Heart: The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.Heart Rate: The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.Cell Death: The termination of the cell's ability to carry out vital functions such as metabolism, growth, reproduction, responsiveness, and adaptability.Cause of Death: Factors which produce cessation of all vital bodily functions. They can be analyzed from an epidemiologic viewpoint.Heart Failure: A heterogeneous condition in which the heart is unable to pump out sufficient blood to meet the metabolic need of the body. Heart failure can be caused by structural defects, functional abnormalities (VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION), or a sudden overload beyond its capacity. Chronic heart failure is more common than acute heart failure which results from sudden insult to cardiac function, such as MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Death: Irreversible cessation of all bodily functions, manifested by absence of spontaneous breathing and total loss of cardiovascular and cerebral functions.Heart Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the HEART including its structural and functional abnormalities.Heart Transplantation: The transference of a heart from one human or animal to another.Heart Defects, Congenital: Developmental abnormalities involving structures of the heart. These defects are present at birth but may be discovered later in life.Fetal Heart: The heart of the fetus of any viviparous animal. It refers to the heart in the postembryonic period and is differentiated from the embryonic heart (HEART/embryology) only on the basis of time.Death, Sudden, Cardiac: Unexpected rapid natural death due to cardiovascular collapse within one hour of initial symptoms. It is usually caused by the worsening of existing heart diseases. The sudden onset of symptoms, such as CHEST PAIN and CARDIAC ARRHYTHMIAS, particularly VENTRICULAR TACHYCARDIA, can lead to the loss of consciousness and cardiac arrest followed by biological death. (from Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine, 7th ed., 2005)Heart Valves: Flaps of tissue that prevent regurgitation of BLOOD from the HEART VENTRICLES to the HEART ATRIA or from the PULMONARY ARTERIES or AORTA to the ventricles.Heart Atria: The chambers of the heart, to which the BLOOD returns from the circulation.Heart Block: Impaired conduction of cardiac impulse that can occur anywhere along the conduction pathway, such as between the SINOATRIAL NODE and the right atrium (SA block) or between atria and ventricles (AV block). Heart blocks can be classified by the duration, frequency, or completeness of conduction block. Reversibility depends on the degree of structural or functional defects.Brain Death: A state of prolonged irreversible cessation of all brain activity, including lower brain stem function with the complete absence of voluntary movements, responses to stimuli, brain stem reflexes, and spontaneous respirations. Reversible conditions which mimic this clinical state (e.g., sedative overdose, hypothermia, etc.) are excluded prior to making the determination of brain death. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp348-9)Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Myocardium: The muscle tissue of the HEART. It is composed of striated, involuntary muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC) connected to form the contractile pump to generate blood flow.Fetal Death: Death of the developing young in utero. BIRTH of a dead FETUS is STILLBIRTH.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Heart Arrest, Induced: A procedure to stop the contraction of MYOCARDIUM during HEART SURGERY. It is usually achieved with the use of chemicals (CARDIOPLEGIC SOLUTIONS) or cold temperature (such as chilled perfusate).Heart Function Tests: Examinations used to diagnose and treat heart conditions.Myocardial Ischemia: A disorder of cardiac function caused by insufficient blood flow to the muscle tissue of the heart. The decreased blood flow may be due to narrowing of the coronary arteries (CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE), to obstruction by a thrombus (CORONARY THROMBOSIS), or less commonly, to diffuse narrowing of arterioles and other small vessels within the heart. Severe interruption of the blood supply to the myocardial tissue may result in necrosis of cardiac muscle (MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION).Myocardial Contraction: Contractile activity of the MYOCARDIUM.Coronary Disease: An imbalance between myocardial functional requirements and the capacity of the CORONARY VESSELS to supply sufficient blood flow. It is a form of MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA (insufficient blood supply to the heart muscle) caused by a decreased capacity of the coronary vessels.Attitude to Death: Conceptual response of the person to the various aspects of death, which are based on individual psychosocial and cultural experience.Myocardial Infarction: NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Myocytes, Cardiac: Striated muscle cells found in the heart. They are derived from cardiac myoblasts (MYOBLASTS, CARDIAC).Hemodynamics: The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Ventricular Function, Left: The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the left HEART VENTRICLE. Its measurement is an important aspect of the clinical evaluation of patients with heart disease to determine the effects of the disease on cardiac performance.Cardiac Output, Low: A state of subnormal or depressed cardiac output at rest or during stress. It is a characteristic of CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES, including congenital, valvular, rheumatic, hypertensive, coronary, and cardiomyopathic. The serious form of low cardiac output is characterized by marked reduction in STROKE VOLUME, and systemic vasoconstriction resulting in cold, pale, and sometimes cyanotic extremities.Apoptosis: One of the mechanisms by which CELL DEATH occurs (compare with NECROSIS and AUTOPHAGOCYTOSIS). Apoptosis is the mechanism responsible for the physiological deletion of cells and appears to be intrinsically programmed. It is characterized by distinctive morphologic changes in the nucleus and cytoplasm, chromatin cleavage at regularly spaced sites, and the endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA; (DNA FRAGMENTATION); at internucleosomal sites. This mode of cell death serves as a balance to mitosis in regulating the size of animal tissues and in mediating pathologic processes associated with tumor growth.Cardiomyopathy, Dilated: A form of CARDIAC MUSCLE disease that is characterized by ventricular dilation, VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION, and HEART FAILURE. Risk factors include SMOKING; ALCOHOL DRINKING; HYPERTENSION; INFECTION; PREGNANCY; and mutations in the LMNA gene encoding LAMIN TYPE A, a NUCLEAR LAMINA protein.Heart Arrest: Cessation of heart beat or MYOCARDIAL CONTRACTION. If it is treated within a few minutes, heart arrest can be reversed in most cases to normal cardiac rhythm and effective circulation.Cardiomyopathies: A group of diseases in which the dominant feature is the involvement of the CARDIAC MUSCLE itself. Cardiomyopathies are classified according to their predominant pathophysiological features (DILATED CARDIOMYOPATHY; HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY; RESTRICTIVE CARDIOMYOPATHY) or their etiological/pathological factors (CARDIOMYOPATHY, ALCOHOLIC; ENDOCARDIAL FIBROELASTOSIS).Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Caspases: A family of intracellular CYSTEINE ENDOPEPTIDASES that play a role in regulating INFLAMMATION and APOPTOSIS. They specifically cleave peptides at a CYSTEINE amino acid that follows an ASPARTIC ACID residue. Caspases are activated by proteolytic cleavage of a precursor form to yield large and small subunits that form the enzyme. Since the cleavage site within precursors matches the specificity of caspases, sequential activation of precursors by activated caspases can occur.Stroke Volume: The amount of BLOOD pumped out of the HEART per beat, not to be confused with cardiac output (volume/time). It is calculated as the difference between the end-diastolic volume and the end-systolic volume.Heart Failure, Systolic: Heart failure caused by abnormal myocardial contraction during SYSTOLE leading to defective cardiac emptying.Cardiomegaly: Enlargement of the HEART, usually indicated by a cardiothoracic ratio above 0.50. Heart enlargement may involve the right, the left, or both HEART VENTRICLES or HEART ATRIA. Cardiomegaly is a nonspecific symptom seen in patients with chronic systolic heart failure (HEART FAILURE) or several forms of CARDIOMYOPATHIES.Perfusion: Treatment process involving the injection of fluid into an organ or tissue.Heart, Artificial: A pumping mechanism that duplicates the output, rate, and blood pressure of the natural heart. It may replace the function of the entire heart or a portion of it, and may be an intracorporeal, extracorporeal, or paracorporeal heart. (Dorland, 28th ed)Echocardiography: Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues. The standard approach is transthoracic.Cardiotonic Agents: Agents that have a strengthening effect on the heart or that can increase cardiac output. They may be CARDIAC GLYCOSIDES; SYMPATHOMIMETICS; or other drugs. They are used after MYOCARDIAL INFARCT; CARDIAC SURGICAL PROCEDURES; in SHOCK; or in congestive heart failure (HEART FAILURE).Heart Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the heart.Myocardial Reperfusion Injury: Damage to the MYOCARDIUM resulting from MYOCARDIAL REPERFUSION (restoration of blood flow to ischemic areas of the HEART.) Reperfusion takes place when there is spontaneous thrombolysis, THROMBOLYTIC THERAPY, collateral flow from other coronary vascular beds, or reversal of vasospasm.