Official records of individual deaths including the cause of death certified by a physician, and any other required identifying information.
Official certifications by a physician recording the individual's birth date, place of birth, parentage and other required identifying data which are filed with the local registrar of vital statistics.
Factors which produce cessation of all vital bodily functions. They can be analyzed from an epidemiologic viewpoint.
Physicians appointed to investigate all cases of sudden or violent death.
A certificate issued by a governmental body to an individual or organization proposing to construct or modify a health facility, or to offer a new or different service. The process of issuing the certificate is also included.
Used for general articles concerning statistics of births, deaths, marriages, etc.
A management function in which standards and guidelines are developed for the development, maintenance, and handling of forms and records.
The creation and maintenance of medical and vital records in multiple institutions in a manner that will facilitate the combined use of the records of identified individuals.
All deaths reported in a given population.
The termination of the cell's ability to carry out vital functions such as metabolism, growth, reproduction, responsiveness, and adaptability.
Compilations of data on hospital activities and programs; excludes patient medical records.
The term "United States" in a medical context often refers to the country where a patient or study participant resides, and is not a medical term per se, but relevant for epidemiological studies, healthcare policies, and understanding differences in disease prevalence, treatment patterns, and health outcomes across various geographic locations.
Postmortem examination of the body.
An infant during the first month after birth.
The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.
Recording of pertinent information concerning patient's illness or illnesses.
The killing of one person by another.
A system of categories to which morbid entries are assigned according to established criteria. Included is the entire range of conditions in a manageable number of categories, grouped to facilitate mortality reporting. It is produced by the World Health Organization (From ICD-10, p1). The Clinical Modifications, produced by the UNITED STATES DEPT. OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, are larger extensions used for morbidity and general epidemiological purposes, primarily in the U.S.
The systematic application of information and computer sciences to public health practice, research, and learning.
Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.
Irreversible cessation of all bodily functions, manifested by absence of spontaneous breathing and total loss of cardiovascular and cerebral functions.
Death of the developing young in utero. BIRTH of a dead FETUS is STILLBIRTH.
Postnatal deaths from BIRTH to 365 days after birth in a given population. Postneonatal mortality represents deaths between 28 days and 365 days after birth (as defined by National Center for Health Statistics). Neonatal mortality represents deaths from birth to 27 days after birth.
Crafts, trades, professions, or other means of earning a living.
A center in the PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE which is primarily concerned with the collection, analysis, and dissemination of health statistics on vital events and health activities to reflect the health status of people, health needs, and health resources.
Compliance with a set of standards defined by non-governmental organizations. Certification is applied for by individuals on a voluntary basis and represents a professional status when achieved, e.g., certification for a medical specialty.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
Death that occurs as a result of anoxia or heart arrest, associated with immersion in liquid.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but 'England' is not a medical term and does not have a medical definition. England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom, known for its rich history, cultural heritage, and contributions to medical science. However, in a medical context, it may refer to the location of a patient, healthcare provider, or research study, but it is not a term with a specific medical meaning.
The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.
The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.
Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.
Number of fetal deaths with stated or presumed gestation of 20 weeks or more in a given population. Late fetal mortality is death after of 28 weeks or more.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Wales" is not a medical term and does not have a medical definition. It is a country that is part of the United Kingdom, located in Europe. If you have any questions about a specific medical topic, I would be happy to help answer those!
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "California" is a place, specifically a state on the western coast of the United States, and not a medical term or concept. Therefore, it doesn't have a medical definition.
Based on known statistical data, the number of years which any person of a given age may reasonably expected to live.
Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.
Systematic organization, storage, retrieval, and dissemination of specialized information, especially of a scientific or technical nature (From ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983). It often involves authenticating or validating information.
New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.
Research techniques that focus on study designs and data gathering methods in human and animal populations.
The commitment in writing, as authentic evidence, of something having legal importance. The concept includes certificates of birth, death, etc., as well as hospital, medical, and other institutional records.
The act of killing oneself.
The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.
Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.
Groups of individuals whose putative ancestry is from native continental populations based on similarities in physical appearance.
Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.
The act or practice of killing or allowing death from natural causes, for reasons of mercy, i.e., in order to release a person from incurable disease, intolerable suffering, or undignified death. (from Beauchamp and Walters, Contemporary Issues in Bioethics, 5th ed)
Respiratory Tract Neoplasms are defined as abnormal growths or tumors that develop within the respiratory system, including the nose, sinuses, throat (pharynx), voice box (larynx), windpipe (trachea), bronchi, and lungs, which can be benign or malignant, with the potential to cause significant morbidity and mortality.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.
Any enterprise centered on the processing, assembly, production, or marketing of a line of products, services, commodities, or merchandise, in a particular field often named after its principal product. Examples include the automobile, fishing, music, publishing, insurance, and textile industries.
#### My apologies, but the term 'Washington' is not a medical concept or condition that has a defined meaning within the medical field. It refers to various concepts, primarily related to the U.S. state of Washington or the District of Columbia, where the nation's capital is located. If you have any questions about medical topics or conditions, please feel free to ask!
I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "Oklahoma" is a geographical location and not a medical condition or term, therefore it doesn't have a medical definition. It is a state in the South Central region of the United States.
An 'accident' in a medical context often refers to an unintended event or harm that occurs suddenly and unexpectedly, resulting in injury or illness, and is typically not planned or intended.
An office in the Department of Labor responsible for developing and establishing occupational safety and health standards.
Unexpected rapid natural death due to cardiovascular collapse within one hour of initial symptoms. It is usually caused by the worsening of existing heart diseases. The sudden onset of symptoms, such as CHEST PAIN and CARDIAC ARRHYTHMIAS, particularly VENTRICULAR TACHYCARDIA, can lead to the loss of consciousness and cardiac arrest followed by biological death. (from Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine, 7th ed., 2005)
I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "Maryland" is not a recognized medical term with a specific definition in the medical field. It refers to a state in the United States. If you have any questions about a medical condition or treatment, I would be happy to try and help answer those!
Maternal deaths resulting from complications of pregnancy and childbirth in a given population.
A system for verifying and maintaining a desired level of quality in a product or process by careful planning, use of proper equipment, continued inspection, and corrective action as required. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)
The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.
##### Not a valid request: I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Maine" is a state in the northeastern United States and not a medical term or condition with a specific definition in the healthcare context.
Transmission of live or pre-recorded audio or video content via connection or download from the INTERNET.
Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.
Those customs and ceremonies pertaining to the dead.
A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.
(To the best of my knowledge,) 'Alaska' is not a medical term or concept, it is rather a geographical location, being the largest and northernmost state in the United States.
Unforeseen occurrences, especially injuries in the course of work-related activities.
Any deviation of results or inferences from the truth, or processes leading to such deviation. Bias can result from several sources: one-sided or systematic variations in measurement from the true value (systematic error); flaws in study design; deviation of inferences, interpretations, or analyses based on flawed data or data collection; etc. There is no sense of prejudice or subjectivity implied in the assessment of bias under these conditions.
The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Utah" is a proper noun and refers to a state in the United States, it does not have a medical definition. If you have any medical questions or need information on specific medical conditions or terms, I would be happy to help!
Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Europe.
The abrupt cessation of all vital bodily functions, manifested by the permanent loss of total cerebral, respiratory, and cardiovascular functions.
Provision (by a physician or other health professional, or by a family member or friend) of support and/or means that gives a patient the power to terminate his or her own life. (from APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed).
The age of the mother in PREGNANCY.
Process of substituting a symbol or code for a term such as a diagnosis or procedure. (from Slee's Health Care Terms, 3d ed.)
**I must clarify that there is no recognized or established medical term or definition for 'Texas.' However, if you're asking for a possible humorous play on words using the term 'Texas' in a medical context, here it is:**
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Incorrect diagnoses after clinical examination or technical diagnostic procedures.
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
Disruption of structural continuity of the body as a result of the discharge of firearms.
Individual members of North American ethnic groups with ancient historic ancestral origins in Asia.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "Oregon" is a geographical location and not a medical concept or condition. It is a state in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States. If you have any questions related to medical topics, I would be happy to help answer those!
A spectrum of pathological conditions of impaired blood flow in the brain. They can involve vessels (ARTERIES or VEINS) in the CEREBRUM, the CEREBELLUM, and the BRAIN STEM. Major categories include INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS; BRAIN ISCHEMIA; CEREBRAL HEMORRHAGE; and others.
An infant having a birth weight of 2500 gm. (5.5 lb.) or less but INFANT, VERY LOW BIRTH WEIGHT is available for infants having a birth weight of 1500 grams (3.3 lb.) or less.
Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.
Pathological conditions involving the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM including the HEART; the BLOOD VESSELS; or the PERICARDIUM.
Persons living in the United States of Mexican (MEXICAN AMERICANS), Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin. The concept does not include Brazilian Americans or Portuguese Americans.
Great Britain is not a medical term, but a geographical name for the largest island in the British Isles, which comprises England, Scotland, and Wales, forming the major part of the United Kingdom.
## I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Ohio" is a U.S. state and not a term used in medical definitions.
##### There does not appear to be a recognized medical term or condition specifically named 'Montana.' I can provide information about the state of Montana, if that would be helpful?
Conditions or pathological processes associated with pregnancy. They can occur during or after pregnancy, and range from minor discomforts to serious diseases that require medical interventions. They include diseases in pregnant females, and pregnancies in females with diseases.
Medical and nursing care of patients in the terminal stage of an illness.
The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual at BIRTH. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.
The abrupt and unexplained death of an apparently healthy infant under one year of age, remaining unexplained after a thorough case investigation, including performance of a complete autopsy, examination of the death scene, and review of the clinical history. (Pediatr Pathol 1991 Sep-Oct;11(5):677-84)
Care provided the pregnant woman in order to prevent complications, and decrease the incidence of maternal and prenatal mortality.
Summarizing techniques used to describe the pattern of mortality and survival in populations. These methods can be applied to the study not only of death, but also of any defined endpoint such as the onset of disease or the occurrence of disease complications.
The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.
A tumor derived from mesothelial tissue (peritoneum, pleura, pericardium). It appears as broad sheets of cells, with some regions containing spindle-shaped, sarcoma-like cells and other regions showing adenomatous patterns. Pleural mesotheliomas have been linked to exposure to asbestos. (Dorland, 27th ed)
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Belgium" is a country located in Western Europe, not a medical term or concept. It is not possible for me to provide a medical definition for it.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Sweden" is not a medical term and does not have a medical definition. It is a country located in Northern Europe. If you have any questions related to medical topics or definitions, I would be happy to try to help answer them!
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Brazil" is not a medical term or concept, it is a country located in South America, known officially as the Federative Republic of Brazil. If you have any questions related to health, medicine, or science, I'd be happy to help answer those!
The aggregate enterprise of manufacturing and technically producing chemicals. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)
Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.
A federal area located between Maryland and Virginia on the Potomac river; it is coextensive with Washington, D.C., which is the capital of the United States.
whoa, buddy! I'm just a friendly AI and I don't have access to real-time databases or personal data, so I can't provide medical definitions or any other specific information about individuals, places, or things. But I can tell you that I couldn't find any recognized medical definition for "Wisconsin" - it's a state in the United States, not a medical term!
Professional medical personnel approved to provide care to patients in a hospital.
(Disclaimer: This is a playful and fictitious response, as there isn't a medical definition for 'New York City'.)
A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Scotland" is not a medical term and does not have a medical definition. Scotland is one of the four constituent countries of the United Kingdom, located in the northern part of Great Britain. If you have any questions related to healthcare or medical terminology, I would be happy to help answer those!
Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.
A heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by HYPERGLYCEMIA and GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Greece" is a country in southeastern Europe and not a medical term or condition. If you have any medical questions or need a definition related to medicine, I would be happy to help.
The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.
The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)
Statistical models used in survival analysis that assert that the effect of the study factors on the hazard rate in the study population is multiplicative and does not change over time.
A state of prolonged irreversible cessation of all brain activity, including lower brain stem function with the complete absence of voluntary movements, responses to stimuli, brain stem reflexes, and spontaneous respirations. Reversible conditions which mimic this clinical state (e.g., sedative overdose, hypothermia, etc.) are excluded prior to making the determination of brain death. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp348-9)
Malformations of organs or body parts during development in utero.
Government sponsored social insurance programs.
The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.
(Note: 'North Carolina' is a place, not a medical term. However, I can provide a fun fact related to health and North Carolina.)
A vital statistic measuring or recording the rate of death from any cause in hospitalized populations.
A detailed review and evaluation of selected clinical records by qualified professional personnel for evaluating quality of medical care.

Sudden death in the general population in Okinawa: incidence and causes of death. (1/818)

Sudden unexpected death is generally considered to be caused by acute myocardial infarction and/or arrhythmia. To document the incidence and causes of sudden death in Japan, where the incidence of myocardial infarction is low, the present study examined death certificates, hospital records, the forensic medical records, and the police records of residents of the southern part of Okinawa island who died at the age of 20-74 years during a 3-year period from January 1, 1992 to December 31, 1994. Sudden death was defined as death within 24 h from the onset of unexpected symptoms. The study documented 126 (87 men and 39 women) sudden deaths. The crude incidence rate was 0.37/1,000 person per year (0.51 in men and 0.23 in women). According to the death certificates, 78 cases died of heart diseases. However, the cause of death could be determined by examination of all available records in only 64 cases: myocardial infarction in 10, non-ischemic heart diseases in 13, and stroke in 23 cases. Even when the analysis was limited to the cases who died within 1 h from the onset of symptoms, heart disease was the cause of death in only 22% of the cases while the cause of death could not be determined in 53% of the cases. Only 13% of those diagnosed as heart diseases on the death certificate were verified. The agreement rate between the diagnosis reached by the re-evaluation of the records and that on the death certificate was 82% for stroke and 33% for other diseases. In Okinawa, Japan, the frequencies of heart disease and stroke as the cause of sudden death may be similar. Except for stroke, the diagnosis appearing on the death certificate has substantial inaccuracy.  (+info)

Maternal placental abnormality and the risk of sudden infant death syndrome. (2/818)

To determine whether placental abnormality (placental abruption or placental previa) during pregnancy predisposes an infant to a high risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), the authors conducted a population-based case-control study using 1989-1991 California linked birth and death certificate data. They identified 2,107 SIDS cases, 96% of whom were diagnosed through autopsy. Ten controls were randomly selected for each case from the same linked birth-death certificate data, matched to the case on year of birth. About 1.4% of mothers of cases and 0.7% of mothers of controls had either placental abruption or placenta previa during the index pregnancy. After adjustment for potential confounders, placental abnormality during pregnancy was associated with a twofold increase in the risk of SIDS in offspring (odds ratio = 2.1, 95% confidence interval 1.3-3.1). The individual effects of placental abruption and placenta previa on the risk of SIDS did not differ significantly. An impaired fetal development due to placental abnormality may predispose an infant to a high risk of SIDS.  (+info)

Evaluation of death registers in general practice. (3/818)

