Dental Abutments: Natural teeth or teeth roots used as anchorage for a fixed or removable denture or other prosthesis (such as an implant) serving the same purpose.Dental Implants: Biocompatible materials placed into (endosseous) or onto (subperiosteal) the jawbone to support a crown, bridge, or artificial tooth, or to stabilize a diseased tooth.Dental Implant-Abutment Design: The plan and delineation of DENTAL IMPLANT fitting with DENTAL ABUTMENT.Dental Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of dental prostheses in general or a specific dental prosthesis. It does not include DENTURE DESIGN. The framework usually consists of metal.Dental Prosthesis, Implant-Supported: A prosthesis that gains its support, stability, and retention from a substructure that is implanted under the soft tissues of the basal seat of the device and is in contact with bone. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Dental Care: The total of dental diagnostic, preventive, and restorative services provided to meet the needs of a patient (from Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982).Dental Prosthesis Retention: Holding a DENTAL PROSTHESIS in place by its design, or by the use of additional devices or adhesives.Denture, Partial, Fixed: A partial denture attached to prepared natural teeth, roots, or implants by cementation.Education, Dental: Use for articles concerning dental education in general.Dental Materials: Materials used in the production of dental bases, restorations, impressions, prostheses, etc.Zirconium: Zirconium. A rather rare metallic element, atomic number 40, atomic weight 91.22, symbol Zr. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Schools, Dental: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of dentistry.Students, Dental: Individuals enrolled a school of dentistry or a formal educational program in leading to a degree in dentistry.Dental Models: Presentation devices used for patient education and technique training in dentistry.Dental Implantation, Endosseous: Insertion of an implant into the bone of the mandible or maxilla. The implant has an exposed head which protrudes through the mucosa and is a prosthodontic abutment.Prosthesis Fitting: The fitting and adjusting of artificial parts of the body. (From Stedman's, 26th ed)Dental Restoration Failure: Inability or inadequacy of a dental restoration or prosthesis to perform as expected.Dental Caries: Localized destruction of the tooth surface initiated by decalcification of the enamel followed by enzymatic lysis of organic structures and leading to cavity formation. If left unchecked, the cavity may penetrate the enamel and dentin and reach the pulp.Immediate Dental Implant Loading: Endosseous dental implantation where implants are fitted with an abutment or where an implant with a transmucosal coronal portion is used immediately (within 1 week) after the initial extraction. Conventionally, the implantation is performed in two stages with more than two months in between the stages.Denture Design: The plan, delineation, and location of actual structural elements of dentures. The design can relate to retainers, stress-breakers, occlusal rests, flanges, framework, lingual or palatal bars, reciprocal arms, etc.Dental Implants, Single-Tooth: Devices, usually alloplastic, surgically inserted into or onto the jawbone, which support a single prosthetic tooth and serve either as abutments or as cosmetic replacements for missing teeth.Dental Stress Analysis: The description and measurement of the various factors that produce physical stress upon dental restorations, prostheses, or appliances, materials associated with them, or the natural oral structures.Dental Care for Chronically Ill: Dental care for patients with chronic diseases. These diseases include chronic cardiovascular, endocrinologic, hematologic, immunologic, neoplastic, and renal diseases. The concept does not include dental care for the mentally or physically disabled which is DENTAL CARE FOR DISABLED.Dental Care for Children: The giving of attention to the special dental needs of children, including the prevention of tooth diseases and instruction in dental hygiene and dental health. The dental care may include the services provided by dental specialists.Dental Clinics: Facilities where dental care is provided to patients.Gold Alloys: Alloys that contain a high percentage of gold. They are used in restorative or prosthetic dentistry.Dental Porcelain: A type of porcelain used in dental restorations, either jacket crowns or inlays, artificial teeth, or metal-ceramic crowns. It is essentially a mixture of particles of feldspar and quartz, the feldspar melting first and providing a glass matrix for the quartz. Dental porcelain is produced by mixing ceramic powder (a mixture of quartz, kaolin, pigments, opacifiers, a suitable flux, and other substances) with distilled water. (From Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Dental Pulp: A richly vascularized and innervated connective tissue of mesodermal origin, contained in the central cavity of a tooth and delimited by the dentin, and having formative, nutritive, sensory, and protective functions. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Dental Hygienists: Persons trained in an accredited school or dental college and licensed by the state in which they reside to provide dental prophylaxis under the direction of a licensed dentist.Titanium: A dark-gray, metallic element of widespread distribution but occurring in small amounts; atomic number, 22; atomic weight, 47.90; symbol, Ti; specific gravity, 4.5; used for fixation of fractures. (Dorland, 28th ed)Laboratories, Dental: Facilities for the performance of services related to dental treatment but not done directly in the patient's mouth.Tooth Preparation, Prosthodontic: The selected form given to a natural tooth when it is reduced by instrumentation to receive a prosthesis (e.g., artificial crown or a retainer for a fixed or removable prosthesis). The selection of the form is guided by clinical circumstances and physical properties of the materials that make up the prosthesis. