Nobel PrizeDeer: The family Cervidae of 17 genera and 45 species occurring nearly throughout North America, South America, and Eurasia, on most associated continental islands, and in northern Africa. Wild populations of deer have been established through introduction by people in Cuba, New Guinea, Australia, New Zealand, and other places where the family does not naturally occur. They are slim, long-legged and best characterized by the presence of antlers. Their habitat is forests, swamps, brush country, deserts, and arctic tundra. They are usually good swimmers; some migrate seasonally. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1362)History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Portraits as Topic: Graphic representations, especially of the face, of real persons, usually posed, living or dead. (From Thesaurus for Graphic Materials II, p540, 1995)Socialism: A system of government in which means of production and distribution of goods are controlled by the state.Psychoanalysis: The separation or resolution of the psyche into its constituent elements. The term has two separate meanings: 1. a procedure devised by Sigmund Freud, for investigating mental processes by means of free association, dream interpretation and interpretation of resistance and transference manifestations; and 2. a theory of psychology developed by Freud from his clinical experience with hysterical patients. (From Campbell, Psychiatric Dictionary, 1996).Replantation: Restoration of an organ or other structure to its original site.Duty to Warn: A health professional's obligation to breach patient CONFIDENTIALITY to warn third parties of the danger of their being assaulted or of contracting a serious infection.History, 21st Century: Time period from 2001 through 2100 of the common era.Gene Expression Profiling: The determination of the pattern of genes expressed at the level of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION, under specific circumstances or in a specific cell.Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis: Hybridization of a nucleic acid sample to a very large set of OLIGONUCLEOTIDE PROBES, which have been attached individually in columns and rows to a solid support, to determine a BASE SEQUENCE, or to detect variations in a gene sequence, GENE EXPRESSION, or for GENE MAPPING.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Morals: Standards of conduct that distinguish right from wrong.Databases, Genetic: Databases devoted to knowledge about specific genes and gene products.Computational Biology: A field of biology concerned with the development of techniques for the collection and manipulation of biological data, and the use of such data to make biological discoveries or predictions. This field encompasses all computational methods and theories for solving biological problems including manipulation of models and datasets.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.History, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.Knowledge Bases: Collections of facts, assumptions, beliefs, and heuristics that are used in combination with databases to achieve desired results, such as a diagnosis, an interpretation, or a solution to a problem (From McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed).Software: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Metabolism: The chemical reactions that occur within the cells, tissues, or an organism. These processes include both the biosynthesis (ANABOLISM) and the breakdown (CATABOLISM) of organic materials utilized by the living organism.Cluster Analysis: A set of statistical methods used to group variables or observations into strongly inter-related subgroups. In epidemiology, it may be used to analyze a closely grouped series of events or cases of disease or other health-related phenomenon with well-defined distribution patterns in relation to time or place or both.Aortic Aneurysm: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of AORTA.Databases, Nucleic Acid: Databases containing information about NUCLEIC ACIDS such as BASE SEQUENCE; SNPS; NUCLEIC ACID CONFORMATION; and other properties. Information about the DNA fragments kept in a GENE LIBRARY or GENOMIC LIBRARY is often maintained in DNA databases.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Hybridization, Genetic: The genetic process of crossbreeding between genetically dissimilar parents to produce a hybrid.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Insemination, Artificial: Artificial introduction of SEMEN or SPERMATOZOA into the VAGINA to facilitate FERTILIZATION.Data Interpretation, Statistical: Application of statistical procedures to analyze specific observed or assumed facts from a particular study.Transcriptome: The pattern of GENE EXPRESSION at the level of genetic transcription in a specific organism or under specific circumstances in specific cells.Gene Regulatory Networks: Interacting DNA-encoded regulatory subsystems in the GENOME that coordinate input from activator and repressor TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS during development, cell differentiation, or in response to environmental cues. The networks function to ultimately specify expression of particular sets of GENES for specific conditions, times, or locations.United StatesInformation Storage and Retrieval: Organized activities related to the storage, location, search, and retrieval of information.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Genomics: The systematic study of the complete DNA sequences (GENOME) of organisms.Observer Variation: The failure by the observer to measure or identify a phenomenon accurately, which results in an error. Sources for this may be due to the observer's missing an abnormality, or to faulty technique resulting in incorrect test measurement, or to misinterpretation of the data. Two varieties are inter-observer variation (the amount observers vary from one another when reporting on the same material) and intra-observer variation (the amount one observer varies between observations when reporting more than once on the same material).Statistics as Topic: The science and art of collecting, summarizing, and analyzing data that are subject to random variation. The term is also applied to the data themselves and to the summarization of the data.Pattern Recognition, Automated: In INFORMATION RETRIEVAL, machine-sensing or identification of visible patterns (shapes, forms, and configurations). (Harrod's Librarians' Glossary, 7th ed)Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Microarray Analysis: The simultaneous analysis, on a microchip, of multiple samples or targets arranged in an array format.