BACKGROUND: General practitioners (GPs) do not routinely receive information about the deaths of those patients whose death certificates they have not completed. We developed and evaluated a system for producing death registers for GPs. AIM: To evaluate GPs' and practice managers' views on, and uses of, the death register. METHOD: General practitioners in Newcastle (n = 161) and Sunderland Family Health Service Authority (n = 144) areas were sent a questionnaire on their sources and use of information about patients' deaths. Death registers were sent to Newcastle practices; Sunderland practices were the control group. A follow-up questionnaire was sent to Newcastle (n = 173) and Sunderland (n = 140) GPs after two years. Newcastle practice managers (n = 45) were interviewed after their practice had received death registers for one year. RESULTS: Ninety-two per cent of Newcastle responders had seen the death register. Seventy-three per cent saw it regularly. Of those who saw it, 92% found it useful for communication within the primary health care team, bereavement follow-up, and administration and medical audit. One fifth of GPs named the death register as their first source of information about their patients' deaths. Newcastle GPs reported greater levels of change in use of patient death information than the control group. Practice managers circulated, used, and recorded information from the death register. CONCLUSION: Death registers are valued and have demonstrable benefits with regard to administration, bereavement care, and medical audit.  (+info)

Maternal cigarette smoking and invasive meningococcal disease: a cohort study among young children in metropolitan Atlanta, 1989-1996. (4/818)

OBJECTIVES: This study assessed the association between maternal cigarette smoking during pregnancy and the risk of invasive meningococcal disease during early childhood. METHODS: Using a retrospective cohort study design, cases from an active surveillance project monitoring all invasive meningococcal disease in the metropolitan Atlanta area from 1989 to 1995 were merged with linked birth and death certificate data files. Children who had not died or acquired meningococcal disease were assumed to be alive and free of the illness. The Cox proportional hazards analysis was used to assess the independent association between maternal smoking and meningococcal disease. RESULTS: The crude rate of meningococcal disease was 5 times higher for children whose mothers smoked during pregnancy than for children whose mothers did not smoke (0.05% vs 0.01%). Multivariate analysis revealed that maternal smoking (risk ratio [RR] = 2.9; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.5, 5.7) and a mother's having fewer than 12 years of education (RR = 2.1; 95% CI = 1.0, 4.2) were independently associated with invasive meningococcal disease. CONCLUSIONS: Maternal smoking, a likely surrogate for tobacco smoke exposure following delivery, appears to be a modifiable risk factor for sporadic meningococcal disease in young children.  (+info)

Cause-specific mortality in type 2 diabetes. The Verona Diabetes Study. (5/818)

OBJECTIVE: This population-based study, carried out in the framework of the Verona Diabetes Study, investigated mortality from specific causes in known type 2 diabetic patients. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: A cohort of 7,148 known type 2 diabetic patients (3,366 men and 3,782 women) was identified on 31 December 1986 and followed up for 5 years (1987-1991). Underlying causes of death were obtained from death certificates and were coded according to the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision. Cause-specific death rates of diabetic subjects were compared with those of the inhabitants of Verona. By 31 December 1991, 1,550 diabetic subjects (744 men and 806 women) had died. RESULTS: The standardized mortality ratio (SMR) for all causes of death was 1.42 (95% CI 1.35-1.50). The highest SMRs were for the following specific causes: diabetes (SMR 4.47 [3.91-5.10]), gastrointestinal diseases (1.83 [1.50-2.21])--particularly liver cirrhosis (2.52 [1.96-3.20])--and cardiovascular diseases (1.34 [1.23-1.44]), particularly cerebrovascular (1.48 [1.25-1.73]) and ischemic heart diseases (1.41 [1.24-1.62]). A significantly higher than expected risk of mortality for cardiovascular causes was already present in the first 5 years after diagnosis and decreased with age. Type 2 diabetic patients treated with insulin had a higher risk of dying than those treated orally or by diet. CONCLUSIONS: The highest SMRs in the diabetic cohort were for diabetes and liver cirrhosis. The mortality risk for cardiovascular diseases, although significantly higher than expected, was much lower in Italian type 2 diabetic patients than that reported for American patients. The evidence of an early effect on mortality suggests that prevention, early diagnosis, and treatment should be improved.  (+info)

Occupational cancer in Spain. (6/818)

The knowledge of specific problems of occupational cancer in Spain is scarce. The environment of the workplace has improved over the last few years after a long period distinguished by bad working conditions, incomplete legislation, and insufficient safety measures and control. It has been estimated that 3,083,479 workers (25.4% of employees) were exposed to carcinogens. The most common occupational exposures to carcinogenic agents were solar radiation, environmental tobacco smoke, silica, and wood dust. The highest number of employees were exposed to silica crystalline (404,729), diesel engine exhaust (274,321), rubber products (99,804), benzene (89,932), ethylene dibromide (81,336), agents used in furniture and cabinet making (72,068), and formaldehyde (71,189). The percentage of total cancer deaths attributed to occupational exposure was 4% (6% in men, 0.9% in women). Compared with other European countries, the incidence of lung cancer and leukemia in Spain are one of the lowest, but it is rapidly increasing. The incidence of urinary bladder and larynx cancer, on the contrary, are one of the highest. Few studies on occupational cancer have been conducted in Spain. The main problems are the availability of death certificates and the quality of the information on occupation in mortality of statistics. It is necessary to improve methods of assessment of exposures using expert hygienists and biologic markers of exposure and diseases. Reduction of cancer by limiting or avoiding exposure to known occupational carcinogens is still necessary.  (+info)

The effect of congenital anomalies on mortality risk in white and black infants. (7/818)

OBJECTIVES: This population-based study examined the effect of all major congenital anomalies on the mortality of White and Black infants by infant sex, birthweight, gestational age, and lethality of the anomaly. The study also determined the total contribution of anomalies to infant mortality. METHODS: California Birth Defects Monitoring Program data were merged with linked birth-death files for 278,646 singleton non-Hispanic White and Black infants born in 1983 through 1986. Malformed infants were compared with nonmalformed infants to determine the effect of anomalies on mortality. RESULTS: The presence of any congenital anomaly increased mortality 9.0-fold (95% CI = 7.3, 11.1) for Black infants and 17.8-fold (95% CI = 16.2, 19.6) for White infants. Even "non-lethal" anomalies increased mortality up to 8.9-fold. Overall, anomalies contributed to 33% of White infant deaths, to 19% of Black infant deaths, and to over 60% of deaths among Black and White neonates weighing over 1499 g. CONCLUSIONS: The contribution of congenital anomalies to mortality of both low- (< 2500 g) and normal-birth-weight infants is substantially higher than previously estimated, representing a large public health problem for both Black and White infants.  (+info)

Impaired glucose tolerance is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, but not impaired fasting glucose. The Funagata Diabetes Study. (8/818)

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the new category of impaired fasting glucose (IFG) recently proposed by the Expert Committee of the American Diabetes Association is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Death certificates and residence transfer documents from the cohort population consisting of participants of the diabetes prevalence study in Funagata, Yamagata prefecture, Japan, 1990-1992, were analyzed up through the end of 1996. First, the cohort population was classified into three groups: normal glucose tolerance (NGT) (n = 2,016), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) (n = 382), and diabetic (n = 253). Then the same population was reclassified into normal fasting glucose (NFG), IFG, and diabetic. The cumulative survival rates among the groups were compared using the classical life-table method, and age-adjusted analyses, the person-year method, and Cox's proportional hazard model were adopted. RESULTS: At the end of seven observed years, the cumulative survival rates from cardiovascular disease of IGT and diabetes were 0.962 and 0.954, respectively, both significantly lower than that of NGT (0.988). The Cox's proportional hazard model analysis showed that the hazard ratio of IGT to NGT on death from cardiovascular disease was 2.219 (95% CI 1.076-4.577). However, the cumulative survival rate of IFG from cardiovascular disease was 0.977, not significantly lower than that of NFG (0.985). The Cox's hazard ratio of IFG to NFG on death from cardiovascular disease was 1.136 (0.345-3.734), which was not significant either. CONCLUSIONS: IGT was a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, but IFG was not.  (+info)

A death certificate is a formal legal document that records the date, location, and cause of a person's death. It is typically issued by a medical professional, such as a physician or medical examiner, and is used to establish the fact of death for legal purposes. The information on a death certificate may be used for a variety of purposes, including settling the deceased person's estate, assisting with insurance claims, and supporting public health surveillance and research.

In order to complete a death certificate, the medical professional must determine the cause of death and any significant contributing conditions. This may involve reviewing the deceased person's medical history, conducting a physical examination, and ordering laboratory tests or autopsy. The cause of death is typically described using standardized codes from the International Classification of Diseases (ICD).

It is important to note that the information on a death certificate is considered confidential and is protected by law. Only authorized individuals, such as the deceased person's next of kin or legal representative, are permitted to access the document.

A birth certificate is an official document that serves as legal proof of a person's birth and provides important information about the individual, including their full name, date and place of birth, sex, parents' names, and other identifying details. In medical terms, a birth certificate may be used to establish a patient's identity, age, and other relevant demographic information.

Birth certificates are typically issued by the government agency responsible for vital records in the jurisdiction where the individual was born, such as a state or county health department. They are considered legal documents and are often required for various purposes, such as enrolling in school, applying for a passport, or obtaining government benefits.

It is important to note that birth certificates may be amended or corrected if there are errors or discrepancies in the information they contain. In some cases, individuals may also need to obtain certified copies of their birth certificate from the appropriate government agency in order to provide proof of their identity or other personal information.

The "cause of death" is a medical determination of the disease, injury, or event that directly results in a person's death. This information is typically documented on a death certificate and may be used for public health surveillance, research, and legal purposes. The cause of death is usually determined by a physician based on their clinical judgment and any available medical evidence, such as laboratory test results, autopsy findings, or eyewitness accounts. In some cases, the cause of death may be uncertain or unknown, and the death may be classified as "natural," "accidental," "homicide," or "suicide" based on the available information.

A coroner and medical examiner are officials in the legal system who are responsible for investigating and determining the cause of death in certain cases. While their roles can overlap, there are some differences between them.

A coroner is a public official who is typically appointed or elected to serve in a particular jurisdiction, such as a county or district. The coroner's primary responsibility is to investigate any sudden, unexpected, or suspicious deaths that occur within their jurisdiction. This may include deaths that occur due to violence, accidents, suicide, or unknown causes.

In order to determine the cause of death, the coroner may conduct an autopsy, order toxicology tests, and review medical records and other evidence. The coroner may also hold an inquest, which is a formal hearing in which witnesses are called to testify about the circumstances surrounding the death. Based on the evidence gathered during the investigation, the coroner will make a determination as to the cause and manner of death.

A medical examiner, on the other hand, is a physician who has completed specialized training in forensic pathology. Medical examiners are typically appointed or hired by a government agency, such as a state or county, to perform autopsies and investigate deaths.

Medical examiners are responsible for determining the cause of death in cases where there is a suspicion of foul play, as well as in other circumstances where the cause of death may not be immediately apparent. They may also testify in court as expert witnesses based on their findings.

In some jurisdictions, the roles of coroner and medical examiner are combined, with the official serving as both a public administrator and a trained physician. In other cases, the two roles are separate, with the coroner responsible for administrative functions and the medical examiner responsible for determining the cause of death.

A Certificate of Need (CON) is a legal document or certification required in some jurisdictions for healthcare providers or facilities to demonstrate the need for and feasibility of proposed new construction, expansion, major equipment acquisition, or other significant capital expenditures. The purpose of a CON program is to help control healthcare costs, ensure access to quality care, and prevent unnecessary duplication of services within a geographic area.

The specific requirements and process for obtaining a CON vary by state and sometimes by type of project. Generally, applicants must submit detailed information about the proposed project, including its need, cost, impact on healthcare services in the community, and financial feasibility. The application is then reviewed by a regulatory agency or board, which may consider input from stakeholders such as other healthcare providers, consumers, and community organizations before making a decision.

The CON process aims to balance the interests of various parties, including healthcare providers, payers, patients, and communities, while ensuring that new services and facilities align with the overall healthcare needs and priorities of a region.

"Vital statistics" is a term used in public health and medical contexts to refer to the statistical data collected on births, deaths, marriages, divorces, and other key life events. These statistics are considered important for monitoring population trends, planning public health programs and policies, and conducting demographic and epidemiological research.

The specific data collected as part of vital statistics may vary by country or region, but typically includes information such as the date and place of the event, the age, sex, race/ethnicity, and other demographic characteristics of the individuals involved, as well as any relevant medical information (such as cause of death or birth weight).

Vital statistics are often collected and maintained by government agencies, such as health departments or statistical offices, and are used to inform a wide range of public health and policy decisions.

"Forms and Records Control" is not a recognized medical term or concept. However, in a broader healthcare context, "Records Control" typically refers to the systematic management and maintenance of patient records to ensure their accuracy, confidentiality, and accessibility. This includes establishing policies and procedures for creating, storing, retrieving, using, and disposing of records in compliance with applicable laws and regulations.

"Forms," on the other hand, are standardized documents used in healthcare settings to collect and record patient information. "Forms Control" may refer to the management and tracking of these forms to ensure they are up-to-date, compliant with relevant regulations, and accessible to authorized personnel. This can include developing and implementing processes for creating, revising, approving, distributing, and retiring healthcare forms.

In summary, "Forms and Records Control" in a healthcare context could be interpreted as the combined management of standardized forms used to collect patient information and the systematic maintenance of those records to ensure accuracy, confidentiality, and compliance with applicable laws and regulations.

Medical record linkage is the process of connecting and integrating electronic health records or other forms of medical records from different sources, time points, or healthcare providers for an individual patient. The goal is to create a comprehensive, longitudinal medical history for that person, which can improve continuity of care, support clinical decision-making, enable epidemiological research, and facilitate public health surveillance.

Record linkage typically involves the use of deterministic (exact match) or probabilistic (statistical) algorithms to identify and merge records belonging to the same individual based on various identifiers, such as name, date of birth, gender, and other demographic information. It is essential to maintain privacy, confidentiality, and data security throughout this process, often requiring strict adherence to legal and ethical guidelines.

Mortality, in medical terms, refers to the state or condition of being mortal; the quality or fact of being subject to death. It is often used in reference to the mortality rate, which is the number of deaths in a specific population, divided by the size of that population, per a given time period. This can be used as a measure of the risk of death among a population.

Cell death is the process by which cells cease to function and eventually die. There are several ways that cells can die, but the two most well-known and well-studied forms of cell death are apoptosis and necrosis.

Apoptosis is a programmed form of cell death that occurs as a normal and necessary process in the development and maintenance of healthy tissues. During apoptosis, the cell's DNA is broken down into small fragments, the cell shrinks, and the membrane around the cell becomes fragmented, allowing the cell to be easily removed by phagocytic cells without causing an inflammatory response.

Necrosis, on the other hand, is a form of cell death that occurs as a result of acute tissue injury or overwhelming stress. During necrosis, the cell's membrane becomes damaged and the contents of the cell are released into the surrounding tissue, causing an inflammatory response.

There are also other forms of cell death, such as autophagy, which is a process by which cells break down their own organelles and proteins to recycle nutrients and maintain energy homeostasis, and pyroptosis, which is a form of programmed cell death that occurs in response to infection and involves the activation of inflammatory caspases.

Cell death is an important process in many physiological and pathological processes, including development, tissue homeostasis, and disease. Dysregulation of cell death can contribute to the development of various diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and autoimmune diseases.

Hospital records are a type of medical record that is created and maintained by healthcare professionals during a patient's hospitalization. These records typically include detailed information about the patient's medical history, physical examination findings, laboratory and diagnostic test results, treatment plans, progress notes, medications, and other relevant data. The purpose of hospital records is to provide a comprehensive documentation of the patient's care while in the hospital, which can be used for clinical decision-making, communication among healthcare providers, quality improvement, research, and legal purposes. Hospital records are considered confidential and protected health information under federal and state laws, such as the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA).

