A superorder of CEPHALOPODS comprised of squid, cuttlefish, and their relatives. Their distinguishing feature is the modification of their fourth pair of arms into tentacles, resulting in 10 limbs.

Direct evidence of Na+/Ca2+ exchange in squid rhabdomeric membranes. (1/1021)

Na+/Ca2+ exchange has been investigated in squid (Loligo pealei) rhabdomeric membranes. Ca2+-containing vesicles have been prepared from purified rhabdomeric membranes by extrusion through polycarbonate filters of 1-micrometer pore size. After removal of external Ca2+, up to 90% of the entrapped Ca2+ could be specifically released by the addition of Na+; this finding indicates that most of the vesicles contained Na+/Ca2+ exchanger. The Na+-induced Ca2+ efflux had a half-maximum value (K1/2) of approximately 44 mM and a Hill coefficient of approximately 1.7. The maximal Na+-induced Ca2+ efflux was approximately 0.6 nmol Ca2+. s-1. mg protein-1. Similar Na+-induced Ca2+ effluxes were measured if K+ was replaced with Li+ or Cs+. Vesicles loaded with Ca2+ by Na+/Ca2+ exchange also released this Ca2+ by Na+/Ca2+ exchange, suggesting that Na+/Ca2+ exchange operated in both forward and reverse modes. Limited proteolysis by trypsin resulted in a rate of Ca2+ efflux enhanced by approximately fivefold when efflux was activated with 95 mM NaCl. For vesicles subjected to limited proteolysis by trypsin, Na+/Ca2+ exchange was characterized by a K1/2 of approximately 25 mM and a Hill coefficient of 1.6. For these vesicles, the maximal Na+-induced Ca2+ efflux was about twice as great as in control vesicles. We conclude that Na+/Ca2+ exchange proteins localized in rhabdomeric membranes mediate Ca2+ extrusion in squid photoreceptors.  (+info)

Distinguishing surface effects of calcium ion from pore-occupancy effects in Na+ channels. (2/1021)

The effects of calcium ion on the Na+ activation gate were studied in squid giant axons. Saxitoxin (STX) was used to block ion entry into Na+ channels without hindering access to the membrane surface, making it possible to distinguish surface effects of calcium from pore-occupancy effects. In the presence of STX, gating kinetics were measured from gating current (Ig). The kinetic effects of external calcium concentration changes were small when STX was present. In the absence of STX, lowering the calcium concentration (from 100 to 10 mM) slowed the closing of Na+ channels (measured from INa tails) by more than a factor of 2. Surprisingly, the voltage sensitivity of closing kinetics changed with calcium concentration, and it was modified by STX. Voltage sensitivity apparently depends in part on the ability of calcium to enter and block the channels as voltage is driven negative. In external medium with no added calcium, INa tail current initially increases in amplitude severalfold with the relief of calcium block, then progressively slows and gets smaller, as calcium diffuses out of the layers investing the axon. INa tails seen just before the current disappears suggest that closing in the absence of channel block is very slow or does not occur. INa amplitude and kinetics are completely restored when calcium is returned. The results strongly suggest that calcium occupancy is a requirement for channel closing and that nonoccupied channels fold reversibly into a nonfunctional conformation.  (+info)

Detyrosination of tubulin regulates the interaction of intermediate filaments with microtubules in vivo via a kinesin-dependent mechanism. (3/1021)

