An enzyme which catalyzes the hydrolysis of LACTOSE to D-GALACTOSE and D-GLUCOSE. Defects in the enzyme cause LACTOSE INTOLERANCE.
A disaccharide of GLUCOSE and GALACTOSE in human and cow milk. It is used in pharmacy for tablets, in medicine as a nutrient, and in industry.
The condition resulting from the absence or deficiency of LACTASE in the MUCOSA cells of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT, and the inability to break down LACTOSE in milk for ABSORPTION. Bacterial fermentation of the unabsorbed lactose leads to symptoms that range from a mild indigestion (DYSPEPSIA) to severe DIARRHEA. Lactose intolerance may be an inborn error or acquired.
Raw and processed or manufactured milk and milk-derived products. These are usually from cows (bovine) but are also from goats, sheep, reindeer, and water buffalo.
A measure of a patient's ability to break down lactose.
The largest class of organic compounds, including STARCH; GLYCOGEN; CELLULOSE; POLYSACCHARIDES; and simple MONOSACCHARIDES. Carbohydrates are composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen in a ratio of Cn(H2O)n.
Cellular processes in biosynthesis (anabolism) and degradation (catabolism) of CARBOHYDRATES.
SUGARS containing an amino group. GLYCOSYLATION of other compounds with these amino sugars results in AMINOGLYCOSIDES.
An enzyme complex that catalyzes the transfer of GALACTOSE from UDP GALACTOSE to GLUCOSE, forming LACTOSE. The enzyme complex is composed of a B subunit, ALPHA-LACTALBUMIN, which changes the substrate specificity of the A subunit, N-ACETYLLACTOSAMINE SYNTHASE, from N-ACETYLGLUCOSAMINE to glucose making lactose synthesis the preferred reaction.
Polyhydric alcohols having no more than one hydroxy group attached to each carbon atom. They are formed by the reduction of the carbonyl group of a sugar to a hydroxyl group.(From Dorland, 28th ed)
The bacterial sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) that catalyzes the transfer of the phosphoryl group from phosphoenolpyruvate to its sugar substrates (the PTS sugars) concomitant with the translocation of these sugars across the bacterial membrane. The phosphorylation of a given sugar requires four proteins, two general proteins, Enzyme I and HPr and a pair of sugar-specific proteins designated as the Enzyme II complex. The PTS has also been implicated in the induction of synthesis of some catabolic enzyme systems required for the utilization of sugars that are not substrates of the PTS as well as the regulation of the activity of ADENYLYL CYCLASES. EC 2.7.1.-.
Galactosides in which the oxygen atom linking the sugar and aglycone is replaced by a sulfur atom.
Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.
A nonreducing disaccharide composed of GLUCOSE and FRUCTOSE linked via their anomeric carbons. It is obtained commercially from SUGARCANE, sugar beet (BETA VULGARIS), and other plants and used extensively as a food and a sweetener.
Simple sugars, carbohydrates which cannot be decomposed by hydrolysis. They are colorless crystalline substances with a sweet taste and have the same general formula CnH2nOn. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
Plasmids which determine the ability of a bacterium to ferment lactose.
A large group of membrane transport proteins that shuttle MONOSACCHARIDES across CELL MEMBRANES.
Membrane transporters that co-transport two or more dissimilar molecules in the same direction across a membrane. Usually the transport of one ion or molecule is against its electrochemical gradient and is "powered" by the movement of another ion or molecule with its electrochemical gradient.
Sucrose present in the diet. It is added to food and drinks as a sweetener.
A monosaccharide in sweet fruits and honey that is soluble in water, alcohol, or ether. It is used as a preservative and an intravenous infusion in parenteral feeding.
A primary source of energy for living organisms. It is naturally occurring and is found in fruits and other parts of plants in its free state. It is used therapeutically in fluid and nutrient replacement.
The sequence of carbohydrates within POLYSACCHARIDES; GLYCOPROTEINS; and GLYCOLIPIDS.
An aldohexose that occurs naturally in the D-form in lactose, cerebrosides, gangliosides, and mucoproteins. Deficiency of galactosyl-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALACTOSE-1-PHOSPHATE URIDYL-TRANSFERASE DEFICIENCY DISEASE) causes an error in galactose metabolism called GALACTOSEMIA, resulting in elevations of galactose in the blood.