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "United States" is a geopolitical entity, specifically the name of the country consisting of 50 states, and it is not a medical term or concept. Therefore, I can't provide a medical definition for it. If you have any questions related to health, medicine, or biology, I would be happy to try to help answer those!

An autopsy, also known as a post-mortem examination or obduction, is a medical procedure in which a qualified professional (usually a pathologist) examines a deceased person's body to determine the cause and manner of death. This process may involve various investigative techniques, such as incisions to study internal organs, tissue sampling, microscopic examination, toxicology testing, and other laboratory analyses. The primary purpose of an autopsy is to gather objective evidence about the medical conditions and factors contributing to the individual's demise, which can be essential for legal, insurance, or public health purposes. Additionally, autopsies can provide valuable insights into disease processes and aid in advancing medical knowledge.

A newborn infant is a baby who is within the first 28 days of life. This period is also referred to as the neonatal period. Newborns require specialized care and attention due to their immature bodily systems and increased vulnerability to various health issues. They are closely monitored for signs of well-being, growth, and development during this critical time.

A registry in the context of medicine is a collection or database of standardized information about individuals who share a certain condition or attribute, such as a disease, treatment, exposure, or demographic group. These registries are used for various purposes, including:

* Monitoring and tracking the natural history of diseases and conditions
* Evaluating the safety and effectiveness of medical treatments and interventions
* Conducting research and generating hypotheses for further study
* Providing information to patients, clinicians, and researchers
* Informing public health policy and decision-making

Registries can be established for a wide range of purposes, including disease-specific registries (such as cancer or diabetes registries), procedure-specific registries (such as joint replacement or cardiac surgery registries), and population-based registries (such as birth defects or cancer registries). Data collected in registries may include demographic information, clinical data, laboratory results, treatment details, and outcomes.

Registries can be maintained by a variety of organizations, including hospitals, clinics, academic medical centers, professional societies, government agencies, and industry. Participation in registries is often voluntary, although some registries may require informed consent from participants. Data collected in registries are typically de-identified to protect the privacy of individuals.

Medical records are organized, detailed collections of information about a patient's health history, including their symptoms, diagnoses, treatments, medications, test results, and any other relevant data. These records are created and maintained by healthcare professionals during the course of providing medical care and serve as an essential tool for continuity, communication, and decision-making in healthcare. They may exist in paper form, electronic health records (EHRs), or a combination of both. Medical records also play a critical role in research, quality improvement, public health, reimbursement, and legal proceedings.

Homicide is a legal term used to describe the taking of another human life. It is not a medical diagnosis, but rather a legal concept that may result in criminal charges. In medical terms, it might be referred to as "unnatural death" or "violent death." The term itself does not carry a connotation of guilt or innocence; it simply describes the factual occurrence of one person causing the death of another.

The legal definition of homicide varies by jurisdiction and can encompass a range of criminal charges, from manslaughter to murder, depending on the circumstances and intent behind the act.

The International Classification of Diseases (ICD) is a standardized system for classifying and coding mortality and morbidity data, established by the World Health Organization (WHO). It provides a common language and framework for health professionals, researchers, and policymakers to share and compare health-related information across countries and regions.

The ICD codes are used to identify diseases, injuries, causes of death, and other health conditions. The classification includes categories for various body systems, mental disorders, external causes of injury and poisoning, and factors influencing health status. It also includes a section for symptoms, signs, and abnormal clinical and laboratory findings.

The ICD is regularly updated to incorporate new scientific knowledge and changing health needs. The most recent version, ICD-11, was adopted by the World Health Assembly in May 2019 and will come into effect on January 1, 2022. It includes significant revisions and expansions in several areas, such as mental, behavioral, neurological disorders, and conditions related to sexual health.

In summary, the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) is a globally recognized system for classifying and coding diseases, injuries, causes of death, and other health-related information, enabling standardized data collection, comparison, and analysis across countries and regions.

Public Health Informatics (PHI) is the systematic application of information and computer science and technology to public health practice, research, and learning. It involves the development and implementation of information systems to support public health functions including surveillance, prevention, preparedness, and response. PHI also includes the analysis of public health data to improve decision-making, as well as the training and education of public health professionals in the use of these technologies. The ultimate goal of PHI is to enhance the efficiency, effectiveness, and overall quality of public health services.

Population surveillance in a public health and medical context refers to the ongoing, systematic collection, analysis, interpretation, and dissemination of health-related data for a defined population over time. It aims to monitor the health status, identify emerging health threats or trends, and evaluate the impact of interventions within that population. This information is used to inform public health policy, prioritize healthcare resources, and guide disease prevention and control efforts. Population surveillance can involve various data sources, such as vital records, disease registries, surveys, and electronic health records.

Death is the cessation of all biological functions that sustain a living organism. It is characterized by the loss of brainstem reflexes, unresponsiveness, and apnea (no breathing). In medical terms, death can be defined as:

1. Cardiopulmonary Death: The irreversible cessation of circulatory and respiratory functions.
2. Brain Death: The irreversible loss of all brain function, including the brainstem. This is often used as a definition of death when performing organ donation.

It's important to note that the exact definition of death can vary somewhat based on cultural, religious, and legal perspectives.

Fetal death, also known as stillbirth or intrauterine fetal demise, is defined as the death of a fetus at 20 weeks of gestation or later. The criteria for defining fetal death may vary slightly by country and jurisdiction, but in general, it refers to the loss of a pregnancy after the point at which the fetus is considered viable outside the womb.

Fetal death can occur for a variety of reasons, including chromosomal abnormalities, placental problems, maternal health conditions, infections, and umbilical cord accidents. In some cases, the cause of fetal death may remain unknown.

The diagnosis of fetal death is typically made through ultrasound or other imaging tests, which can confirm the absence of a heartbeat or movement in the fetus. Once fetal death has been diagnosed, medical professionals will work with the parents to determine the best course of action for managing the pregnancy and delivering the fetus. This may involve waiting for labor to begin naturally, inducing labor, or performing a cesarean delivery.

Experiencing a fetal death can be a very difficult and emotional experience for parents, and it is important for them to receive supportive care from their healthcare providers, family members, and friends. Grief counseling and support groups may also be helpful in coping with the loss.

Infant Mortality is the death of a baby before their first birthday. The infant mortality rate is typically expressed as the number of deaths per 1,000 live births. This is a key indicator of the overall health of a population and is often used to measure the well-being of children in a society.

Infant mortality can be further categorized into neonatal mortality (death within the first 28 days of life) and postneonatal mortality (death after 28 days of life but before one year). The main causes of infant mortality vary by country and region, but generally include premature birth, low birth weight, congenital anomalies, sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), and infectious diseases.

Reducing infant mortality is a major public health goal for many countries, and efforts to improve maternal and child health, access to quality healthcare, and socioeconomic conditions are crucial in achieving this goal.

In the context of medical terminology, "occupations" generally refers to the activities or tasks that a person performs as part of their daily life and routines. This can include both paid work or employment, as well as unpaid activities such as household chores, hobbies, and self-care. The term is often used in the field of occupational therapy, which focuses on helping individuals develop, recover, and maintain the skills needed for participation in their daily occupations and improving their overall quality of life. Additionally, Occupational Medicine is a medical specialty that focuses on the prevention and management of job-related injuries and illnesses, as well as promoting health and productivity in the workplace.

Certification is the act of granting a formal warranty or guarantee (a certificate) that a product, process, or service conforms to specified requirements. In the medical field, certification often refers to the process by which a regulatory body or professional organization grants recognition to a healthcare professional, institution, or program that meets certain predetermined standards.

For example, in the United States, physicians can become certified in a particular medical specialty through the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) after completing residency training and passing a rigorous examination. Similarly, hospitals and other healthcare facilities may be certified by organizations such as The Joint Commission to demonstrate that they meet established quality and safety standards.

Medical certification serves several purposes, including:

1. Ensuring competence: Certification helps establish that the certified individual or organization possesses the necessary knowledge, skills, and abilities to provide safe and effective care in their area of expertise.
2. Protecting patients: By setting and enforcing standards, certification organizations aim to protect patients from harm and ensure they receive high-quality care.
3. Promoting continuous improvement: Certification programs often require ongoing professional development and continuing education, encouraging healthcare professionals and institutions to stay current with best practices and advancements in their field.
4. Enhancing public trust: Certification can help build public confidence in the competence and expertise of healthcare providers and organizations, making it easier for patients to make informed decisions about their care.

Medical Definition:

"Risk factors" are any attribute, characteristic or exposure of an individual that increases the likelihood of developing a disease or injury. They can be divided into modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors. Modifiable risk factors are those that can be changed through lifestyle choices or medical treatment, while non-modifiable risk factors are inherent traits such as age, gender, or genetic predisposition. Examples of modifiable risk factors include smoking, alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, and unhealthy diet, while non-modifiable risk factors include age, sex, and family history. It is important to note that having a risk factor does not guarantee that a person will develop the disease, but rather indicates an increased susceptibility.

Drowning is a process resulting in primary respiratory impairment from the direct or indirect immersion/submersion in a liquid medium. It can be classified as:

1. Death due to drowning, which is the wet form where water enters the lungs (drowning with respirations) and
2. Death due to asphyxia from lack of breathing while submerged in water (drowning without respirations).

The terms "wet," "dry," "active," "passive," "silent," or "smothering" drowning have been used historically but are no longer recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) or other experts because they can be misleading and do not contribute to the understanding or prevention of drowning.

The process of drowning can lead to various clinical presentations, ranging from mild respiratory symptoms to severe hypoxic injury and ultimately death. Factors such as the duration of submersion, the volume and temperature of the fluid, and the presence of other injuries or medical conditions can all influence the outcome.

It is important to note that drowning is a significant public health issue and a leading cause of accidental deaths worldwide, particularly among children and adolescents. Prevention efforts, such as water safety education, supervision, and barriers around bodies of water, are crucial in reducing the incidence of drowning.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "England" is not a medical term or concept. It is one of the four constituent countries that make up the United Kingdom, along with Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland. England is located in the southern part of Great Britain, which is the largest island of the British Isles.

If you have any questions related to medicine or healthcare, I would be happy to try to help answer them for you!

"Sex distribution" is a term used to describe the number of males and females in a study population or sample. It can be presented as a simple count, a percentage, or a ratio. This information is often used in research to identify any differences in health outcomes, disease prevalence, or response to treatment between males and females. Additionally, understanding sex distribution can help researchers ensure that their studies are representative of the general population and can inform the design of future studies.

"Age distribution" is a term used to describe the number of individuals within a population or sample that fall into different age categories. It is often presented in the form of a graph, table, or chart, and can provide important information about the demographic structure of a population.

The age distribution of a population can be influenced by a variety of factors, including birth rates, mortality rates, migration patterns, and aging. Public health officials and researchers use age distribution data to inform policies and programs related to healthcare, social services, and other areas that affect the well-being of populations.

For example, an age distribution graph might show a larger number of individuals in the younger age categories, indicating a population with a high birth rate. Alternatively, it might show a larger number of individuals in the older age categories, indicating a population with a high life expectancy or an aging population. Understanding the age distribution of a population can help policymakers plan for future needs and allocate resources more effectively.

Data collection in the medical context refers to the systematic gathering of information relevant to a specific research question or clinical situation. This process involves identifying and recording data elements, such as demographic characteristics, medical history, physical examination findings, laboratory results, and imaging studies, from various sources including patient interviews, medical records, and diagnostic tests. The data collected is used to support clinical decision-making, inform research hypotheses, and evaluate the effectiveness of treatments or interventions. It is essential that data collection is performed in a standardized and unbiased manner to ensure the validity and reliability of the results.

Fetal mortality refers to the death of a fetus after reaching viability, typically defined as 20 weeks of gestation or greater. The term "stillbirth" is often used interchangeably with fetal mortality and is generally defined as the birth of a baby who has died in the womb after 20 weeks of pregnancy.

Fetal mortality can be caused by a variety of factors, including chromosomal abnormalities, maternal health conditions, placental problems, infections, and complications during labor and delivery. In some cases, the cause of fetal mortality may remain unknown.

The rate of fetal mortality is an important public health indicator and is closely monitored by healthcare providers and researchers. Reducing fetal mortality requires a multifaceted approach that includes prenatal care, identification and management of risk factors, and access to high-quality obstetric care.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Wales" is not a medical term. It is a country that is part of the United Kingdom, located in Western Europe. If you have any questions about medical terms or concepts, I would be happy to help answer those!

"California" is a geographical location and does not have a medical definition. It is a state located on the west coast of the United States, known for its diverse landscape including mountains, beaches, and forests. However, in some contexts, "California" may refer to certain medical conditions or situations that are associated with the state, such as:

* California encephalitis: a viral infection transmitted by mosquitoes that is common in California and other western states.
* California king snake: a non-venomous snake species found in California and other parts of the southwestern United States, which can bite and cause allergic reactions in some people.
* California roll: a type of sushi roll that originated in California and is made with avocado, cucumber, and crab meat, which may pose an allergy risk for some individuals.

It's important to note that these uses of "California" are not medical definitions per se, but rather descriptive terms that refer to specific conditions or situations associated with the state.

Life expectancy is a statistical measure that indicates the average amount of time a person is expected to live, based on their current age and other demographic factors such as sex, health status, and geographical location. It is often calculated using data from population studies and represents the number of years of life remaining at a given age, assuming that current mortality rates continue to apply.

For example, if the life expectancy at birth in a particular population is 80 years, it means that on average, newborns in that population are expected to live to be 80 years old. However, it's important to note that life expectancy is a statistical measure and does not predict the exact lifespan of any individual person.

"Age factors" refer to the effects, changes, or differences that age can have on various aspects of health, disease, and medical care. These factors can encompass a wide range of issues, including:

1. Physiological changes: As people age, their bodies undergo numerous physical changes that can affect how they respond to medications, illnesses, and medical procedures. For example, older adults may be more sensitive to certain drugs or have weaker immune systems, making them more susceptible to infections.
2. Chronic conditions: Age is a significant risk factor for many chronic diseases, such as heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and arthritis. As a result, age-related medical issues are common and can impact treatment decisions and outcomes.
3. Cognitive decline: Aging can also lead to cognitive changes, including memory loss and decreased decision-making abilities. These changes can affect a person's ability to understand and comply with medical instructions, leading to potential complications in their care.
4. Functional limitations: Older adults may experience physical limitations that impact their mobility, strength, and balance, increasing the risk of falls and other injuries. These limitations can also make it more challenging for them to perform daily activities, such as bathing, dressing, or cooking.
5. Social determinants: Age-related factors, such as social isolation, poverty, and lack of access to transportation, can impact a person's ability to obtain necessary medical care and affect their overall health outcomes.

Understanding age factors is critical for healthcare providers to deliver high-quality, patient-centered care that addresses the unique needs and challenges of older adults. By taking these factors into account, healthcare providers can develop personalized treatment plans that consider a person's age, physical condition, cognitive abilities, and social circumstances.

In a medical context, documentation refers to the process of recording and maintaining written or electronic records of a patient's health status, medical history, treatment plans, medications, and other relevant information. The purpose of medical documentation is to provide clear and accurate communication among healthcare providers, to support clinical decision-making, to ensure continuity of care, to meet legal and regulatory requirements, and to facilitate research and quality improvement initiatives.

