West Nile virus: A species of FLAVIVIRUS, one of the Japanese encephalitis virus group (ENCEPHALITIS VIRUSES, JAPANESE). It can infect birds and mammals. In humans, it is seen most frequently in Africa, Asia, and Europe presenting as a silent infection or undifferentiated fever (WEST NILE FEVER). The virus appeared in North America for the first time in 1999. It is transmitted mainly by CULEX spp mosquitoes which feed primarily on birds, but it can also be carried by the Asian Tiger mosquito, AEDES albopictus, which feeds mainly on mammals.West Nile Fever: A mosquito-borne viral illness caused by the WEST NILE VIRUS, a FLAVIVIRUS and endemic to regions of Africa, Asia, and Europe. Common clinical features include HEADACHE; FEVER; maculopapular rash; gastrointestinal symptoms; and lymphadenopathy. MENINGITIS; ENCEPHALITIS; and MYELITIS may also occur. The disease may occasionally be fatal or leave survivors with residual neurologic deficits. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1996, Ch26, p13; Lancet 1998 Sep 5;352(9130):767-71)Bird Diseases: Diseases of birds not considered poultry, therefore usually found in zoos, parks, and the wild. The concept is differentiated from POULTRY DISEASES which is for birds raised as a source of meat or eggs for human consumption, and usually found in barnyards, hatcheries, etc.West Nile Virus Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent infection with WEST NILE VIRUS.Culex: A genus of mosquitoes (CULICIDAE) commonly found in tropical regions. Species of this genus are vectors for ST. LOUIS ENCEPHALITIS as well as many other diseases of man and domestic and wild animals.Culicidae: A family of the order DIPTERA that comprises the mosquitoes. The larval stages are aquatic, and the adults can be recognized by the characteristic WINGS, ANIMAL venation, the scales along the wing veins, and the long proboscis. Many species are of particular medical importance.Horse Diseases: Diseases of domestic and wild horses of the species Equus caballus.Birds: Warm-blooded VERTEBRATES possessing FEATHERS and belonging to the class Aves.Crows: Common name for the largest birds in the order PASSERIFORMES, family Corvidae. These omnivorous black birds comprise most of the species in the genus Corvus, along with ravens and jackdaws (which are often also referred to as crows).Flavivirus: A genus of FLAVIVIRIDAE containing several subgroups and many species. Most are arboviruses transmitted by mosquitoes or ticks. The type species is YELLOW FEVER VIRUS.Flavivirus Infections: Infections with viruses of the genus FLAVIVIRUS, family FLAVIVIRIDAE.Horses: Large, hoofed mammals of the family EQUIDAE. Horses are active day and night with most of the day spent seeking and consuming food. Feeding peaks occur in the early morning and late afternoon, and there are several daily periods of rest.Insect Vectors: Insects that transmit infective organisms from one host to another or from an inanimate reservoir to an animate host.Sciuridae: A family of the order Rodentia which contains 49 genera. Some of the more common genera are MARMOTA, which includes the marmot and woodchuck; Sciurus, the gray squirrel, S. carolinensis, and the fox squirrel, S. niger; Tamias, the eastern and western chipmunk; and Tamiasciurus, the red squirrel. The flying squirrels, except the scaly-tailed Anomaluridae, also belong to this family.Antibodies, Viral: Immunoglobulins produced in response to VIRAL ANTIGENS.Vero Cells: A CELL LINE derived from the kidney of the African green (vervet) monkey, (CERCOPITHECUS AETHIOPS) used primarily in virus replication studies and plaque assays.Encephalitis Virus, St. Louis: A species of FLAVIVIRUS, one of the Japanese encephalitis virus group (ENCEPHALITIS VIRUSES, JAPANESE), which is the etiologic agent of ST. LOUIS ENCEPHALITIS in the United States, the Caribbean, and Central and South America.Cercopithecus aethiops: A species of CERCOPITHECUS containing three subspecies: C. tantalus, C. pygerythrus, and C. sabeus. They are found in the forests and savannah of Africa. The African green monkey (C. pygerythrus) is the natural host of SIMIAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS and is used in AIDS research.Virus Replication: The process of intracellular viral multiplication, consisting of the synthesis of PROTEINS; NUCLEIC ACIDS; and sometimes LIPIDS, and their assembly into a new infectious particle.RNA, Viral: Ribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of viruses.Blood DonorsArbovirus Infections: Infections caused by arthropod-borne viruses, general or unspecified.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Encephalitis, St. Louis: A viral encephalitis caused by the St. Louis encephalitis virus (ENCEPHALITIS VIRUS, ST. LOUIS), a FLAVIVIRUS. It is transmitted to humans and other vertebrates primarily by mosquitoes of the genus CULEX. The primary animal vectors are wild birds and the disorder is endemic to the midwestern and southeastern United States. Infections may be limited to an influenza-like illness or present as an ASEPTIC MENINGITIS or ENCEPHALITIS. Clinical manifestations of the encephalitic presentation may include SEIZURES, lethargy, MYOCLONUS, focal neurologic signs, COMA, and DEATH. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p750)Encephalitis Viruses, Japanese: A subgroup of the genus FLAVIVIRUS which comprises a number of viral species that are the etiologic agents of human encephalitis in many different geographical regions. These include Japanese encephalitis virus (ENCEPHALITIS VIRUS, JAPANESE), St. Louis encephalitis virus (ENCEPHALITIS VIRUS, ST. LOUIS), Murray Valley encephalitis virus (ENCEPHALITIS VIRUS, MURRAY VALLEY), and WEST NILE VIRUS.Raptors: BIRDS that hunt and kill other animals, especially higher vertebrates, for food. They include the FALCONIFORMES order, or diurnal birds of prey, comprised of EAGLES, falcons, HAWKS, and others, as well as the STRIGIFORMES order, or nocturnal birds of prey, which includes OWLS.Viremia: The presence of viruses in the blood.Viral Nonstructural Proteins: Proteins encoded by a VIRAL GENOME that are produced in the organisms they infect, but not packaged into the VIRUS PARTICLES. Some of these proteins may play roles within the infected cell during VIRUS REPLICATION or act in regulation of virus replication or VIRUS ASSEMBLY.Cell Death: The termination of the cell's ability to carry out vital functions such as metabolism, growth, reproduction, responsiveness, and adaptability.Viral Plaque Assay: Method for measuring viral infectivity and multiplication in CULTURED CELLS. Clear lysed areas or plaques develop as the VIRAL PARTICLES are released from the infected cells during incubation. With some VIRUSES, the cells are killed by a cytopathic effect; with others, the infected cells are not killed but can be detected by their hemadsorptive ability. Sometimes the plaque cells contain VIRAL ANTIGENS which can be measured by IMMUNOFLUORESCENCE.Neutralization Tests: The measurement of infection-blocking titer of ANTISERA by testing a series of dilutions for a given virus-antiserum interaction end-point, which is generally the dilution at which tissue cultures inoculated with the serum-virus mixtures demonstrate cytopathology (CPE) or the dilution at which 50% of test animals injected with serum-virus mixtures show infectivity (ID50) or die (LD50).RNA Viruses: Viruses whose genetic material is RNA.Songbirds: PASSERIFORMES of the suborder, Oscines, in which the flexor tendons of the toes are separate, and the lower syrinx has 4 to 9 pairs of tensor muscles inserted at both ends of the tracheal half rings. They include many commonly recognized birds such as CROWS; FINCHES; robins; SPARROWS; and SWALLOWS.Dengue Virus: A species of the genus FLAVIVIRUS which causes an acute febrile and sometimes hemorrhagic disease in man. Dengue is mosquito-borne and four serotypes are known.Cause of Death: Factors which produce cessation of all vital bodily functions. They can be analyzed from an epidemiologic viewpoint.Rodent Diseases: Diseases of rodents of the order RODENTIA. This term includes diseases of Sciuridae (squirrels), Geomyidae (gophers), Heteromyidae (pouched mice), Castoridae (beavers), Cricetidae (rats and mice), Muridae (Old World rats and mice), Erethizontidae (porcupines), and Caviidae (guinea pigs).Sentinel Surveillance: Monitoring of rate of occurrence of specific conditions to assess the stability or change in health levels of a population. It is also the study of disease rates in a specific cohort such as in a geographic area or population subgroup to estimate trends in a larger population. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Mid-Atlantic Region: A geographical area of the United States comprising the District of Columbia, Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania.Encephalitis Virus, Japanese: A species of FLAVIVIRUS, one of the Japanese encephalitis virus group (ENCEPHALITIS VIRUSES, JAPANESE), which is the etiological agent of Japanese encephalitis found in Asia, southeast Asia, and the Indian subcontinent.Disease Reservoirs: Animate or inanimate sources which normally harbor disease-causing organisms and thus serve as potential sources of disease outbreaks. Reservoirs are distinguished from vectors (DISEASE VECTORS) and carriers, which are agents of disease transmission rather than continuing sources of potential disease outbreaks.Virus Shedding: The expelling of virus particles from the body. Important routes include the respiratory tract, genital tract, and intestinal tract. Virus shedding is an important means of vertical transmission (INFECTIOUS DISEASE TRANSMISSION, VERTICAL).Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Virus Cultivation: Process of growing viruses in live animals, plants, or cultured cells.Cricetinae: A subfamily in the family MURIDAE, comprising the hamsters. Four of the more common genera are Cricetus, CRICETULUS; MESOCRICETUS; and PHODOPUS.Aedes: A genus of mosquitoes (CULICIDAE) frequently found in tropical and subtropical regions. YELLOW FEVER and DENGUE are two of the diseases that can be transmitted by species of this genus.Vaccinia virus: The type species of ORTHOPOXVIRUS, related to COWPOX VIRUS, but whose true origin is unknown. It has been used as a live vaccine against SMALLPOX. It is also used as a vector for inserting foreign DNA into animals. Rabbitpox virus is a subspecies of VACCINIA VIRUS.Seroepidemiologic Studies: EPIDEMIOLOGIC STUDIES based on the detection through serological testing of characteristic change in the serum level of specific ANTIBODIES. Latent subclinical infections and carrier states can thus be detected in addition to clinically overt cases.Communicable Diseases, Emerging: Infectious diseases that are novel in their outbreak ranges (geographic and host) or transmission mode.Meningoencephalitis: An inflammatory process involving the brain (ENCEPHALITIS) and meninges (MENINGITIS), most often produced by pathogenic organisms which invade the central nervous system, and occasionally by toxins, autoimmune disorders, and other conditions.Encephalitis, Viral: Inflammation of brain parenchymal tissue as a result of viral infection. Encephalitis may occur as primary or secondary manifestation of TOGAVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; HERPESVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; ADENOVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; FLAVIVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; BUNYAVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; PICORNAVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; PARAMYXOVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; ORTHOMYXOVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; RETROVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; and ARENAVIRIDAE INFECTIONS.