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Heart Septum: This structure includes the thin muscular atrial septum between the two HEART ATRIA, and the thick muscular ventricular septum between the two HEART VENTRICLES.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Ventricular Dysfunction, Left: A condition in which the LEFT VENTRICLE of the heart was functionally impaired. This condition usually leads to HEART FAILURE; MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION; and other cardiovascular complications. Diagnosis is made by measuring the diminished ejection fraction and a depressed level of motility of the left ventricular wall.Rheumatic Heart Disease: Cardiac manifestation of systemic rheumatological conditions, such as RHEUMATIC FEVER. Rheumatic heart disease can involve any part the heart, most often the HEART VALVES and the ENDOCARDIUM.Heart Rate, Fetal: The heart rate of the FETUS. The normal range at term is between 120 and 160 beats per minute.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Adrenergic beta-Antagonists: Drugs that bind to but do not activate beta-adrenergic receptors thereby blocking the actions of beta-adrenergic agonists. Adrenergic beta-antagonists are used for treatment of hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias, angina pectoris, glaucoma, migraine headaches, and anxiety.Heart Valve Prosthesis: A device that substitutes for a heart valve. It may be composed of biological material (BIOPROSTHESIS) and/or synthetic material.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Cell Survival: The span of viability of a cell characterized by the capacity to perform certain functions such as metabolism, growth, reproduction, some form of responsiveness, and adaptability.Mortality: All deaths reported in a given population.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Autopsy: Postmortem examination of the body.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.United StatesVentricular Remodeling: The geometric and structural changes that the HEART VENTRICLES undergo, usually following MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION. It comprises expansion of the infarct and dilatation of the healthy ventricle segments. While most prevalent in the left ventricle, it can also occur in the right ventricle.Heart Failure, Diastolic: Heart failure caused by abnormal myocardial relaxation during DIASTOLE leading to defective cardiac filling.Receptors, Death Domain: A family of cell surface receptors that signal via a conserved domain that extends into the cell CYTOPLASM. The conserved domain is referred to as a death domain due to the fact that many of these receptors are involved in signaling APOPTOSIS. Several DEATH DOMAIN RECEPTOR SIGNALING ADAPTOR PROTEINS can bind to the death domains of the activated receptors and through a complex series of interactions activate apoptotic mediators such as CASPASES.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.American Heart Association: A voluntary organization concerned with the prevention and treatment of heart and vascular diseases.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Necrosis: The pathological process occurring in cells that are dying from irreparable injuries. It is caused by the progressive, uncontrolled action of degradative ENZYMES, leading to MITOCHONDRIAL SWELLING, nuclear flocculation, and cell lysis. It is distinct it from APOPTOSIS, which is a normal, regulated cellular process.Cardiovascular Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM including the HEART; the BLOOD VESSELS; or the PERICARDIUM.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Mice, Inbred C57BLIncidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Oxygen Consumption: The rate at which oxygen is used by a tissue; microliters of oxygen STPD used per milligram of tissue per hour; the rate at which oxygen enters the blood from alveolar gas, equal in the steady state to the consumption of oxygen by tissue metabolism throughout the body. (Stedman, 25th ed, p346)Caspase 3: A short pro-domain caspase that plays an effector role in APOPTOSIS. It is activated by INITIATOR CASPASES such as CASPASE 9. Isoforms of this protein exist due to multiple alternative splicing of its MESSENGER RNA.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Cardiac Pacing, Artificial: Regulation of the rate of contraction of the heart muscles by an artificial pacemaker.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Autonomic Nervous System: The ENTERIC NERVOUS SYSTEM; PARASYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEM; and SYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEM taken together. Generally speaking, the autonomic nervous system regulates the internal environment during both peaceful activity and physical or emotional stress. Autonomic activity is controlled and integrated by the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, especially the HYPOTHALAMUS and the SOLITARY NUCLEUS, which receive information relayed from VISCERAL AFFERENTS.Exercise Test: Controlled physical activity which is performed in order to allow assessment of physiological functions, particularly cardiovascular and pulmonary, but also aerobic capacity. Maximal (most intense) exercise is usually required but submaximal exercise is also used.Natriuretic Peptide, Brain: A PEPTIDE that is secreted by the BRAIN and the HEART ATRIA, stored mainly in cardiac ventricular MYOCARDIUM. It can cause NATRIURESIS; DIURESIS; VASODILATION; and inhibits secretion of RENIN and ALDOSTERONE. It improves heart function. It contains 32 AMINO ACIDS.Mitochondria: Semiautonomous, self-reproducing organelles that occur in the cytoplasm of all cells of most, but not all, eukaryotes. Each mitochondrion is surrounded by a double limiting membrane. The inner membrane is highly invaginated, and its projections are called cristae. Mitochondria are the sites of the reactions of oxidative phosphorylation, which result in the formation of ATP. They contain distinctive RIBOSOMES, transfer RNAs (RNA, TRANSFER); AMINO ACYL T RNA SYNTHETASES; and elongation and termination factors. Mitochondria depend upon genes within the nucleus of the cells in which they reside for many essential messenger RNAs (RNA, MESSENGER). Mitochondria are believed to have arisen from aerobic bacteria that established a symbiotic relationship with primitive protoeukaryotes. (King & Stansfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Mice, Knockout: Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome: A condition caused by underdevelopment of the whole left half of the heart. It is characterized by hypoplasia of the left cardiac chambers (HEART ATRIUM; HEART VENTRICLE), the AORTA, the AORTIC VALVE, and the MITRAL VALVE. Severe symptoms appear in early infancy when DUCTUS ARTERIOSUS closes.Heart Septal Defects: Abnormalities in any part of the HEART SEPTUM resulting in abnormal communication between the left and the right chambers of the heart. The abnormal blood flow inside the heart may be caused by defects in the ATRIAL SEPTUM, the VENTRICULAR SEPTUM, or both.Heart Neoplasms: Tumors in any part of the heart. They include primary cardiac tumors and metastatic tumors to the heart. Their interference with normal cardiac functions can cause a wide variety of symptoms including HEART FAILURE; CARDIAC ARRHYTHMIAS; or EMBOLISM.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Calcium: A basic element found in nearly all organized tissues. It is a member of the alkaline earth family of metals with the atomic symbol Ca, atomic number 20, and atomic weight 40. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and combines with phosphorus to form calcium phosphate in the bones and teeth. It is essential for the normal functioning of nerves and muscles and plays a role in blood coagulation (as factor IV) and in many enzymatic processes.National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (U.S.): Component of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH. It conducts and supports research program related to diseases of the heart, blood vessels, lung, and blood; blood resources; and SLEEP WAKE DISORDERS. From 1948 until October 10, 1969, it was known as the National Heart Institute. From June 25, 1976, it was the National Heart and Lung Institute. Since October 1997, the NHLBI has also had administrative responsibility for the NIH Woman's Health Initiative.Sympathetic Nervous System: The thoracolumbar division of the autonomic nervous system. Sympathetic preganglionic fibers originate in neurons of the intermediolateral column of the spinal cord and project to the paravertebral and prevertebral ganglia, which in turn project to target organs. The sympathetic nervous system mediates the body's response to stressful situations, i.e., the fight or flight reactions. It often acts reciprocally to the parasympathetic system.Ventricular Pressure: The pressure within a CARDIAC VENTRICLE. Ventricular pressure waveforms can be measured in the beating heart by catheterization or estimated using imaging techniques (e.g., DOPPLER ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY). The information is useful in evaluating the function of the MYOCARDIUM; CARDIAC VALVES; and PERICARDIUM, particularly with simultaneous measurement of other (e.g., aortic or atrial) pressures.Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Models, Cardiovascular: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of the cardiovascular system, processes, or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers and other electronic equipment.Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2: Membrane proteins encoded by the BCL-2 GENES and serving as potent inhibitors of cell death by APOPTOSIS. The proteins are found on mitochondrial, microsomal, and NUCLEAR MEMBRANE sites within many cell types. Overexpression of bcl-2 proteins, due to a translocation of the gene, is associated with follicular lymphoma.Rats, Wistar: A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Reactive Oxygen Species: Molecules or ions formed by the incomplete one-electron reduction of oxygen. These reactive oxygen intermediates include SINGLET OXYGEN; SUPEROXIDES; PEROXIDES; HYDROXYL RADICAL; and HYPOCHLOROUS ACID. They contribute to the microbicidal activity of PHAGOCYTES, regulation of signal transduction and gene expression, and the oxidative damage to NUCLEIC ACIDS; PROTEINS; and LIPIDS.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Risk: The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.In Situ Nick-End Labeling: An in situ method for detecting areas of DNA which are nicked during APOPTOSIS. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase is used to add labeled dUTP, in a template-independent manner, to the 3 prime OH ends of either single- or double-stranded DNA. The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase nick end labeling, or TUNEL, assay labels apoptosis on a single-cell level, making it more sensitive than agarose gel electrophoresis for analysis of DNA FRAGMENTATION.Blotting, Western: Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.Systole: Period of contraction of the HEART, especially of the HEART VENTRICLES.Electrocardiography, Ambulatory: Method in which prolonged electrocardiographic recordings are made on a portable tape recorder (Holter-type system) or solid-state device ("real-time" system), while the patient undergoes normal daily activities. It is useful in the diagnosis and management of intermittent cardiac arrhythmias and transient myocardial ischemia.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Endocardium: The innermost layer of the heart, comprised of endothelial cells.Antigens, CD95: A tumor necrosis factor receptor subtype found in a variety of tissues and on activated LYMPHOCYTES. It has specificity for FAS LIGAND and plays a role in regulation of peripheral immune responses and APOPTOSIS. Multiple isoforms of the protein exist due to multiple ALTERNATIVE SPLICING. The activated receptor signals via a conserved death domain that associates with specific TNF RECEPTOR-ASSOCIATED FACTORS in the CYTOPLASM.DNA Fragmentation: Splitting the DNA into shorter pieces by endonucleolytic DNA CLEAVAGE at multiple sites. It includes the internucleosomal DNA fragmentation, which along with chromatin condensation, are considered to be the hallmarks of APOPTOSIS.Anti-Arrhythmia Agents: Agents used for the treatment or prevention of cardiac arrhythmias. They may affect the polarization-repolarization phase of the action potential, its excitability or refractoriness, or impulse conduction or membrane responsiveness within cardiac fibers. Anti-arrhythmia agents are often classed into four main groups according to their mechanism of action: sodium channel blockade, beta-adrenergic blockade, repolarization prolongation, or calcium channel blockade.Diastole: Post-systolic relaxation of the HEART, especially the HEART VENTRICLES.Enzyme Activation: Conversion of an inactive form of an enzyme to one possessing metabolic activity. It includes 1, activation by ions (activators); 2, activation by cofactors (coenzymes); and 3, conversion of an enzyme precursor (proenzyme or zymogen) to an active enzyme.Myocarditis: Inflammatory processes of the muscular walls of the heart (MYOCARDIUM) which result in injury to the cardiac muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC). Manifestations range from subclinical to sudden death (DEATH, SUDDEN). Myocarditis in association with cardiac dysfunction is classified as inflammatory CARDIOMYOPATHY usually caused by INFECTION, autoimmune diseases, or responses to toxic substances. Myocarditis is also a common cause of DILATED CARDIOMYOPATHY and other cardiomyopathies.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Kaplan-Meier Estimate: A nonparametric method of compiling LIFE TABLES or survival tables. It combines calculated probabilities of survival and estimates to allow for observations occurring beyond a measurement threshold, which are assumed to occur randomly. Time intervals are defined as ending each time an event occurs and are therefore unequal. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1995)Autophagy: The segregation and degradation of damaged or unwanted cytoplasmic constituents by autophagic vacuoles (cytolysosomes) composed of LYSOSOMES containing cellular components in the process of digestion; it plays an important role in BIOLOGICAL METAMORPHOSIS of amphibians, in the removal of bone by osteoclasts, and in the degradation of normal cell components in nutritional deficiency states.Heart Septal Defects, Ventricular: Developmental abnormalities in any portion of the VENTRICULAR SEPTUM resulting in abnormal communications between the two lower chambers of the heart. Classification of ventricular septal defects is based on location of the communication, such as perimembranous, inlet, outlet (infundibular), central muscular, marginal muscular, or apical muscular defect.Propanolamines: AMINO ALCOHOLS containing the propanolamine (NH2CH2CHOHCH2) group and its derivatives.Isoproterenol: Isopropyl analog of EPINEPHRINE; beta-sympathomimetic that acts on the heart, bronchi, skeletal muscle, alimentary tract, etc. It is used mainly as bronchodilator and heart stimulant.Registries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.Enzyme Inhibitors: Compounds or agents that combine with an enzyme in such a manner as to prevent the normal substrate-enzyme combination and the catalytic reaction.Ischemic Preconditioning, Myocardial: Exposure of myocardial tissue to brief, repeated periods of vascular occlusion in order to render the myocardium resistant to the deleterious effects of ISCHEMIA or REPERFUSION. The period of pre-exposure and the number of times the tissue is exposed to ischemia and reperfusion vary, the average being 3 to 5 minutes.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Heart-Assist Devices: Small pumps, often implantable, designed for temporarily assisting the heart, usually the LEFT VENTRICLE, to pump blood. They consist of a pumping chamber and a power source, which may be partially or totally external to the body and activated by electromagnetic motors.Animals, Newborn: Refers to animals in the period of time just after birth.Neurons: The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.Aging: The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.Cardiac Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the heart.Cell Line, Tumor: A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.Caspase Inhibitors: Endogenous and exogenous compounds and that either inhibit CASPASES or prevent their activation.bcl-2-Associated X Protein: A member of the Bcl-2 protein family and homologous partner of C-BCL-2 PROTO-ONCOGENE PROTEIN. It regulates the release of CYTOCHROME C and APOPTOSIS INDUCING FACTOR from the MITOCHONDRIA. Several isoforms of BCL2-associated X protein occur due to ALTERNATIVE SPLICING of the mRNA for this protein.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Norepinephrine: Precursor of epinephrine that is secreted by the adrenal medulla and is a widespread central and autonomic neurotransmitter. Norepinephrine is the principal transmitter of most postganglionic sympathetic fibers and of the diffuse projection system in the brain arising from the locus ceruleus. It is also found in plants and is used pharmacologically as a sympathomimetic.Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular: Enlargement of the LEFT VENTRICLE of the heart. This increase in ventricular mass is attributed to sustained abnormal pressure or volume loads and is a contributor to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.Infant Mortality: Postnatal deaths from BIRTH to 365 days after birth in a given population. Postneonatal mortality represents deaths between 28 days and 365 days after birth (as defined by National Center for Health Statistics). Neonatal mortality represents deaths from birth to 27 days after birth.Gene Expression: The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of synthetic material to repair injured or diseased heart valves.Gene Expression Regulation: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Ventricular Dysfunction: A condition in which HEART VENTRICLES exhibit impaired function.Ventricular Fibrillation: A potentially lethal cardiac arrhythmia that is characterized by uncoordinated extremely rapid firing of electrical impulses (400-600/min) in HEART VENTRICLES. Such asynchronous ventricular quivering or fibrillation prevents any effective cardiac output and results in unconsciousness (SYNCOPE). It is one of the major electrocardiographic patterns seen with CARDIAC ARREST.Caspase 8: A long pro-domain caspase that contains a death effector domain in its pro-domain region. Caspase 8 plays a role in APOPTOSIS by cleaving and activating EFFECTOR CASPASES. Activation of this enzyme can occur via the interaction of its N-terminal death effector domain with DEATH DOMAIN RECEPTOR SIGNALING ADAPTOR PROTEINS.