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Linear Models: Statistical models in which the value of a parameter for a given value of a factor is assumed to be equal to a + bx, where a and b are constants. The models predict a linear regression.Psychometrics: Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Statistics, Nonparametric: A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Kearns-Sayre Syndrome: A mitochondrial disorder featuring the triad of chronic progressive EXTERNAL OPHTHALMOPLEGIA, cardiomyopathy (CARDIOMYOPATHIES) with conduction block (HEART BLOCK), and RETINITIS PIGMENTOSA. Disease onset is in the first or second decade. Elevated CSF protein, sensorineural deafness, seizures, and pyramidal signs may also be present. Ragged-red fibers are found on muscle biopsy. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p984)Diet Records: Records of nutrient intake over a specific period of time, usually kept by the patient.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Gene Expression Regulation: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.Imaging, Three-Dimensional: The process of generating three-dimensional images by electronic, photographic, or other methods. For example, three-dimensional images can be generated by assembling multiple tomographic images with the aid of a computer, while photographic 3-D images (HOLOGRAPHY) can be made by exposing film to the interference pattern created when two laser light sources shine on an object.Hyoid Bone: A mobile U-shaped bone that lies in the anterior part of the neck at the level of the third CERVICAL VERTEBRAE. The hyoid bone is suspended from the processes of the TEMPORAL BONES by ligaments, and is firmly bound to the THYROID CARTILAGE by muscles.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Nutrition Assessment: Evaluation and measurement of nutritional variables in order to assess the level of nutrition or the NUTRITIONAL STATUS of the individual. NUTRITION SURVEYS may be used in making the assessment.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Diet Surveys: Systematic collections of factual data pertaining to the diet of a human population within a given geographic area.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Image Processing, Computer-Assisted: A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.Reference Values: The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.Translating: Conversion from one language to another language.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.ROC Curve: A graphic means for assessing the ability of a screening test to discriminate between healthy and diseased persons; may also be used in other studies, e.g., distinguishing stimuli responses as to a faint stimuli or nonstimuli.Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted: Methods developed to aid in the interpretation of ultrasound, radiographic images, etc., for diagnosis of disease.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Diagnostic Techniques, Ophthalmological: Methods and procedures for the diagnosis of diseases of the eye or of vision disorders.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Cephalometry: The measurement of the dimensions of the HEAD.Posture: The position or attitude of the body.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Blood Specimen Collection: The taking of a blood sample to determine its character as a whole, to identify levels of its component cells, chemicals, gases, or other constituents, to perform pathological examination, etc.BrazilDisability Evaluation: Determination of the degree of a physical, mental, or emotional handicap. The diagnosis is applied to legal qualification for benefits and income under disability insurance and to eligibility for Social Security and workmen's compensation benefits.Translations: Products resulting from the conversion of one language to another.Mental Recall: The process whereby a representation of past experience is elicited.Models, Statistical: Statistical formulations or analyses which, when applied to data and found to fit the data, are then used to verify the assumptions and parameters used in the analysis. Examples of statistical models are the linear model, binomial model, polynomial model, two-parameter model, etc.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.TurkeyAnthropometry: The technique that deals with the measurement of the size, weight, and proportions of the human or other primate body.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Factor Analysis, Statistical: A set of statistical methods for analyzing the correlations among several variables in order to estimate the number of fundamental dimensions that underlie the observed data and to describe and measure those dimensions. It is used frequently in the development of scoring systems for rating scales and questionnaires.Monitoring, Ambulatory: The use of electronic equipment to observe or record physiologic processes while the patient undergoes normal daily activities.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Tomography, Optical Coherence: An imaging method using LASERS that is used for mapping subsurface structure. When a reflective site in the sample is at the same optical path length (coherence) as the reference mirror, the detector observes interference fringes.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Body Mass Index: An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)Contrast Media: Substances used to allow enhanced visualization of tissues.Monitoring, Physiologic: The continuous measurement of physiological processes, blood pressure, heart rate, renal output, reflexes, respiration, etc., in a patient or experimental animal; includes pharmacologic monitoring, the measurement of administered drugs or their metabolites in the blood, tissues, or urine.Probability: The study of chance processes or the relative frequency characterizing a chance process.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Breast Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.Energy Intake: Total number of calories taken in daily whether ingested or by parenteral routes.Epidemiologic Methods: Research techniques that focus on study designs and data gathering methods in human and animal populations.Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Photography: Method of making images on a sensitized surface by exposure to light or other radiant energy.Cultural Characteristics: Those aspects or characteristics which identify a culture.Ultrasonography, Doppler: Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect, with frequency-shifted ultrasound reflections produced by moving targets (usually red blood cells) in the bloodstream along the ultrasound axis in direct proportion to the velocity of movement of the targets, to determine both direction and velocity of blood flow. (Stedman, 25th ed)Image Enhancement: Improvement of the quality of a picture by various techniques, including computer processing, digital filtering, echocardiographic techniques, light and ultrastructural MICROSCOPY, fluorescence spectrometry and microscopy, scintigraphy, and in vitro image processing at the molecular level.Postural Balance: A POSTURE in which an ideal body mass distribution is achieved. Postural balance provides the body carriage stability and conditions for normal functions in stationary position or in movement, such as sitting, standing, or walking.Databases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)China: A country spanning from central Asia to the Pacific Ocean.Body Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Language: A verbal or nonverbal means of communicating ideas or feelings.Ankle Joint: The joint that is formed by the inferior articular and malleolar articular surfaces of the TIBIA; the malleolar articular surface of the FIBULA; and the medial malleolar, lateral malleolar, and superior surfaces of the TALUS.Pain Measurement: Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.Computer Simulation: Computer-based representation of physical systems and phenomena such as chemical processes.