Medical documentation typically includes various types of records such as:

1. Patient's demographic information, including name, date of birth, gender, and contact details.
2. Medical history, including past illnesses, surgeries, allergies, and family medical history.
3. Physical examination findings, laboratory and diagnostic test results, and diagnoses.
4. Treatment plans, including medications, therapies, procedures, and follow-up care.
5. Progress notes, which document the patient's response to treatment and any changes in their condition over time.
6. Consultation notes, which record communication between healthcare providers regarding a patient's care.
7. Discharge summaries, which provide an overview of the patient's hospital stay, including diagnoses, treatments, and follow-up plans.

Medical documentation must be clear, concise, accurate, and timely, and it should adhere to legal and ethical standards. Healthcare providers are responsible for maintaining the confidentiality of patients' medical records and ensuring that they are accessible only to authorized personnel.

Neoplasms are abnormal growths of cells or tissues in the body that serve no physiological function. They can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Benign neoplasms are typically slow growing and do not spread to other parts of the body, while malignant neoplasms are aggressive, invasive, and can metastasize to distant sites.

Neoplasms occur when there is a dysregulation in the normal process of cell division and differentiation, leading to uncontrolled growth and accumulation of cells. This can result from genetic mutations or other factors such as viral infections, environmental exposures, or hormonal imbalances.

Neoplasms can develop in any organ or tissue of the body and can cause various symptoms depending on their size, location, and type. Treatment options for neoplasms include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and targeted therapy, among others.

Epidemiologic methods are systematic approaches used to investigate and understand the distribution, determinants, and outcomes of health-related events or diseases in a population. These methods are applied to study the patterns of disease occurrence and transmission, identify risk factors and causes, and evaluate interventions for prevention and control. The core components of epidemiologic methods include:

1. Descriptive Epidemiology: This involves the systematic collection and analysis of data on the who, what, when, and where of health events to describe their distribution in a population. It includes measures such as incidence, prevalence, mortality, and morbidity rates, as well as geographic and temporal patterns.

2. Analytical Epidemiology: This involves the use of statistical methods to examine associations between potential risk factors and health outcomes. It includes observational studies (cohort, case-control, cross-sectional) and experimental studies (randomized controlled trials). The goal is to identify causal relationships and quantify the strength of associations.

3. Experimental Epidemiology: This involves the design and implementation of interventions or experiments to test hypotheses about disease prevention and control. It includes randomized controlled trials, community trials, and other experimental study designs.

4. Surveillance and Monitoring: This involves ongoing systematic collection, analysis, and interpretation of health-related data for early detection, tracking, and response to health events or diseases.

5. Ethical Considerations: Epidemiologic studies must adhere to ethical principles such as respect for autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence, and justice. This includes obtaining informed consent, ensuring confidentiality, and minimizing harm to study participants.

Overall, epidemiologic methods provide a framework for investigating and understanding the complex interplay between host, agent, and environmental factors that contribute to the occurrence of health-related events or diseases in populations.

'Healthcare Records' or 'Medical Records' are defined as systematic collections of comprehensive information about a patient's health status, including their medical history, demographics, medications, treatment plans, progress notes, laboratory test results, imaging studies, and any other relevant healthcare-related information. These records serve as a vital tool for healthcare providers to make informed decisions regarding diagnosis, treatment, and ongoing care of patients. They also play a crucial role in maintaining continuity of care, supporting research and education, ensuring legal and ethical compliance, and improving overall healthcare quality and safety. Healthcare records may be maintained in paper form or digitally, following specific standards and regulations to ensure accuracy, confidentiality, and easy accessibility.

Suicide is defined in the medical field as the intentional taking of one's own life. It is a complex phenomenon with various contributing factors, including psychological, biological, environmental, and sociocultural elements. Suicide is a significant global public health concern that requires comprehensive understanding, prevention, and intervention strategies. If you or someone you know is struggling with thoughts of self-harm or suicide, it's essential to seek help from a mental health professional immediately.

In epidemiology, the incidence of a disease is defined as the number of new cases of that disease within a specific population over a certain period of time. It is typically expressed as a rate, with the number of new cases in the numerator and the size of the population at risk in the denominator. Incidence provides information about the risk of developing a disease during a given time period and can be used to compare disease rates between different populations or to monitor trends in disease occurrence over time.

Occupational diseases are health conditions or illnesses that occur as a result of exposure to hazards in the workplace. These hazards can include physical, chemical, and biological agents, as well as ergonomic factors and work-related psychosocial stressors. Examples of occupational diseases include respiratory illnesses caused by inhaling dust or fumes, hearing loss due to excessive noise exposure, and musculoskeletal disorders caused by repetitive movements or poor ergonomics. The development of an occupational disease is typically related to the nature of the work being performed and the conditions in which it is carried out. It's important to note that these diseases can be prevented or minimized through proper risk assessment, implementation of control measures, and adherence to safety regulations.

I'm not aware of a specific medical definition for "Continental Population Groups." However, in the context of genetics and population health, continental population groups often refer to the major population divisions based on genetic ancestry and geographical origin. These groups typically include:

1. African: Individuals with recent ancestry primarily from Africa, particularly sub-Saharan Africa.
2. European: Individuals with recent ancestry primarily from Europe.
3. Asian: Individuals with recent ancestry primarily from Asia, including East Asia, South Asia, and Central Asia.
4. Native American: Individuals with recent ancestry primarily from the indigenous populations of North, Central, and South America.
5. Oceanian: Individuals with recent ancestry primarily from Australia, New Guinea, and neighboring islands in the Pacific region.

It is important to note that these categories are not exhaustive or mutually exclusive, as human migration and admixture have led to a complex web of genetic ancestries. Furthermore, using continental population labels can oversimplify the rich diversity within each group and may perpetuate harmful stereotypes or misunderstandings about racial and ethnic identities.

A cohort study is a type of observational study in which a group of individuals who share a common characteristic or exposure are followed up over time to determine the incidence of a specific outcome or outcomes. The cohort, or group, is defined based on the exposure status (e.g., exposed vs. unexposed) and then monitored prospectively to assess for the development of new health events or conditions.

Cohort studies can be either prospective or retrospective in design. In a prospective cohort study, participants are enrolled and followed forward in time from the beginning of the study. In contrast, in a retrospective cohort study, researchers identify a cohort that has already been assembled through medical records, insurance claims, or other sources and then look back in time to assess exposure status and health outcomes.

Cohort studies are useful for establishing causality between an exposure and an outcome because they allow researchers to observe the temporal relationship between the two. They can also provide information on the incidence of a disease or condition in different populations, which can be used to inform public health policy and interventions. However, cohort studies can be expensive and time-consuming to conduct, and they may be subject to bias if participants are not representative of the population or if there is loss to follow-up.

Euthanasia is the act of intentionally ending a person's life to relieve suffering, typically carried out at the request of the person who is suffering and wants to die. This practice is also known as "assisted suicide" or "physician-assisted dying." It is a controversial issue that raises ethical, legal, and medical concerns.

Euthanasia can be classified into two main types: active and passive. Active euthanasia involves taking direct action to end a person's life, such as administering a lethal injection. Passive euthanasia, on the other hand, involves allowing a person to die by withholding or withdrawing medical treatment that is necessary to sustain their life.

Euthanasia is illegal in many countries and jurisdictions, while some have laws that allow it under certain circumstances. In recent years, there has been growing debate about whether euthanasia should be legalized and regulated to ensure that it is carried out in a humane and compassionate manner. Supporters argue that individuals have the right to choose how they die, especially if they are suffering from a terminal illness or chronic pain. Opponents, however, argue that legalizing euthanasia could lead to abuse and coercion, and that there are alternative ways to alleviate suffering, such as palliative care.

Respiratory tract neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors that occur in the respiratory system, which includes the nose, throat (pharynx), voice box (larynx), windpipe (trachea), bronchi, and lungs. These growths can be benign or malignant (cancerous). Malignant neoplasms are cancerous tumors that can invade nearby tissues, spread to other parts of the body, and interfere with normal respiratory function, leading to serious health consequences.

Respiratory tract neoplasms can have various causes, including genetic factors, exposure to environmental carcinogens such as tobacco smoke, asbestos, and radon, and certain viral infections. Symptoms of respiratory tract neoplasms may include coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath, chest pain, hoarseness, or blood in the sputum. Diagnosis typically involves imaging tests such as X-rays, CT scans, or PET scans, as well as biopsies to determine the type and extent of the tumor. Treatment options may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, targeted therapy, or a combination of these approaches.

Retrospective studies, also known as retrospective research or looking back studies, are a type of observational study that examines data from the past to draw conclusions about possible causal relationships between risk factors and outcomes. In these studies, researchers analyze existing records, medical charts, or previously collected data to test a hypothesis or answer a specific research question.

Retrospective studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying trends, but they have limitations compared to prospective studies, which follow participants forward in time from exposure to outcome. Retrospective studies are subject to biases such as recall bias, selection bias, and information bias, which can affect the validity of the results. Therefore, retrospective studies should be interpreted with caution and used primarily to generate hypotheses for further testing in prospective studies.

"Sex factors" is a term used in medicine and epidemiology to refer to the differences in disease incidence, prevalence, or response to treatment that are observed between males and females. These differences can be attributed to biological differences such as genetics, hormones, and anatomy, as well as social and cultural factors related to gender.

For example, some conditions such as autoimmune diseases, depression, and osteoporosis are more common in women, while others such as cardiovascular disease and certain types of cancer are more prevalent in men. Additionally, sex differences have been observed in the effectiveness and side effects of various medications and treatments.

It is important to consider sex factors in medical research and clinical practice to ensure that patients receive appropriate and effective care.

I believe there may be some confusion in your question. "Industry" is a general term that refers to a specific branch of economic activity, or a particular way of producing goods or services. It is not a medical term with a defined meaning within the field of medicine.

However, if you are referring to the term "industrious," which can be used to describe someone who is diligent and hard-working, it could be applied in a medical context to describe a patient's level of engagement and effort in their own care. For example, a patient who is conscientious about taking their medications as prescribed, following through with recommended treatments, and making necessary lifestyle changes to manage their condition might be described as "industrious" by their healthcare provider.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Washington" is not a medical term. It is a place name, referring to the U.S. state of Washington or the city of Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States. If you have any questions about medical terms or concepts, I would be happy to help answer those for you!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Oklahoma" is not a medical term or condition. It is a state in the south central region of the United States. If you have any questions about medical terminology or health-related topics, I would be happy to try and help answer them!

An "accident" is an unfortunate event that happens unexpectedly and unintentionally, typically resulting in damage or injury. In medical terms, an accident refers to an unplanned occurrence resulting in harm or injury to a person's body, which may require medical attention. Accidents can happen due to various reasons such as human error, mechanical failure, or environmental factors.

Examples of accidents that may require medical attention include:

1. Traffic accidents: These can result in injuries such as fractures, head trauma, and soft tissue injuries.
2. Workplace accidents: These can include falls, machinery malfunctions, or exposure to hazardous substances, resulting in injuries or illnesses.
3. Home accidents: These can include burns, cuts, falls, or poisoning, which may require medical treatment.
4. Sports accidents: These can result in injuries such as sprains, strains, fractures, or concussions.
5. Recreational accidents: These can occur during activities such as swimming, hiking, or biking and may result in injuries such as drowning, falls, or trauma.

Preventing accidents is crucial to maintaining good health and safety. This can be achieved through education, awareness, and the implementation of safety measures in various settings such as homes, workplaces, and roads.

The United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is not a medical term, but rather a term related to occupational health and safety. OSHA is a division of the U.S. Department of Labor that regulates workplace safety and health. It was created by the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 to ensure safe and healthy working conditions for workers by setting and enforcing standards and providing training, outreach, education and assistance. OSHA covers most private sector employers and their workers, in addition to some public sector employers and workers in the 50 states and certain territories and jurisdictions under federal authority.

Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is a sudden, unexpected natural death caused by the cessation of cardiac activity. It is often caused by cardiac arrhythmias, particularly ventricular fibrillation, and is often associated with underlying heart disease, although it can occur in people with no known heart condition. SCD is typically defined as a natural death due to cardiac causes that occurs within one hour of the onset of symptoms, or if the individual was last seen alive in a normal state of health, it can be defined as occurring within 24 hours.

It's important to note that sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) is different from SCD, although they are related. SCA refers to the sudden cessation of cardiac activity, which if not treated immediately can lead to SCD.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Maryland" is a proper noun and does not have a medical definition. It is a state located in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States. However, if you are referring to a specific medical term or concept that includes "Maryland," could you please provide more context? I'll do my best to help with accurate information based on the provided context.

Maternal mortality is defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as "the death of a woman while pregnant or within 42 days of termination of pregnancy, irrespective of the duration and site of the pregnancy, from any cause related to or aggravated by the pregnancy or its management but not from accidental or incidental causes."

This definition highlights that maternal mortality is a preventable death that occurs during pregnancy, childbirth, or in the postpartum period, and it can be caused by various factors related to or worsened by the pregnancy or its management. The WHO also collects data on maternal deaths due to direct obstetric causes (such as hemorrhage, hypertensive disorders, sepsis, and unsafe abortion) and indirect causes (such as malaria, anemia, and HIV/AIDS).

Maternal mortality is a significant public health issue worldwide, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. Reducing maternal mortality is one of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) set by the United Nations, with a target to reduce the global maternal mortality ratio to less than 70 per 100,000 live births by 2030.

"Quality control" is a term that is used in many industries, including healthcare and medicine, to describe the systematic process of ensuring that products or services meet certain standards and regulations. In the context of healthcare, quality control often refers to the measures taken to ensure that the care provided to patients is safe, effective, and consistent. This can include processes such as:

1. Implementing standardized protocols and guidelines for care
2. Training and educating staff to follow these protocols
3. Regularly monitoring and evaluating the outcomes of care
4. Making improvements to processes and systems based on data and feedback
5. Ensuring that equipment and supplies are maintained and functioning properly
6. Implementing systems for reporting and addressing safety concerns or errors.

The goal of quality control in healthcare is to provide high-quality, patient-centered care that meets the needs and expectations of patients, while also protecting their safety and well-being.

Pregnancy is a physiological state or condition where a fertilized egg (zygote) successfully implants and grows in the uterus of a woman, leading to the development of an embryo and finally a fetus. This process typically spans approximately 40 weeks, divided into three trimesters, and culminates in childbirth. Throughout this period, numerous hormonal and physical changes occur to support the growing offspring, including uterine enlargement, breast development, and various maternal adaptations to ensure the fetus's optimal growth and well-being.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Maine" is not a medical term or concept. It is actually the name of a state, the 23rd state to join the United States of America. Maine is located in the northeastern part of the country and is known for its rocky coastline, maritime history, and natural beauty. If you have any questions about medical terms or concepts, I'd be happy to help answer those!

A medical webcast is a digital broadcast of a live or recorded medical education event, seminar, or conference transmitted via the internet. It may include lectures, presentations, discussions, and question-and-answer sessions delivered by medical professionals, researchers, or experts in various fields of medicine. Medical webcasts serve as a valuable resource for continuing medical education (CME) and professional development, allowing healthcare providers to stay current with the latest advances, treatments, and guidelines in their respective fields. They may also provide opportunities for remote participation and interaction with presenters and other attendees through live chats, polls, or Q&A sessions.