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Myocardial Reperfusion: Generally, restoration of blood supply to heart tissue which is ischemic due to decrease in normal blood supply. The decrease may result from any source including atherosclerotic obstruction, narrowing of the artery, or surgical clamping. Reperfusion can be induced to treat ischemia. Methods include chemical dissolution of an occluding thrombus, administration of vasodilator drugs, angioplasty, catheterization, and artery bypass graft surgery. However, it is thought that reperfusion can itself further damage the ischemic tissue, causing MYOCARDIAL REPERFUSION INJURY.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Stroke: A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Fibrosis: Any pathological condition where fibrous connective tissue invades any organ, usually as a consequence of inflammation or other injury.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Cardiac Catheterization: Procedures in which placement of CARDIAC CATHETERS is performed for therapeutic or diagnostic procedures.Death Domain Receptor Signaling Adaptor Proteins: Intracellular signaling adaptor proteins that bind to the cytoplasmic death domain region found on DEATH DOMAIN RECEPTORS. Many of the proteins in this class take part in intracellular signaling from TUMOR NECROSIS FACTOR RECEPTORS.Tachycardia: Abnormally rapid heartbeat, usually with a HEART RATE above 100 beats per minute for adults. Tachycardia accompanied by disturbance in the cardiac depolarization (cardiac arrhythmia) is called tachyarrhythmia.Kidney: Body organ that filters blood for the secretion of URINE and that regulates ion concentrations.Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action during the developmental stages of an organism.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Heart Septal Defects, Atrial: Developmental abnormalities in any portion of the ATRIAL SEPTUM resulting in abnormal communications between the two upper chambers of the heart. Classification of atrial septal defects is based on location of the communication and types of incomplete fusion of atrial septa with the ENDOCARDIAL CUSHIONS in the fetal heart. They include ostium primum, ostium secundum, sinus venosus, and coronary sinus defects.BH3 Interacting Domain Death Agonist Protein: A member of the Bcl-2 protein family that reversibly binds MEMBRANES. It is a pro-apoptotic protein that is activated by caspase cleavage.Energy Metabolism: The chemical reactions involved in the production and utilization of various forms of energy in cells.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Reference Values: The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.Tachycardia, Ventricular: An abnormally rapid ventricular rhythm usually in excess of 150 beats per minute. It is generated within the ventricle below the BUNDLE OF HIS, either as autonomic impulse formation or reentrant impulse conduction. Depending on the etiology, onset of ventricular tachycardia can be paroxysmal (sudden) or nonparoxysmal, its wide QRS complexes can be uniform or polymorphic, and the ventricular beating may be independent of the atrial beating (AV dissociation).Echocardiography, Doppler: Measurement of intracardiac blood flow using an M-mode and/or two-dimensional (2-D) echocardiogram while simultaneously recording the spectrum of the audible Doppler signal (e.g., velocity, direction, amplitude, intensity, timing) reflected from the moving column of red blood cells.Adenosine Triphosphate: An adenine nucleotide containing three phosphate groups esterified to the sugar moiety. In addition to its crucial roles in metabolism adenosine triphosphate is a neurotransmitter.Disease Progression: The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.Models, Animal: Non-human animals, selected because of specific characteristics, for use in experimental research, teaching, or testing.Phosphorylation: The introduction of a phosphoryl group into a compound through the formation of an ester bond between the compound and a phosphorus moiety.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Adrenergic beta-Agonists: Drugs that selectively bind to and activate beta-adrenergic receptors.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Carrier Proteins: Transport proteins that carry specific substances in the blood or across cell membranes.Pacemaker, Artificial: A device designed to stimulate, by electric impulses, contraction of the heart muscles. It may be temporary (external) or permanent (internal or internal-external).Baroreflex: A response by the BARORECEPTORS to increased BLOOD PRESSURE. Increased pressure stretches BLOOD VESSELS which activates the baroreceptors in the vessel walls. The net response of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM is a reduction of central sympathetic outflow. This reduces blood pressure both by decreasing peripheral VASCULAR RESISTANCE and by lowering CARDIAC OUTPUT. Because the baroreceptors are tonically active, the baroreflex can compensate rapidly for both increases and decreases in blood pressure.Atrial Fibrillation: Abnormal cardiac rhythm that is characterized by rapid, uncoordinated firing of electrical impulses in the upper chambers of the heart (HEART ATRIA). In such case, blood cannot be effectively pumped into the lower chambers of the heart (HEART VENTRICLES). It is caused by abnormal impulse generation.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Creatine Kinase: A transferase that catalyzes formation of PHOSPHOCREATINE from ATP + CREATINE. The reaction stores ATP energy as phosphocreatine. Three cytoplasmic ISOENZYMES have been identified in human tissues: the MM type from SKELETAL MUSCLE, the MB type from myocardial tissue and the BB type from nervous tissue as well as a mitochondrial isoenzyme. Macro-creatine kinase refers to creatine kinase complexed with other serum proteins.Oxygen: An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight [15.99903; 15.99977]. It is the most abundant element on earth and essential for respiration.Vascular Resistance: The force that opposes the flow of BLOOD through a vascular bed. It is equal to the difference in BLOOD PRESSURE across the vascular bed divided by the CARDIAC OUTPUT.Anoxia: Relatively complete absence of oxygen in one or more tissues.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Vagus Nerve: The 10th cranial nerve. The vagus is a mixed nerve which contains somatic afferents (from skin in back of the ear and the external auditory meatus), visceral afferents (from the pharynx, larynx, thorax, and abdomen), parasympathetic efferents (to the thorax and abdomen), and efferents to striated muscle (of the larynx and pharynx).Sinoatrial Node: The small mass of modified cardiac muscle fibers located at the junction of the superior vena cava (VENA CAVA, SUPERIOR) and right atrium. Contraction impulses probably start in this node, spread over the atrium (HEART ATRIUM) and are then transmitted by the atrioventricular bundle (BUNDLE OF HIS) to the ventricle (HEART VENTRICLE).Body Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Caspase 9: A long pro-domain caspase that contains a caspase recruitment domain in its pro-domain region. Caspase 9 is activated during cell stress by mitochondria-derived proapoptotic factors and by CARD SIGNALING ADAPTOR PROTEINS such as APOPTOTIC PROTEASE-ACTIVATING FACTOR 1. It activates APOPTOSIS by cleaving and activating EFFECTOR CASPASES.Fas Ligand Protein: A transmembrane protein belonging to the tumor necrosis factor superfamily that was originally discovered on cells of the lymphoid-myeloid lineage, including activated T-LYMPHOCYTES and NATURAL KILLER CELLS. It plays an important role in immune homeostasis and cell-mediated toxicity by binding to the FAS RECEPTOR and triggering APOPTOSIS.Vasodilator Agents: Drugs used to cause dilation of the blood vessels.Cytochromes c: Cytochromes of the c type that are found in eukaryotic MITOCHONDRIA. They serve as redox intermediates that accept electrons from MITOCHONDRIAL ELECTRON TRANSPORT COMPLEX III and transfer them to MITOCHONDRIAL ELECTRON TRANSPORT COMPLEX IV.Receptors, Adrenergic, beta: One of two major pharmacologically defined classes of adrenergic receptors. The beta adrenergic receptors play an important role in regulating CARDIAC MUSCLE contraction, SMOOTH MUSCLE relaxation, and GLYCOGENOLYSIS.Up-Regulation: A positive regulatory effect on physiological processes at the molecular, cellular, or systemic level. At the molecular level, the major regulatory sites include membrane receptors, genes (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION), mRNAs (RNA, MESSENGER), and proteins.Diuretics: Agents that promote the excretion of urine through their effects on kidney function.Tissue Distribution: Accumulation of a drug or chemical substance in various organs (including those not relevant to its pharmacologic or therapeutic action). This distribution depends on the blood flow or perfusion rate of the organ, the ability of the drug to penetrate organ membranes, tissue specificity, protein binding. The distribution is usually expressed as tissue to plasma ratios.Defibrillators, Implantable: Implantable devices which continuously monitor the electrical activity of the heart and automatically detect and terminate ventricular tachycardia (TACHYCARDIA, VENTRICULAR) and VENTRICULAR FIBRILLATION. They consist of an impulse generator, batteries, and electrodes.Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.