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Range of Motion, Articular: The distance and direction to which a bone joint can be extended. Range of motion is a function of the condition of the joints, muscles, and connective tissues involved. Joint flexibility can be improved through appropriate MUSCLE STRETCHING EXERCISES.Sports: Activities or games, usually involving physical effort or skill. Reasons for engagement in sports include pleasure, competition, and/or financial reward.Environmental Monitoring: The monitoring of the level of toxins, chemical pollutants, microbial contaminants, or other harmful substances in the environment (soil, air, and water), workplace, or in the bodies of people and animals present in that environment.IranMuscle Strength: The amount of force generated by MUSCLE CONTRACTION. Muscle strength can be measured during isometric, isotonic, or isokinetic contraction, either manually or using a device such as a MUSCLE STRENGTH DYNAMOMETER.Physical Therapy Modalities: Therapeutic modalities frequently used in PHYSICAL THERAPY SPECIALTY by PHYSICAL THERAPISTS or physiotherapists to promote, maintain, or restore the physical and physiological well-being of an individual.Models, Genetic: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of genetic processes or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Knee Joint: A synovial hinge connection formed between the bones of the FEMUR; TIBIA; and PATELLA.Video Recording: The storing or preserving of video signals for television to be played back later via a transmitter or receiver. Recordings may be made on magnetic tape or discs (VIDEODISC RECORDING).Quality Control: A system for verifying and maintaining a desired level of quality in a product or process by careful planning, use of proper equipment, continued inspection, and corrective action as required. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Air Pollutants, Occupational: Air pollutants found in the work area. They are usually produced by the specific nature of the occupation.Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Automation: Controlled operation of an apparatus, process, or system by mechanical or electronic devices that take the place of human organs of observation, effort, and decision. (From Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 1993)Health Status Indicators: The measurement of the health status for a given population using a variety of indices, including morbidity, mortality, and available health resources.Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A diagnostic technique that incorporates the measurement of molecular diffusion (such as water or metabolites) for tissue assessment by MRI. The degree of molecular movement can be measured by changes of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) with time, as reflected by tissue microstructure. Diffusion MRI has been used to study BRAIN ISCHEMIA and tumor response to treatment.Vegetables: A food group comprised of EDIBLE PLANTS or their parts.Stroke: A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)Aging: The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.Neuropsychological Tests: Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Positron-Emission Tomography: An imaging technique using compounds labelled with short-lived positron-emitting radionuclides (such as carbon-11, nitrogen-13, oxygen-15 and fluorine-18) to measure cell metabolism. It has been useful in study of soft tissues such as CANCER; CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM; and brain. SINGLE-PHOTON EMISSION-COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY is closely related to positron emission tomography, but uses isotopes with longer half-lives and resolution is lower.Activities of Daily Living: The performance of the basic activities of self care, such as dressing, ambulation, or eating.Food Habits: Acquired or learned food preferences.Radiographic Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted: Computer systems or networks designed to provide radiographic interpretive information.Educational Measurement: The assessing of academic or educational achievement. It includes all aspects of testing and test construction.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Motor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.Syndrome: A characteristic symptom complex.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Radiopharmaceuticals: Compounds that are used in medicine as sources of radiation for radiotherapy and for diagnostic purposes. They have numerous uses in research and industry. (Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1161)Feasibility Studies: Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Blood Flow Velocity: A value equal to the total volume flow divided by the cross-sectional area of the vascular bed.Exercise Test: Controlled physical activity which is performed in order to allow assessment of physiological functions, particularly cardiovascular and pulmonary, but also aerobic capacity. Maximal (most intense) exercise is usually required but submaximal exercise is also used.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Nutritional Status: State of the body in relation to the consumption and utilization of nutrients.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Breast: In humans, one of the paired regions in the anterior portion of the THORAX. The breasts consist of the MAMMARY GLANDS, the SKIN, the MUSCLES, the ADIPOSE TISSUE, and the CONNECTIVE TISSUES.Self Report: Method for obtaining information through verbal responses, written or oral, from subjects.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Artificial Intelligence: Theory and development of COMPUTER SYSTEMS which perform tasks that normally require human intelligence. Such tasks may include speech recognition, LEARNING; VISUAL PERCEPTION; MATHEMATICAL COMPUTING; reasoning, PROBLEM SOLVING, DECISION-MAKING, and translation of language.