Dental Anxiety: Abnormal fear or dread of visiting the dentist for preventive care or therapy and unwarranted anxiety over dental procedures.Manifest Anxiety Scale: True-false questionnaire made up of items believed to indicate anxiety, in which the subject answers verbally the statement that describes him.Dental Care: The total of dental diagnostic, preventive, and restorative services provided to meet the needs of a patient (from Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982).Anxiety: Feeling or emotion of dread, apprehension, and impending disaster but not disabling as with ANXIETY DISORDERS.Dental High-Speed Technique: Dental methods involving the use of DENTAL HIGH-SPEED EQUIPMENT.Anxiety Disorders: Persistent and disabling ANXIETY.Dentist-Patient Relations: The psychological relations between the dentist and patient.Toothache: Pain in the adjacent areas of the teeth.Education, Dental: Use for articles concerning dental education in general.Schools, Dental: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of dentistry.Students, Dental: Individuals enrolled a school of dentistry or a formal educational program in leading to a degree in dentistry.Dental Scaling: Removal of dental plaque and dental calculus from the surface of a tooth, from the surface of a tooth apical to the gingival margin accumulated in periodontal pockets, or from the surface coronal to the gingival margin.Dental Caries: Localized destruction of the tooth surface initiated by decalcification of the enamel followed by enzymatic lysis of organic structures and leading to cavity formation. If left unchecked, the cavity may penetrate the enamel and dentin and reach the pulp.Engineering: The practical application of physical, mechanical, and mathematical principles. (Stedman, 25th ed)Salivary alpha-Amylases: A subclass of alpha-amylase ISOENZYMES that are secreted into SALIVA.Anesthesia, Dental: A range of methods used to reduce pain and anxiety during dental procedures.Oral Health: The optimal state of the mouth and normal functioning of the organs of the mouth without evidence of disease.Projective Techniques: Techniques to reveal personality attributes by responses to relatively unstructured or ambiguous stimuli.Conscious Sedation: A drug-induced depression of consciousness during which patients respond purposefully to verbal commands, either alone or accompanied by light tactile stimulation. No interventions are required to maintain a patent airway. (From: American Society of Anesthesiologists Practice Guidelines)Sense of Coherence: A view of the world and the individual's environment as comprehensible, manageable, and meaningful, claiming that the way people view their life has a positive influence on their health.Dental Cavity Preparation: An operation in which carious material is removed from teeth and biomechanically correct forms are established in the teeth to receive and retain restorations. A constant requirement is provision for prevention of failure of the restoration through recurrence of decay or inadequate resistance to applied stresses. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p239-40)Hypnosis: A state of increased receptivity to suggestion and direction, initially induced by the influence of another person.Dental Care for Chronically Ill: Dental care for patients with chronic diseases. These diseases include chronic cardiovascular, endocrinologic, hematologic, immunologic, neoplastic, and renal diseases. The concept does not include dental care for the mentally or physically disabled which is DENTAL CARE FOR DISABLED.DMF Index: "Decayed, missing and filled teeth," a routinely used statistical concept in dentistry.Oral Surgical Procedures: Surgical procedures used to treat disease, injuries, and defects of the oral and maxillofacial region.Tooth Extraction: The surgical removal of a tooth. (Dorland, 28th ed)Tooth Loss: The failure to retain teeth as a result of disease or injury.Dental Clinics: Facilities where dental care is provided to patients.Dental Care for Children: The giving of attention to the special dental needs of children, including the prevention of tooth diseases and instruction in dental hygiene and dental health. The dental care may include the services provided by dental specialists.Dental Pulp: A richly vascularized and innervated connective tissue of mesodermal origin, contained in the central cavity of a tooth and delimited by the dentin, and having formative, nutritive, sensory, and protective functions. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Dental Hygienists: Persons trained in an accredited school or dental college and licensed by the state in which they reside to provide dental prophylaxis under the direction of a licensed dentist.JordanFaculty, Dental: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a dental school.Dental Care for Disabled: Dental care for the emotionally, mentally, or physically disabled patient. It does not include dental care for the chronically ill ( = DENTAL CARE FOR CHRONICALLY ILL).Dentist's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice in dentistry related to diagnosis and treatment.Insurance, Dental: Insurance providing coverage for dental care.Dental Auxiliaries: Personnel whose work is prescribed and supervised by the dentist.Dental Health Services: Services designed to promote, maintain, or restore dental health.Dental