Includes ortho-, meta-, and para-nitrophenylgalactosides.
The processes of milk secretion by the maternal MAMMARY GLANDS after PARTURITION. The proliferation of the mammary glandular tissue, milk synthesis, and milk expulsion or let down are regulated by the interactions of several hormones including ESTRADIOL; PROGESTERONE; PROLACTIN; and OXYTOCIN.
Carbohydrates consisting of between two (DISACCHARIDES) and ten MONOSACCHARIDES connected by either an alpha- or beta-glycosidic link. They are found throughout nature in both the free and bound form.
A slightly acid milk food produced by fermentation due to the combined action of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Streptococcus thermophilus.
Glycosides formed by the reaction of the hydroxyl group on the anomeric carbon atom of galactose with an alcohol to form an acetal. They include both alpha- and beta-galactosides.
Oligosaccharides containing two monosaccharide units linked by a glycosidic bond.
Membrane proteins whose primary function is to facilitate the transport of molecules across a biological membrane. Included in this broad category are proteins involved in active transport (BIOLOGICAL TRANSPORT, ACTIVE), facilitated transport and ION CHANNELS.
A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.
The white liquid secreted by the mammary glands. It contains proteins, sugar, lipids, vitamins, and minerals.
A disaccharide consisting of one galactose and one glucose moiety in an alpha (1-6) glycosidic linkage.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
A hexose or fermentable monosaccharide and isomer of glucose from manna, the ash Fraxinus ornus and related plants. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed & Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)
A family of galactoside hydrolases that hydrolyze compounds with an O-galactosyl linkage. EC 3.2.1.-.
A dextrodisaccharide from malt and starch. It is used as a sweetening agent and fermentable intermediate in brewing. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
The characteristic 3-dimensional shape of a carbohydrate.
INFLAMMATION of the UDDER in cows.
Carbohydrates present in food comprising digestible sugars and starches and indigestible cellulose and other dietary fibers. The former are the major source of energy. The sugars are in beet and cane sugar, fruits, honey, sweet corn, corn syrup, milk and milk products, etc.; the starches are in cereal grains, legumes (FABACEAE), tubers, etc. (From Claudio & Lagua, Nutrition and Diet Therapy Dictionary, 3d ed, p32, p277)
Proteins that share the common characteristic of binding to carbohydrates. Some ANTIBODIES and carbohydrate-metabolizing proteins (ENZYMES) also bind to carbohydrates, however they are not considered lectins. PLANT LECTINS are carbohydrate-binding proteins that have been primarily identified by their hemagglutinating activity (HEMAGGLUTININS). However, a variety of lectins occur in animal species where they serve diverse array of functions through specific carbohydrate recognition.
A plant genus of the family POACEAE widely cultivated in the tropics for the sweet cane that is processed into sugar.
Proteins obtained from ESCHERICHIA COLI.
The first chemical element in the periodic table. It has the atomic symbol H, atomic number 1, and atomic weight [1.00784; 1.00811]. It exists, under normal conditions, as a colorless, odorless, tasteless, diatomic gas. Hydrogen ions are PROTONS. Besides the common H1 isotope, hydrogen exists as the stable isotope DEUTERIUM and the unstable, radioactive isotope TRITIUM.
The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.
Anaerobic degradation of GLUCOSE or other organic nutrients to gain energy in the form of ATP. End products vary depending on organisms, substrates, and enzymatic pathways. Common fermentation products include ETHANOL and LACTIC ACID.
Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.
The movement of materials (including biochemical substances and drugs) through a biological system at the cellular level. The transport can be across cell membranes and epithelial layers. It also can occur within intracellular compartments and extracellular compartments.
The N-acetyl derivative of glucosamine.
Substances that sweeten food, beverages, medications, etc., such as sugar, saccharine or other low-calorie synthetic products. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)
Any tests done on exhaled air.
The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
A non-pathogenic species of LACTOCOCCUS found in DAIRY PRODUCTS and responsible for the souring of MILK and the production of LACTIC ACID.