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Movement: The act, process, or result of passing from one place or position to another. It differs from LOCOMOTION in that locomotion is restricted to the passing of the whole body from one place to another, while movement encompasses both locomotion but also a change of the position of the whole body or any of its parts. Movement may be used with reference to humans, vertebrate and invertebrate animals, and microorganisms. Differentiate also from MOTOR ACTIVITY, movement associated with behavior.Tumor Markers, Biological: Molecular products metabolized and secreted by neoplastic tissue and characterized biochemically in cells or body fluids. They are indicators of tumor stage and grade as well as useful for monitoring responses to treatment and predicting recurrence. Many chemical groups are represented including hormones, antigens, amino and nucleic acids, enzymes, polyamines, and specific cell membrane proteins and lipids.Biopsy: Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay: An immunoassay utilizing an antibody labeled with an enzyme marker such as horseradish peroxidase. While either the enzyme or the antibody is bound to an immunosorbent substrate, they both retain their biologic activity; the change in enzyme activity as a result of the enzyme-antibody-antigen reaction is proportional to the concentration of the antigen and can be measured spectrophotometrically or with the naked eye. Many variations of the method have been developed.Occupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Obesity: A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Physical Fitness: The ability to carry out daily tasks and perform physical activities in a highly functional state, often as a result of physical conditioning.Disease Progression: The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.Psychiatric Status Rating Scales: Standardized procedures utilizing rating scales or interview schedules carried out by health personnel for evaluating the degree of mental illness.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Fluorodeoxyglucose F18: The compound is given by intravenous injection to do POSITRON-EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY for the assessment of cerebral and myocardial glucose metabolism in various physiological or pathological states including stroke and myocardial ischemia. It is also employed for the detection of malignant tumors including those of the brain, liver, and thyroid gland. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1162)Femur: The longest and largest bone of the skeleton, it is situated between the hip and the knee.Geriatric Assessment: Evaluation of the level of physical, physiological, or mental functioning in the older population group.Carotid Stenosis: Narrowing or stricture of any part of the CAROTID ARTERIES, most often due to atherosclerotic plaque formation. Ulcerations may form in atherosclerotic plaques and induce THROMBUS formation. Platelet or cholesterol emboli may arise from stenotic carotid lesions and induce a TRANSIENT ISCHEMIC ATTACK; CEREBROVASCULAR ACCIDENT; or temporary blindness (AMAUROSIS FUGAX). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp 822-3)Walking: An activity in which the body advances at a slow to moderate pace by moving the feet in a coordinated fashion. This includes recreational walking, walking for fitness, and competitive race-walking.Gestational Age: The age of the conceptus, beginning from the time of FERTILIZATION. In clinical obstetrics, the gestational age is often estimated as the time from the last day of the last MENSTRUATION which is about 2 weeks before OVULATION and fertilization.Visual Acuity: Clarity or sharpness of OCULAR VISION or the ability of the eye to see fine details. Visual acuity depends on the functions of RETINA, neuronal transmission, and the interpretative ability of the brain. Normal visual acuity is expressed as 20/20 indicating that one can see at 20 feet what should normally be seen at that distance. Visual acuity can also be influenced by brightness, color, and contrast.Evaluation Studies as Topic: Studies determining the effectiveness or value of processes, personnel, and equipment, or the material on conducting such studies. For drugs and devices, CLINICAL TRIALS AS TOPIC; DRUG EVALUATION; and DRUG EVALUATION, PRECLINICAL are available.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Bone Density: The amount of mineral per square centimeter of BONE. This is the definition used in clinical practice. Actual bone density would be expressed in grams per milliliter. It is most frequently measured by X-RAY ABSORPTIOMETRY or TOMOGRAPHY, X RAY COMPUTED. Bone density is an important predictor for OSTEOPOROSIS.Body Composition: The relative amounts of various components in the body, such as percentage of body fat.Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.IndiaPolymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Depression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.African Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.Netherlands: Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.Oxygen Consumption: The rate at which oxygen is used by a tissue; microliters of oxygen STPD used per milligram of tissue per hour; the rate at which oxygen enters the blood from alveolar gas, equal in the steady state to the consumption of oxygen by tissue metabolism throughout the body. (Stedman, 25th ed, p346)Cognition: Intellectual or mental process whereby an organism obtains knowledge.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Neoplasm Staging: Methods which attempt to express in replicable terms the extent of the neoplasm in the patient.Muscle, Skeletal: A subtype of striated muscle, attached by TENDONS to the SKELETON. Skeletal muscles are innervated and their movement can be consciously controlled. They are also called voluntary muscles.Pain: An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.Energy Metabolism: The chemical reactions involved in the production and utilization of various forms of energy in cells.
Pearson, David; Smalley, Michelle; Ainsworth, Christopher; Cook, Maria; Boyle, Jacqueline; Flury, Sarah (August 2008). " ... Slade, Peter D. (1994). "Models of hallucination: from theory to practice". In David, Anthony S.; Cutting, John C. (eds.). The ... Bentall, Richard P.; Jackson, Howard F.; Pilgrim, David (November 1988). "Abandoning the concept of "schizophrenia": some ... Chadwick, Paul; Hughes, Stephanie; Russell, Daphne; Russell, Ian; Dagnan, Dave (July 2009). "Mindfulness groups for distressing ...
Painter, Ron M.; Pearson, David M.; Waymouth, Robert M. (2010). "Selective Catalytic Oxidation of Glycerol to Dihydroxyacetone ... Chung, Kevin; Banik, Steven M.; De Crisci, Antonio G.; Pearson, David M.; Blake, Timothy R.; Olsson, Johan V.; Ingram, Andrew J ...
David Pearson (3) • Lee Petty (3) • Tony Stewart (3) • Buck Baker (2) • Herb Thomas (2) • Joe Weatherly (2) • Ned Jarrett (2 ... David Ragan (38) • Kurt Busch (41) • Kyle Larson (42) • Aric Almirola (43) • A. J. Allmendinger (47) • Jimmie Johnson (48) • ...