Research: The study of laws, theories, and hypotheses through a systematic examination of pertinent facts and their interpretation in the field of dentistry. (From Jablonski, Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982, p674)Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Dental Care for Aged: The giving of attention to the special dental needs of the elderly for proper maintenance or treatment. The dental care may include the services provided by dental specialists.Periodontal Diseases: Pathological processes involving the PERIODONTIUM including the gum (GINGIVA), the alveolar bone (ALVEOLAR PROCESS), the DENTAL CEMENTUM, and the PERIODONTAL LIGAMENT.Dental Arch: The curve formed by the row of TEETH in their normal position in the JAW. The inferior dental arch is formed by the mandibular teeth, and the superior dental arch by the maxillary teeth.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Dental Plaque: A film that attaches to teeth, often causing DENTAL CARIES and GINGIVITIS. It is composed of MUCINS, secreted from salivary glands, and microorganisms.Dental Offices: The room or rooms in which the dentist and dental staff provide care. Offices include all rooms in the dentist's office suite.Dental Records: Data collected during dental examination for the purpose of study, diagnosis, or treatment planning.Anxiety, Separation: Anxiety experienced by an individual upon separation from a person or object of particular significance to the individual.Dental Equipment: The nonexpendable items used by the dentist or dental staff in the performance of professional duties. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p106)Dental Staff: Personnel who provide dental service to patients in an organized facility, institution or agency.General Practice, Dental: Nonspecialized dental practice which is concerned with providing primary and continuing dental care.Dental Amalgam: An alloy used in restorative dentistry that contains mercury, silver, tin, copper, and possibly zinc.Injections: Introduction of substances into the body using a needle and syringe.Dental Assistants: Individuals who assist the dentist or the dental hygienist.Phobic Disorders: Anxiety disorders in which the essential feature is persistent and irrational fear of a specific object, activity, or situation that the individual feels compelled to avoid. The individual recognizes the fear as excessive or unreasonable.Education, Dental, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform dentists of recent advances in their fields.Dental Implants: Biocompatible materials placed into (endosseous) or onto (subperiosteal) the jawbone to support a crown, bridge, or artificial tooth, or to stabilize a diseased tooth.FloridaRadiography, Dental: Radiographic techniques used in dentistry.Dental Models: Presentation devices used for patient education and technique training in dentistry.Dental Service, Hospital: Hospital department providing dental care.Education, Dental, Graduate: Educational programs for dental graduates entering a specialty. They include formal specialty training as well as academic work in the clinical and basic dental sciences, and may lead to board certification or an advanced dental degree.Ethics, Dental: The principles of proper professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the dentist, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the dentist in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Test Anxiety Scale: A self-reporting test consisting of items concerning fear and worry about taking tests and physiological activity, such as heart rate, sweating, etc., before, during, and after tests.Dentists: Individuals licensed to practice DENTISTRY.Societies, Dental: Societies whose membership is limited to dentists.Statistics, Nonparametric: A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)Technology, Dental: The field of dentistry involved in procedures for designing and constructing dental appliances. It includes also the application of any technology to the field of dentistry.Dental Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to dental or oral health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Fluorosis, Dental: A chronic endemic form of hypoplasia of the dental enamel caused by drinking water with a high fluorine content during the time of tooth formation, and characterized by defective calcification that gives a white chalky appearance to the enamel, which gradually undergoes brown discoloration. (Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p286)Licensure, Dental: The granting of a license to practice dentistry.Laboratories, Dental: Facilities for the performance of services related to dental treatment but not done directly in the patient's mouth.Depression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Dental Materials: Materials used in the production of dental bases, restorations, impressions, prostheses, etc.Sampling Studies: Studies in which a number of subjects are selected from all subjects in a defined population. Conclusions based on sample results may be attributed only to the population sampled.Specialties, Dental: Various branches of dental practice limited to specialized areas.Fees, Dental: Amounts charged to the patient as payer for dental services.Dental Technicians: Individuals responsible for fabrication of dental appliances.