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p239)Dental Impression Technique: Procedure of producing an imprint or negative likeness of the teeth and/or edentulous areas. Impressions are made in plastic material which becomes hardened or set while in contact with the tissue. They are later filled with plaster of Paris or artificial stone to produce a facsimile of the oral structures present. Impressions may be made of a full complement of teeth, of areas where some teeth have been removed, or in a mouth from which all teeth have been extracted. (Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982)Faculty, Dental: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a dental school.Dental Care for Disabled: Dental care for the emotionally, mentally, or physically disabled patient. It does not include dental care for the chronically ill ( = DENTAL CARE FOR CHRONICALLY ILL).Dental Anxiety: Abnormal fear or dread of visiting the dentist for preventive care or therapy and unwarranted anxiety over dental procedures.Dental Alloys: A mixture of metallic elements or compounds with other metallic or metalloid elements in varying proportions for use in restorative or prosthetic dentistry.Torque: The rotational force about an axis that is equal to the product of a force times the distance from the axis where the force is applied.Insurance, Dental: Insurance providing coverage for dental care.Dental Impression Materials: Substances used to create an impression, or negative reproduction, of the teeth and dental arches. These materials include dental plasters and cements, metallic oxide pastes, silicone base materials, or elastomeric materials.Dental Auxiliaries: Personnel whose work is prescribed and supervised by the dentist.Dental Health Services: Services designed to promote, maintain, or restore dental health.Dental Research: The study of laws, theories, and hypotheses through a systematic examination of pertinent facts and their interpretation in the field of dentistry. (From Jablonski, Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982, p674)Dental Care for Aged: The giving of attention to the special dental needs of the elderly for proper maintenance or treatment. The dental care may include the services provided by dental specialists.Computer-Aided Design: The use of computers for designing and/or manufacturing of anything, including drugs, surgical procedures, orthotics, and prosthetics.Dental Arch: The curve formed by the row of TEETH in their normal position in the JAW. The inferior dental arch is formed by the mandibular teeth, and the superior dental arch by the maxillary teeth.Dental Prosthesis: An artificial replacement for one or more natural teeth or part of a tooth, or associated structures, ranging from a portion of a tooth to a complete denture. The dental prosthesis is used for cosmetic or functional reasons, or both. DENTURES and specific types of dentures are also available. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p244 & Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p643)Dental Plaque: A film that attaches to teeth, often causing DENTAL CARIES and GINGIVITIS. It is composed of MUCINS, secreted from salivary glands, and microorganisms.Dental Offices: The room or rooms in which the dentist and dental staff provide care. Offices include all rooms in the dentist's office suite.Dental Records: Data collected during dental examination for the purpose of study, diagnosis, or treatment planning.Dental Staff: Personnel who provide dental service to patients in an organized facility, institution or agency.Dental Equipment: The nonexpendable items used by the dentist or dental staff in the performance of professional duties. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p106)Chromium Alloys: Specific alloys not less than 85% chromium and nickel or cobalt, with traces of either nickel or cobalt, molybdenum, and other substances. They are used in partial dentures, orthopedic implants, etc.Materials Testing: The testing of materials and devices, especially those used for PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS; SUTURES; TISSUE ADHESIVES; etc., for hardness, strength, durability, safety, efficacy, and biocompatibility.General Practice, Dental: Nonspecialized dental practice which is concerned with providing primary and continuing dental care.Denture, Partial, Removable: A partial denture designed and constructed to be removed readily from the mouth.Dental Amalgam: An alloy used in restorative dentistry that contains mercury, silver, tin, copper, and possibly zinc.Esthetics, Dental: Skills, techniques, standards, and principles used to improve the art and symmetry of the teeth and face to improve the appearance as well as the function of the teeth, mouth, and face. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p108)Dental Soldering: The joining of pieces of metal through the use of an alloy which has a lower melting point, usually at least 100 degrees Celsius below the fusion temperature of the parts being soldered. In dentistry, soldering is used for joining components of a dental appliance, as in assembling a bridge, joining metals to orthodontic bands, or adding to the bulk of certain structures, such as the establishment of proper contact areas on inlays and crowns with adjacent teeth. (Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982)Peri-Implantitis: An inflammatory process with loss of supporting bone in the tissues surrounding functioning DENTAL IMPLANTS.Dental Assistants: Individuals who assist the dentist or the dental hygienist.Education, Dental, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform dentists of recent advances in their fields.Anesthesia, Dental: A range of methods used to reduce pain and anxiety during dental procedures.Denture, Overlay: Removable prosthesis constructed over natural teeth or implanted studs.Dental Restoration, Temporary: A prosthesis or restoration placed for a limited period, from several days to several months, which is designed to seal the tooth and maintain its position until a permanent restoration (DENTAL RESTORATION, PERMANENT) will replace it. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Dental Casting Technique: The process of producing a form or impression made of metal or plaster using a mold.Bicuspid: One of the eight permanent teeth, two on either side in each jaw, between the canines (CUSPID) and the molars (MOLAR), serving for grinding and crushing food. The upper have two cusps (bicuspid) but the lower have one to three. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p822)