Lazarus sign Lazarus taxon Near-death experience Premature burial Suspended animation The Lazarus Heart Hornby K, Hornby L, ... "Death following spontaneous recovery from cardiopulmonary arrest in a hospital mortuary: 'Lazarus phenomenon' in a case of ... About a minute after resuscitation ended, a nurse noticed a rhythm on the heart monitor and resuscitation was resumed. The ... Judith Johnson, 61, went into cardiac arrest at Beebe Medical Center in Lewes, Delaware, United States, in May 2007. She was ...
May 27, 1942: Death due to heart attack. Chen Duxiu was born in the city of Anqing, in Anhui province. He was born to a wealthy ... In 1932, Chen was arrested by the government of the Shanghai International Settlement, where he had been living since 1927, and ... 1932 to 1937: Arrest by Kuomintang authorities and imprisonment. 1937 to 1942: Retires from public life. ... which had led to the deaths of thousands of Communists - now known as the Shanghai massacre of 1927, and because of his ...
"Heart Attack Cited in Death of Louisiana Tech Running Back Tyrone Duplessis". KSLA.com. 2012-02-13. Retrieved 2013-04-05. " ... cardiac arrest (2013) † Davis was under contract when he died though did not play in a game due to his illness. †† Johnson was ... "Coroner: Northwestern State death from heart disease". USA Today. 2004-03-18. Retrieved 2015-09-20. "Arkansas Linebacker Found ... Each NFL player is listed with the team for which he last played before his death, rather than the team with which he spent ...
Ramchand suffered three heart attacks in the two months preceding his death. He was admitted to the Hinduja Hospital in Mumbai ... In 1995, he recovered after suffering a cardiac arrest. ... on 1 September 2003, and, days before his death, asked the ... Gollapudi, Nagaraj (8 September 2003). "Former cricketers react to Ramchand's death". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 1 August 2016. ... "heart complications". "Gulabrai Ramchand". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 1 August 2016. "Wisden - GS Ramchand". ESPNcricinfo. ...
... puthiyathalaimurai.tv/arcot-mla-death-from-a-heart-attack Profile on Rajya Sabha website. ... He died from cardiac arrest on 18 July 2013. "List of MLAs from Tamil Nadu 2011" (PDF). Govt. of Tamil Nadu. Archived from the ...
The noted cause of death was "acute heart failure". Before his arrest, Stefan Meier did not have a history of heart problems. ... In October 1941, Stefan Meier, after denunciation by a neighbor, was arrested again and sentenced by a Special Court of ...
Half of these deaths come from heart failure which often develops from electrical heart rhythm problems such as atrial ... "cardiac arrest" is often confused with "sudden death" from ventricular fibrillation.) This sudden death rate is equal to the ... care and treatment of cardiac electrical diseases that lead to heart failure and sudden death. It includes national and ... The other half of these deaths occur suddenly due to an extreme and instantly fatal cardiac turbulence called ventricular ...
Lacking proper glycogen storage, the horse's brain, heart muscle, and skeletal muscles cannot function, leading to rapid death ... Symptoms include general weakness, contracted tendons, hypoglycemic seizures, cardiac arrest, and sudden death. Horses that are ... It leads to abortion, stillbirths, or early death of affected animals. Glycogen is a molecular polymer of glucose used to store ...
An abnormal heart rate can occur which can result in cardiac arrest and death. Common causes include kidney failure, ... Injecting potassium chloride into the heart muscle disrupts the signal that causes the heart to beat. This same amount of ... cardiac arrest in special situations: 2010 American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and ... Among those who are in hospital, rates are between 1% and 2.5%. It increases the overall risk of death by at least ten times. ...
The cause of death was heart disease. Worrell died in 1899 at the Kings County Hospital of burns she sustained while sleeping ... Police of the precinct had arrested her a number of times. Her sisters separated themselves from her years before because of ...
Singh was arrested under sections 279 (rash and negligent driving) and 304A (causing death by negligence) of the Indian Penal ... Later the doctors said that his death occurred maybe due to heart attack. His funeral was held at 2pm on 4 June 2014 at his ... After the death of his father in 1969, his brothers took care of his education. He is the third child in the family. His family ... He was immediately rushed to the AIIMS hospital but later went into cardiac arrest. He was administered CPR but could not be ...
Arrest made in ex-Sacred Heart Pioneers player Chauncey Hardy's death - ESPN "Chauncey Hardy: Former Sacred Heart Basketball ... Before his death he had 3 heart attacks. A day later, a man was arrested after he surrendered to police. He was put in custody ... Chauncey, a native of Middletown, Connecticut, previously played basketball for Sacred Heart University in Fairfield, ...
Individual studies have indicated snus is correlated with death from heart attack and with heart failure. The European Union ... At higher doses, tachycardia, reflex bradycardia, arrhythmia or even cardiac arrest can occur in some individuals.[citation ... In contrast, since women traditionally are less likely to use snus, their rate of tobacco-related deaths in Sweden can be ... Asplund, Kjell (October 29, 2002). Snuffing, Smoking and the risk for heart disease and other vascular diseases (PDF) (3rd ed ...
Some newspapers wrote that he had died of a heart attack, however others suggested that his death had been related to his ... Four years before, in 1933, Reza Pahlavi had arrested Davar's closest friend Teymourtash. Teymourtash died shortly afterward in ...
His heart rate dropped ... leading to his death from a cardiac arrest ... a classic secondary response to raised intercranial ... Wroe, David (August 19, 2014). "Reza Barati: Two men arrested over death of asylum seeker at PNG detention centre". Retrieved ... In July 2014 a security guard and later a Salvation Army worker, both Papua-New Guinean, were arrested. Both men were charged ... Berati ... was struck from behind .... also kicked and had a rock dropped on his head, before dying of heart failure while ...
He was found guilty and sentenced to death by hanging. Pister died in Landsberg Prison of an acute heart attack on 28 September ... Pister was arrested by the Americans in 1945; put on trial for war crimes by the American Military Tribunal at Dachau with 30 ... This train came to be known as the "Death Train". It took until 27 April for the train to arrive at Dachau with many aboard ...
The coroner ruled Brinkamp's death to be attributed to a heart attack. Following his death, she inherited $5,000 from a life ... Authorities reported Vermilya had been ingesting the "white pepper" since her house arrest on October 28. By November 9, she ... The coroner, however, ruled her cause of death as "acute nephritis". Due to the unusually high number of deaths within the ... His death was determined to be caused by gastritis. Smith was still married at the time of his supposed nuptials to Vermilya. ...