Posttranslationally modified forms of tubulin accumulate in the subset of stabilized microtubules (MTs) in cells but are not themselves involved in generating MT stability. We showed previously that stabilized, detyrosinated (Glu) MTs function to localize vimentin intermediate filaments (IFs) in fibroblasts. To determine whether tubulin detyrosination or MT stability is the critical element in the preferential association of IFs with Glu MTs, we microinjected nonpolymerizable Glu tubulin into cells. If detyrosination is critical, then soluble Glu tubulin should be a competitive inhibitor of the IF-MT interaction. Before microinjection, Glu tubulin was rendered nonpolymerizable and nontyrosinatable by treatment with iodoacetamide (IAA). Microinjected IAA-Glu tubulin disrupted the interaction of IFs with MTs, as assayed by the collapse of IFs to a perinuclear location, and had no detectable effect on the array of Glu or tyrosinated MTs in cells. Conversely, neither IAA-tyrosinated tubulin nor untreated Glu tubulin, which assembled into MTs, caused collapse of IFs when microinjected. The epitope on Glu tubulin responsible for interfering with the Glu MT-IF interaction was mapped by microinjecting tubulin fragments of alpha-tubulin. The 14-kDa C-terminal fragment of Glu tubulin (alpha-C Glu) induced IF collapse, whereas the 36-kDa N-terminal fragment of alpha-tubulin did not alter the IF array. The epitope required more than the detyrosination site at the C terminus, because a short peptide (a 7-mer) mimicking the C terminus of Glu tubulin did not disrupt the IF distribution. We previously showed that kinesin may mediate the interaction of Glu MTs and IFs. In this study we found that kinesin binding to MTs in vitro was inhibited by the same reagents (i.e., IAA-Glu tubulin and alpha-C Glu) that disrupted the IF-Glu MT interaction in vivo. These results demonstrate for the first time that tubulin detyrosination functions as a signal for the recruitment of IFs to MTs via a mechanism that is likely to involve kinesin.  (+info)

Characterization of a Na+-dependent betaine transporter with Cl- channel properties in squid motor neurons. (4/1021)

Most marine invertebrates, including squids, use transporters to accumulate organic osmolytes such as betaine, to prevent water loss when exposed to elevated salinity. Although a limited number of flux studies have shown the Na+ dependence of betaine transport, nothing is known about the electrogenic properties of osmolyte transporters. We used whole cell and perforated-patch voltage-clamp techniques to characterize the electrical properties of the betaine transporter in giant fiber lobe motor neurons of the squid Lolliguncula brevis. Betaine activated a large, Cl--selective current that was reversibly blocked by 100 microM niflumic acid (97 +/- 2% block after 40 s, SD; n = 7) and partially inhibited by 500 microM SITS (29 +/- 11%; n = 5). The Cl- current was Na+ dependent and was virtually eliminated by isotonic replacement of Na+ with Li+, NMDG+, or Tris+. Concentration-response data revealed an EC50 in a physiologically relevant range for these animals of 5.1 +/- 0.9 mM (n = 11). In vertebrates, the betaine transporter is structurally related to the GABA transporter, and although GABA did not directly activate the betaine-induced current, it reversibly reduced betaine responses by 34 +/- 14% (n = 8). Short-term changes in osmolality alone did not activate the Cl- current, but when combined with betaine, Cl- currents increased in hypertonic solutions and decreased in hypotonic solutions. Activation of the betaine transporter and Cl- current in hypertonic conditions may affect both volume regulation and excitability in L. brevis motor neurons. This study is the first report of a novel betaine transporter in neurons that can act as a Cl- channel.  (+info)

The bombesin receptor subtypes have distinct G protein specificities. (5/1021)

We used an in situ reconstitution assay to examine the receptor coupling to purified G protein alpha subunits by the bombesin receptor family, including gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRP-R), neuromedin B receptor (NMB-R), and bombesin receptor subtype 3 (BRS-3). Cells expressing GRP-R or NMB-R catalyzed the activation of squid retinal Galphaq and mouse Galphaq but not bovine retinal Galphat or bovine brain Galphai/o. The GRP-R- and NMB-R-catalyzed activations of Galphaq were dependent upon and enhanced by different betagamma dimers in the same rank order as follows: bovine brain betagamma > beta1gamma2 >> beta1gamma1. Despite these qualitative similarities, GRP-R and NMB-R had distinct kinetic properties in receptor-G protein coupling. GRP-R had higher affinities for bovine brain betagamma, beta1gamma1, and beta1gamma2 and squid retinal Galphaq. In addition, GRP-R showed higher catalytic activity on squid Galphaq. Like GRP-R and NMB-R, BRS-3 did not catalyze GTPgammaS binding to Galphai/o or Galphat. However, BRS-3 showed little, if any, coupling with squid Galphaq but clearly activated mouse Galphaq. GRP-R and NMB-R catalyzed GTPgammaS binding to both squid and mouse Galphaq, with GRP-R activating squid Galphaq more effectively, and NMB-R also showed slight preference for squid Galphaq. These studies reveal that the structurally similar bombesin receptor subtypes, in particular BRS-3, possess distinct coupling preferences among members of the Galphaq family.  (+info)