A pilot study of the efficacy of oral midazolam for sedation in pediatric dental patients. (1/130)

Oral midazolam is being used for conscious sedation in dentistry with little documentation assessing its efficacy. In order to accumulate preliminary data, a randomized, double-blind, controlled, crossover, multi-site pilot study was conducted. The objective was to determine if 0.6 mg/kg of oral midazolam was an equally effective or superior means of achieving conscious sedation in the uncooperative pediatric dental patient, compared with a commonly used agent, 50 mg/kg of oral chloral hydrate. Twenty-three children in three clinics who required dentistry with local anesthetic and were determined to exhibit behavior rated as "negative" or "definitely negative" based on the Frankl scale were assessed. They were evaluated with respect to acceptance of medication; initial level of anxiety at each appointment; level of sedation prior to and acceptance of local anesthetic; movement and crying during the procedure; and overall behavior. The results showed that the group randomly assigned to receive midazolam had a significantly greater initial level of anxiety for that appointment (P < 0.02), a finding that could clearly confound further determination of the efficacy of these drugs. Patients given oral midazolam had an increased level of sedation prior to the administration of local anesthetic compared with those given chloral hydrate (P < 0.015). No statistically significant differences were noted in any of the other parameters. The age of the patient was found to have no correlation with the difference in overall behavior (r = -0.09). These preliminary data warrant further clinical trials.  (+info)

Intranasal midazolam plasma concentration profile and its effect on anxiety associated with dental procedures. (2/130)

The objectives of this study were to describe the serum concentration time profile for midazolam following intranasal administration to adult dental surgery patients and to ascertain the effect of midazolam on anxiety. Six female patients received a single 20 mg (0.32 to 0.53 mg/kg) dose of midazolam. Blood samples were collected at 5, 10, 20, 30, 45, and 60 min following dose administration. Midazolam plasma concentrations were determined by gas chromatography. Anxiety was evaluated using a 100-mm visual analogue scale. The maximum concentration of midazolam was reached 25.8 min (range 18 to 35 min) following dose administration. Maximum concentrations were variable. However, there was no relationship between the weight-adjusted dose and maximal concentration. Patients experiencing baseline anxiety exhibited a trend toward reduction in their measured anxiety score (P = 0.06). Plasma concentrations above the hypothesized minimum effective concentration for sedative effects were attained when midazolam was administered intranasally to adult dental patients.  (+info)

Dental fear among university students: implications for pharmacological research. (3/130)

University students are often subjects in randomized clinical trials involving anxiolytic and analgesic medications used during clinical dental and medical procedures. The purpose of this study was to describe a typical university student population available for research by using data from a mail survey. Subjects were 350 students chosen randomly from all enrolled, full-time, traditional students on the main campus at the University of Washington in Seattle, WA. The aim was to determine the extent and nature of dental anxiety in this population. In addition, the relationships between subject willingness to receive dental injections and general and mental health and medical avoidance and medical fears were examined. The Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS) was used to measure dental anxiety. Dental anxiety was prevalent in this population; 19% of students reported high rates of dental fear. Thirteen percent of students had never had a dental injection. Students with no experience with dental injections were more reluctant than those with experience to receive an injection if one were needed. DAS scores were correlated with injection reluctance. Students who were reluctant to go ahead with a dental injection also reported poorer general and mental health than those who were less reluctant. These students also reported higher medical avoidance and medical anxiety scores. University students provide a rich source of potential subjects for clinical research. The student population, like the community at large, contains people with high levels of dental and medical fear.  (+info)

Dental anesthetic management of a patient with ventricular arrhythmias. (4/130)

During routine deep sedation for endodontic therapy, a dentist-anesthesiologist observed premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) on a 62-yr-old woman's electrocardiogram (EKG) tracing. The dentist was able to complete the root canal procedure under intravenous (i.v.) sedation without any problems. The dentist-anesthesiologist referred the patient for medical evaluation. She was found to be free from ischemic cardiac disease with normal ventricular function. The patient was cleared to continue her dental treatment with deep sedation. She subsequently continued to undergo dental treatment with deep intravenous sedation without incident, although her EKG exhibited frequent PVCs, up to 20 per minute, including couplets and episodes of trigeminy. This article will review indications for medical intervention, antiarrhythmic medications, and anesthetic interventions for perioperative PVCs.  (+info)

Factors predictive of anxiety before oral surgery: efficacy of various subject screening measures. (5/130)