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.North AmericaNew YorkViral Envelope Proteins: Layers of protein which surround the capsid in animal viruses with tubular nucleocapsids. The envelope consists of an inner layer of lipids and virus specified proteins also called membrane or matrix proteins. The outer layer consists of one or more types of morphological subunits called peplomers which project from the viral envelope; this layer always consists of glycoproteins.Antigens, Viral: Substances elaborated by viruses that have antigenic activity.Immunoglobulin M: A class of immunoglobulin bearing mu chains (IMMUNOGLOBULIN MU-CHAINS). IgM can fix COMPLEMENT. The name comes from its high molecular weight and originally being called a macroglobulin.Sparrows: The family Passeridae comprised of small, mainly brown and grey seed-eating birds with conical bills.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Disease Vectors: Invertebrates or non-human vertebrates which transmit infective organisms from one host to another.Virus Diseases: A general term for diseases produced by viruses.Encephalitis Viruses, Tick-Borne: A subgroup of the genus FLAVIVIRUS that causes encephalitis and hemorrhagic fevers and is found in eastern and western Europe and the former Soviet Union. It is transmitted by TICKS and there is an associated milk-borne transmission from viremic cattle, goats, and sheep.Passeriformes: A widely distributed order of perching BIRDS, including more than half of all bird species.Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay: An immunoassay utilizing an antibody labeled with an enzyme marker such as horseradish peroxidase. While either the enzyme or the antibody is bound to an immunosorbent substrate, they both retain their biologic activity; the change in enzyme activity as a result of the enzyme-antibody-antigen reaction is proportional to the concentration of the antigen and can be measured spectrophotometrically or with the naked eye. Many variations of the method have been developed.Arboviruses: Arthropod-borne viruses. A non-taxonomic designation for viruses that can replicate in both vertebrate hosts and arthropod vectors. Included are some members of the following families: ARENAVIRIDAE; BUNYAVIRIDAE; REOVIRIDAE; TOGAVIRIDAE; and FLAVIVIRIDAE. (From Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2nd ed)Encephalitis, Arbovirus: Infections of the brain caused by arthropod-borne viruses (i.e., arboviruses) primarily from the families TOGAVIRIDAE; FLAVIVIRIDAE; BUNYAVIRIDAE; REOVIRIDAE; and RHABDOVIRIDAE. Life cycles of these viruses are characterized by ZOONOSES, with birds and lower mammals serving as intermediate hosts. The virus is transmitted to humans by the bite of mosquitoes (CULICIDAE) or TICKS. Clinical manifestations include fever, headache, alterations of mentation, focal neurologic deficits, and COMA. (From Clin Microbiol Rev 1994 Jan;7(1):89-116; Walton, Brain's Diseases of the Nervous System, 10th ed, p321)Yellow fever virus: The type species of the FLAVIVIRUS genus. Principal vector transmission to humans is by AEDES spp. mosquitoes.Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.Receptors, Virus: Specific molecular components of the cell capable of recognizing and interacting with a virus, and which, after binding it, are capable of generating some signal that initiates the chain of events leading to the biological response.Virus Assembly: The assembly of VIRAL STRUCTURAL PROTEINS and nucleic acid (VIRAL DNA or VIRAL RNA) to form a VIRUS PARTICLE.RNA Helicases: A family of proteins that promote unwinding of RNA during splicing and translation.LouisianaAnimals, Wild: Animals considered to be wild or feral or not adapted for domestic use. It does not include wild animals in zoos for which ANIMALS, ZOO is available.Antiviral Agents: Agents used in the prophylaxis or therapy of VIRUS DISEASES. Some of the ways they may act include preventing viral replication by inhibiting viral DNA polymerase; binding to specific cell-surface receptors and inhibiting viral penetration or uncoating; inhibiting viral protein synthesis; or blocking late stages of virus assembly.United StatesTexasHost-Pathogen Interactions: The interactions between a host and a pathogen, usually resulting in disease.Sindbis Virus: The type species of ALPHAVIRUS normally transmitted to birds by CULEX mosquitoes in Egypt, South Africa, India, Malaya, the Philippines, and Australia. It may be associated with fever in humans. Serotypes (differing by less than 17% in nucleotide sequence) include Babanki, Kyzylagach, and Ockelbo viruses.Antibodies, Neutralizing: Antibodies that reduce or abolish some biological activity of a soluble antigen or infectious agent, usually a virus.