An ethogram of body patterning behavior in the biomedically and commercially valuable squid Loligo pealei off Cape Cod, Massachusetts. (6/1021)

Squids have a wide repertoire of body patterns; these patterns contain visual signals assembled from a highly diverse inventory of chromatic, postural, and locomotor components. The chromatic components reflect the activity of dermal chromatophore organs that, like the postural and locomotor muscles, are controlled directly from the central nervous system. Because a thorough knowledge of body patterns is fundamental to an understanding of squid behavior, we have compiled and described an ethogram (a catalog of body patterns and associated behaviors) for Loligo pealei. Observations of this species were made over a period of three years (> or = 440 h) and under a variety of behavioral circumstances. The natural behavior of the squid was filmed on spawning grounds off Cape Cod (northwestern Atlantic), and behavioral trials in the laboratory were run in large tanks. The body pattern components--34 chromatic (including 4 polarization components), 5 postural, and 12 locomotor--are each described in detail. Eleven of the most common body patterns are also described. Four of them are chronic, or long-lasting, patterns for crypsis; an example is Banded Bottom Sitting, which produces disruptive coloration against the substrate. The remaining seven patterns are acute; they are mostly used in intraspecific communication among spawning squids. Two of these acute patterns--Lateral Display and Mate Guarding Pattern--are used during agonistic bouts and mate guarding; they are visually bright and conspicuous, which may subject the squids to predation; but we hypothesize that schooling and diurnal activity may offset the disadvantage presented by increased visibility to predators. The rapid changeability and the diversity of body patterns used for crypsis and communication are discussed in the context of the behavioral ecology of this species.  (+info)

Slow transport of unpolymerized tubulin and polymerized neurofilament in the squid giant axon. (7/1021)

A major issue in the slow transport of cytoskeletal proteins is the form in which they are transported. We have investigated the possibility that unpolymerized as well as polymerized cytoskeletal proteins can be actively transported in axons. We report the active transport of highly diffusible tubulin oligomers, as well as transport of the less diffusible neurofilament polymers. After injection into the squid giant axon, tubulin was transported in an anterograde direction at an average rate of 2.3 mm/day, whereas neurofilament was moved at 1.1 mm/day. Addition of the metabolic poisons cyanide or dinitrophenol reduced the active transport of both proteins to less than 10% of control values, whereas disruption of microtubules by treatment of the axon with cold in the presence of nocodazole reduced transport of both proteins to approximately 20% of control levels. Passive diffusion of these proteins occurred in parallel with transport. The diffusion coefficient of the moving tubulin in axoplasm was 8.6 micrometer(2)/s compared with only 0.43 micrometer(2)/s for neurofilament. These results suggest that the tubulin was transported in the unpolymerized state and that the neurofilament was transported in the polymerized state by an energy-dependent nocodazole/cold-sensitive transport mechanism.  (+info)

Purification and characterization of a novel isoform of myosinase from spear squid liver. (8/1021)

A novel isoform of myosinase was purified to homogeneity from liver of spear squid by sequential chromatographies using SP Sephadex, hydroxylapatite, Zn/Co chelating affinity, and TSK-gel G2000SW columns. Myosinase activity was detected as a single peak of 45-kDa protein by gel filtration. The novel isoform of myosinase specifically hydrolyzed a rabbit skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain into products of 120 and 100 kDa in the presence of Co(2+) ions, and the cleavage site in the myosin heavy chain was quite different from those of two known myosinase isoforms, I and II. Therefore, we named the novel isoform myosinase III. Myosinase III was also distinguishable from myosinase I by its amino-terminal sequence. The sequence showed similarity to an internal sequence of the astacin family.  (+info)

Decapodiformes is a taxonomic order of marine cephalopods, which includes squids, octopuses, and cuttlefish. The name "Decapodiformes" comes from the Greek words "deca," meaning ten, and "podos," meaning foot, referring to the fact that these animals have ten limbs.