Initial orthopaedic displacement compared with longitudinal displacement of the maxilla after a forward force application. An experimental study in dogs. (1/129)

The aim of this study was to compare the initial orthopaedic displacement of the maxilla in vivo and the longitudinal changes after a forward force application. The sample consisted of five 1-year-old dogs. An anterior force of 5 N on the maxilla was applied by a coil spring system pushing between Branemark implants and a maxillary splint. The initial displacement of the maxilla after force application was measured by means of speckle interferometry. The longitudinal displacement of the maxilla after a force application during 8 weeks was measured by superimposing standardized lateral cephalograms. The initial, as well as the longitudinal, displacement of the maxilla of the dogs was in a forward direction with some counterclockwise rotation. There was no statistical difference between the initial and longitudinal displacement. The biological response after force application during 8 weeks can be predicted by the initial orthopaedic displacement.  (+info)

A modified technique for direct, fibre-reinforced, resin-bonded bridges: clinical case reports. (2/129)

This article presents new modifications to the clinical technique of fabricating directly applied resin-bonded fibre-reinforced bridges. Torsional and flexural strength is achieved by means of a reinforced polyethylene fibre ribbon substructure surrounded by laminated layers of microhybrid and microfilled resins. The modifications provide a simple method for creating a better pontic-ridge relation and improved overall esthetics. Early clinical experience suggests that this technique has the potential to give patients a relatively conservative, esthetic and periodontally noninvasive alternative for anterior tooth replacement.  (+info)

The marginal-ridge rest seat. (3/129)

Natural canine crowns are preferred as abutments for removable partial dentures because of their root morphology and bony support. However, preparing the rest seat on the lingual surface of a mandibular canine risks perforating the enamel. An alternative rest-seat preparation, on the marginal ridge of the canine crown, conserves tooth structure and provides a rest seat of adequate length and depth to ensure support for a cast framework. To illustrate why this little-discussed rest-seat preparation has endured locally, the rationale and preparation of the marginal-ridge rest seat is discussed from both historical and clinical perspectives.  (+info)

The Procera abutment--the fifth generation abutment for dental implants. (4/129)

The Branemark dental implant has undergone progressive development in terms of both the implant body itself and the components connecting the implant to the prosthesis. Many screw and abutment designs have been developed, with various degrees of success. About 15 years ago, CAD (computer-assisted design)-CAM (computer-assisted manufacture) technology was introduced to dentists. More recently CAD-CAM has been used in the manufacture of abutments for implants. This article reviews currently available techniques for creating the Procera custom abutment (Nobel Biocare, Goteborg, Sweden) and outlines appropriate applications for this type of implant.  (+info)

Indirect retention. (5/129)

This article explains the mechanism of indirect retention for RPDs and discusses the factors which determine its effectiveness. Examples are given of designs which incorporate indirect retention.  (+info)