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)ColoradoIllinoisViral Proteins: Proteins found in any species of virus.Simian virus 40: A species of POLYOMAVIRUS originally isolated from Rhesus monkey kidney tissue. It produces malignancy in human and newborn hamster kidney cell cultures.2',5'-Oligoadenylate Synthetase: An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of ATP into a series of (2'-5') linked oligoadenylates and pyrophosphate in the presence of double-stranded RNA. These oligonucleotides activate an endoribonuclease (RNase L) which cleaves single-stranded RNA. Interferons can act as inducers of these reactions. EC 2.7.7.-.Plant Viruses: Viruses parasitic on plants higher than bacteria.DNA Viruses: Viruses whose nucleic acid is DNA.Togaviridae Infections: Virus diseases caused by the TOGAVIRIDAE.Encephalitis, Japanese: A mosquito-borne encephalitis caused by the Japanese B encephalitis virus (ENCEPHALITIS VIRUS, JAPANESE) occurring throughout Eastern Asia and Australia. The majority of infections occur in children and are subclinical or have features limited to transient fever and gastrointestinal symptoms. Inflammation of the brain, spinal cord, and meninges may occur and lead to transient or permanent neurologic deficits (including a POLIOMYELITIS-like presentation); SEIZURES; COMA; and death. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p751; Lancet 1998 Apr 11;351(9109):1094-7)Virulence: The degree of pathogenicity within a group or species of microorganisms or viruses as indicated by case fatality rates and/or the ability of the organism to invade the tissues of the host. The pathogenic capacity of an organism is determined by its VIRULENCE FACTORS.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Defective Viruses: Viruses which lack a complete genome so that they cannot completely replicate or cannot form a protein coat. Some are host-dependent defectives, meaning they can replicate only in cell systems which provide the particular genetic function which they lack. Others, called SATELLITE VIRUSES, are able to replicate only when their genetic defect is complemented by a helper virus.Genome, Viral: The complete genetic complement contained in a DNA or RNA molecule in a virus.Blood-Borne Pathogens: Infectious organisms in the BLOOD, of which the predominant medical interest is their contamination of blood-soiled linens, towels, gowns, BANDAGES, other items from individuals in risk categories, NEEDLES and other sharp objects, MEDICAL WASTE and DENTAL WASTE, all of which health workers are exposed to. This concept is differentiated from the clinical conditions of BACTEREMIA; VIREMIA; and FUNGEMIA where the organism is present in the blood of a patient as the result of a natural infectious process.
West Nile Virus Avian Mortality Surveillance Group (2001). "Crow deaths as a sentinel surveillance system for West Nile virus ... so their deaths are an early-warning system when West Nile virus arrives in an area (as are horse and other bird species deaths ... One of the first signs that West Nile virus first arrived in the US in 1999 was the death of crows in New York. Several ... Corvids are reservoirs (carriers) for the West Nile virus in the United States. They are infected by mosquitoes (the vectors), ...
In Ontario and northeastern Oregon there are confirmed great grey owl deaths from West Nile Virus. Testing of owls in the ... Other dangers to great grey owls include rodenticides, collisions with vehicles, and West Nile Virus. West Nile Virus is likely ... Yosemite area since 2005 has found evidence of West Nile Virus in that population. Due to their large size, great grey owls ... Nero, Robert W. (1980). "The Great Gray Owl: Phantom of the Northern Forest". Smithsonian, Washington, D.C. Nero, Robert W. ( ...
"A CRISPR-Based Screen Identifies Genes Essential for West-Nile-Virus-Induced Cell Death". Cell reports. 12 (4): 673-83. doi: ... "A CRISPR-Based Screen Identifies Genes Essential for West-Nile-Virus-Induced Cell Death". Cell reports. 12 (4): 673-83. doi: ... "A CRISPR-Based Screen Identifies Genes Essential for West-Nile-Virus-Induced Cell Death". Cell reports. 12 (4): 673-83. doi: ... Large-scale genetic screens imply several mEMC subunits in modulating the pathogenicity of flaviviruses such as West Nile Virus ...
"West Nile virus". World Health Organization. Retrieved 2017-10-01. "West Nile virus - Diagnosis". Mayo Clinic. Retrieved 2017- ... Symptoms can last several days to weeks, but death resulting from this infection is rare. Most people infected with the West ... Viruses carried by arthropods such as mosquitoes or ticks are known collectively as arboviruses. West Nile virus was ... Other viral transmission for Flaviviridae diseases include West Nile virus, yellow fever virus and hepatitis B and C, via ...
As another example, there are more than a hundred items about West Nile virus infections, since the 1999 outbreak of the ... Several dozen deaths in teens participating in what is called the "choking game" (February 2008) A report about the elevated ... Such a standing report section is the "Notifiable Diseases and Mortality Tables", which reports deaths by disease and state, ... The initial reports of a novel swine flu virus which led to the 2009 flu pandemic (April 24, 2009) Five cases of Pneumocystis ...
Louis encephalitis to West Nile virus on September 27, 1999, citing research by Dr. Duane J. Gubler, a C.D.C. expert on ... arborviruses, as well as several bird deaths in the Bronx, located to the north of Queens. Dr. Deborah Asnis was credited by ... Not only did her actions lead to the discovery of the West Nile virus in the United States, but, by alerting authorities, Dr. ... Asnis' patients were diagnosed with West Nile virus in September 1999, the first known human cases of the disease in the United ...
