfort.
Sleepright Dental Guards. The SleepRight dental guards are the only occlusal splints approved by the British Dental Health ... Research has found that children with bruxism have a tendency towards anxiety, stress and hyperactivity. It is also strongly ... dental occlusion and psycholgical problems. It is also linked to craniomandibular disorders including headaches and ...
Sleepright Dental Guards. The SleepRight dental guards are the only occlusal splints approved by the British Dental Health ... To complicate the picture, it has been argued that smokers report higher anxiety and are more likely to possess personality ... life and those with anxiety have a three times higher prevalence of sleep bruxism as compared with low stress or non-anxiety ... Episodes that occur during REM sleep are more frequently associated with facial and dental pain. ...
Sleepright Dental Guards. The SleepRight dental guards are the only occlusal splints approved by the British Dental Health ... Other drugs such as sedative and anxiolytic drugs (drugs to treat anxiety) seem promising although the safety of their use is ...
Depression, Anxiety & Mental Health *Self Help and Natural Options for Depression & Anxiety ... Your Teeth & All Things Dental. *Natural & Complimentary Therapies. *Your Body After Baby & Post Natal Issues ...
Depression, Anxiety & Mental Health *Self Help and Natural Options for Depression & Anxiety ... Your Teeth & All Things Dental. *Natural & Complimentary Therapies. *Your Body After Baby & Post Natal Issues ...
Overcome our customer s pre-purchase anxieties by creating helpful guides that empower them to order with confidence, such as ... Medical and dental benefits.. *401k with employer matching.. *Vacation and Holiday pay. ...
Effective one-on-one research and writing support skills to reduce library anxiety and writing anxiety. ... At Saint Leo, we offer an array of medical, dental, and vision packages as well as several add-on perks to make your benefits ... Inclusive Group Health Plan (Medical, Dental, Vision). *Group Health Plan features include Teledoc, Surgery Plus!, Wellness ...
Engage with your dental professional before beginning any teeth bleaching plan. If you currently have any kind of dental care ... Go to the automobile clean to remove an anxiety attack. Rub your vehicle to some stunning glow and acquire every tiny depth ... illness or issue, your dental practitioner may suggest a certain way of whitening teeth. Most natural home remedies do not have ...
I just felt less anxiety about things and was better able to cope. This drug, I think, has a short life span in your system, so ... I have a few dental problems, but cant imagine what you must have gone through with all yours. Thankfully you have adjusted to ... I just felt less anxiety about things and was better able to cope. This drug, I think, has a short life span in your system, so ... That sent me into a downward spiral of depression and anxiety for five years. I was only 28 at the time, in a bad marriage, had ...
CBD for anxiety in my dog Last postbyErica « Fri Nov 10, 2017 1:46 pm ... Dental cleaning/exam Last postbyColt_An2 « Mon Oct 29, 2018 1:02 pm ...
We have an early start today ... OH is cycling into the city for a 9am dental appointment. Ill catch the bus a bit later as my ... anxiety, B12 deficiency, tachycardia, high blood pressure and migraines ...
... and the non-quantifiable costs of anxiety, apprehension and other quality of life issues. One study found that American ... Dental Materials. * ↳ Thyroid/Breast Health. * ↳ Dental Fluorosis. * ↳ Cadmium. * ↳ Lies & Deceptions. * ↳ Pesticides. * ↳ ...
Anxiety and Stress. Anxiety and Stress Forum 8 Topics. 54 Posts. Last post. by dazzyshahu Tue Sep 19, 2017 6:19 am ... Dental Health. Dental Health Forum 14 Topics. 74 Posts. Last post. by albertdds Thu Jun 29, 2017 9:49 pm ...
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Dental Care*View All Dental Care. *Dental Accessories. *Dental Floss. *Denture Care ... Stress & Anxiety. *Womens Vitamins*View All Womens Vitamins. *Hair, Skin & Nails. *Pregnancy & Conception ...
Dental Care*View All Dental Care. *Dental Accessories. *Dental Floss. *Denture Care ... Stress & Anxiety. *Womens Vitamins*View All Womens Vitamins. *Hair, Skin & Nails. *Pregnancy & Conception ...
Dental Care*View All Dental Care. *Dental Accessories. *Dental Floss. *Denture Care ... Stress & Anxiety. *Womens Vitamins*View All Womens Vitamins. *Hair, Skin & Nails. *Pregnancy & Conception ...
Dental Care*View All Dental Care. *Dental Accessories. *Dental Floss. *Denture Care ... Stress & Anxiety. *Womens Vitamins*View All Womens Vitamins. *Hair, Skin & Nails. *Pregnancy & Conception ...
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  • Research has found that children with bruxism have a tendency towards anxiety, stress and hyperactivity. (bruxism.org.uk)
  • Stress levels and personality characteristics are often considered to be predisposing factors for several diseases and it is well documented that individuals with a highly stressful life and those with anxiety have a three times higher prevalence of sleep bruxism as compared with low stress or non-anxiety individuals. (bruxism.org.uk)
  • In the dental profession the belief that bruxism and dental occlusion are causally related has been widespread. (bruxism.org.uk)
  • Mental disorders, anxiety, stress and adverse psychosocial factors are significantly related to tooth grinding during sleep and it has been found that nearly 70% of bruxism occurs as a result of stress or anxiety. (bruxism.org.uk)
  • It is a very common complaint of children with mouth breathing, adenotonsillar hypertrophy, obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), dental occlusion and psycholgical problems. (bruxism.org.uk)
  • The use of psychoactive substances (tobacco, alcohol, caffeine, or medications for sleep, depression, and anxiety) increases arousal and leads to problems falling asleep, staying asleep and daytime sleepiness. (bruxism.org.uk)
  • Episodes that occur during REM sleep are more frequently associated with facial and dental pain. (bruxism.org.uk)

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