David Pearson (3). *Lee Petty (3). *Tony Stewart (3). *Buck Baker (2) ... David Reutimann. Jamie McMurray 25. 5-sep. Emory Healthcare 500. Atlanta Motor Speedway. Tony Stewart. Carl Edwards. Jimmie ... David Reutimann. Carl Edwards. Jeff Gordon 20. 25-jul. Brickyard 400. Indianapolis Motor Speedway. Jamie McMurray. Kevin ...
Dave Mustaine - Megadeth. *David Ellefson - Megadeth. *David Pearson - Blissed. *David Wilde - Outkast ...
Pearson, David (1 September 2011). "Peugeot-Citroen to Invest €650 Million in Indian Assembly Plant". Wall Street Journal. ...
Rehabilitation & Physical Therapy Coordinator - David Pearson. *Strength & Conditioning Coordinator - Jason Craig. *Mental ... 17: Since Keith Hernandez's retirement, his number 17 has been worn by Kevin Appier, Dae-Sung Koo, José Lima, David Newhan, and ... as well as young superstars José Reyes and David Wright. The Mets advanced to game seven of the 2006 NLCS but lost after Yadier ...
1975: David Pearson's win came amid controversy; his Mercury, sponsored by race sponsor Purolator filters, was leaking oil in ... 1978: The 1978 running saw the fewest cautions (1) in track history.[4][5] Darrell Waltrip edged David Pearson for the win. ... David Pearson. Wood Brothers Racing. Mercury. 200. 500 (804.672). 4:29:50. 111.179. Report. ... Johnson was not alone, as David Stremme and David Gilliland also had right front tire troubles. Kasey Kahne dominated the ...
David Pearson (racing driver) (born 1934), NASCAR driver. *Phillip Schofield (born 1962), television presenter ... David Taylor (snooker player) (born 1943), English snooker player. *Dieter F. Uchtdorf (born 1940), a religious leader in the ...
3rd ed., Pearson, 2002. David Tong. "Cambridge Lecture Notes on Classical Dynamics". DAMTP. Retrieved 2017-06-08. Principle of ...
David Pearson was the Director of Libraries, Archives in the City of London between 2009 and early 2017. His brief also ... "David Pearson". LinkedIn. Archived from the original on December 12, 2014. Retrieved December 12, 2014. Guildhall Library ...
Pearson, David. C. (August 1, 1999), "Trail to the Chief", CIO Magazine Summer Leadership Curriculum, CIO Communications, Inc. ... David H. (May 1985). "Redefining an Industry through Integrated Automation", Infosystems, Hitchcock Publications. Santosus, ...
40 Pearson, pp. 40 KAL 007: Cover-Up, David Pearson, Summit Books, 1987, pg. 277, point 8. KAL 007:the cover-up, David Pearson ... 230-237 Time, December 3, 1984 Pearson, pp. 38-39 Hersh, pp. 199-213 KAL 007 Cover-Up. David Pearson, Summit Books, N.Y., Pg. ... KAL 007: the Coverup, David Pearson, Summit Books, New York 1987, Pg. 37 Pearson, p. 309 US District Court, District of ... Pearson, David; Keppel, John (August 17, 1985). "New Pieces in the Puzzle of Flight 007: Journey into Doubt". The Nation. 421. ...
Pearson, David. "Cadillac Moon Ensemble's Debut Album Drops". I Care if You Listen. Retrieved March 5, 2015. ... Williams, David. "An unusual trio with new music makes for a superb concert". West Virginia Gazette. Retrieved March 5, 2015. ... Murrieta, David. "counter)induction ~ {group theory}". A Closer Listen. Retrieved March 5, 2015. Lee, Andrew. "Group Theory by ... Murrieta, David. "counter)induction ~ {group theory}". A Closer Listen. Retrieved March 5, 2015. Cunningham, Sara. "From Sea to ...
McSweeney, Kendra; Nielsen, Erik; Taylor, Matthew; Wrathall, David; Pearson, Zoe; Wang, Ophelia; Plumb, Spencer (January 31, ... Abrams, Elliot M., and David J. Rue. "The Causes and Consequences of Deforestation among the Prehistoric Maya." Human Ecology ...
Pearson, David; Svensson, Lars (2006), "Family Sylviidae (Old World Warblers)", in del Hoyo, Josep; Elliott, Andrew; Christie, ... David, Handbook of the Birds of the World. Volume 11, Old World Flycatchers to Old World Warblers, Barcelona: Lynx Edicions, p ...
Richard Petty - vocals David Pearson - vocals Cale Yarborough - vocals Bobby Allison - vocals Buddy Baker - vocals Darrell ... David Pearson; Cale Yarborough; Bobby Allison; Buddy Baker; and Darrell Waltrip. The Jordanaires contributed to additional ...
Cox, Peter M.; Pearson, David; Booth, Ben B.; et al. (February 2013). "Sensitivity of tropical carbon to climate change ... Schimel, David; Stephens, Britton B.; Fisher, Joshua B. (January 2015). "Effect of increasing CO2on the terrestrial carbon ... Patra, Prabir Kumar; Crisp, David; Kaiser, Johannes W.; et al. (14 December 2016). Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO-2) tracks ... David (November 2007). "Carbon cycle conundrums". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 104 (47): 18353-18354. ...
Elliott, Chip; Colvin, Alexander; Pearson, David; Pikalo, Oleksiy; Schlafer, John; Yeh, Henry (17 March 2005). "Current status ...