Changing paradigms in implant dentistry. (6/129)

This review focuses on five paradigms of implant dentistry which have undergone considerable modifications in recent years. An attempt was made to select and include all the relevant citations of the past 10 years. These five paradigms document the debate in the clinical and scientific community and include the aspects of (1) smooth vs. rough implant surfaces, (2) submerged vs. non-submerged implant installation techniques, (3) mixed tooth-implant vs. solely implant-supported reconstructions, (4) morse-taper abutment fixation vs. butt-joint interfaces, and (5) titanium abutments vs. esthetic abutments in clinical situations where esthetics is of primary concern.  (+info)

Esthetic option for the implant-supported single-tooth restoration -- treatment sequence with a ceramic abutment. (7/129)

A single implant-supported restoration is one treatment alternative to consider for the replacement of a missing tooth. Technological advances in materials and machining have led to the development of a densely sintered aluminum oxide ceramic abutment, designed and machined using CAD/CAM technology. This manufacturing method improves management of the subgingival depth of the crown/abutment interface and enhances the esthetic qualities of the restoration. However, since this ceramic abutment has less mechanical resistance than metal abutments, its use should be confined to the restoration of incisors and premolars not subjected to excessive occlusal forces.  (+info)

Occlusal stability in implant prosthodontics -- clinical factors to consider before implant placement. (8/129)

The success of any prosthetic design depends on proper management of the occlusion. The clinical variables influencing occlusal stability must be determined and considered in the design of the final prosthesis. This paper outlines some of these variables.  (+info)