The West Nile virus appeared in the United States in 1999 in the New York City area, and moved through the country in the ... eventually transmitting the virus to farmers and causing 105 human deaths. Similarly, in recent times avian influenza and West ... Examples include rabies, anthrax, tularemia and West Nile virus. Thus, much of human exposure to infectious disease has been ... Nile virus have spilled over into human populations probably due to interactions between the carrier host and domestic animals ...
... for West Nile virus. While crows and jays are often the first noticed deaths in an area with West Nile virus, the American ... West Nile Virus: The Search for Answers in Chicago's Suburbs *^ Diversity Of Birds Buffer Against West Nile Virus. Sciencedaily ... Holt, D. W. & Leroux, L. A. (1996). "Diets of northern pygmy-owls and northern saw-whet owls in west-central Montana" (PDF). ... This is because, while crows and jays die quickly from the virus, the American robin survives the virus longer, hence spreading ...
... and West Nile virus have been recorded in the past. In 2013 at the Great Salt Lake, for example, there was an outbreak of West ... Large-scaled deaths (such as 150,000 birds on the Salton Sea in 1992) from erysipelas, avian cholera, avian botulism, ... Since West Nile virus is able to survive in brine shrimp and, for a temporary time, the water of the Great Salt Lake around the ... It is also theorized that West Nile virus could be transmitted among grebes through contact with the excrement of an infected ...
West Nile virus - Vectors: vary according to geographical area; in the United States Culex pipiens (Eastern US), Culex tarsalis ... with 30,000 deaths) per year. Minor Ross River fever - Vector: Mosquitoes, main vectors A. vigilax, Aedes camptorhynchus, and ... McNeil, W. H. 1976. Plagues and people. Anchor Press,Doubleday, Garden City, NY. Service, M. 2008. Medical Entomology for ... Houseflies also transmit poliomyelitis by carrying the virus from infected faeces to food or drink. Cholera and hepatitis are ...
West Nile virus) Myxobolus cerebralis (whirling disease) Ophiostoma ulmi (Dutch elm disease) Paramyxovirus (Exotic Newcastle ... soybean rust) Phytophthora ramorum (sudden oak death) Potyvirus (plum pox) Pseudogymnoascus destructans (white-nose syndrome) ... Nile monitor) Xenopus laevis (African clawed frog) Osteopilus septentrionalis (Cuban tree frog) Axis axis (chital) [62] Bison ... West Indian drywood termite) Ctenarytaina eucalypti (blue gum psyllid) [7] Culex quinquefasciatus (southern house mosquito) [8 ...
West Nile fever, chikungunya, eastern equine encephalitis, and Zika virus, along with many other, less notable diseases. ... Infections with these viruses are typically accompanied by a fever, and, in some cases, encephalitis, which can lead to death. ... The two most prominent species that transmit viruses are Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus which transmit the viruses that ... CDC Transmission of Zika virus Nene V, Wortman JR, Lawson D, et al. (2007). "Genome sequence of Aedes aegypti, a major ...
West Nile fever Flavivirus birds, horses mosquito bite Zika fever Zika virus chimpanzees, gorillas, orangutans, monkeys, ... eventually transmitting the virus to farmers and causing 105 human deaths.[38] ... The West Nile virus appeared in the United States in 1999 in the New York City area, and moved through the country in the ... Examples include rabies, anthrax, tularemia and West Nile virus. Thus, much of human exposure to infectious disease has been ...
Clark Middleton, 63, American actor (Sin City, Snowpiercer, Twin Peaks), West Nile virus.[535] ... The following deaths of notable individuals occurred in 2020. Names are reported under the date of death, in alphabetical order ... Arvinder Grewal, American production designer (Land of the Dead, Survival of the Dead, Resident Evil: Afterlife).[109] (death ... Jill Paton Walsh, 83, English novelist (Knowledge of Angels, A Presumption of Death, The Attenbury Emeralds).[220] ...
Many infectious diseases-most recently, the West Nile virus-originate outside U.S. borders and are introduced by international ... The U.S. death toll from the virus may surpass that of HIV/AIDS in the next five years. TB, exacerbated by multidrug resistant ... The death rates for many diseases, including HIV/AIDS and malaria, exceed those in all other regions. Sub-Saharan Africa's ... Death rates attributed to infectious diseases in the FSU increased 50% from 1990 to 1996, with TB accounting for a substantial ...
In the 1950s, Southam also tested the West Nile Virus as a potential virotherapy; he injected it into over 100 cancer patients ... "Paid Notice: Deaths Southam, Chester Milton". The New York Times. April 10, 2002. "Chester Milton Southam." (n.d.): Marquis ... Sepkowitz, Kent (2009-08-24). "West Nile Made Its U.S. Debut in the 1950s, in a Doctor's Syringe". The New York Times. ISSN ... but some people he injected got severe cases of West Nile fever; he went on to do further research to see if he could "train" ...