Pearson, David; Pikalo, Oleksiy; Schlafer, John; Yeh, Henry (2005), "Current status of the DARPA Quantum Network", Defense and ...
With Norman Paton, Vijay Dialani, Dave Pearson, Tony Storey and Paul Watson, he was a member of the UK Database Task Force ... Paton, Norman; Malcolm P Atkinson, Vijay Dialani, Dave Pearson, Tony Storey and Paul Watson (1 February 2002). "Database Access ... Antonioletti, Mario; Malcolm Atkinson; Amy Krause; Simon Laws; Susan Malaika; Norman W Paton; Dave Pearson; Greg Riccardi (20 ... Atkinson, Malcolm; François Bancilhon; David DeWitt; Klaus Dittrich; David Maier; Stanley Zdonik (December 1989). "The Object- ...
Pearson, David. "Movement is the Key". colorado.edu. University of Colorado, Boulder. Retrieved 3 October 2015. When Jansher ...
Pearson, David. "Global pilots shortage worsens," The Australian, April 25, 2008; retrieved 2012-1-4. Lekic, Slobodo. "Shortage ...
Pearson, David. New organic architecture: the breaking wave. University of California Press, 2001. Hughes, Norman Francis. The ... Wilson, Karen, and David Morrison, eds. Monocots: Systematics and Evolution: Systematics and Evolution. CSIRO PUBLISHING, 2000 ...
Pearson Education. Harley, David; Vibert, Robert S. (2007). AVIEN Malware Defense Guide for the Enterprise. Elsevier. p. 147. ...
Pearson, David; Pingali, Keshav (1994), The Program Structure Tree: Computing Control Regions in Linear Time, pp. 171-185, doi: ...
Pearson. p. 151. ISBN 978-0205239399. .. *^ a b ARSAC - Notes for Guidance on the Clinical Administration of ... David Townsend and Dr. Ronald Nutt, was named by TIME Magazine as the medical invention of the year in 2000.[68] ... BROWNELL G.L., Dave Marcum, B. HOOP JR., and D.E. BOHNING, "Quantitative dynamic studies using short-lived radioisotopes and ... The concept of emission and transmission tomography was introduced by David E. Kuhl, Luke Chapman and Roy Edwards in the late ...
Zimmerman, Dale A.; Pearson, David J.; Turner, Donald A. (2005). Birds of Kenya and Northern Tanzania. London: Christopher Helm ...
2004 Oct 5, Americans David J. Gross, H. David Politzer and Frank Wilczek won the 2004 Nobel Prize in physics for their ... 1957 Oct 14, Lester Bowles Pearson (1897-1972, former president of the UN General Assembly (1952-1953) and later Canadian PM ( ... 1970 Oct, David Baltimore (37) of MIT won a Nobel Prize for discovering the reverse transcriptase enzyme. In 2001 Shane Crotty ... David Trimble and John Hume (1998). 1997 Jody Williams and the International Campaign to Ban Landmines, United States.. 1998 ...
David J. Gross, H. David Politzer and Frank Wilczek. "for the discovery of asymptotic freedom in the theory of the strong ... Lester Bowles Pearson. 1956. The Nobel Prize in Physics 1956. William Bradford Shockley, John Bardeen and Walter Houser ... Niels Henrik David Bohr. "for his services in the investigation of the structure of atoms and of the radiation emanating from ... David M. Lee, Douglas D. Osheroff and Robert C. Richardson. "for their discovery of superfluidity in helium-3" ...
David Pearson or Dave Pearson may refer to: David Pearson (librarian) (born 1955), British librarian and scholar David Pearson ... American offensive lineman Dave Pearson (painter) (1937-2008), English artist Dave Pearson (pool player), British speed pool ... Paralympic athlete Dave Pearson (footballer) (born 1932), Scottish footballer David Pearson (cricketer) (born 1963), former ... American car racing champion David Pearson (scientist), Canadian scientist, academic and television personality Dave Pearson ( ...
"Teams David Pearson played for". CricketArchive. Retrieved 1 April 2011. David Pearson at ESPNcricinfo David Pearson at ... David John Pearson (born 16 April 1963) is a former English cricketer. Pearson was a left-handed batsman who fielded as a ... "Minor Counties Trophy Matches played by David Pearson". CricketArchive. Retrieved 1 April 2011. "List A Matches played by David ... "List A Batting and Fielding For Each Team by David Pearson". CricketArchive. Retrieved 1 April 2011. " ...
David Pearson: Whites Books is currently two people: [publisher] Jonathan Jackson and myself. This is largely to reduce start- ... The typographic covers, designed by David Pearson, then a recent graduate of Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design ... 2 thoughts on "Interview with David Pearson" * Pingback: Stories from my Life , ... Pearson has gone on to design three more rounds of Great Ideas titles for Penguin, as well as such spin-off series as Great ...
David Pearson: Type as Image. David Pearsons exhibition at Londons Kemistry Gallery showcases the designers work for Penguin ...