Death can occur rapidly following overdose as a result of respiratory arrest and paralysis of the heart. Calabar Bean Cymserine ... and death). Physostigmine may counteract GHB by producing a nonspecific state of arousal. However, not enough scientific ... induces neuronal cell death". Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology. 106 (1): 28-37. doi:10.1016/0041-008X(90)90102-Z. PMID ...
The gas was designed to induce cardiac arrest, making the victim's death look like a heart attack. Stashynsky used the weapon ... In 1950 he was arrested for traveling without a ticket on public transportation to Lviv from his village. After agreeing to act ... 182-9 Echo of the Arrest of the Murderer Lev Rebet How the KGB organized the assassination of Bandera. (Як КДБ організовував ... ISBN 0-465-00312-5. Plokhy, Serhii (5 January 2017). "How a KGB Assassin Used the Death of His Child to Defect". POLITICO ...
Since the ring has replaced her heart, she cannot remove it without risking death by cardiac arrest. She is also vulnerable to ... In the aftermath of the War of the Green Lanterns and the death of the rogue Guardian Krona, Atrocitus felt his rage dimming, ... where she is among the Red Lanterns who are overcome by the rage generated by the deaths of billions of beings within ...
He forged Man-lung's signature to frame him, causing Man-lung to be arrested. He dies of a heart attack in the final episode ... After the death of his ex-wife, he marries Cheung Hok-wa. Ekin Cheng as Pau Man-lung (包文龍) Formerly an agent working for the ... His greed and ambition would inadvertently cause the deaths of Wong Lui's mother and Ching-lit. Amy Kwok as Wong Lui (黃蕾) The ... However, she soon opens her heart to Man-lung and his family when they show her kindness and acceptance, something she had been ...
Myocardial infarction (a.k.a. heart attack) - A myocardial infarction is the death of a part of the heart which is typically ... There are several causes of sudden cardiac death and it is distinct from cardiac arrest. The leading cause of SCD in young ... American College of Cardiology American Heart Association Heart Rhythm Society Indian Heart Association National Heart ... Heart cancer - Cancer of the heart is very rare and those cancers tend to be benign. Myxoma - Most common tumor of the heart. ...
Current passing through the heart produces an immediate cardiac arrest that also leads shortly to unconsciousness and death. It ... As early as 1853, he designed a lethal chamber that would gas animals to death relatively painlessly, and he founded the Model ... that produce unconsciousness or death through hypoxia or asphyxia. The process is not instantaneous. With percussive stunning, ... Gas stunning Percussive stunning Electrical stunning is done by sending an electric current through the brain and/or heart of ...
Broken-hearted, he was placed under house arrest, and his death followed ten weeks later, on 31 December. Unamuno died while ... Millán Astray responded: "Death to intelligence! Long live death!" provoking applause from the Falangists. Pemán, in an effort ... Unamuno was removed from his position of rector of the University of Salamanca by Franco and placed under house arrest. He died ... He called the battle cry of the elite armed forces group named La Legión-"Long live death!"-repellent and suggested Astray ...
"Heart condition caused White Rock Marathon runner's death", The Dallas Morning News, 2 March 2009. "Teacher dies from heart ... "New York City Marathon: Two Runners Are Dead From Cardiac Arrest", The New York Times, 7 November 1994. "A second runner, a man ... "Coach copes with wife's death", The Columbus Dispatch, 27 January 2004. "The Fit Man's Heart Threat", Men's Health, 23 August ... The most-frequent causes are: sudden cardiac death, triggered by a congenital or acquired heart disorder; exercise-associated ...
... was very frail and had to be carried.[396] After Mok's troops apprehended them, Pol Pot was placed under house arrest.[ ... Heuveline's central estimate is 2.52 million excess deaths, of which 1.4 million were the direct result of violence.[313][315] ... On 15 April 1998, Pol Pot died in his sleep, apparently of heart failure.[398] His body was preserved with ice and formaldehyde ... Pol Pot had grown suspicious of Son Sen and in June 1997 ordered his death. Khmer Rouge cadres subsequently killed Son and 13 ...
... after the death of a girl thrown from an inflatable trampoline in Gorleston. ... A man and woman from Great Yarmouth have been arrested - ... Heart East Anglia On Air Now. Hearts Feel Good Weekend with ... A man and woman from Great Yarmouth have been arrested - after the death of a girl thrown from an inflatable trampoline in ... Two arrested after Gorleston inflatable death. 12 July 2018, 12:36 , Updated: 12 July 2018, 12:53 ...
These celebrities who died of heart attacks are listed alphabetically and include the famous cardiac arrest victims hometown ... List of famous people who died of cardiac arrest, including photos, birthdates, professions, and other information. ... These notable heart attack deaths include modern and long-gone famous men and women, from politicians to religious leaders to ... Everyone on this list has cardiac arrest as a cause of death somewhere in their public records, even if it was just one ...
Details of his death are still emerging, but friends and relatives say they have been concerned about Jacksons use of ... Iconic pop star Michael Jackson suffered a cardiac arrest and died on Thursday at the age of 50. ... Heart attacks are about twice as common as cardiac arrests, but a heart attack can progress to a cardiac arrest if not treated. ... and tissue death in part of the heart muscle. In contrast to cardiac arrest, heart attack patients may not lose consciousness. ...
The store owner suffers a heart attack and dies.Is the younger man guilty of ... Trial begins in case of heart attack death Pushed, grocer went into cardiac arrest. ... "The medical examiner will testify the stress of that attack caused the man to have a heart attack," the prosecutor added. "He ... Flannery said the jury could resolve the case by answering a single question: "Did the death occur during that crime, during ...
Study Highlights Heart-related deaths spike around Christmas, and the effect may not be because of the cold winter season. ... The mission of the Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Foundation is to prevent death and disability from sudden cardiac arrest. The ... DALLAS, TX - Heart-related deaths spike during Christmas, but the effect may have nothing to do with the cold winter season, ... Heart-related deaths spike around Christmas, and the effect may not be because of the cold winter season. ...
... claiming the companys products led to the death of his wife. ... Lawrence Harbaugh filed a GranuFlo heart attack lawsuit against ... Furthermore, a 2010 study by Fresenius examined the incidence of sudden death and cardiac arrest among patients. These results ... which increases the risk of adverse GranuFlo side effects including cardiac arrest and sudden cardiac death. It also places ... GranuFlo Cardiac Arrest Lawsuit Filed Against Fresenius. July 24, 2013. By: Jacky Gale Granuflo ...
Quantitative troponin and death, cardiogenic shock, cardiac arrest and new heart failure in patients with non-ST-segment ... Quantitative troponin and death, cardiogenic shock, cardiac arrest and new heart failure in patients with non-ST-segment ... Quantitative troponin and death, cardiogenic shock, cardiac arrest and new heart failure in patients with non-ST-segment ...
With no effective heartbeat, the brain and other vital organs are deprived of blood, leading to death within minutes. ... Cardiac arrest occurs when the heart suddenly stops functioning. ... Sudden Cardiac Arrest Cardiac arrest occurs when the heart ... Cardiac arrest is not a heart attack. The heart usually continues beating during a heart attack; however, cardiac arrest may ... Causes of Cardiac Arrest. Electrical signals in the heart synchronize heart function so that the heart beats properly and pumps ...
... the diagnostic test most often used to assess the electrical and muscular functions of the heart. ... Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundations mission is to raise awareness about sudden cardiac arrest and help save lives through ... Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation is a non-profit organization with a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt status. All rights reserved. ... His 2014 research showed that the incidence of sudden cardiac arrest among athletes may be 1 in 50,000 - four times higher than ...