... are distributed throughout the county from the Sylmar ponds as part of an effort to battle the spread of the West Nile virus. ... Ash from the Sayre Fire also resulted in the death of Los Angeles County's mosquito-killing fish, which were bred in ponds ... The fire moved west from Sylmar and threatened the luxury planned community of Knollwood in Granada Hills. On November 15, 2008 ... On November 18, 2008, President George W. Bush declared the area struck by November 2008 California wildfires a federal ...
According to analysis of other authors in response to Marr and Calisher, the West Nile virus could not have infected humans ... Epidemiologist John Marr and Charles Calisher put forward the West Nile fever as possible cause of Alexander's death. This ... "Alexander the Great and West Nile Virus Encephalitis". CDC. Retrieved Aug 21, 2011. "Disease, not conflict, ended the reign of ... "Alexander the Great and West Nile Virus Encephalitis". CDC. Retrieved Aug 21, 2011. Sbarounis CN (June 1997). "Did Alexander ...
The risk of death among those in whom the nervous system is affected is about 10%. West Nile virus is typically spread by ... Lists general information and resources for West Nile Virus. West Nile Virus-West Nile Encephalitis Brain Scans. ... "West Nile Virus". Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). CDC-West Nile Virus ... West Nile Virus. Scottish National Blood Transfusion Service. "West Nile virus". Mayo Clinic. Archived from the original on 26 ...
... that roosting birds play a key part in perpetuating the viruses that cause eastern equine encephalitis virus and West Nile ... at his death. Madeline, his eldest granddaughter, is currently a student at the prestigious University of Washington and is ... West Nile encephalitis, and filariasis. First description of the life cycles and ecology of the agents of human babesiosis and ...
The virus that causes La Crosse encephalitis was discovered in the 1960s, and West Nile virus arrived in New York in 1999. As ... Beginning in October 2004 and continuing into 2005, there were 252 cases including 227 deaths. The Ebola virus epidemic in West ... West Nile virus, a flavivirus, was first identified in 1937 when it was found in the blood of a feverish woman. The virus, ... There are numerous causes, including viruses - particularly hepatitis A virus, hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus. ...
Zika virus (ZIKV) is a vector-borne flavivirus in the same family as yellow fever, dengue, West Nile and Japanese encephalitis ... No hemorrhagic manifestations occurred and no deaths resulted. It was estimated that 73% (95% confidence interval, 68 to 77) of ... Viruses portal 2013-2014 Zika virus outbreaks in Oceania Zika virus outbreak in the Americas (2015-present) Hayes, Edward B. ( ... Duffy, Mark R.; Chen, Tai-Ho; Hancock, W. Thane; et al. (11 June 2009). "Zika virus outbreak on Yap Islands, Federated States ...
West Nile virus [1] Error CTV.ca , Sask. reports 339 cases of West Nile, one death News , West Nile virus found in BC ... West Nile Virus - Statistics, Surveillance, and Control CDC: West Nile Virus - Statistics, Surveillance, and Control CDC: West ... West Nile Virus - Statistics, Surveillance, and Control "Dallas County declares state of emergency due to West Nile". WFAA.com ... United States: From 1999 through 2001, the CDC confirmed 149 West Nile virus infections, including 18 deaths. In 2002, a total ...
... and Control West Nile Cases Drop as Immunities Emerge, Experts Say CDC Information Page For Current Cases and Deaths For West ... www.medicaldaily.com/west-nile-virus-more-dangerous-elderly-and-reason-may-lie-speed-their-immune-system-344410 West Nile ... "West Nile Virus". CDC. Retrieved 21 May 2013. Roberts, Sam (2015-09-15). "Dr. Deborah Asnis, Who Sounded Alert on West Nile ... 1,039 West Nile-tainted blood donations were discovered between 2003 and mid-2005. 30 cases of West Nile from blood transfusion ...
Saint Louis encephalitis and West Nile virus. McJunkin, J. E.; de los Reyes, E. C.; Irazuzta, J. E.; Caceres, M. J.; Khan, R. R ... CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link) "La Crosse virus disease cases and deaths reported to CDC by year and clinical ... Thompson, W.H.; Kalfayan, B.; Anslow, R.O. (1965). "Isolation of California encephalitis virus from a fatal human illness". Am ... La Crosse encephalitis virus (LACV) is one of a group of mosquito-transmitted viruses that can cause encephalitis, or ...
Lujo virus. References[edit]. *^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad "Lassa fever". WHO. March 2016 ... The virus is estimated to be responsible for about 5,000 deaths annually. The fever accounts for up to one-third of deaths in ... West Nile fever *WNV. *Viral hemorrhagic fevers: Dengue fever *DENV-1-4 ... Lassa fever is endemic in West Africa. *^ Yun, N. E.; Walker, D. H. (2012). "Pathogenesis of Lassa Fever". Viruses. 4 (12): ...
... at BellaOnline ... How many people have died each year from West Nile Virus? Here ... West Nile Virus Yearly Death Count. Guest Author - Lisa Shea. How many people have died each year from West Nile Virus? West ... total deaths: 2. Even with a wider range of West Nile Virus laden mosquitoes, fewer people were infected.. 2001. total reported ... total deaths: 0 (""). Anti Mosquito Information. West Nile Virus Information. This site needs an editor - click to learn more! ...