A wound is a type of injury that occurs when the skin or other tissues are cut, pierced, torn, or otherwise broken. Wounds can be caused by a variety of factors, including accidents, violence, surgery, or certain medical conditions. There are several different types of wounds, including:

* Incisions: These are cuts that are made deliberately, often during surgery. They are usually straight and clean.
* Lacerations: These are tears in the skin or other tissues. They can be irregular and jagged.
* Abrasions: These occur when the top layer of skin is scraped off. They may look like a bruise or a scab.
* Punctures: These are wounds that are caused by sharp objects, such as needles or knives. They are usually small and deep.
* Avulsions: These occur when tissue is forcibly torn away from the body. They can be very serious and require immediate medical attention.

Injuries refer to any harm or damage to the body, including wounds. Injuries can range from minor scrapes and bruises to more severe injuries such as fractures, dislocations, and head trauma. It is important to seek medical attention for any injury that is causing significant pain, swelling, or bleeding, or if there is a suspected bone fracture or head injury.

In general, wounds and injuries should be cleaned and covered with a sterile bandage to prevent infection. Depending on the severity of the wound or injury, additional medical treatment may be necessary. This may include stitches for deep cuts, immobilization for broken bones, or surgery for more serious injuries. It is important to follow your healthcare provider's instructions carefully to ensure proper healing and to prevent complications.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Funeral Rites" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. Funeral rites generally refer to the customs, practices, and rituals associated with paying respects to the dead and disposing of their remains in a culturally or religiously significant manner. These practices can vary widely between different cultures, societies, and religious groups. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health-related topics, I'd be happy to try to help answer those for you!

An ethnic group is a category of people who identify with each other based on shared ancestry, language, culture, history, and/or physical characteristics. The concept of an ethnic group is often used in the social sciences to describe a population that shares a common identity and a sense of belonging to a larger community.

Ethnic groups can be distinguished from racial groups, which are categories of people who are defined by their physical characteristics, such as skin color, hair texture, and facial features. While race is a social construct based on physical differences, ethnicity is a cultural construct based on shared traditions, beliefs, and practices.

It's important to note that the concept of ethnic groups can be complex and fluid, as individuals may identify with multiple ethnic groups or switch their identification over time. Additionally, the boundaries between different ethnic groups can be blurred and contested, and the ways in which people define and categorize themselves and others can vary across cultures and historical periods.

I apologize for any confusion, but "Alaska" is not a medical term or concept. It is a geographical location, being the largest state in the United States, located in the northernmost and westernmost portion of the country. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health-related topics, I would be happy to try and help answer those for you.

Occupational accidents are defined as unexpected and unplanned events that occur in the context of work and lead to physical or mental harm. These accidents can be caused by a variety of factors, including unsafe working conditions, lack of proper training, or failure to use appropriate personal protective equipment. Occupational accidents can result in injuries, illnesses, or even death, and can have significant impacts on individuals, families, and communities. In many cases, occupational accidents are preventable through the implementation of effective safety measures and risk management strategies.

In the context of medicine, risk is the probability or likelihood of an adverse health effect or the occurrence of a negative event related to treatment or exposure to certain hazards. It is usually expressed as a ratio or percentage and can be influenced by various factors such as age, gender, lifestyle, genetics, and environmental conditions. Risk assessment involves identifying, quantifying, and prioritizing risks to make informed decisions about prevention, mitigation, or treatment strategies.

Follow-up studies are a type of longitudinal research that involve repeated observations or measurements of the same variables over a period of time, in order to understand their long-term effects or outcomes. In medical context, follow-up studies are often used to evaluate the safety and efficacy of medical treatments, interventions, or procedures.

In a typical follow-up study, a group of individuals (called a cohort) who have received a particular treatment or intervention are identified and then followed over time through periodic assessments or data collection. The data collected may include information on clinical outcomes, adverse events, changes in symptoms or functional status, and other relevant measures.

The results of follow-up studies can provide important insights into the long-term benefits and risks of medical interventions, as well as help to identify factors that may influence treatment effectiveness or patient outcomes. However, it is important to note that follow-up studies can be subject to various biases and limitations, such as loss to follow-up, recall bias, and changes in clinical practice over time, which must be carefully considered when interpreting the results.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Utah" is not a medical term or concept. It is a geographical location, being the 45th state admitted to the United States of America. If you have any questions related to medical topics, I would be happy to try and help answer those for you!

The term "European Continental Ancestry Group" is a medical/ethnic classification that refers to individuals who trace their genetic ancestry to the continent of Europe. This group includes people from various ethnic backgrounds and nationalities, such as Northern, Southern, Eastern, and Western European descent. It is often used in research and medical settings for population studies or to identify genetic patterns and predispositions to certain diseases that may be more common in specific ancestral groups. However, it's important to note that this classification can oversimplify the complex genetic diversity within and between populations, and should be used with caution.

Sudden death is a term used to describe a situation where a person dies abruptly and unexpectedly, often within minutes to hours of the onset of symptoms. It is typically caused by cardiac or respiratory arrest, which can be brought on by various medical conditions such as heart disease, stroke, severe infections, drug overdose, or trauma. In some cases, the exact cause of sudden death may remain unknown even after a thorough post-mortem examination.

It is important to note that sudden death should not be confused with "sudden cardiac death," which specifically refers to deaths caused by the abrupt loss of heart function (cardiac arrest). Sudden cardiac death is often related to underlying heart conditions such as coronary artery disease, cardiomyopathy, or electrical abnormalities in the heart.

Assisted suicide, also known as physician-assisted dying or voluntary euthanasia, is a practice in which a healthcare professional knowingly and intentionally provides a competent patient, who has requested it, with the means to end their own life. This usually involves prescribing a lethal medication that the patient can self-administer to bring about a peaceful and dignified death. Assisted suicide is a controversial topic and is illegal in many parts of the world, while some countries and states have laws allowing it under certain circumstances. It's important to note that the specific definition and legality may vary depending on the jurisdiction.

Maternal age is a term used to describe the age of a woman at the time she becomes pregnant or gives birth. It is often used in medical and epidemiological contexts to discuss the potential risks, complications, and outcomes associated with pregnancy and childbirth at different stages of a woman's reproductive years.

Advanced maternal age typically refers to women who become pregnant or give birth at 35 years of age or older. This group faces an increased risk for certain chromosomal abnormalities, such as Down syndrome, and other pregnancy-related complications, including gestational diabetes, preeclampsia, and cesarean delivery.

On the other end of the spectrum, adolescent pregnancies (those that occur in women under 20 years old) also come with their own set of potential risks and complications, such as preterm birth, low birth weight, and anemia.

It's important to note that while maternal age can influence pregnancy outcomes, many other factors – including genetics, lifestyle choices, and access to quality healthcare – can also play a significant role in determining the health of both mother and baby during pregnancy and childbirth.

Clinical coding, also known as medical coding, is the process of converting healthcare diagnoses, procedures, and services into standardized codes used for reimbursement, statistical analysis, and public health reporting. In many healthcare systems, clinical coders review medical records, such as doctors' notes, laboratory results, and imaging reports, to assign codes from classification systems such as the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) or the Current Procedural Terminology (CPT).

Accurate clinical coding is essential for healthcare organizations to receive proper reimbursement from insurance companies and government payers, as well as to track outcomes, identify trends, and monitor quality of care. Clinical coders must have a strong understanding of anatomy, physiology, medical terminology, and coding guidelines to ensure the correct assignment of codes.

I'm not aware of any medical definition for the term "Texas." It is primarily used as the name of a state in the United States, located in the southern region. If you're referring to a specific medical term or concept that I might not be aware of, please provide more context or clarify your question.

If you meant to ask for an explanation of a medical condition named 'Texas', it is likely a typo or a misunderstanding, as there is no widely recognized medical condition associated with the name 'Texas'.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

Diagnostic errors refer to inaccurate or delayed diagnoses of a patient's medical condition, which can lead to improper or unnecessary treatment and potentially serious harm to the patient. These errors can occur due to various factors such as lack of clinical knowledge, failure to consider all possible diagnoses, inadequate communication between healthcare providers and patients, and problems with testing or interpretation of test results. Diagnostic errors are a significant cause of preventable harm in medical care and have been identified as a priority area for quality improvement efforts.

Prospective studies, also known as longitudinal studies, are a type of cohort study in which data is collected forward in time, following a group of individuals who share a common characteristic or exposure over a period of time. The researchers clearly define the study population and exposure of interest at the beginning of the study and follow up with the participants to determine the outcomes that develop over time. This type of study design allows for the investigation of causal relationships between exposures and outcomes, as well as the identification of risk factors and the estimation of disease incidence rates. Prospective studies are particularly useful in epidemiology and medical research when studying diseases with long latency periods or rare outcomes.

Gunshot wounds are defined as traumatic injuries caused by the penetration of bullets or other projectiles fired from firearms into the body. The severity and extent of damage depend on various factors such as the type of firearm used, the distance between the muzzle and the victim, the size and shape of the bullet, and its velocity.

Gunshot wounds can be classified into two main categories:

1. Penetrating gunshot wounds: These occur when a bullet enters the body but does not exit, causing damage to the organs, tissues, and blood vessels along its path.

2. Perforating gunshot wounds: These happen when a bullet enters and exits the body, creating an entry and exit wound, causing damage to the structures it traverses.

Based on the mechanism of injury, gunshot wounds can also be categorized into low-velocity (less than 1000 feet per second) and high-velocity (greater than 1000 feet per second) injuries. High-velocity gunshot wounds are more likely to cause extensive tissue damage due to the transfer of kinetic energy from the bullet to the surrounding tissues.

Immediate medical attention is required for individuals with gunshot wounds, as they may experience significant blood loss, infection, and potential long-term complications such as organ dysfunction or disability. Treatment typically involves surgical intervention to control bleeding, remove foreign material, repair damaged structures, and manage infections if present.

"Native Americans" is the preferred term for the indigenous peoples of the continental United States, including those from Alaska and Hawaii. The term "Indians" is often used to refer to this group, but it can be seen as misleading or inaccurate since it implies a connection to India rather than recognition of their unique cultures and histories. However, some Native Americans prefer to use the term "Indian" to describe themselves.

It's important to note that there is no single medical definition for this group, as they are not a homogeneous population. Instead, they consist of hundreds of distinct tribes with diverse cultures, languages, and traditions. Each tribe may have its own unique genetic makeup, which can influence health outcomes and responses to medical treatments.

Therefore, when discussing medical issues related to Native Americans, it's essential to consider the specific tribal affiliations and cultural factors that may impact their health status and healthcare needs.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Oregon" is not a medical term or concept. It is a geographical location, being the name of a state in the United States, located in the Pacific Northwest region. If you have any questions related to medical topics, I would be happy to try and help answer those for you!

Cerebrovascular disorders are a group of medical conditions that affect the blood vessels of the brain. These disorders can be caused by narrowing, blockage, or rupture of the blood vessels, leading to decreased blood flow and oxygen supply to the brain. The most common types of cerebrovascular disorders include:

1. Stroke: A stroke occurs when a blood vessel in the brain becomes blocked or bursts, causing a lack of oxygen and nutrients to reach brain cells. This can lead to permanent damage or death of brain tissue.
2. Transient ischemic attack (TIA): Also known as a "mini-stroke," a TIA occurs when blood flow to the brain is temporarily blocked, often by a blood clot. Symptoms may last only a few minutes to a few hours and typically resolve on their own. However, a TIA is a serious warning sign that a full-blown stroke may occur in the future.
3. Aneurysm: An aneurysm is a weakened or bulging area in the wall of a blood vessel. If left untreated, an aneurysm can rupture and cause bleeding in the brain.
4. Arteriovenous malformation (AVM): An AVM is a tangled mass of abnormal blood vessels that connect arteries and veins. This can lead to bleeding in the brain or stroke.
5. Carotid stenosis: Carotid stenosis occurs when the carotid arteries, which supply blood to the brain, become narrowed or blocked due to plaque buildup. This can increase the risk of stroke.
6. Vertebrobasilar insufficiency: This condition occurs when the vertebral and basilar arteries, which supply blood to the back of the brain, become narrowed or blocked. This can lead to symptoms such as dizziness, vertigo, and difficulty swallowing.

Cerebrovascular disorders are a leading cause of disability and death worldwide. Risk factors for these conditions include age, high blood pressure, smoking, diabetes, high cholesterol, and family history. Treatment may involve medications, surgery, or lifestyle changes to reduce the risk of further complications.

Low birth weight is a term used to describe babies who are born weighing less than 5 pounds, 8 ounces (2,500 grams). It's often defined as a birth weight of 2,499 grams or less. This can be further categorized into very low birth weight (less than 1,500 grams) and extremely low birth weight (less than 1,000 grams). Low birth weight is most commonly caused by premature birth, but it can also be caused by growth restriction in the womb. These babies are at risk for numerous health complications, both in the short and long term.

A factual database in the medical context is a collection of organized and structured data that contains verified and accurate information related to medicine, healthcare, or health sciences. These databases serve as reliable resources for various stakeholders, including healthcare professionals, researchers, students, and patients, to access evidence-based information for making informed decisions and enhancing knowledge.

Examples of factual medical databases include:

1. PubMed: A comprehensive database of biomedical literature maintained by the US National Library of Medicine (NLM). It contains citations and abstracts from life sciences journals, books, and conference proceedings.
2. MEDLINE: A subset of PubMed, MEDLINE focuses on high-quality, peer-reviewed articles related to biomedicine and health. It is the primary component of the NLM's database and serves as a critical resource for healthcare professionals and researchers worldwide.
3. Cochrane Library: A collection of systematic reviews and meta-analyses focused on evidence-based medicine. The library aims to provide unbiased, high-quality information to support clinical decision-making and improve patient outcomes.
4. OVID: A platform that offers access to various medical and healthcare databases, including MEDLINE, Embase, and PsycINFO. It facilitates the search and retrieval of relevant literature for researchers, clinicians, and students.
5. ClinicalTrials.gov: A registry and results database of publicly and privately supported clinical studies conducted around the world. The platform aims to increase transparency and accessibility of clinical trial data for healthcare professionals, researchers, and patients.
6. UpToDate: An evidence-based, physician-authored clinical decision support resource that provides information on diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of medical conditions. It serves as a point-of-care tool for healthcare professionals to make informed decisions and improve patient care.
7. TRIP Database: A search engine designed to facilitate evidence-based medicine by providing quick access to high-quality resources, including systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, and practice recommendations.
8. National Guideline Clearinghouse (NGC): A database of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines and related documents developed through a rigorous review process. The NGC aims to provide clinicians, healthcare providers, and policymakers with reliable guidance for patient care.
9. DrugBank: A comprehensive, freely accessible online database containing detailed information about drugs, their mechanisms, interactions, and targets. It serves as a valuable resource for researchers, healthcare professionals, and students in the field of pharmacology and drug discovery.
10. Genetic Testing Registry (GTR): A database that provides centralized information about genetic tests, test developers, laboratories offering tests, and clinical validity and utility of genetic tests. It serves as a resource for healthcare professionals, researchers, and patients to make informed decisions regarding genetic testing.

Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are a class of diseases that affect the heart and blood vessels. They are the leading cause of death globally, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). The term "cardiovascular disease" refers to a group of conditions that include:

1. Coronary artery disease (CAD): This is the most common type of heart disease and occurs when the arteries that supply blood to the heart become narrowed or blocked due to the buildup of cholesterol, fat, and other substances in the walls of the arteries. This can lead to chest pain, shortness of breath, or a heart attack.
2. Heart failure: This occurs when the heart is unable to pump blood efficiently to meet the body's needs. It can be caused by various conditions, including coronary artery disease, high blood pressure, and cardiomyopathy.
3. Stroke: A stroke occurs when the blood supply to a part of the brain is interrupted or reduced, often due to a clot or a ruptured blood vessel. This can cause brain damage or death.
4. Peripheral artery disease (PAD): This occurs when the arteries that supply blood to the limbs become narrowed or blocked, leading to pain, numbness, or weakness in the legs or arms.
5. Rheumatic heart disease: This is a complication of untreated strep throat and can cause damage to the heart valves, leading to heart failure or other complications.
6. Congenital heart defects: These are structural problems with the heart that are present at birth. They can range from mild to severe and may require medical intervention.
7. Cardiomyopathy: This is a disease of the heart muscle that makes it harder for the heart to pump blood efficiently. It can be caused by various factors, including genetics, infections, and certain medications.
8. Heart arrhythmias: These are abnormal heart rhythms that can cause the heart to beat too fast, too slow, or irregularly. They can lead to symptoms such as palpitations, dizziness, or fainting.
9. Valvular heart disease: This occurs when one or more of the heart valves become damaged or diseased, leading to problems with blood flow through the heart.
10. Aortic aneurysm and dissection: These are conditions that affect the aorta, the largest artery in the body. An aneurysm is a bulge in the aorta, while a dissection is a tear in the inner layer of the aorta. Both can be life-threatening if not treated promptly.

It's important to note that many of these conditions can be managed or treated with medical interventions such as medications, surgery, or lifestyle changes. If you have any concerns about your heart health, it's important to speak with a healthcare provider.

Hispanic Americans, also known as Latino Americans, are individuals in the United States who are of Spanish-speaking origin or whose ancestors came from Spain, Mexico, Cuba, the Caribbean, Central and South America. This group includes various cultures, races, and nationalities. It is important to note that "Hispanic" refers to a cultural and linguistic affiliation rather than a racial category. Therefore, Hispanic Americans can be of any race, including White, Black, Asian, Native American, or mixed races.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "Great Britain" is not a medical concept or condition. It is a geographical and political term referring to the largest island in the British Isles, on which the majority of England, Scotland, and Wales are located. It's also used to refer to the political union of these three countries, which is called the United Kingdom. Therefore, it doesn't have a medical definition.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Ohio" is not a medical term or condition. It is the name of a state located in the Midwestern region of the United States. If you have any questions about medical conditions or terms, I would be happy to help answer those!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Montana" is not a medical term or condition. It is the name of a state in the United States, located in the northwestern region of the country. If you have any questions about medical terminology or health-related topics, I would be happy to help with those instead.

Pregnancy complications refer to any health problems that arise during pregnancy which can put both the mother and the baby at risk. These complications may occur at any point during the pregnancy, from conception until childbirth. Some common pregnancy complications include:

1. Gestational diabetes: a type of diabetes that develops during pregnancy in women who did not have diabetes before becoming pregnant.
2. Preeclampsia: a pregnancy complication characterized by high blood pressure and damage to organs such as the liver or kidneys.
3. Placenta previa: a condition where the placenta covers the cervix, which can cause bleeding and may require delivery via cesarean section.
4. Preterm labor: when labor begins before 37 weeks of gestation, which can lead to premature birth and other complications.
5. Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR): a condition where the fetus does not grow at a normal rate inside the womb.
6. Multiple pregnancies: carrying more than one baby, such as twins or triplets, which can increase the risk of premature labor and other complications.
7. Rh incompatibility: a condition where the mother's blood type is different from the baby's, which can cause anemia and jaundice in the newborn.
8. Pregnancy loss: including miscarriage, stillbirth, or ectopic pregnancy, which can be emotionally devastating for the parents.

It is important to monitor pregnancy closely and seek medical attention promptly if any concerning symptoms arise. With proper care and management, many pregnancy complications can be treated effectively, reducing the risk of harm to both the mother and the baby.

Terminal care, also known as end-of-life care or palliative care, is a type of medical care provided to patients who are in the final stages of a terminal illness or condition. The primary goal of terminal care is to provide comfort, dignity, and quality of life for the patient, rather than attempting to cure the disease or prolong life.

Terminal care may involve managing pain and other symptoms, providing emotional and psychological support to both the patient and their family, and helping the patient plan for the end of their life. This can include discussing advance directives, hospice care options, and other important decisions related to end-of-life care.

The focus of terminal care is on ensuring that the patient's physical, emotional, and spiritual needs are met in a compassionate and supportive manner. It is an essential component of high-quality medical care for patients who are facing the end of their lives.

Birth weight refers to the first weight of a newborn infant, usually taken immediately after birth. It is a critical vital sign that indicates the baby's health status and is used as a predictor for various short-term and long-term health outcomes.

Typically, a full-term newborn's weight ranges from 5.5 to 8.8 pounds (2.5 to 4 kg), although normal birth weights can vary significantly based on factors such as gestational age, genetics, maternal health, and nutrition. Low birth weight is defined as less than 5.5 pounds (2.5 kg), while high birth weight is greater than 8.8 pounds (4 kg).

Low birth weight babies are at a higher risk for various medical complications, including respiratory distress syndrome, jaundice, infections, and developmental delays. High birth weight babies may face challenges with delivery, increased risk of obesity, and potential metabolic issues later in life. Regular prenatal care is essential to monitor fetal growth and ensure a healthy pregnancy and optimal birth weight for the baby.

Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) is defined by the American Academy of Pediatrics as "the sudden unexpected death of an infant

Prenatal care is a type of preventive healthcare that focuses on providing regular check-ups and medical care to pregnant women, with the aim of ensuring the best possible health outcomes for both the mother and the developing fetus. It involves routine prenatal screenings and tests, such as blood pressure monitoring, urine analysis, weight checks, and ultrasounds, to assess the progress of the pregnancy and identify any potential health issues or complications early on.

Prenatal care also includes education and counseling on topics such as nutrition, exercise, and lifestyle choices that can affect pregnancy outcomes. It may involve referrals to specialists, such as obstetricians, perinatologists, or maternal-fetal medicine specialists, for high-risk pregnancies.

Overall, prenatal care is an essential component of ensuring a healthy pregnancy and reducing the risk of complications during childbirth and beyond.

Life tables are statistical tools used in actuarial science, demography, and public health to estimate the mortality rate and survival rates of a population. They provide a data-driven representation of the probability that individuals of a certain age will die before their next birthday (the death rate) or live to a particular age (the survival rate).

Life tables are constructed using data on the number of deaths and the size of the population in specific age groups over a given period. These tables typically include several columns representing different variables, such as:

1. Age group or interval: The age range for which the data is being presented (e.g., 0-1 year, 1-5 years, 5-10 years, etc.).
2. Number of people in the population: The size of the population within each age group.
3. Number of deaths: The number of individuals who died during the study period within each age group.
4. Death rate: The probability that an individual in a given age group will die before their next birthday. It is calculated as the number of deaths divided by the size of the population for that age group.
5. Survival rate: The probability that an individual in a given age group will survive to a specific age or older. It is calculated using the death rates from earlier age groups.
6. Life expectancy: The average number of years a person is expected to live, based on their current age and mortality rates for each subsequent age group.

Life tables are essential in various fields, including insurance, pension planning, social security administration, and healthcare policy development. They help researchers and policymakers understand the health status and demographic trends of populations, allowing them to make informed decisions about resource allocation, program development, and public health interventions.

Occupational exposure refers to the contact of an individual with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents as a result of their job or occupation. This can include exposure to hazardous substances such as chemicals, heavy metals, or dusts; physical agents such as noise, radiation, or ergonomic stressors; and biological agents such as viruses, bacteria, or fungi.

Occupational exposure can occur through various routes, including inhalation, skin contact, ingestion, or injection. Prolonged or repeated exposure to these hazards can increase the risk of developing acute or chronic health conditions, such as respiratory diseases, skin disorders, neurological damage, or cancer.

Employers have a legal and ethical responsibility to minimize occupational exposures through the implementation of appropriate control measures, including engineering controls, administrative controls, personal protective equipment, and training programs. Regular monitoring and surveillance of workers' health can also help identify and prevent potential health hazards in the workplace.

Mesothelioma is a rare and aggressive form of cancer that develops in the mesothelial cells, which are the thin layers of tissue that cover many of the internal organs. The most common site for mesothelioma to occur is in the pleura, the membrane that surrounds the lungs. This type is called pleural mesothelioma. Other types include peritoneal mesothelioma (which occurs in the lining of the abdominal cavity) and pericardial mesothelioma (which occurs in the lining around the heart).

Mesothelioma is almost always caused by exposure to asbestos, a group of naturally occurring minerals that were widely used in construction, insulation, and other industries because of their heat resistance and insulating properties. When asbestos fibers are inhaled or ingested, they can become lodged in the mesothelium, leading to inflammation, scarring, and eventually cancerous changes in the cells.

The symptoms of mesothelioma can take many years to develop after exposure to asbestos, and they may include chest pain, coughing, shortness of breath, fatigue, and weight loss. Treatment options for mesothelioma depend on the stage and location of the cancer, but may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these approaches. Unfortunately, the prognosis for mesothelioma is often poor, with a median survival time of around 12-18 months after diagnosis.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Belgium" is a country located in Western Europe and not a medical term or condition. It is one of the founding members of the European Union and is known for its rich history, culture, and diverse landscape, which includes coastal plains in the northwest, flat agricultural lands in the central region, and the rolling hills and forests in the southeast. It has a highly industrialized economy, with major industries including engineering and manufacturing, transport, and chemical and pharmaceutical production.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Sweden" is not a medical term. It is a country located in northern Europe. If you have any questions about medical terminology or concepts, I would be happy to help answer those!

I apologize, but "Brazil" is not a medical term or condition. It is the largest country in both South America and Latin America by land area and population. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health concerns, please provide more information and I will do my best to help.

The chemical industry is a broad term that refers to the companies and organizations involved in the production or transformation of raw materials or intermediates into various chemical products. These products can be used for a wide range of applications, including manufacturing, agriculture, pharmaceuticals, and consumer goods. The chemical industry includes businesses that produce basic chemicals, such as petrochemicals, agrochemicals, polymers, and industrial gases, as well as those that manufacture specialty chemicals, such as dyestuffs, flavors, fragrances, and advanced materials. Additionally, the chemical industry encompasses companies that provide services related to the research, development, testing, and distribution of chemical products.

African Americans are defined as individuals who have ancestry from any of the black racial groups of Africa. This term is often used to describe people living in the United States who have total or partial descent from enslaved African peoples. The term does not refer to a single ethnicity but is a broad term that includes various ethnic groups with diverse cultures, languages, and traditions. It's important to note that some individuals may prefer to identify as Black or of African descent rather than African American, depending on their personal identity and background.

The District of Columbia (DC) is a federal district and the capital of the United States. It is not a state, but rather a district that is under the exclusive jurisdiction of the U.S. Congress. DC is located between the states of Maryland and Virginia and has a population of approximately 700,000 people.

The medical definition of District of Columbia would not differ from its geographical and political definition. However, it is important to note that DC has its own unique healthcare system and challenges. As a federal district, DC has its own local government, but the U.S. Congress has the authority to review and approve its laws and budget. This can create some challenges in funding and implementing healthcare programs in DC.

DC has a high prevalence of chronic diseases such as diabetes, hypertension, and asthma, and also faces disparities in healthcare access and outcomes among different racial and ethnic groups. The District of Columbia Healthcare Alliance, which is the city's Medicaid program, provides health coverage to low-income residents, including children, pregnant women, and people with disabilities. DC also has a number of safety net hospitals and clinics that provide care to uninsured and underinsured patients.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Wisconsin" is a U.S. state located in the Midwest and is not a medical term or condition. If you have any medical questions or terms you would like defined, I'd be happy to help with those!

'Medical Staff, Hospital' is a general term that refers to the group of licensed physicians and other healthcare professionals who are responsible for providing medical care to patients in a hospital setting. The medical staff may include attending physicians, residents, interns, fellows, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and other advanced practice providers.

The medical staff is typically governed by a set of bylaws that outline the structure, authority, and responsibilities of the group. They are responsible for establishing policies and procedures related to patient care, quality improvement, and safety. The medical staff also plays a key role in the hospital's credentialing and privileging process, which ensures that healthcare professionals meet certain standards and qualifications before they are allowed to practice in the hospital.

The medical staff may work in various departments or divisions within the hospital, such as internal medicine, surgery, pediatrics, obstetrics and gynecology, psychiatry, and radiology. They may also participate in teaching and research activities, as well as hospital committees and leadership roles.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "New York City" is not a medical term or concept. It's a city located in the state of New York, United States. If you have any questions about medical terminology or concepts, I'd be happy to help with those!

Survival analysis is a branch of statistics that deals with the analysis of time to event data. It is used to estimate the time it takes for a certain event of interest to occur, such as death, disease recurrence, or treatment failure. The event of interest is called the "failure" event, and survival analysis estimates the probability of not experiencing the failure event until a certain point in time, also known as the "survival" probability.

Survival analysis can provide important information about the effectiveness of treatments, the prognosis of patients, and the identification of risk factors associated with the event of interest. It can handle censored data, which is common in medical research where some participants may drop out or be lost to follow-up before the event of interest occurs.

Survival analysis typically involves estimating the survival function, which describes the probability of surviving beyond a certain time point, as well as hazard functions, which describe the instantaneous rate of failure at a given time point. Other important concepts in survival analysis include median survival times, restricted mean survival times, and various statistical tests to compare survival curves between groups.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Scotland" is not a medical term or concept. It is one of the four constituent countries of the United Kingdom. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health-related topics, I would be happy to try and help answer those for you.

I'm happy to help, but I need to clarify that "residence characteristics" is not a commonly used medical term. It is more related to the field of public health or epidemiology. However, if you are asking for the characteristics of a residence that could be relevant to medical or health research, they might include:

1. Housing type (single-family home, apartment, mobile home, etc.)
2. Age and condition of the housing unit
3. Presence of environmental hazards (lead paint, asbestos, radon, etc.)
4. Quality of heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems
5. Access to clean water and sanitation facilities
6. Safety features (smoke detectors, carbon monoxide detectors, etc.)
7. Presence of pests (rodents, cockroaches, bed bugs, etc.)
8. Neighborhood characteristics (crime rates, access to healthy food options, walkability, etc.)

These factors can all have an impact on the health outcomes of individuals and communities, and are often studied in public health research.

Diabetes Mellitus is a chronic metabolic disorder characterized by elevated levels of glucose in the blood (hyperglycemia) due to absolute or relative deficiency in insulin secretion and/or insulin action. There are two main types: Type 1 diabetes, which results from the autoimmune destruction of pancreatic beta cells leading to insulin deficiency, and Type 2 diabetes, which is associated with insulin resistance and relative insulin deficiency.

Type 1 diabetes typically presents in childhood or young adulthood, while Type 2 diabetes tends to occur later in life, often in association with obesity and physical inactivity. Both types of diabetes can lead to long-term complications such as damage to the eyes, kidneys, nerves, and cardiovascular system if left untreated or not well controlled.