However, it is worth noting that within Decapodiformes, octopuses are an exception as they only have eight arms. The other members of this order, such as squids and cuttlefish, have ten appendages, which are used for locomotion, feeding, and sensory perception.

Decapodiformes species are known for their complex behaviors, sophisticated communication systems, and remarkable adaptations that enable them to thrive in a variety of marine habitats. They play important ecological roles as both predators and prey in the ocean food chain.

abstract CephBase: Decapodiformes The Taxonomicon: Superorder Decapodiformes v t e (Articles with short description, Short ... Decapodiformes is a superorder of Cephalopoda comprising all cephalopod species with ten limbs, specifically eight short arms ... in The Tree of Life Web Project "WoRMS - World Register of Marine Species - Decapodiformes". www.marinespecies.org. Retrieved ... The following orders are recognised in the superorder Decapodiformes: Bathyteuthida †Belemnitida †Diplobelida Idiosepida ...
The squid orders Myopsida and Oegopsida are in the superorder Decapodiformes (from the Greek for "ten-legged"). Two other ... and two tentacles in the superorder Decapodiformes, though many other molluscs within the broader Neocoleoidea are also called ... Decapodiformes. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at: https://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id= ...
Decapodiformes in Tree of Life Web Project. (CS1 errors: missing periodical, Articles with short description, Short description ...
These are the standard measures of beak size in Decapodiformes; hood length is preferred for Octopodiformes. They can be used ...
However, the structure of the beak of Plesioteuthis resembles that of the Decapodiformes. These squids lived in the Tithonian, ...
Decapodiformes)". Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom. 92 (7): 1629-1636. doi:10.1017/ ...
Among Decapodiformes (ten-limbed cephalopods), generally either one or both of arms IV are hectocotylized. In incirrate ...
... , also known as the pygmy squids, is a family of squids in the superorder Decapodiformes. They are the smallest ...
The firefly squid belongs to the Cephalopoda class and the superorder Decapodiformes, commonly known as squid. Their body ...
Lindgren, Annie R. (2010-07-01). "Molecular inference of phylogenetic relationships among Decapodiformes (Mollusca: Cephalopoda ...
Blizzard (ブリザード, Burizādo, 44, 45): A decapodiformes Saucer Creature from an ice age alien planet. The blue side emits -100° ...
... is one of the two orders of squid in the superorder Decapodiformes, in the class Cephalopoda. Together with the ...
Superorder Decapodiformes Order Bathyteuthida Order †Belemnitida Order †Diplobelida Order Idiosepida Order Myopsida - coastal ... This cohort contains two extant groups: Decapodiformes (squid, cuttlefish, and relatives) and Octopodiformes (octopuses and the ...
In Decapodiformes (ten-limbed cephalopods), mantle length is measured from the anterior edge of the mantle (near the head), to ... The rostral length of the lower and upper beaks is the standard measure of beak size in Decapodiformes; hood length is ...
Within this class there are two orders, the Myopsida and Oegopsida, which both fall under the superorder Decapodiformes. A. ...
... specifically Decapodiformes and nautiluses) and gastropods. In cephalopods, nidamental glands are large, paired glandular ...
According to some authors, belemnites were a stem-group of Decapodiformes: According to the "belemnoid root-stock theory", ... In 1994, American geologist Peter Doyle defined Coleoidea as composing of three superorders: Decapodiformes (squid and ... but Doyle considered it to be a stem-group to Decapodiformes and Octopodiformes. However, the higher classification of ...