West Nile Virus Death in Houston. A 96-year-old Houston man is believed to be the second person in Texas to die from West Nile ... of West Nile virus infection in Houston and Harris County.. The virus is transmitted to humans by the bite of an infected ... The West Nile virus was discovered in area birds in early June of this year. The first human cases were identified in July. ... The Culex mosquito is believed to be the primary carrier of the West Nile virus. The Culex is a night feeder and is most active ...
... Share this:. *Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window) ... Until this month, Orange County had not had a West Nile virus-related death since 2004. ... Health officials reported today that a 64-year-old Garden Grove man has become the second confirmed death from West Nile virus ... "We are very concerned about the level of West Nile virus activity in Orange County," Handler said. ...
Sutter County health officials say a total of four confirmed or probable cases of West Nile virus illness have been reported so ... far this year, including two West Nile virus-related deaths. ...
... announced today three confirmed deaths in California due to West Nile virus (WNV). The deceased persons were residents of Kern ... West Nile virus is transmitted to humans and animals by the bite of an infected mosquito. The risk of serious illness to most ... West Nile virus is influenced by many factors, including climate, the number and types of birds and mosquitoes in an area, and ... West Nile virus can cause a deadly infection in humans, and the elderly are particularly susceptible, said CDPH Director and ...
The Department of State Health Services is investigating whether or not a teenage boy died from West Nile Virus Sunday in ... Long said after many negative tests, doctors tested the 13-year-old for West Nile and told the family he did have the virus. ... According to the CDC, deaths from West Nile are rare. Since 1999, of the nearly 44,000 confirmed cases, only 1,911 people have ... 13, DSHS confirmed Cody was, in fact, diagnosed with West Nile virus. ...
It is the only death related to the virus that has been reported in the county this year. ... Sutter County public health officials say a resident has died of complications related to West Nile virus acquired over the ...
AP) A Laclede County man who died earlier this month is the states first fatality blamed on the West Nile virus, Missouri ... State attributes death to West Nile virus. Tuesday. Aug 28, 2012 at 12:01 AM Aug 28, 2012 at 12:20 PM ... AP) A Laclede County man who died earlier this month is the states first fatality blamed on the West Nile virus, Missouri ...
California saw record number of severe West Nile cases in 2014 * Orange County confirms its first case of West Nile Virus in ... 28 deaths from West Nile virus reported in California this year. Photo by Raj/prince_tigereye via Flickr Creative Commons. KPCC ... Health officials say 28 people have died in California this year due to West Nile virus, which is transmitted to humans by ... So far, there are about 150 cases of West Nile in Los Angeles County, according to Laurene Mascola, chief of acute communicable ...
Maryland health officials are reporting the states first death from the West Nile virus.State health department spokeswoman ... Maryland has had 13 cases of West Nile virus this year. Nineteen cases, including one death, were reported last year, and 23 ... Maryland health officials are reporting the states first death from the West Nile virus. ... Federal officials announced Wednesday that West Nile cases nationwide are up 40 percent since last week and may rival the ...
State records second West Nile virus death of 2013. Posted by: in Health, NEWS August 6, 2013 ... BOLIVAR COUNTY - The Mississippi State Department of Health has reported a second death in the state from the West Nile Virus ... Home » NEWS » Health » State records second West Nile virus death of 2013 ... 55 cases of West Nile virus in Mississippi so far in 2017. October 3, 2017 ...
Health officials say they have confirmed the years first human death from the West Nile Virus in San Bernardino County. ... San Bernardino County has first West Nile virus death of year. October 24, 2012 , 7:30 am ... have reported being sick with West Nile Virus since 1999. So far in 2012, 4,531 cases have been reported, according to the ... The virus generally spreads from the bite of an infected mosquito that has feasted on an infected bird. Most people with the ...
death disease epidemic health health care illness Mississippi State Department of Health mosquito public health West Nile virus ... State records second death this year from West Nile virus. Posted by: in Health, NEWS August 27, 2014 ... MADISON COUNTY - State health officials are reporting a second death this year from the West Nile virus in Mississippi. ... Home » NEWS » Health » State records second death this year from West Nile virus ...
"The death of a Long Beach resident due to West Nile virus is a sad and sobering reminder of the risk posed by mosquito bites," ... City Health Officer Announces First Death in Long Beach from West Nile Virus in 2017 ... announced the first death this year in Long Beach due to complications associated with West Nile virus (WNV). As of September 1 ... West Nile virus is transmitted to humans and animals by the bite of an infected mosquito. For most people, the risk of serious ...
This comes as LDH confirms two new West Nile virus deaths this week, bringing this years total to four West Nile virus deaths ... Health Officials Confirm Two New West Nile Virus Deaths. Louisiana reports 19 new West Nile virus cases this week; 80 total ... which was down from 2002s high of 204 cases of West Nile virus neuroinvasive disease. LDH has been tracking West Nile Virus ... Humans contract West Nile when they are bitten by mosquitoes infected with the virus. When people are infected with West Nile, ...
HealthFirst 2016 Human West Nile Virus Deaths in Illinois. First 2016 Human West Nile Virus Deaths in Illinois. 30 września ... Last year there were 77 human cases, including nine deaths.. West Nile virus is transmitted through the bite of a mosquito. ... Health Możliwość komentowania First 2016 Human West Nile Virus Deaths in Illinois została wyłączona ... Surveillance for West Nile virus in Illinois includes laboratory tests on mosquito batches, dead crows, blue jays, robins and ...