Calcium compounds used as food supplements or in food to supply the body with calcium. Dietary calcium is needed during growth for bone development and for maintenance of skeletal integrity later in life to prevent osteoporosis.
The chemical or biochemical addition of carbohydrate or glycosyl groups to other chemicals, especially peptides or proteins. Glycosyl transferases are used in this biochemical reaction.
A synthetic disaccharide used in the treatment of constipation and hepatic encephalopathy. It has also been used in the diagnosis of gastrointestinal disorders. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p887)
A nutritious food consisting primarily of the curd or the semisolid substance formed when milk coagulates.
Proteins found in any species of bacterium.
Any of a group of polysaccharides of the general formula (C6-H10-O5)n, composed of a long-chain polymer of glucose in the form of amylose and amylopectin. It is the chief storage form of energy reserve (carbohydrates) in plants.
A pentose active in biological systems usually in its D-form.
The genetic unit consisting of three structural genes, an operator and a regulatory gene. The regulatory gene controls the synthesis of the three structural genes: BETA-GALACTOSIDASE and beta-galactoside permease (involved with the metabolism of lactose), and beta-thiogalactoside acetyltransferase.
A characteristic feature of enzyme activity in relation to the kind of substrate on which the enzyme or catalytic molecule reacts.
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
Spectroscopic method of measuring the magnetic moment of elementary particles such as atomic nuclei, protons or electrons. It is employed in clinical applications such as NMR Tomography (MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING).
Protein or glycoprotein substances of plant origin that bind to sugar moieties in cell walls or membranes. Some carbohydrate-metabolizing proteins (ENZYMES) from PLANTS also bind to carbohydrates, however they are not considered lectins. Many plant lectins change the physiology of the membrane of BLOOD CELLS to cause agglutination, mitosis, or other biochemical changes. They may play a role in plant defense mechanisms.
Phosphoric acid esters of galactose.
A methylpentose whose L- isomer is found naturally in many plant glycosides and some gram-negative bacterial lipopolysaccharides.
A nucleoside diphosphate sugar which can be epimerized into UDPglucose for entry into the mainstream of carbohydrate metabolism. Serves as a source of galactose in the synthesis of lipopolysaccharides, cerebrosides, and lactose.
Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.
A disaccharide consisting of two glucose units in beta (1-4) glycosidic linkage. Obtained from the partial hydrolysis of cellulose.
Substances made up of an aggregation of small particles, as that obtained by grinding or trituration of a solid drug. In pharmacy it is a form in which substances are administered. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.
The movement of materials across cell membranes and epithelial layers against an electrochemical gradient, requiring the expenditure of metabolic energy.
Oligosaccharides containing three monosaccharide units linked by glycosidic bonds.
Foodstuff used especially for domestic and laboratory animals, or livestock.
A trisaccharide occurring in Australian manna (from Eucalyptus spp, Myrtaceae) and in cottonseed meal.
A diuretic and renal diagnostic aid related to sorbitol. It has little significant energy value as it is largely eliminated from the body before any metabolism can take place. It can be used to treat oliguria associated with kidney failure or other manifestations of inadequate renal function and has been used for determination of glomerular filtration rate. Mannitol is also commonly used as a research tool in cell biological studies, usually to control osmolarity.
Uptake of substances through the lining of the INTESTINES.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.
A genus of gram-positive, coccoid bacteria whose organisms occur in pairs or chains. No endospores are produced. Many species exist as commensals or parasites on man or animals with some being highly pathogenic. A few species are saprophytes and occur in the natural environment.
Organic compounds that generally contain an amino (-NH2) and a carboxyl (-COOH) group. Twenty alpha-amino acids are the subunits which are polymerized to form proteins.
Enzymes that catalyze the epimerization of chiral centers within carbohydrates or their derivatives. EC 5.1.3.
A polyhydric alcohol with about half the sweetness of sucrose. Sorbitol occurs naturally and is also produced synthetically from glucose. It was formerly used as a diuretic and may still be used as a laxative and in irrigating solutions for some surgical procedures. It is also used in many manufacturing processes, as a pharmaceutical aid, and in several research applications.
Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
Liquids that are suitable for drinking. (From Merriam Webster Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
The N-acetyl derivative of galactosamine.