The superorder Decapodiformes has arm pair IV modified into long tentacles with suckers generally only on the club-shaped ... Belemnitida Division Neocoleoidea Superorder Decapodiformes Order Bathyteuthida Order †Belemnitida Order †Diplobelida Order ...
Eight major fin shapes can be distinguished among the Decapodiformes: sagittate (the most common shape in squid), rhomboid, ...
... ammonites Subclass Coleoidea Superorder Decapodiformes: squid, cuttlefish Superorder Octopodiformes Family †Trachyteuthididae ( ...
... interpret the anatomy of the studied lower jaws as supporting the interpretation of Longibelus as a relative of Decapodiformes ...
... ammonites Subclass Coleoidea Superorder Decapodiformes: squid, cuttlefish Superorder Octopodiformes Family †Trachyteuthididae ( ...
... decapodiformes MeSH B01.500.644.116.150.500 - loligo MeSH B01.500.644.116.150.700 - sepia MeSH B01.500.644.116.550 - nautilus ...
Cohort Neocoleoidea Superorder Decapodiformes (also known as Decabrachia or Decembranchiata) Order Spirulida: Ram's horn squid ...
... may refer to: Decapoda, an order of crustaceans such as lobsters and crabs Decapodiformes, ten-limbed cephalopods with ...
CLASS CEPHALOPODA Subclass Nautiloidea: nautilus Subclass †Ammonoidea: ammonites Subclass Coleoidea Superorder Decapodiformes: ...
Class Cephalopoda Subclass Nautiloidea: nautilus Subclass Coleoidea: squid, octopus, cuttlefish Superorder Decapodiformes Order ...
... ammonites Subclass Coleoidea Superorder Decapodiformes: squid, cuttlefish Clade Vampyropoda Genus †Syllipsimopodi Genus † ...
The tentacles of Decapodiformes are thought to be derived from the fourth arm pair of the ancestral coleoid, but the term arms ...
The gladius (plural: gladii), or pen, is a hard internal bodypart found in many cephalopods of the superorder Decapodiformes ( ...
abstract CephBase: Decapodiformes The Taxonomicon: Superorder Decapodiformes v t e (Articles with short description, Short ... Decapodiformes is a superorder of Cephalopoda comprising all cephalopod species with ten limbs, specifically eight short arms ... in The Tree of Life Web Project "WoRMS - World Register of Marine Species - Decapodiformes". www.marinespecies.org. Retrieved ... The following orders are recognised in the superorder Decapodiformes: Bathyteuthida †Belemnitida †Diplobelida Idiosepida ...
Considerable published evidence suggests that alpha-subunits of the cloned channel sqKv1A compose the delayed rectifier in the squid giant axon system, but discrepancies regarding inactivation properties of cloned versus native channels exist. In this paper we define the mechanism of inactivation …
Decapodiformes (Superorder). *Oegopsida (Order). *[unassigned] Oegopsida (Superfamily). *Onychoteuthidae (Family). *Kondakovia ...
additional source Reid, A. & Jereb, P. (2005). Family Sepiolidae. pp. 153-203, in P. Jereb & C.F.E. Roper eds. ,em,Cephalopods of the world. An annotated and illustrated catalogue of cephalopod species known to date.,/em, Volume 1. Chambered nautiluses and sepioids (,em,Nautilidae,/em,, ,em,Sepiidae,/em,, ,em,Sepiolidae,/em,, ,em,Sepiadariidae,/em,, ,em,Idiosepiidae,/em, and ,em,Spirulidae,/em,). ,em,FAO Species Catalogue for Fishery Purposes [Rome, FAO].,/em, 4(1): 262 pp. 9 pls. [details] ...
The interaction of QX222, a quaternary ammonium derivative of lidocaine, with the Na channel was studied in internally perfused squid axons under voltage-clamped conditions. A use-dependent block was observed in response to repetitive depolarizing pulses. The time constant for block development and the steady state level of the block were increased with increasing frequency of stimulation from 0.1 to 10 Hz. Use-dependent block can be viewed as a net increase in the drug incorporation into Na channels with successive pulses. That is, net drug uptake by Na channels occurs during the depolarizing phase and net drug release occurs during the interpulse interval. The observed uptake rate of use-dependent block is shown to be a linear combination of the uptake rates associated with the depolarizing and resting potentials. Also, the steady state fraction of blocked channels is shown to be a linear combination of the state-dependent blockade equilibria. Drug-channel interactions are assumed to be ...