David Pearson dates. SYDNEY, at the Powerhouse: 6:30pm Tuesday 25 August 2015. (Brought by AGDA and ABDA, the Australian Book ... Ta-da! Here is an exclusive interview with David Pearson, one of the handful of most regarded book designers in the UK (and ... Interview with Creative Superstar, David Pearson. How does a great creative mind work? The design superstar tells us, before ... A couple of examples of Davids notes:. Fred Lane: Danger Is My Beer - I love the spirit of Fred Lanes music. The way his ...
Announcement is made of the engagement and upcoming wedding of Jeanine Marie Cirba and Scott David Pearson, both of Dunmore. ...
David Pearson DIP ARCH (HONS) MCRP, RIBA, is an architect and planner who has been actively involved in inner city and new ... David Pearson is Founder and Chair of the Trustees of the Ecological Design Association, an educational charity, and Editor of ... D.Pearson combines the goodness of our earth with all that we cherish in a good home with well written text and astounding ...
David,Pearson,Named,Vice,President,of,Human,Resources,at,Extensis,Group,Inc.,medicine,medical news today,latest medical news, ... Dan Sheridan President and CMO of Extensis Group Inc today announced the appointment of David Pearson to the position of Vice ... Pearson will lead the team that provides Extensis clients with guidance on employee relations state and federal compliance ... today announced the appointment of David Pearson to the position of Vice President of Human Resources. Mr. Pearson will lead ...
A First Course plus Pearson MyLab Statistics with Pearson eText, Global Edition,David M. Levine,9781292320496,Decision Sciences ... Pearson Author David M. Levine / Kathryn A. Szabat / David F. Stephan Publisher Pearson Cover Softcover Edition 8 Language ... This title is a Pearson Global Edition. The Editorial team at Pearson has worked closely with educators around the world to ... Business Statistics: A First Course plus Pearson MyLab Statistics with Pearson eText, Global Edition 100.50. approx. 01.2020 ...
David Pearson Mr. David L. Pearson is Chief Information Officer, Executive Vice President of the Company. He joined SYKES in ... David Pearson 58. 2010. Chief Information Officer, Executive Vice President. James Holder 58. 2010. Executive Vice President, ... Pearson held various engineering and technical management roles over a fifteen year period, including eight years at Compaq ...
David Pearson says that high carb foods are rich in Gluten which raises the level of sugar in your blood stream so his main ... David Pearson in his e-Book says that adding this delicious shake as a part of your daily routine will reverse the symptoms of ... David Pearson who himself was a victim of this disease discovered an incredible cure for reversing the signs of diabetes. He ... David Pearson in his eBook called The Diabetes Free System says that controlling diabetes through prescription drugs in not a ...
Buy or Rent MyMathLab with Pearson eText -- Standalone Access Card -- for Calculus & Its Applications, Brief Version as an ... David Lay; and Publisher Pearson. Save up to 80% by choosing the eTextbook option for ISBN: 9780134765662, 0134765664. ... Courseware MyMathLab with Pearson eText -- Standalone Access Card -- for Calculus & Its Applications, Brief Version by Larry J ... MyMathLab with Pearson eText -- Standalone Access Card -- for Calculus & Its Applications, Brief Version 14th Edition by Larry ...
David G. Pearson, M.D.. *General Surgeon. *Phoenix, AZ. Areas of focus:. Nissen fundoplication, Sleeve gastrectomy, ...
David Pearson, MD. Distance: 26.24 mi 1577 Little Lake Dr. Park City, UT 84098 ...
Copyright 2018 David E. Pearson DMD PC. All rights reserved. Website Design - Business Promotion ...
Commission Vice Chair P. David Pearson will convene General Session. Roll call will be taken and the Pledge of Allegiance ...
NASCAR Hall of Famer David Pearson dies at 83 * NASCAR results at Phoenix: Kyle Busch wins, Kevin Harvick, Martin Truex Jr. ...
Pearson, David; Smalley, Michelle; Ainsworth, Christopher; Cook, Maria; Boyle, Jacqueline; Flury, Sarah (August 2008). " ... Slade, Peter D. (1994). "Models of hallucination: from theory to practice". In David, Anthony S.; Cutting, John C. (eds.). The ... Bentall, Richard P.; Jackson, Howard F.; Pilgrim, David (November 1988). "Abandoning the concept of "schizophrenia": some ... Chadwick, Paul; Hughes, Stephanie; Russell, Daphne; Russell, Ian; Dagnan, Dave (July 2009). "Mindfulness groups for distressing ...
P. David Pearson, Michigan State University. Introduction. Theoretical Underpinnings of Our Work. Unique Strengths of ... Hughes, J. E., Packard, B. W., & Pearson, P. D. (1999). The role of hypermedia cases on preservice teachers views of reading ... Hughes, J. E.; Packard, B. W.; & Pearson, P. D. (1997). Reading Classroom Explorer: Visiting Classrooms via Hypermedia. In C. K ... Hughes, J. E., Packard, B. W., Reischl, C. H., & Pearson, P. D. (1998, December). UsingReading Classroom Explorer s Interactive ...
Painter, Ron M.; Pearson, David M.; Waymouth, Robert M. (2010). "Selective Catalytic Oxidation of Glycerol to Dihydroxyacetone ... Chung, Kevin; Banik, Steven M.; De Crisci, Antonio G.; Pearson, David M.; Blake, Timothy R.; Olsson, Johan V.; Ingram, Andrew J ...
COMMENTARY: The legend of David Pearson will live on. Nov 14 at 7:48 AM ...