A class of carbohydrates that contains five carbon atoms.
A major protein fraction of milk obtained from the WHEY.
Enzymes that catalyze the transfer of glycosyl groups to an acceptor. Most often another carbohydrate molecule acts as an acceptor, but inorganic phosphate can also act as an acceptor, such as in the case of PHOSPHORYLASES. Some of the enzymes in this group also catalyze hydrolysis, which can be regarded as transfer of a glycosyl group from the donor to water. Subclasses include the HEXOSYLTRANSFERASES; PENTOSYLTRANSFERASES; SIALYLTRANSFERASES; and those transferring other glycosyl groups. EC 2.4.
"Asked: How do dairies make lactose free milk?". USA Today. 3 September 2014. Retrieved 13 March 2018. "Lactose intolerance - ... Lactase is essential to the complete digestion of whole milk; it breaks down lactose, a sugar which gives milk its sweetness. ... Lacking lactase, a person consuming dairy products may experience the symptoms of lactose intolerance. Lactase can be purchased ... Porch, Kaitlyn (2018-04-12). "Lactose-Free Milk, Low-Fat Cheese, and More Dairy Breakthroughs". www.federallabs.org. Retrieved ...
Microbes are used to convert the lactose sugars into lactic acid through fermentation. The bacteria used for such fermentation ... Dairy products like cheese and yogurt can also be made through fermentation using microbes. Cheese was produced as a way to ... Drinking alcohol is produced from natural sugars like glucose. Carbon dioxide is produced as a side product in this reaction ... Also these microbes are responsible for the different flavors of cheese, since they have enzymes that breakdown milk sugars and ...
There are many individuals who are unable to tolerate dairy products because of lactose intolerance. Such foods should be ... Many vegetables are known to cause bloating due to high levels of fiber and undigestible sugars such as raffinose (e.g. beans, ... In rare cases, bloating may occur in individuals who have milk intolerance (lactose intolerance), parasite infections like ... As an underlying disease cause: Constipation Lactose intolerance and other food intolerances Overeating (due to overproduction ...
... a sugar found in dairy products. In 2010, the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) determined that lactose intolerance can be ... Lactose intolerance. Lactose intolerance is a condition in which people have symptoms due to the decreased ability to digest ... Live yogurt cultures in yogurt improve digestion of lactose in yogurt in individuals with lactose maldigestion. ... that are able to digest the lactose in other dairy products.[65] The scientific review by EFSA enabled yogurt manufacturers to ...
Go Dairy Free: The Guide and Cookbook for Milk Allergies, Lactose Intolerance, and Casein-free Living. Go Dairy Free. p. 90. ... Sugar or tapioca additionally may be used. In some rare instances, some lactic acid is fermented from dairy products such as ... Despite the similarity in name, sodium lactate is not chemically similar to lactose (milk sugar), so need not be restricted by ... Such dairy-type lactic acid generally goes back into dairy products, such as ice cream and cream cheese, rather than into ...
The bacteria break down lactose, the sugar in milk, that lactose-intolerant people find difficult to digest. As early as the ... Live cultures of S. thermophilus make it easier for people who are lactose intolerant to digest dairy products. ... Its purpose is to turn lactose, the sugar in milk, into lactic acid. The increase in lactic acid turns milk into the gel-like ... S. thermophilus is one of the most widely used bacteria in the dairy industry. USDA statistics from 1998 showed that more than ...
Lactose is the major sugar found in dairy milk. Lactose intolerance occurs when an individual is deficient in the enzyme ... For example, traditional dairy ice cream is made with a combination of milk products that contain lactose, but non-dairy ice ... In Asia and Africa, where rates of lactose intolerance are much higher than in the West and dairy production has been less ... A lactose-free food, such as non-dairy ice cream, may require a different process during manufacturing. ...
Soy milk on its own lacks the lactose (milk sugar) that is the basic food for the yogurt bacteria. Soy yogurt may have a slight ... Soy yogurt is similar in protein content to dairy yogurt, lower in sugar, and higher in fat. If not fortified, soy yogurt does ... This amounts to about 2.7% (the same percentage as soy milk), versus 3.5% in dairy yogurt. However, dairy yogurt can be made ... Soy yogurt can be prepared at home using the same method as dairy yogurt, using soy milk and a starter culture. One tablespoon ...