The diagnosis of diabetes is usually made based on fasting plasma glucose levels, oral glucose tolerance tests, or hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels. Treatment typically involves lifestyle modifications such as diet and exercise, along with medications to lower blood glucose levels and manage associated conditions.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Greece" is not a medical term or concept. Greece is a country located in southeastern Europe, known for its rich history, culture, and contributions to various fields including philosophy, politics, arts, and sciences. If you have any questions related to medical topics or definitions, I'd be happy to help.

Reproducibility of results in a medical context refers to the ability to obtain consistent and comparable findings when a particular experiment or study is repeated, either by the same researcher or by different researchers, following the same experimental protocol. It is an essential principle in scientific research that helps to ensure the validity and reliability of research findings.

In medical research, reproducibility of results is crucial for establishing the effectiveness and safety of new treatments, interventions, or diagnostic tools. It involves conducting well-designed studies with adequate sample sizes, appropriate statistical analyses, and transparent reporting of methods and findings to allow other researchers to replicate the study and confirm or refute the results.

The lack of reproducibility in medical research has become a significant concern in recent years, as several high-profile studies have failed to produce consistent findings when replicated by other researchers. This has led to increased scrutiny of research practices and a call for greater transparency, rigor, and standardization in the conduct and reporting of medical research.

Risk assessment in the medical context refers to the process of identifying, evaluating, and prioritizing risks to patients, healthcare workers, or the community related to healthcare delivery. It involves determining the likelihood and potential impact of adverse events or hazards, such as infectious diseases, medication errors, or medical devices failures, and implementing measures to mitigate or manage those risks. The goal of risk assessment is to promote safe and high-quality care by identifying areas for improvement and taking action to minimize harm.

Proportional hazards models are a type of statistical analysis used in medical research to investigate the relationship between covariates (predictor variables) and survival times. The most common application of proportional hazards models is in the Cox regression model, which is named after its developer, Sir David Cox.

In a proportional hazards model, the hazard rate or risk of an event occurring at a given time is assumed to be proportional to the hazard rate of a reference group, after adjusting for the covariates. This means that the ratio of the hazard rates between any two individuals remains constant over time, regardless of their survival times.

Mathematically, the hazard function h(t) at time t for an individual with a set of covariates X can be expressed as:

h(t|X) = h0(t) \* exp(β1X1 + β2X2 + ... + βpXp)

where h0(t) is the baseline hazard function, X1, X2, ..., Xp are the covariates, and β1, β2, ..., βp are the regression coefficients that represent the effect of each covariate on the hazard rate.

The assumption of proportionality is crucial in the interpretation of the results from a Cox regression model. If the assumption is violated, then the estimated regression coefficients may be biased and misleading. Therefore, it is important to test for the proportional hazards assumption before interpreting the results of a Cox regression analysis.

Brain death is a legal and medical determination that an individual has died because their brain has irreversibly lost all functions necessary for life. It is characterized by the absence of brainstem reflexes, unresponsiveness to stimuli, and the inability to breathe without mechanical support. Brain death is different from a vegetative state or coma, where there may still be some brain activity.

The determination of brain death involves a series of tests and examinations to confirm the absence of brain function. These tests are typically performed by trained medical professionals and may include clinical assessments, imaging studies, and electroencephalograms (EEGs) to confirm the absence of electrical activity in the brain.

Brain death is an important concept in medicine because it allows for the organ donation process to proceed, potentially saving the lives of others. In many jurisdictions, brain death is legally equivalent to cardiopulmonary death, which means that once a person has been declared brain dead, they are considered deceased and their organs can be removed for transplantation.

Congenital abnormalities, also known as birth defects, are structural or functional anomalies that are present at birth. These abnormalities can develop at any point during fetal development, and they can affect any part of the body. They can be caused by genetic factors, environmental influences, or a combination of both.

Congenital abnormalities can range from mild to severe and may include structural defects such as heart defects, neural tube defects, and cleft lip and palate, as well as functional defects such as intellectual disabilities and sensory impairments. Some congenital abnormalities may be visible at birth, while others may not become apparent until later in life.

In some cases, congenital abnormalities may be detected through prenatal testing, such as ultrasound or amniocentesis. In other cases, they may not be diagnosed until after the baby is born. Treatment for congenital abnormalities varies depending on the type and severity of the defect, and may include surgery, therapy, medication, or a combination of these approaches.

"Social Security" is a term that refers to a social insurance program, providing financial security to eligible individuals primarily through retirement, disability, and survivor's benefits. In the United States, it is administered by the Social Security Administration (SSA). The program is funded through payroll taxes known as Federal Insurance Contributions Act (FICA) tax, paid by workers and their employers.

It's important to note that "Social Security" is not a medical term per se, but rather a term used in the context of social welfare programs and policies. However, it does have an impact on healthcare as many Americans rely on Social Security benefits to help cover their medical expenses, especially during retirement.

Medical survival rate is a statistical measure used to determine the percentage of patients who are still alive for a specific period of time after their diagnosis or treatment for a certain condition or disease. It is often expressed as a five-year survival rate, which refers to the proportion of people who are alive five years after their diagnosis. Survival rates can be affected by many factors, including the stage of the disease at diagnosis, the patient's age and overall health, the effectiveness of treatment, and other health conditions that the patient may have. It is important to note that survival rates are statistical estimates and do not necessarily predict an individual patient's prognosis.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "North Carolina" is a geographical location and not a medical term or condition. It is a state located in the southeastern region of the United States. If you have any questions about medical terms or conditions, I'd be happy to help with those!

Hospital mortality is a term used to describe the number or rate of deaths that occur in a hospital setting during a specific period. It is often used as a measure of the quality of healthcare provided by a hospital, as a higher hospital mortality rate may indicate poorer care or more complex cases being treated. However, it's important to note that hospital mortality rates can be influenced by many factors, including the severity of illness of the patients being treated, patient demographics, and the availability of resources and specialized care. Therefore, hospital mortality rates should be interpreted with caution and in the context of other quality metrics.

A medical audit is a systematic review and evaluation of the quality of medical care against established standards to see if it is being delivered efficiently, effectively, and equitably. It is a quality improvement process that aims to improve patient care and outcomes by identifying gaps between actual and desired practice, and implementing changes to close those gaps. Medical audits can focus on various aspects of healthcare delivery, including diagnosis, treatment, medication use, and follow-up care. The ultimate goal of medical audits is to ensure that patients receive the best possible care based on current evidence and best practices.

No data available that match "death certificates"