Recruiting anxious people for analgesic and anxiolytic studies allows greater opportunities to study the positive effects of anxiolytic medication. The purpose of this study is to describe a population recruited for a study of anxiolytic medication using the third molar model and to evaluate the relative efficacy of different measures of dental anxiety as recruitment tools. A concerted effort was made to recruit anxious subjects. The following measures were tested: Corah's Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS), Kleinknecht's Dental Fear Survey (DFS), Litt's Oral Surgery Confidence Questionnaire (OSCQ), and Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. The influence of prior experience with tooth extractions on anxiety was also assessed. Subjects who had previously experienced tooth extraction reported higher anxiety before oral surgery than did subjects without such experience. DAS, DFS and state anxiety scores correlated with anxiety reported before oral surgery. However, OSCQ scores and trait anxiety were not related to anxiety reported before surgery. Linear regression indicated that the DFS predicted anxiety before oral surgery best of all measures that were used. Kleinknecht's DFS is thus recommended for use as a tool for recruiting anxious patients.  (+info)

Dental attendance in 1998 and implications for the future. (6/130)

The 1998 survey of Adult Dental Health in the UK was carried out under the auspices of the Office of National Statistics together with the Universities of Birmingham, Dundee, Newcastle-upon-Tyne and Wales. A key behavioural indicator in these decennial surveys is whether people say they go to a dentist for a regular dental check-up, an occasional dental check-up or only when they have trouble with their teeth. The proportion of dentate adults in the UK who report attending for regular dental check-ups has risen from 43% in 1978 to 59% in 1998. Older adults (over 55 years old) in 1998 were the most likely to say they attend for regular dental check-ups. Many younger adults (16-24) in 1998 said they went to a dentist less often than 5 years previously, they were also the least likely to say they attend for regular dental check-ups. Dental anxiety remains a problem for many dental patients but another factor of importance to many is their want to be involved in the treatment process and especially to be given an estimate of treatment costs.  (+info)

A joint approach to treating dental phobics between community dental services and specialist psychotherapy services--a single case report. (7/130)

A 41-year-old male patient presented at the local dental hospital requesting treatment under IV sedation, a treatment that he had had for the past 25 years. The patient was referred to the specialist psychotherapy services for cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), and received a 1 hour course of therapy. He was then introduced to dental services, and at this visit had a check-up, OPG, and treatment planning discussion. At a subsequent visit he had local anaesthetic, three fillings, and a scale and polish. The patient is now able to return to general dental practice, after only a brief therapeutic intervention, and subsequent dental treatment. The present and future cost saving to the NHS is substantial compared with the treatment method initially sought by the patient.  (+info)

A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, comparative study of topical skin analgesics and the anxiety and discomfort associated with venous cannulation. (8/130)

OBJECTIVES: To compare the effect of topical skin anaesthetic agents on the discomfort and anxiety associated with venous cannulation. DESIGN: Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, within subject, volunteer trial. METHODS: 20 healthy volunteers underwent venous cannulation on three separate occasions having received topical skin application of either 4% amethocaine gel (Ametop), 5% eutectic mixture of lidocaine and prilocaine (EMLA) or E45 cream (placebo). Visual analogue and verbal rating scales were used to assess pain and anxiety associated with the venous cannulation, and anticipated anxiety for future cannulation, under each drug condition. RESULTS: Subjects were aged 22-53 years (mean 32.8 years). The mean visual analogue scores (VAS) for discomfort were found to be significantly lower (p< 0.001) with Ametop (VAS = 18mm) and EMLA (VAS = 29mm) compared with the control (VAS = 38mm). There was a positive correlation (R2 = 72%, p<0.001) between discomfort and the predicted anxiety if cannulation was to be repeated with the same cream. With the placebo a positive correlation (R2 = 19.8%, p = 0.05) was found between the level of anxiety before cannulation and the level of discomfort recorded. CONCLUSIONS: Ametop and EMLA topical anaesthetic agents produce effective skin analgesia for venous cannulation. The use of topical analgesia can reduce perceived anxiety about future cannulation procedures. This has application in the management of anxious patients undergoing intravenous sedation, suggesting that topical analgesia prior to venous cannulation may significantly aid anxiolysis.  (+info)