West Nile virus deaths in California have… Share this:. *Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window) ... There have been no deaths reported to the state.. RELATED STORY: 2 Riverside County residents get West Nile virus for first ... In 2014, a drought year, there were 801 people infected with West Nile virus and 31 deaths. The following year also saw drought ... West Nile virus deaths in California have nearly tripled from last year ...
West nile virus RNA not detected in urine of 40 people tested 6 years after acute West Nile virus disease. J Infect Dis. 2011; ... Green MS, Weinberger M, Ben-Ezer J, Bin H, Mendelson E, Gandacu D, et al. Long-term death rates, West Nile virus epidemic, ... Deaths.... Tables. *Table 1. Demographic and clinical characteristics of case-patients with fatal and nonfatal West Nile virus ... West Nile virus (WNV) is an arbovirus that can result in severe disease and death in humans. Since the first outbreak of ...
The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services confirmed Friday that eight human cases of West Nile virus for 2018 in ... confirmed Friday that eight human cases of West Nile virus for 2018 in Michigan have been confirmed, including one death. The ... For more information and surveillance activity about West Nile virus and other mosquito-borne viruses CLICK HERE. ... August is peak season for West Nile virus activity in Michigan. Other communities, including Metro Detroit and Grand Rapids, ...
An individual in Anderson County has died due to West Nile Virus, according to the South Carolina Department of Health and ... First SC West Nile Virus death reported in Anderson Co. - , WBTV Charlotte. Member Center:*Create Account, ... First SC West Nile Virus death reported in Anderson Co.. 2017-08-31T22:09:26Z. 2017-09-29T14:59:04Z. time.prefixdate:before{ ... The death in Anderson County is the first in the state linked to West Nile Virus for 2017. ...
Dying from West Nile virus is pretty rare - over a five-year period, there were 25 reported cases in the state and seven deaths ... One person has died from West Nile virus in North Carolina. Health officials say its also the first confirmed case in 2018. ... First West Nile Virus-Related Death Reported In North Carolina First West Nile Virus-Related Death Reported In North Carolina ... Dying from West Nile virus is pretty rare - over a five-year period, there were 25 reported cases in the state and seven deaths ...
1st human West Nile virus death in Orange County this year reported in Tustin. From the Orange County Register. October 16, ... The first two West Nile virus deaths in California were reported last month in Glenn and Yuba counties, respectively, according ... The agency said there were 38 reported infections and four deaths in 2017 due to West Nile virus infections in Orange County. ... 1st human West Nile virus death in Orange County this year reported in Tustin. ...
We found that WNV infection induces cell death in the brain-derived tumour cell line T98G by apoptosis under involvement of ... T98G cells are highly permissive for lytic WNV-infection as demonstrated by the production of infectious virus titre and the ... Our results illuminate the molecular mechanism of WNV-induced neural cell death. ... Pan-caspase inhibition prevented WNV-induced apoptosis without affecting virus replication. ...
Two Windsor Deaths Attributed To West Nile Virus TOPICS:deathsWest Nile VirusWindsor-Essex County Health Unit ... the Windsor-Essex County Health Unit has received two separate reports of death attributed to the West Nile virus. This is a ... So far this year, 29 mosquito pools have tested positive for West Nile Virus (WNV) throughout the area, and 11 cases of WNV ... The Health Unit, along with each municipality, will continue to monitor for West Nile Virus activity for the remainder of the ...
There were 1,021 cases of West Nile infections reported in the U.S. last year, and 629 of these were neuroinvasive, meaning the ... which caused 68 infections last year with one death, and St. Louis encephalitis virus, which caused 10 cases and one death, the ... Since West Nile virus was first detected in the Western Hemisphere in 1999, it has become the leading cause in the U.S. of ... Cases of the severe form of West Nile virus rose in 2010, says a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ...
  • Protecting yourself from mosquito bites, eliminating mosquito breeding grounds, and using larvicides to kill mosquito larva before they can grow into biting adults are the best ways to prevent mosquito-borne illnesses like West Nile," Dr. Unini Odama, health director for the Georgia Department of Public Health Northwest Health District, said in a news release. (ajc.com)
  • With the holiday weekend approaching and children heading back to school and participating in outdoor sports, it is important to remember that by taking personal precautions, each of us can make a difference in the fight against West Nile virus," he said. (dailynews.com)
  • Although fall has begun and temperatures are becoming cooler, West Nile virus is still a concern," said IDPH Director Nirav D. Shah, M.D., J.D. "It's important for everyone to continue taking precautions like wearing insect repellent and staying indoors between dusk and dawn. (polishnews.com)
  • If you live in a county with a high incidence of the virus, the CDPH recommends draining any standing water on your property and taking precautions-bug repellant, long sleeves, pants-when going outside, especially at dawn and dusk. (motherjones.com)
  • The best way to prevent West Nile encephalitis and other mosquito-borne illnesses is to reduce the number of mosquitoes around your home and neighborhood and to take personal precautions to avoid mosquito bites. (illinois.edu)