Decapodiformes Medicine & Life Sciences 79% * Intercellular Junctions Medicine & Life Sciences 67% * Gap Junctions Medicine & ...
Decapodiforme use Decapodiformes Decapodiformes Decapods use Decapoda Decarbazine use Dacarbazine Decarbonation ...
Decapodiformes. C - Diseases. Deleted term. Concept absorbed by. C04 - Neoplasms. Dermatofibroma. Histiocytoma, Benign Fibrous ...
Decapodiforme use Decapodiformes Decapodiformes Decapods use Decapoda (Crustacea) Decarbazine use Dacarbazine Decarbonation ...
Decapodiformes. C - Diseases. Deleted term. Concept absorbed by. C04 - Neoplasms. Dermatofibroma. Histiocytoma, Benign Fibrous ...
Decapodiforme use Decapodiformes Decapodiformes Decapods use Decapoda (Crustacea) Decarbazine use Dacarbazine Decarbonation ...
Decapodiformes. C - Diseases. Deleted term. Concept absorbed by. C04 - Neoplasms. Dermatofibroma. Histiocytoma, Benign Fibrous ...
Decapodiformes. C - Diseases. Deleted term. Concept absorbed by. C04 - Neoplasms. Dermatofibroma. Histiocytoma, Benign Fibrous ...
Decapodiformes. C - Diseases. Deleted term. Concept absorbed by. C04 - Neoplasms. Dermatofibroma. Histiocytoma, Benign Fibrous ...
Decapodiformes. C - Diseases. Deleted term. Concept absorbed by. C04 - Neoplasms. Dermatofibroma. Histiocytoma, Benign Fibrous ...
Decapodiforme use Decapodiformes Decapodiformes Decapods use Decapoda (Crustacea) Decarbazine use Dacarbazine Decarbonation ...
Decapodiformes. C - Diseases. Deleted term. Concept absorbed by. C04 - Neoplasms. Dermatofibroma. Histiocytoma, Benign Fibrous ...
Decapodiforme use Decapodiformes Decapodiformes Decapods use Decapoda (Crustacea) Decarbazine use Dacarbazine Decarbonation ...
Decapodiformes is a superorder of Cephalopoda, which includes all species with ten limbs; the name derives from the Greek word ... Decapodiformes is a superorder of Cephalopoda, which includes all species with ten limbs; the name derives from the Greek word ... This cohort contains two extant groups: Decapodiformes and Octopodiformes . Species within this group exist in all major ...
Decapodiformes. Subclass. Coleoidea. Class. Cephalopoda. Phylum. Mollusca. Kingdom. Animalia. * Size Range. Males smaller, up ...
Decapodiformes. Order. Oegopsida. Family. Cranchiidae. Subfamily. Taoniinae. Genus. Mesonychoteuthis. Scientific name. M. ...
Eukarya - Opisthokonta - Animalia - Mollusca - Cephalopoda - Coleoidea - Decapodiformes - Teuthoidea - Oegopsida. Gonatidae ...
CattleOctopodiformesDucksChickensScyphozoaMice, Inbred C57BLMice, TransgenicRabbitsMice, KnockoutEscherichia coliDecapodiformes ... Decapodiformes. A superorder of CEPHALOPODS comprised of squid, cuttlefish, and their relatives. Their distinguishing feature ...
Many deep-sea species, particularly crustaceans, cephalopods, and fish, use photophores to illuminate their ventral surfaces and thus disguise their silhouettes from predators viewing them from below. This strategy has several potential limitations, two of which are examined here. First, a predator with acute vision may be able to detect the individual photophores on the ventral surface. Second, a predator may be able to detect any mismatch between the spectrum of the bioluminescence and that of the background light. The first limitation was examined by modeling the perceived images of the counterillumination of the squid Abralia veranyi and the myctophid fish Ceratoscopelus maderensis as a function of the distance and visual acuity of the viewer. The second limitation was addressed by measuring downwelling irradiance under moonlight and starlight and then modeling underwater spectra. Four water types were examined: coastal water at a depth of 5 m and oceanic water at 5, 210, and 800 m. The ...