  • High dental fear was reported by 16.8% of the women at baseline and was associated with a higher number of other phobias, a higher level of neuroticism, more psychiatric impairment, more social disability due to phobic disorder, and a higher anxiety level. (gu.se)
  • The International Society for Dental Anxiety Management (ISDAM) brings together all psychological, pharmacological, clinical, and technological techniques used in helping people overcome their fears and phobias. (dentalfearcentral.org)
  • Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), a psychotherapeutic method used for decades to treat depression, phobias and eating disorders, has been investigated recently as a possible approach for relieving children's dental anxiety. (southshoredentist.com)
  • The first book to describe evidence-based treatment of dental phobia using brief CBT, based on the pioneering single-session treatment for specific phobias developed by Lars-Goran Ost. (magrudy.com)
  • We are proud to be considered one of Europes leading clinics when it comes to treating patients who have phobias or anxieties. (berkeleyclinic.com)
  • They suggest that perhaps practitioners and counselors are focused on other problems than social anxiety or judge that feelings of embarrassment, shame or guilt are only secondary to more concrete problems, such as specific phobias or presence of other co-morbid anxiety or mood disorders. (biomedcentral.com)
  • A new study has suggested that watching cartoons could help children to combat dental anxiety. (cosmeticdentistryguide.co.uk)
  • For your teeth's sake, there are ways to combat dental anxiety, a condition sure to cause cavities. (theperiogroup.com)
  • Conclusion: For the low percentage of anxiety found in this study, it can be inferred that there is, on the part of patients, knowledge and reasonable expectations on the subject, as well as on the objectives, advantages and benefits. (bvsalud.org)
  • Multiple logistic regression analyses showed that the following factors were associated with irregular dental utilization among dentate women: high dental anxiety, fewer teeth and restorations, more caries, poorer chewing ability and dissatisfaction with dental esthetics. (nih.gov)
  • But for the first time, a new study suggests chronic stress in pregnancy may increase a child's risk for dental caries. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Researchers say chronic stress during pregnancy may increase a child's risk for dental caries. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • According to National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, 42% of children aged 2-11 in the US have had dental caries, or tooth decay, in their primary teeth, while 21% of children aged 6-11 have had dental caries in their adult teeth. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Compared with mothers who had no AL markers, those who had two or more were significantly more likely to have offspring with dental caries. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • What is more, they found incidence of dental caries among offspring was more common among those who were not breastfed, and lower incidence of breastfeeding was significantly more common among mothers with lower income. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • While previous studies have linked low socioeconomic status with increased risk of dental caries among offspring, the researchers say their study is the first to identify stress as a driver of this association. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • A separate analysis showed that individuals with high fear and regular, as opposed to irregular, dental attendance had more teeth at a statistically significant level, which were less often decayed and more often restored. (nih.gov)
  • If positive reinforcement, learning to control fear and other behavior management techniques don't do the trick, dental sedation could ease your mind and allow you to get your teeth cleaned . (theperiogroup.com)
  • Sedation is the process of helping patients relax during dental procedures like crown restorations , smile makeovers , or simple teeth cleaning. (cunningdental.com)
  • A dental check-up is now a little more than £20 in England so by going regularly, every two years, it's a relatively small price to pay to ensure our teeth are in tip-top condition. (gallowaygazette.co.uk)
  • In truth, it's really a dentist's joy to look at a person that seemed to be both reluctant to travel to the dental office and in addition ashamed to smile as a result of look in their teeth, and then to bring this person to the situation that not only is he no longer reluctant, but that they likewise have an attractive smile. (fat-loss-expert.com)
  • With nitrous i handked the dental work fairly well up to and including minor surgery even after my teeth were all removed. (oralanswers.com)
  • Across the pond a new survey conducted for the British Dental Association showed that 77 percent of respondents felt that decayed teeth or bad breath would seriously impact a job seeker's chances of securing employment in any sort of public or client-facing roles 2 . (businessinsider.com)
  • Adolescence and the early teenage years are the perfect time to correct any dental issues like crooked teeth, over-bites, and other common problems. (barriesmilecentre.com)
  • If you have sensitive teeth and want pain-free dental veneers, we can help. (orlandparksedationdentistry.com)
  • If you'd like professional, compassionate help with learning how to relieve your dental anxiety , call George A. Hoop, DDS today at (239) 594-8817. (wemakeyousmile.com)