James Gandolfinis Death Brings to Light Distinction Between a Heart Attack and Sudden Cardiac Arrest. June 20, 2013. AED ... Gandolfini suffered a heart attack or cardiac arrest. The investigation into cause of death is ongoing, but the head physician ... As mentioned above, cardiac arrest may occur as a result of a heart attack or coronary heart disease, but it can also be ... Heart attacks occur when there is a blockage of vessels in the heart limiting blood flow; however, the heart generally keeps ...
Routinely implanting pager-size defibrillators in heart attack survivors to stop cardiac arrest reduces their chance of dying ... Effective Treatment for Heart Failure Possible Following Discovery of Heart Molecule. Significant Decrease in Heart Disease ... a history of heart attack and evidence of resulting heart weakness. Heart specialists called the results important, but some ... ATLANTA (AP) - Routinely implanting pager-size defibrillators in heart attack survivors to stop cardiac arrest reduces their ...
Iran has issued an arrest warrant and asked Interpol for help in detaining President Donald Trump and dozens of others it ... Grant Imahara mourned by MythBusters co-stars after sudden death: My heart is broken. Yahoo Celebrity ... which represents the highest-level arrest request issued by Interpol. Local authorities generally make the arrests on behalf of ... TEHRAN, Iran (AP) - Iran has issued an arrest warrant and asked Interpol for help in detaining President Donald Trump and ...
... is when the heart stops beating suddenly and unexpectedly - possibly leading to sudden cardiac death. Read on to learn more ... Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) / Sudden Cardiac Death (SCD). While heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United ... Protect This Heart *Sudden Cardiac Arrest *Enlarged Heart *Long QT Syndrome *Chain of Survival *Heart Screenings *Research * ... What causes sudden cardiac arrest in children?. There are two types of heart conditions that lead to sudden cardiac arrest in ...
WebMD explains the difference between sudden cardiac arrest and a heart attack. ... Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is a sudden, unexpected death caused by a change in heart rhythm (sudden cardiac arrest). It is the ... SCD is responsible for half of all heart disease deaths.. How Is Sudden Cardiac Arrest Different from a Heart Attack?. Sudden ... Heart Disease and Sudden Cardiac Death. In this Article. In this Article In this Article * How Is Sudden Cardiac Arrest ...
... died from a heart attack ... and no drugs were found in his system ... TMZ has learned.The L.A. County Coroner… ... Dad Shares Update After Nude, Bloody Arrest. Hes Gonna Be Fine Ozzy Osbourne. Suing AEG Youre Making Me a Slave to Staples ... As for why he had a heart attack, were told there was evidence of heart disease. A source connected with the Coroner tells TMZ ... Sylvester Stallones son, Sage Stallone, died from a heart attack ... and no drugs were found in his system ... TMZ has learned ...
Toronto police have arrested a fugitive who fled to Canada from the U.S. after he was convicted of reckless driving and driving ... How a death on Torontos streets strikes at the heart of what it means to be good. ... Toronto police arrest fugitive wanted in Wisconsin. Toronto police have arrested a fugitive who fled to Canada from the U.S. ... Toronto police have arrested a fugitive who fled to Canada from the U.S. after he was convicted of reckless driving and driving ...
A male in his late teens has been arrested at his Scarborough-area home after a student of a similar age was stabbed in the ... How a death on Torontos streets strikes at the heart of what it means to be good. ... UPDATED: Teen arrested after Danforth and Greenwood stabbing. J.P. Moczulski for National Post ... A male in his late teens has been arrested at his Scarborough-area home after a student of a similar age was stabbed in the ...
Dog the Bounty Hunter rushed to the hospital for heart emergency, months after wifes death. ... Arrest of Youcef Nadarkhanis Lawyer: A Bad Situation Made Worse. Arrest of Youcef Nadarkhanis Lawyer: A Bad Situation Made ... Nadarkhani was arrested in October 2009 for protesting the mandatory teaching of Islam at his childrens schools. His charges ... One aspect of Dadkhahs arrest which makes the situation so dire is the fact that now Iranian pastor Youcef Nadarkhani, who has ...
TMZ has obtained Casey Johnsons death certificate.The certificate lists Caseys death as deferred. Shes listed as an ... Insane Nude, Bloody Arrest After Penthouse Meltdown Queen Latifah. Mom Dies. After Long Struggle with Heart Condition ... Casey Johnson Death Certificate. TMZ has obtained Casey Johnsons death certificate.. The certificate lists Caseys death as " ... Caseys cause of death is still unknown, but our sources say her frail medical condition -- including diabetes -- may have ...
... to patients with heart disease because of a ... Sex-Cult Story Is Much Deeper Than Allison Macks Arrest. ... to patients with heart disease because of a "potential increased risk of heart problems or death that can occur years later." ... As a result, the FDA has added a new warning about this increased risk of death in patients with heart disease, have advised ... However, based on these studies, the FDA is unable to determine why the risk of death is greater for patients with heart ...
Heart Arrest. Death, Sudden. Death, Sudden, Cardiac. Heart Diseases. Cardiovascular Diseases. Death. Pathologic Processes. ... Heart Arrest Death, Sudden, Cardiac Procedure: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) Drug: Epinephrine Drug: Atropine Drug: ... related to CPR interventions and the cause of arrest. The cause of arrest will be determined based on chart records, interview ... In-hospital Cardiac Arrest - Dynamics and State Transitions. The safety and scientific validity of this study is the ...
Jarrid Wilsons wife shares Bible verse late husband sent before his death: Its speaking to my heart. ... Should the Secret Service Arrest Former Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe?. Should the Secret Service Arrest Former Virginia ... hating liberals may want to become familiar with this law before issuing a threat against the President as they may be arrested ...
... we also used the Million Hearts cardiac arrest definition (10) and examined cardiac arrest deaths that had heart disease ... and heart failure death rates increased. Death rates attributable to diabetes-related heart disease and non-AMI ischemic heart ... Limiting cardiac arrest deaths to those defined as such by Million Hearts or to those defined as heart disease by using the ... We investigated heart disease death rates among all people in Maine during 1999-2017. We analyzed trends in heart disease death ...
2,200 per each stroke death annually; $2,100 for each heart disease death; and $91 for each cardiac arrest death. The ... Cardiac arrest gets little research funding despite huge death toll. By AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION NEWS ... The American Heart Associations 2017 Statistical Update does not rank cardiac arrest as a separate cause of death, but the ... Cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death in the U.S. but gets just a fraction of the governments funding for medical ...