au:Weaver, Patricia AND (instance:perinatal OR (instance:regional AND (db:MEDLINE OR db:LILACS OR db:WHOLIS OR db:PAHO OR db:IBECS OR db:MedCarib OR db:REPDISCA OR db:CidSaude OR db:BDENF OR db:HISA OR db:DESASTRES OR db:COCHRANE-AGENCIAS OR db:COCHRANE-BANDOLIER OR db:COCHRANE-CENTRAL OR db:COCHRANE-CMR OR db:COCHRANE-DARE_ABSTRACTS OR db:COCHRANE-DARECLIB OR db:COCHRANE-EED_ABSTRACTS OR db:COCHRANE-EED_BIBLIO OR db:COCHRANE-EVIDARGENT OR db:COCHRANE-GESTION OR db:COCHRANE-HTA OR db:COCHRANE-KOVACS OR db:COCHRANE-METH_PROTOCOLS OR db:COCHRANE-METH_REVIEWS OR db:COCHRANE-PROTOCOLS OR db:COCHRANE-REGISTRO OR db:COCHRANE-REVIEWS-PLUS OR db:COCHRANE-REVIEWS ...
Chiba, S., Ohue, M., Gryniukova, A., Borysko, P., Zozulya, S., Yasuo, N., Yoshino, R., Ikeda, K., Shin, W. H., Kihara, D., Iwadate, M., Umeyama, H., Ichikawa, T., Teramoto, R., Hsin, K. Y., Gupta, V., Kitano, H., Sakamoto, M., Higuchi, A., Miura, N., & 33 othersYura, K., Mochizuki, M., Ramakrishnan, C., Thangakani, A. M., Velmurugan, D., Gromiha, M. M., Nakane, I., Uchida, N., Hakariya, H., Tan, M., Nakamura, H. K., Suzuki, S. D., Ito, T., Kawatani, M., Kudoh, K., Takashina, S., Yamamoto, K. Z., Moriwaki, Y., Oda, K., Kobayashi, D., Okuno, T., Minami, S., Chikenji, G., Prathipati, P., Nagao, C., Mohsen, A., Ito, M., Mizuguchi, K., Honma, T., Ishida, T., Hirokawa, T., Akiyama, Y. & Sekijima, M., 2019 12月 1, In: Scientific reports. 9, 1, 19585.. 研究成果: Article › 査読 ...
Decapodiformes Medicine & Life Sciences 93% * Proteins Engineering & Materials Science 27% * collagen Agriculture & Biology 27% ...
Decapodiformes Medicine & Life Sciences 42% * Weapons Medicine & Life Sciences 19% * Ecosystem Medicine & Life Sciences 16% ...
Decapodiformes Medicine & Life Sciences 79% * squid Agriculture & Biology 63% * Ovum Medicine & Life Sciences 57% ...
Filters: Keyword is Decapodiformes [Clear All Filters]. 2011. J. Jung and Zhao, Y., "Characteristics of deacetylation and ...
  • The following orders are recognised in the superorder Decapodiformes: Bathyteuthida †Belemnitida †Diplobelida Idiosepida Myopsida - coastal squid Oegopsida - neritic squid Sepiida - cuttlefish, pygmy, bobtail and bottletail squid Spirulida - ram's horn squid see Boletzkyida, Belemnite Young, R. E., Vecchione, M., Mangold, K. M. (2008). (wikipedia.org)
  • A squid is a mollusc in the superorder Decapodiformes with an elongated soft body, large eyes, eight arms, and two tentacles. (qmartco.com)
  • Decapodiformes is a superorder of Cephalopoda comprising all cephalopod species with ten limbs, specifically eight short arms and two long tentacles. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is hypothesized that the ancestral coleoid had five identical pairs of limbs, and that one branch of descendants evolved a modified arm pair IV to become the Decapodiformes, while another branch of descendants evolved and then eventually lost its arm pair II, becoming the Octopodiformes. (wikipedia.org)
  • The following orders are recognised in the superorder Decapodiformes: Bathyteuthida †Belemnitida †Diplobelida Idiosepida Myopsida - coastal squid Oegopsida - neritic squid Sepiida - cuttlefish, pygmy, bobtail and bottletail squid Spirulida - ram's horn squid see Boletzkyida, Belemnite Young, R. E., Vecchione, M., Mangold, K. M. (2008). (wikipedia.org)
  • Decapodiformes is a superorder of cephalopods . (eol.org)
  • Common name for different ten-armed cephalopod mollusks in numerous families, in the superorder DECAPODIFORMES . (nih.gov)
  • Known occurrences, collected specimens and observations of Decapodiformes Young, Vecchione & Donovan 1998. (eol.org)
  • There are 561 species of Decapodiformes, in 127 genera and 36 families. (eol.org)