  • Microbial leakage and colonization between the implant and the abutments can result in inflammatory reactions and crestal bone loss. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1. In a fixture for use in a dental implant system, said fixture having an outer end provided with a conically flaring outer surface intended to at least partly abut the bone tissue, the improvement wherein said conically flaring outer surface is provided with a circumferentially oriented, defined micro-roughness (9, 109) having a height between 0.02 and 0.20 mm. (google.com)
  • Healing abutment manipulation increased crestal bone remodeling when compared to no abutment manipulation (1.28 mm versus 0.92 mm, respectively), although the difference was not statistically significant ( p = 0.0836). (springer.com)
  • These findings indicate that the controlled variables explored here (abutment manipulation/internal silver coating) have a limited effect on initial crestal bone loss. (springer.com)
  • The abutment is typically not added to the implant fixture (screwed or cemented on) until after the osseointegration process (implant-to-bone fusion) has taken place. (animated-teeth.com)
  • In dental implantology, it is common after implantation of the implant body in the jaw bone to seal the implant body during the healing phase using a healing cap. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • Market growth can be attributed to the rapid rise in geriatric population, rising incidences of dental caries and other periodontal diseases, rising demand for cosmetic dentistry, and increasing dental care expenditure. (giiresearch.com)
  • In dentistry, an abutment is a connecting element. (wikipedia.org)
  • The clinic forms part of the Alpha Dental Group that offers dentistry of a high standard in clinics located across North Yorkshire and County Durham. (whatclinic.com)
  • Services at the clinic include examinations and oral hygiene services, NHS dental care, general dental care, the cosmetic improvement of smiles, adult orthodontics using Invisalign clear aligners, implant dentistry and facial aesthetics. (whatclinic.com)
  • This includes oral health's relation to general health, sources of infection, modern technology in dentistry, and the public health impact of dental medicine. (coursera.org)
  • For more information about the Medentika ASC Flex, please visit www.straumann.com/medentika/us/en/dentistry.html . (dentistry.co.uk)
  • The World Dental Prosthetics Market report explores the Dental Prosthetics Industry segments on the basis of revenue, shares, demand and Forecasts period of 2017 to 2023. (abnewswire.com)
  • It can be concluded that the installation torque of prosthetic abutments influences the interface between prosthetic connector and implant surface. (alliedacademies.org)
  • The aim of this study was to evaluate the decreasing pattern of removal torque values (RTVs) of a combined cone and octalobule index implant-abutment connection under different numbers of mechanical loading cycles. (springer.com)
  • Statistical analysis demonstrated that mechanical cycling reduced the torque of abutments without significant difference between cast or pre-machined UCLA abutments (p=0.908). (scielo.br)
  • Within the limitations of this in vitro study, it may be concluded that the mechanical cycling, corresponding to one-year use, reduced the torque of the samples regardless if cast or pre-machined UCLA abutments were used. (scielo.br)
  • The stability of the external implant-abutment connection has been improved by altering the screw alloys and their surfaces and applying proper torque values to establish higher initial preloads 3-5 . (scielo.br)
  • This screw needs to be tightened to a predetermined torque with a dental torque wrench, in order to avoid screw loosening during chewing, which can often create a counter-clockwise torque on the implant-abutment interface, encouraging the abutment screw to come loose. (wikipedia.org)
  • Morse taper conical abutments showed a cumulative implant survival rate of 98.23% in terms of seal performance, microgap formation, torque maintenance, and abutment stability. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the present study, the mean maximum torque generated by professors was higher than that generated by postgraduate dental students. (ac.ir)
  • 7 - 9 The recommended force for tightening of the abutment screw is 20‒30 N/cm. 2 Based on the results of various studies, individuals produce a wide range of torque, depending on their individual characteristics. (ac.ir)
  • Presently, a number of manufacturers are focusing on providing custom fit dental implant abutment systems according to the patients need. (medgadget.com)
  • Find a Dentist For Patients Patients Sign In Dental Health Topics Are you a dentist? (patientconnect365.com)
  • Understanding what to expect before, during, and after the dental implant procedure can help patients play a more active role in their treatment outcome. (docshop.com)
  • Private patients and patients on the NHS are treated at this dental clinic located at Northallerton in North Yorkshire. (whatclinic.com)
  • David worked in The Dental Centre Group for three years with Ben, Guy and Ian gaining experience with high need patients helping to stabilise declining oral condition and returning patients to a high standard of dental health before moving on to becoming a founding member of Alpha Dental Group in 2008 with the opening of the first Alpha site in Catterick. (whatclinic.com)
  • The dental profession is committed to delivering the highest quality of care to each of its individual patients and applying advancements in technology and science to continually improve the oral health status of the U.S. population. (fda.gov)
  • The guidelines titled, "The Selection of Patients for X-Ray Examination" were first developed in 1987 by a panel of dental experts convened by the Center for Devices and Radiological Health of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). (fda.gov)
  • However, some patients may require more complex high end dental care which is not categorised as diagnostic, preventive or routine. (health.gov.au)
  • In this case, we believe that any program using a primary dental care schedule would need to have a mechanism where by patients could access a category of complex care items in exceptional circumstances. (health.gov.au)
  • This course provides an overview of dental medicine to engage, educate, excite and assist you in improving the oral health of your patients and members of your community. (coursera.org)
  • We will review topics in dental medicine including scope of the field, what to expect in function, and some of the many ways that dysfunction may present for different patients. (coursera.org)
  • We will talk about differences between patients and the unique roles that different members of the dental field may play in treatment depending on the patient and condition. (coursera.org)
  • Only with high quality and versatile solutions can we deliver first-class dental implant treatment to patients with different needs yet similarly high expectations. (dentistry.co.uk)
  • include: Unit Sales, ASPs, Market Value & Growth Trends - Market Drivers & Limiters for each chapter segment - Competitive Analysis for each chapter segment - Section on recent mergers & acquisitions The European final abutment market can be segmented by fabrication process, yielding three segments: stock abutments, custom cast abutments and CAD/CAM abutments. (medindia.net)
  • He specializes in all kinds of dental procedures including complex ones like dental Implantation, clinical oral surgeries, maxillofacial surgeries, direct sinus lift surgery and many others. (lyfboat.com)
  • The universal connector is also adapted to facilitate preselected or adjustable universal angular alignment between the first and second axes, that angular relationship then securably lockable to enable the dental prosthesis to be thereafter securely mounted over the prosthesis insert. (google.com)
  • To enable this, the abutment is shaped as a small connector (a button, ball, bar or magnet) which can be connected to analogous adapters in the underside of the dental prosthesis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Similarly, the innovative and now more accessible and affordable CAD/CAM abutments are generating high levels of growth and consequently pushing the final abutment market forward. (giiresearch.com)
  • These products range from traditional necessary components, such as implant fixtures and final abutment counterparts, to recent innovative digital technologies, such as treatment planning software and corresponding surgical guides. (giiresearch.com)
  • The incidence of abutment screw loosening was 4.3% in short-term studies and 10% in long-term studies 1 . (scielo.br)