  • ATLANTA (AP) - Routinely implanting pager-size defibrillators in heart attack survivors to stop cardiac arrest reduces their chance of dying by a surprising one-third and could benefit millions of Americans, a major study found. (heart1.com)
  • Moss's study involved 1,232 heart attack survivors who also had diminished heart pumping power, a common consequence of the damage caused by a heart attack. (heart1.com)
  • ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) - A newer cholesterol drug, used with older statin medicines, modestly lowered heart risks and deaths in a big study of heart attack survivors that might persuade insurers to cover the pricey treatment more often. (wandtv.com)
  • The clinical characteristics of the arrests were determined by interviewing survivors and the next of kin of nonsurvivors, reviewing medical records, and analyzing postmortem data. (acc.org)
  • Here, five heart attack survivors share their very different experiences - and what they wish they'd realized sooner. (aarp.org)
  • One new study found that heart attack survivors benefited from a medicine long used to treat gout. (yahoo.com)
  • As a young woman Nelson, a social work major at Sacred Heart University in Fairfield, aided survivors of another tragedy - the 2012 shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown. (newstimes.com)
  • NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - A quarter of cardiac arrest survivors suffer long-term psychological problems such as anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder and depression, a new review of research estimates. (lifescript.com)
  • Many long-term care issues for survivors are unknown, experts said, largely because only 10 percent of the 382,800 Americans who suffer cardiac arrest each year survive. (lifescript.com)
  • In reality, however, the long-term mental health state of many cardiac arrest survivors is not typically considered or assessed, the researchers write in their report, which appears in the journal Resuscitation. (lifescript.com)
  • Over a five-year period, survivors of cardiac arrest and similar events who did not show signs of PTSD lived three and a half times longer than those with ongoing trauma, according to a 2008 study by Dr. Karl-Heinz Ladwig, an epidemiologist at the Helmholtz Zentrum M�nchen in Germany. (lifescript.com)
  • In the long term, a reexamination of the current understanding of the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of cardiac arrest will be necessary to generate new knowledge that can be used to enable high-quality care across the continuum of care and overcome the longstanding plateau in cardiac arrest survival rates. (nap.edu)
  • Racing heart (feels like it is beating out of your chest). (simonsheart.org)
  • A male in his late teens has been arrested at his Scarborough-area home after a student of a similar age was stabbed in the neck and chest Friday morning near Danforth and Greenwood avenues. (nationalpost.com)
  • Hodge also noted that cardiac arrest is different from a heart attack, where a person is feeling chest pains, sweating, nausea and heaviness in the arms. (usatoday.com)
  • As blood accumulates, it can obstruct the heart's normal blood flow, leading to chest pain , heart attack and even sudden death. (heart.org)
  • As with men, women's most common heart attack symptom is chest pain or discomfort. (heart.org)
  • During a heart attack, an individual will experience shortness of breath, chest pain, and pain in the shoulder, arm, or neck area. (qualityhealth.com)
  • People have this idea of the Hollywood heart attack, which is a man squeezing his chest, the feeling of the balloon about to burst," says clinical cardiologist Malissa Wood, assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. (aarp.org)
  • Decreasing the time between cardiac arrest onset and the first chest compressions is critical. (nap.edu)
  • Brian Hook, the U.S. special representative for Iran, dismissed the arrest warrant announcement during a news conference in Saudi Arabia on Monday. (yahoo.com)
  • The news came the day that the parents of the man arrested in the stabbing defended their son, claiming the killing was in self-defense . (nbclosangeles.com)
  • Our collective hearts are broken at the news of this tragedy," Easton Area School District Superintendent John Reinhart said Sunday. (mcall.com)
  • Tim Russert [NBC News' Washington bureau chief and the moderator of Meet the Press] died of sudden cardiac death. (baltimoresun.com)
  • If all of this is above board, it doesn't explain the deputies' pressing need to "secure" citizens' cell phone recordings, which was performed without a warrant in one case, and in the other, took the form of a nine-hour "house arrest" to ensure the footage didn't make its way to the news before the warrant arrived. (techdirt.com)
  • In this study, researchers analyzed trends in deaths in New Zealand, where Christmas occurs during the summer season when death rates are usually at a seasonal low - allowing researchers to separate any winter effect from a holiday effect. (sca-aware.org)
  • However, researchers note that the study did not track daily temperatures and New Zealand has an island climate, which almost eliminates the extremes of temperature that have been associated with heart-related death rates in previous studies. (sca-aware.org)
  • Researchers aren't sure exactly why there's such a disparity in funding from the National Institutes of Health, but say more is definitely needed considering about 450,000 Americans die each year from cardiac arrest. (heart.org)
  • The new analysis of funding from 2007 to 2016 is the first to evaluate the annual trend of NIH cardiac arrest research funding over time, researchers said. (heart.org)
  • NIH funds allocated for cardiac arrest have declined from $35.4 million to $28.5 million during the past decade, the researchers noted. (heart.org)
  • Drinking more than that increased the risk of many heart health problems, researchers found. (hon.ch)
  • For this study, researchers at the University of Cambridge and University College London investigated the potential link between alcohol consumption and 12 cardiovascular diseases by analyzing electronic health records for nearly 2 million adults with good heart health. (hon.ch)
  • The researchers found increased risks with newer models featuring pacemakers that supply electrical impulses to the upper and lower heart chambers. (ljworld.com)
  • The researchers halted the study early because of the poor results, which could translate into thousands of hospitalizations or deaths worldwide each year. (ljworld.com)
  • In a study published in November, for example, researchers found that a depressed patient recovering from a heart attack treated with psychotherapy and antidepressants during a six-month trial incurred - on average - $1,857 in medical costs, whereas a depressed patient who received no psychological treatments cost an average of $2,797 over the same time period. (lifescript.com)
  • Other types of electrical problems that can lead to cardiac arrest include electrical signals that slow and stop, or the heart muscle's inability to respond to electrical signals. (barnesjewish.org)
  • Physicians responsible for the cardiovascular care of athletes must be guided by interpretation standards that distinguish normal ECG findings in athletes from ECG abnormalities requiring additional evaluation for conditions associated with sudden cardiac death," said Jonathan Drezner, who directs UW Medicine's Center for Sports Cardiology and is a team physician for the University of Washington Huskies and Seattle Seahawks. (sca-aware.org)
  • Increased efforts to address cardiovascular dis- and ischemic heart disease (not including acute myocardial infarction) ap- peared to drive the plateauing rates. (cdc.gov)
  • Bolton's son alleges that Fresenius concealed or misrepresented information about the risks associated with their hemodialysis treatments, and failed to adequately warn about the increased risk of cardiovascular injury and death. (aboutlawsuits.com)
  • Cardiovascular disease accounted for the majority of cardiac arrests. (acc.org)
  • exercise, control your diabetes) was carefully followed, eventual death remains certain, and some of that will be cardiovascular. (acc.org)
  • This study does an excellent job in demonstrating that cardiovascular death occurs during distance races, but that it is rare. (acc.org)
  • Among homeless individuals cardiovascular disease remains one of the major causes of death due to challenges in predicting initial risk, limited access to health care and difficulties in long-term management, according to a review published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. (news-medical.net)
  • Here's what the report says contributed to Silva's death: "Acute intoxication, chronic alcoholism, severe abdominal obesity, chronic hypertension, acute pulmonary-cardiovascular strain. (techdirt.com)
  • Death is from the sequelae of severe chronic cardiovascular disease exacerbated by the effects of acute intoxication together with the sequelae of properly employed restraint procedures. (techdirt.com)
  • The most immediately recognizable difference between the two conditions is that a heart attack victim will remain conscious with their heart beating, while someone who suffers from sudden cardiac arrest will be unconscious, with no discernible heartbeat. (mercola.com)
  • A study of Framingham Heart Study participants found that death certificates attributed 24% more deaths to CHD than did a physician panel that reviewed medical records (7). (cdc.gov)
  • We, of course, encourage all our readers to regularly visit their doctors to screen for potential heart problems as well as consider how you can prepare your home or business in the case of cardiac arrest through AED training and the installation of an AED . (aed.com)
  • The devices, like the one given to Vice President Dick Cheney last summer, constantly check for abnormal beats and zap the heart back to normal in case of cardiac arrest. (heart1.com)
  • In the case of cardiac arrest, the system of care encompasses numerous facets including the public, EMS systems, health care systems, and hospitals. (nap.edu)
  • SINGAPORE: Bodybuilding champion Pradip Subramanian, who died after a celebrity Muay Thai match with YouTuber Steven Lim in 2017, had underlying heart conditions that placed him at a high risk of cardiac arrest, a coroner's court heard on Monday (Dec 30). (campusrock.sg)
  • While there is still much speculation over the circumstances of his death, the Los Angeles County Coroner's office declared it as a result of a cardiac arrest. (qualityhealth.com)
  • This disease can be a rather sudden killer (onset-to-death can be as little as two years), but the "contributing factors" listed on the coroner's report make no mention of the heavy physical strain put on Silva's body by the restraint efforts of nine law enforcement officers and a police dog. (techdirt.com)