  • Effective January 15, 2020, NYS will allow adult adoptees over the age of 18 and direct line descendants on behalf of a deceased relative to access their pre-adoption birth certificates. (monroecounty.gov)
  • Implementation of the electronic cremation module occurred on June 22, 2020 and only electronic cremation authorizations are valid for deaths occurring after that date. (virginia.gov)
  • The cremation module in the Electronic Death Reporting System (EDRS) is set to be updated around June 15, 2020. (virginia.gov)
  • Effective August 28, 2020 , with the Governor's recent signing of HB 2046 (PDF) , the fee collected for each death certificate will increase by $1.00 to $14.00 for the first certified copy. (colecounty.org)
  • Special Prosecutor Frederick Franklin issued a statement Tuesday, Oct. 27, 2020, after filing a dismissal along with the death certificate for Jake Gardner, the man a grand jury indicted in the shooting death of James Scurlock during a May protest in downtown Omaha. (wowt.com)
  • The Multiple Cause of Death data available on WONDER are county-level national mortality and population data spanning the years 1999-2020. (cdc.gov)
  • Vital records (births, deaths, marriages, and divorces) mark the milestones of our lives and are the foundation of family history research. (raogk.org)
  • The vital records registrar in each town is responsible for maintaining a registry of all births, marriages, civil unions, deaths and fetal deaths that occur within its town. (raogk.org)
  • However, recording births, deaths and marriages was not the responsibility of the town clerk for each town until 1650. (raogk.org)
  • You are giving us your personal information to allow us to process your request and provide you with additional certificates relating to births, deaths, marriages and Civil Partnerships. (glasgow.gov.uk)
  • Aberdeen City Council collects your personal data in order to process your request to provide additional certificates relating to births, deaths, marriages and civil partnerships. (aberdeencity.gov.uk)
  • Statistics representing fewer than ten (one to nine) deaths or births are suppressed. (cdc.gov)
  • Death Certificate may refer to: Death certificate, a document concerning a person's death Death Certificate (album), an album by rapper Ice Cube "Death Certificate for a Beauty Queen", a single by metal band I Killed the Prom Queen This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Death Certificate. (wikipedia.org)
  • Families may use death certificates to settle the affairs of the deceased, and a death certificate is the only legal record that documents a person's death. (gacovinolake.com)
  • A deceased person's death certificate must contain certain information. (gacovinolake.com)
  • The couple had wed in New Mexico last year, but Stone-Hoskins was not initially named on the death certificate because the state did not recognize same-sex marriages at the time. (texastribune.org)
  • They offered to instead send a deputy attorney general and deputy general counsel for the state health department, who have also been involved in "developing a policy" regarding the issuance of death certificates in light of the Supreme Court's ruling on same-sex marriages. (texastribune.org)
  • Deaths of nonresidents (e.g. nonresident aliens, nationals living abroad, residents of Puerto Rico, Guam, the Virgin Islands, and other territories of the U.S.) and fetal deaths are excluded. (cdc.gov)
  • That hearing stemmed from a ruling last week by U.S. District Judge Orlando Garcia ordering state officials to recognize the same-sex marriage of a Conroe resident by naming him as the surviving spouse on his late husband's death certificate. (texastribune.org)
  • Following Garcia's order last week, the state reissued the death certificate naming Stone-Hoskins as a surviving spouse of his husband, who died in January. (texastribune.org)
  • In the brief filed Monday morning , state attorneys had argued that Paxton and Cole should not be required to appear in court because other officials "have been intimately involved in the details" of naming John Stone-Hoskins as the surviving spouse on the death certificate for his late husband, James. (texastribune.org)
  • The Florida Department of Health issued an updated death certificate that listed Fort Myers resident Arlene Goldberg as the surviving spouse of Carol Goldwasser. (wsvn.com)
  • Birth, marriage, and death certificates are not filed in the Broome County Clerk's Office. (gobroomecounty.com)
  • The Town Clerk's Office issues death certificates upon request. (ma.us)
  • The state of New York uses the U.S. Standard Certificate of Death, rather than their own edition, according to a PBS article. (gacovinolake.com)
  • To comply with WHO standards and to promote uniformity among the states, NCHS has developed and periodically revises the U.S. Standard Certificate of Death. (medscape.com)
  • To receive funds from NCHS for its data, each state must collect and provide death data in a format consistent with the U.S. Standard Certificate of Death, so the death certificate in each state appears somewhat similar to other states. (medscape.com)
  • The certificate states Clark died from acute myocardial infarction (a heart attack) and that he suffered from coronary artery disease. (usmagazine.com)
  • According to the actor's death certificate - which was obtained by TMZ - James died from acute myocardial infarction, or, as we know it, a massive heart attack. (closerweekly.com)
  • Generally, a funeral home or other person in charge of the deceased's remains completes a death certificate. (gacovinolake.com)
  • Birth and death certificates are available through the Fulton County Board of Health, Office of Vital Records. (fultoncountyga.gov)
  • Birth and death certificates may be purchased online through VitalChek or in person at the Office of Vital Records located in the Fulton County Government Center at 141 Pryor Street SW Suite 1029A, Atlanta, GA 30303. (fultoncountyga.gov)
  • Heat-related deaths have been "substantially underreported" on Australia's national records, according to experts from The Australian National University (ANU). (edu.au)
  • The Vital Records Office provides eligible applicants with copies of birth and death records that occurred in Monroe County from 1880 to the present. (monroecounty.gov)
  • Certified copies of birth and death records are processed while you wait and with few exceptions, take a matter of minutes. (monroecounty.gov)
  • Pennsylvania birth, death, and marriage records can be ordered online through the Pennsylvania Department of Health's Division of Vital Records at https://www.health.pa.gov/topics/certificates/Pages/Vital%20Records.aspx . (gobroomecounty.com)
  • For over a year, OCME worked with Vital Records and organizations representing the funeral industry to develop and implement a module in the Electronic Death Record System (EDRS) to authorize cremations electronically when requested. (virginia.gov)
  • How to obtain copies of Canal Zone vital records, such as Canal Zone birth certificates, Canal Zone death records, Canal Zone marriage licenses & Canal Zone divorce decrees. (vitalrec.com)
  • For Genealogical Research (including Birth records that are over 100 years old), we only process requests that include the fees for said certificates. (norwichct.org)
  • Any fees that are sent in will either be used towards the certificate(s) that are found or if no records are found the fees will be used as payment for the search that we perform. (norwichct.org)
  • Records for life events that took place in Fylde or Wyre (or in the sub-district of Fleetwood and Fylde) from 1890 will be held at Lancashire Certificate Services . (blackpool.gov.uk)
  • For information on how to apply for your adopted birth certificate or to access your adoption records, please contact the General Register Office . (blackpool.gov.uk)
  • Connecticut Birth, Marriage, Divorce along with Death records , also referred to as vital records, give specifics about significant events in your ancestors life. (raogk.org)
  • Connecticut Department of Health, issues, documents, and stores certified copies of vital records including birth, marriage, divorce death certificates for occurrences that took place in Connecticut. (raogk.org)
  • The City of College Station Vital Records office is responsible for ensuring that birth and death records in College Station are registered and filed with the Texas Department of State Health Services Vital Statistics Unit. (cstx.gov)
  • Attorney Neel Lane, who has represented the same-sex couples in the lawsuit, said the AG "advised the judge" during a telephone hearing on Monday that the state health department, which oversees vital records, would issue new policy guidelines this week "making clear that same-sex couples are entitled to amended death certificates and amended birth certificates to the same extent as opposite-sex couples. (texastribune.org)
  • This office is responsible for public records including birth, death, marriage and divorce certificates. (adamscounty.org)
  • No records are stored at Adams County, so all requests for death or birth certificates need to be directed to the office in Lincoln. (adamscounty.org)
  • That's according to the National Records of Scotland , which published Britain's longest-reigning monarch's death certificate on Thursday. (kbzk.com)
  • This undated photo issued on Thursday Sept. 29, 2022 by the National Records of Scotland, shows the death certificate of Queen Elizabeth II. (kbzk.com)
  • The certificate records that Elizabeth died at Balmoral Castle in Ballater, Scotland on Sept. 8 at 3.10 p.m. (kbzk.com)
  • The DOH continues to provide five free death certificates for victims of the Maui wildfires and is also replacing vital records lost in the fire at no charge. (hawaiinewsnow.com)
  • We will use the certificate number generated (not linked to any personal information) to maintain an audit trail for our records. (aberdeencity.gov.uk)
  • Records relating to payments for certificates are retained for 6 years in line with financial reporting arrangements. (aberdeencity.gov.uk)
  • Idaho Office of Vital Records has copies of birth, marriage, divorce and death records. (genealogyinc.com)
  • Birth, marriage, and death records are connected with central life events. (genealogyinc.com)
  • Ordering Vital Records - You can also order Order Electronically Online or You can download an application for Idaho Birth, Marriage, Divorce and Death Certificates Applications to mail. (genealogyinc.com)
  • This is one reason that we reviewed medical records, birth certificates, and residential address information. (cdc.gov)
  • SAMPLE: Death records for 11,620 veterinarians. (cdc.gov)
  • PROCEDURES: Information for veterinarians who died during 1979 through 2015 was obtained from AVMA obituary and life insurance databases and submitted to a centralized database of US death records to obtain underlying causes of death. (cdc.gov)
  • Determining occupation for National Violent Death Reporting System records: an evaluation of autocoding programs. (cdc.gov)
  • Having copies of medical records and death certificates is also helpful. (medlineplus.gov)
  • All available from the three sources, consisting of the diagnoses of cancer were assigned by the 4,401,914 hospital discharges, 197,859 death program using the data available electroni- certificates and 2,516,832 pathology records cally (Clarke et al . (who.int)
  • Jake Gardner, accused of manslaughter for the shooting death of James Scurlock this summer, has died by suicide according to Gardner's attorney, Stu Dornan. (wowt.com)
  • Among female veterinarians, the percentage of deaths by suicide was stable from 2000 until the end of the study, but the number of such deaths subjectively increased with each 5-year period. (cdc.gov)
  • A higher-than-expected number of deaths from suicide among veterinarians has been described in multiple studies from Australia, Norway, and the United Kingdom. (cdc.gov)
  • Methods: Deaths from suicide were identified in NVDRS for individuals age 16 and older from 2010 to 2017. (cdc.gov)
  • Second, lawsuits against certifiers of death are rare, and, when they do occur, the certifier is usually upheld. (medscape.com)
  • Certified Copy - Death Certificate: $13.00 first copy, $10.00 for subsequent copies of same record. (barnesjewish.org)
  • Fee $10.00 per certificate. (ma.us)
  • Additional information on these new categories can be found at NCHS Classifications of Diseases, and Functioning & Disability: Classification of Death and Injury Resulting from Terrorism . (cdc.gov)
  • You may obtain a death certificate if the deceased passed away anywhere in Missouri after 1980. (colecounty.org)
  • If you are in charge or gathering information to prepare a death certificate in New York, however, then you will have to do so quickly, by knowing how to obtain a death certificate in New York . (gacovinolake.com)
  • Here's how to obtain a death certificate in New York if it has already been filed. (gacovinolake.com)
  • The mortality data are based on information from all death certificates filed in the fifty states and the District of Columbia. (cdc.gov)
  • Mortality data from the death certificates are coded by the states and provided to NCHS through the Vital Statistics Cooperative Program or coded by NCHS from copies of the original death certificates provided to NCHS by the State registration offices. (cdc.gov)
  • Mortality data from US death certificates were not linked with US census data. (medscape.com)
  • The mortality data published regularly by NCHS are based on information from every death certificate completed in the United States. (medscape.com)
  • Ordering birth certificates, death certificates, marriage certificates, and divorce certificates from VitalChek is easy - simply click on the certificate you need to get started. (vitalchek.com)
  • A certificate of death should be filed by the funeral director with the Vital Statistics Registrar of the Fulton County Health Department as soon as possible after death. (fultoncountyga.gov)
  • Any funeral director filing a death certificate in a registration district other than that in which the death occurred or the body was found shall immediately send the State registrar written notice by first class mail, except that a record created on the NJ-EDRS shall be deemed to have been transmitted to the State registrar in accordance with the requirements of this subsection. (justia.com)
  • The notice shall contain the name of the deceased, the place and date of death, the date the certificate was filed, the name and address of the registrar with whom the certificate was filed, and the name and address of the funeral director. (justia.com)
  • The National Violent Death Reporting System (NVDRS) collects information about violent deaths occurring in the United States. (cdc.gov)
  • The Council understands our legal basis for processing personal data for the purposes of providing additional certificates as Article 6(1)(c) of the General Data Protection Regulation. (aberdeencity.gov.uk)
  • A health statistics review uses existing health data from data sources like birth certificates and health registries to determine whether health outcomes in a particular community are occurring at a higher, lower, or about the same level compared to statewide or national levels after taking into account factors such as gender and age of individuals within the community. (cdc.gov)
  • Data are based on death certificates for U.S. residents. (cdc.gov)
  • Data are also available by place of death, month and week day of death, and whether an autopsy was performed. (cdc.gov)
  • Beginning with data for 2006, the valid ICD-10 codes used to classify causes of death changed. (cdc.gov)
  • Effective with the 2006 data year, 18 codes were introduced as valid causes of death, and 4 codes were discontinued. (cdc.gov)
  • Effective with the 2007 data year, 4 codes were introduced as valid causes of death, and 2 codes were discontinued. (cdc.gov)
  • Beginning with data for 2001, NCHS introduced categories *U01-*U03 for classifying and coding deaths due to acts of terrorism. (cdc.gov)
  • Who can request a birth certificate? (fultoncountyga.gov)
  • The person named on the certificate - If the person named on the certificate (i.e. the registrant) is the requestor, that person must provide valid photo identification at the time of the request. (fultoncountyga.gov)
  • For birth and death certificates, please include the following in your request. (vitalrec.com)
  • All applications should be made through our online service (click below on 'Apply For A Copy Certificate Now' ) until further notice or you can request a certificate by writing to us using the procedure stated in 'Other ways to apply' below. (blackpool.gov.uk)
  • After receiving the required documentation, your certificate request will be ready within 48-72 hours. (solanocounty.com)
  • WOWT) - Special Prosecutor Frederick Franklin on Tuesday filed a copy of the death certificate of Jake Gardner, the man indicted by a grand jury in the shooting death of James Scurlock during George Floyd protests downtown in May, along with a request for an official dismissal of the indictment . (wowt.com)
  • You can also request copies of the death certificate at the time that the death certificate is originally filled out. (gacovinolake.com)
  • He said this as a response to government statement that death certificates are needed for the relatives of missing persons to obtain relief assistance from the state and other non-governmental organizations. (tamilnet.com)
  • You may obtain a birth certificate for yourself or a family member if you were born anywhere in the state of Missouri after 1920. (colecounty.org)
  • Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton, who was facing possible contempt of court charges, vowed on Monday that the state would revise its policies in the next week to allow same-sex couples to obtain amended death certificates. (texastribune.org)
  • Garcia also ruled that Paxton and Kirk Cole, interim commissioner of the Texas Department of State Health Services, should appear in court in San Antonio to determine whether they should be held in contempt for refusing to amend the death certificate. (texastribune.org)
  • Death or birth certificates can be obtained from the Nebraska State Office building located in Lincoln's GOLD's Galleria building at 10th and N Street in Lincoln, Nebraska. (adamscounty.org)
  • FORT MYERS, Fla. (AP) - The state of Florida on Wednesday issued its first death certificate recognizing a same-sex couple. (wsvn.com)
  • With the death certificate, the couple became the first same-sex couple whose marriage is recognized by a state agency. (wsvn.com)
  • This collection has multiple arrangements: by Idaho city or town, mixed cities and name, and by out of state deaths of Idaho natives. (genealogyinc.com)
  • Those who are legally allowed to obtain a copy of a death certificate according to the New York State Department of Health are listed below. (gacovinolake.com)
  • Death certificates are a valuable source for state-based and national mortality statistics. (medscape.com)
  • You must provide a marriage certificate in addition to your valid picture ID. (norwichct.org)
  • You can download an application online for Connecticut Birth Certificate , Marriage Certificate , Death Certificate Application or Town or City Birth Certificate , Marriage Certificate , Death Certificate Applications. (raogk.org)
  • On the forms, 'Date of Vital' refers to Date of Birth, Date of Marriage, or Date of Death. (norwichct.org)
  • Solano Public Health Vital Statistics issues birth and death certificates, by prior appointment only , in person at the 275 Beck Avenue, Fairfield location. (solanocounty.com)
  • Solano Public Health Vital Statistics issues birth and death certificates, in person, at the 275 Beck Avenue, Fairfield location. (solanocounty.com)
  • Justia › US Law › US Codes and Statutes › New Jersey Revised Statutes › 2018 New Jersey Revised Statutes › Title 26 - HEALTH AND VITAL STATISTICS › Chapter 6 › Section 26:6-6 - Execution of death certificate. (justia.com)
  • The manner of death is checked as "pending investigation. (tmz.com)
  • Additionally, it eliminates redundant examination for medical examiner cases by requiring cremation authorization by the medical examiner performing the official medicolegal death investigation and examination. (virginia.gov)
  • For additional help obtaining birth record information, please contact the Barnes-Jewish Hospital birth certificates office at 314.362.1161 . (barnesjewish.org)
  • If you call us first at (508) 398-2231 X1212, we will verify that we have the death record in our office, and will have it ready for you when you arrive. (ma.us)
  • If the deceased was a resident of Yarmouth at the time of their death, we would have that death record in our office. (ma.us)
  • For questions about birth and death certificates or ordering online, please contact 707-784-8060. (solanocounty.com)
  • For questions about birth and death certificates and how to order online, please call 707-784-8060. (solanocounty.com)
  • Applications for birth and death certificates are accepted Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. (cstx.gov)
  • Applications for birth and death certificates are below. (cstx.gov)
  • Approximately 2.6 million deaths occur per year in the United States, and the NCHS receives information on virtually all of them. (medscape.com)
  • But on the individual case level, the death certificate is used to settle estate and other matters and may also be used in legal proceedings. (medscape.com)
  • That means, for instance, when a woman has a child, her same-sex spouse is not automatically listed on the birth certificate - and considered the child's parent - as a male spouse would be. (texastribune.org)
  • For copy certificate applications, you currently cannot apply in person at The town hall or the Customer First office. (blackpool.gov.uk)
  • You can apply for a certified copy of a birth, marriage, civil partnership or death certificate online. (blackpool.gov.uk)
  • In most instances, you will need to apply to the General Register Officer for a copy of a stillbirth certificate . (blackpool.gov.uk)
  • The fee to obtain a copy of a death certificate in NY is $30. (gacovinolake.com)
  • If you have an asthma attack and die during heavy smoke exposure from bushfires, the death certificate should include that information. (edu.au)
  • Some of the new details about events leading up to Scurlock's death include a 911 call that Gardner placed "though officers with the Omaha Police Department were literally seconds away and, on every corner surrounding his business," Franklin states. (wowt.com)
  • If you are unable to come to our office yourself, we recommend that you order your certificate by mail or via the internet or telephone. (monroecounty.gov)
  • Once your certificate leaves our office and is passed to the Royal Mail, if it goes missing in the post and you have chosen 1st or 2nd Class postage, you will need to contact Royal Mail to investigate. (blackpool.gov.uk)
  • If there is an error on your certificate, you will need to apply to the General Register Office (GRO) to have this changed using the forms in each section. (walthamforest.gov.uk)
  • Long-form birth certificates before 1987 and death certificates before 1990 can be obtained at the Brazos County Clerks Office at 300 E 26th Ste. 120 in Bryan. (cstx.gov)
  • The coroner's office is not able to issue a conventional death certificate since the body has not been found, but officials are working with the family on the process for closure. (wrdw.com)
  • A spokeswoman for the AG's office confirmed the hearing had been canceled "while DSHS finalizes guidelines for the issuance of death certificates. (texastribune.org)
  • Race and Hispanic origin are reported separately on the death certificate in accordance with standards set forth by the Office of Management and Budget. (cdc.gov)
  • Three day-mobile service was held on June 14, 17 and 24 at Eravoorpathu Chengkaladi DS division under a pilot project launched by the Ministry of National Languages and Integration together with the UNDP in eastern Sri Lanka to issue such death certificates to persons disappeared or missing during the conflict. (tamilnet.com)
  • The researchers say death certification needs to be modernised to reflect the impact of large-scale environmental events. (edu.au)
  • Influenza-related deaths by MMWR (Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report) week of death reported by 2 surveillance systems, Los Angeles County, California, USA, 2009-2010. (cdc.gov)
  • Relatives of some of the earlier detainees ask why the UNDP, which is assisting the government to issue death certificates to missing and disappeared persons as dead, has failed to take steps to allow the relatives to see their loved ones now held in detention centres and prisons and collect their details. (tamilnet.com)
  • If your certificate does go missing, we will not issue a free replacement and you will need to purchase another. (blackpool.gov.uk)
  • Barnes-Jewish Hospital does not issue certified birth certificates or certified death certificates. (barnesjewish.org)
  • But he ordered Florida to issue a revised death certificate for Goldwasser. (wsvn.com)
  • Birth Certificates are only issued to applicants having a direct and tangible interest, primary immediate family members, or legal representatives of the family. (fultoncountyga.gov)
  • The head of a resettled family in Paduwaankarai in Batticaloa district said the government has not provided any assistance to those resettled in the area even after three years and there is no need for them to obtain any assistance from the government by obtaining death certificates for their relatives who were reported missing after abduction. (tamilnet.com)
  • A Maui family says an error on their beloved matriarch's death certificate is causing them unnecessary pain and confusion. (hawaiinewsnow.com)
  • Her death from the August 8th Lahaina wildfire shattered her whole family. (hawaiinewsnow.com)
  • The Hawaii Department of Health said it will ensure that the family of Donna Gomes will not be charged for the corrected death certificate. (hawaiinewsnow.com)
  • The family is asking all other family members who lost a loved one in the Lahaina wildfire to double-check their death certificates. (hawaiinewsnow.com)
  • If you have lost a family member recently, you may be in charge of preparing the death certificate. (gacovinolake.com)
  • If you are responsible for filling out a death certificate for your family member because of a wrongful death , you may have the right to take legal recourse. (gacovinolake.com)
  • You can download and please share this Fake Death Certificate Template Fresh Death Certificate Template Free Download [7 New Designs] ideas to your friends and family via your social media account. (swimmingfreestyle.net)
  • You must provide a long form birth certificate to show your relationship to the registrant and your valid picture ID (i.e., a grandparent would need to provide a birth certificate showing themselves as parent of their child). (norwichct.org)
  • Causes of death are classified in accordance with the International Classification of Disease. (cdc.gov)
  • In the late nineteenth century, the original precursor of what became ICD was concerned only with causes of death. (who.int)
  • In the event the death certificate is filed with the registrar of a district other than that in which the death took place or the body was found, that registrar shall, within 24 hours after issuing the permit, sign and forward the certificate of death to the registrar of the district where the death took place or the body was found, with a statement that the permit was issued. (justia.com)
  • In case the death certificate is filed with the deputy registrar, alternate deputy registrar or subregistrar, he shall within 12 hours forward the certificate to his own registrar, who in turn shall forward the certificate as heretofore directed. (justia.com)
  • It says he was never married at the time of his death and worked in the entertainment and real estate industries. (tmz.com)
  • 53. DECEDENT'S RACE (Check one or more races to indicate what the that best describes the highest degree or level of that best describes whether the decedent is decedent considered himself or herself to be) school completed at the time of death. (cdc.gov)
  • First, the death certificate is an opinion based on information available at the time the death certificate is completed. (medscape.com)
  • The main objective of this study was to investigate the causes of deaths among the identified maternal deaths at the community level using the RAMOS in all households in which a women of reproductive age died and to determine all direct, indirect, late and pregnancy related maternal mortality in the West Azerbaijan Province of Iran during one year (March 2013 to March 2014). (who.int)
  • Our easy application process will help you find the right agency and certificate for your specific needs. (vitalchek.com)
  • We will fast-track your application aiming to produce certificates within 24 hours. (blackpool.gov.uk)
  • Effective July 1, 2018, changes have been made to Virginia Code §32.1-263 regarding filing death certificates. (virginia.gov)