David TS, Henriques MO, Kurz-Besson C, Nunes J, Valente F, Vaz M, Pereira JS, Siegwolf R, Chaves MM, Gazarini LC, David JS. ... R.V. and D.D.B.: designed the study; R.V.: performed data analysis; G.A., J. M.C., P.C., H.K., D.Pearson, S.P., O.S.: ... Pereira JS, Mateus JA, Aires LM, Pita G, Pio C, David JS, Andrade V, Banza J, David TS, Paco TA, Rodrigues A. 2007. Net ... R.V. acknowledges support from Ciencia Básica CONACyT (152671). D. Pearson was supported by the Joint UK DECC/Defra Met Office ...
  • Dr. David Pearson who himself was a victim of this disease discovered an incredible cure for reversing the signs of diabetes. (healthyusa.co)
  • Dr. David Pearson in his e-Book says that adding this delicious shake as a part of your daily routine will reverse the symptoms of diabetes and help you get rid out of it ultimately. (healthyusa.co)
  • David Pearson DIP ARCH (HONS) MCRP, RIBA, is an architect and planner who has been actively involved in inner city and new community housing for most of his working life in Britain and the USA. (google.com)
  • The London Mathematical December Newsletter also reported the sad news that David Kendall, one of this centuries greatest probabilist, has died at age 90. (causeweb.org)
  • Pearson made his debut for Cumberland in the 1990 Minor Counties Championship against Bedfordshire. (wikipedia.org)
  • Announcement is made of the engagement and upcoming wedding of Jeanine Marie Cirba and Scott David Pearson, both of Dunmore. (thetimes-tribune.com)
  • In the exchange with Chivas USA, Arena made a move to shore up the backline by acquiring central defender David Junior Lopes. (pasadenastarnews.com)
  • Pearson has gone on to design three more rounds of Great Ideas titles for Penguin, as well as such spin-off series as Great Journeys (travel writing) and Great Loves (short love stories) and a nifty line of "Popular Classics," thrift editions with minimalist covers that sell for two quid each. (printmag.com)
  • David Pearson is one of THE great book designers in the world today, his work helping to sell literally millions of copies for Penguin while reinvigorating its design brand this century. (crikey.com.au)
  • The typographic covers, designed by David Pearson , then a recent graduate of Central Saint Martin's College of Art and Design in London, were nothing short of dazzling, with lettering contemporaneous with the classic contents debossed on a pristine white background. (printmag.com)
  • Speaking of Hollywood, Pearson was recently the design consultant on Wes Anderson's wonderful, artful The Grand Budapest Hotel . (crikey.com.au)
  • David brings tremendous experience and leadership to our management team,' said Dan Sheridan, Extensis President. (bio-medicine.org)
  • It's time now to show as a team and individuals the character we've got that we've shown over the last few years," said midfielder David Beckham, who missed last week's loss in Kansas City because of a tight hamstring. (pasadenastarnews.com)
  • Dr. David Pearson says that high carb foods are rich in Gluten which raises the level of sugar in your blood stream so his main idea was to cut from high carb diet and convert your meals to fresh green vegetables and salads. (healthyusa.co)
  • David has six years of PEO industry experience and most recently held a key leadership position with ADP TotalSource in their New York office. (bio-medicine.org)
  • In his career, David has also held HR positions with the Target Corporation and Revrac Industries. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Prior to SYKES, Mr. Pearson held various engineering and technical management roles over a fifteen year period, including eight years at Compaq Computer Corporation and five years at Texas Instruments. (reuters.com)
  • Professor David Pearson is an executive in the Fight Food Waste Cooperative Research Centre where he is the Engage Program Leader. (aifst.asn.au)
  • A list full of sound textures that play nicely in the background but crackles with the energy missing in most ambient music, amusingly annotated by David. (crikey.com.au)
  • Pearson MyLab Statistics should only be purchased when required by an instructor. (pearson.ch)
  • David joins Extensis with over 16 years working in the human resource field and is a certified Professional in Human Resources (PHR). (bio-medicine.org)
  • Final contract details between Pearson and the Indiana Department of Education still need to be finalized and negotiated. (fox59.com)
  • Dave, what are some of the tools that the National Weather Service has that people should be aware of that they can access and get more information about what might be happening hour to hour or minute to minute? (usgs.gov)
  • Today, April 20, is the 300th birthday of David Brainerd, a missionary to Native Americans who left a mark on the people of my town and stirred many souls who have read his diary , which was edited by Jonathan Edwards. (brandywinebooks.net)
  • The winner of the younger competitors was Jack Shayler (GBR), with teammates William Dixon and Reuben Trotter completing a British podium sweep in the 16-19 category, as they also did in the 20-24 class, with William Kirk , David Pearson and Lewis Strachan completing the first three positions. (triathlon.org)
  • David Pearson Named Vice President of Human Resources at Extensis Group Inc. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Woodbridge NJ (PRWEB) July 31 2013 Dan Sheridan President and CMO of Extensis Group Inc today announced the appointment of David Pearson to the position of Vice President of Human Resources. (bio-medicine.org)
  • D.Pearson combines the goodness of our earth with all that we cherish in a good home with well written text and astounding photos. (google.com)
  • David, That's as good an explanation as I have seen. (themoneyillusion.com)