Some beers, particularly milk stouts, contain lactose, a sugar derived from milk, and are thus not suitable for people who ... abstain from eating dairy products. Other than bottle conditioned, beers which are packaged in cans, bottles or kegs are ... When beer is left unfiltered, the yeast that fermented the wort, and turned the sugar in the barley into alcohol, remains in ...
Parrots cannot digest lactose and can have digestive problems if given too much dairy. Owners are instructed to give dairy ... fat or sugar can cause health problems and lead to poor diet and nutrition if given to parrots too regularly. Parrots can be ... Another food to be limited is dairy products. ...
The diet may include lactases-so that children who have developed lactose intolerance can ingest dairy products-and antibiotics ... During week one, a diet high in sugar and carbs is gradually enriched in protein as well as essential elements: sweet milk with ...
A person who has lactose intolerance can have difficulty absorbing lactose after an extraordinarily high intake of dairy ... Sugar alcohols such as sorbitol (often found in sugar-free foods) are difficult for the body to absorb and, in large amounts, ... lactose intolerance (intolerance to milk sugar, common in non-Europeans), and fructose malabsorption. ... For those with lactose intolerance, taking digestive enzymes containing lactase when consuming dairy products often improves ...
The bacteria metabolize lactose, the sugar naturally found in milk, into lactic acid which means people who are lactose ... "Self-Renewing DAIRY Cultures: FRESH FIL MJÖLK (from Sweden)". gemcultures.com. Retrieved 2007-06-30. "Fil Mjölk Dairy/Soy ... In addition, Wapnö AB, a Swedish dairy company, and Valio, a Finnish dairy company, also sell a limited variety of filmjölk in ... Some people add sugar, jam, apple sauce, cinnamon, ginger, fruits, or berries for extra flavor. In Norwegian it is called ...
... whilst the American version manufactured by Hershey started its ingredients list with sugar. It also listed lactose, emulsifier ... Dairy Milk Ritz, a bar with salty Ritz crackers was launched in the United Kingdom in 2014. Alongside this new bar, Dairy Milk ... But when a customer's daughter suggested Dairy Milk, the name stuck."[3] Fruit and Nut was introduced as part of the Dairy Milk ... Every product in the Dairy Milk line is made with exclusively milk chocolate. In 2014, Dairy Milk was ranked the best-selling ...
Shigella species are negative for motility and are generally not lactose fermenters, but S. sonnei can ferment lactose. They ... When inoculated to a triple sugar iron slant, they react as follows: K/A, gas -, and H2S -. Indole reactions are mixed, ... milk and dairy products, and meat. Contamination of these foods is usually through the fecal-oral route. Fecally contaminated ... "Possible mechanisms underlying the slow lactose fermentation phenotype in Shigella spp". Applied and Environmental Microbiology ...
Lactose is the naturally occurring sugar found in milk. A molecule of lactose is formed by the combination of a molecule of ... It can only be found in milk, including human breast milk, and in some dairy products. A cheap source of sugar is corn syrup, ... Rare sugar Sugar plantations in the Caribbean Sugar substitute Glycomics Brown sugar crystals Whole date sugar Whole cane sugar ... Beet sugar 0.80 g/mL Dextrose sugar 0.62 g/mL ( = 620 kg/m^3) Granulated sugar 0.70 g/mL Powdered sugar 0.56 g/mL Manufacturers ...
... occurs when the human body doesn't produce a sufficient amount of lactase enzyme to break down the sugar lactose found in dairy ... Sugar uptake. Polysaccharides and disaccharidases in the glycocalyx break down large sugar molecules, which are then absorbed. ... As a result of this deficiency, undigested lactose is not absorbed and is instead passed on to the colon. There bacteria ... These include broken down proteins, fats, and sugars, as well as water, electrolytes, vitamins, and bile salts. Enterocytes ...
... take sugar down by 30 percent, and have no lactose, and a milk that's premiumised and taste better and we'll charge twice as ... Fairlife is marketed as an ultra-filtered milk, as well as "a dairy option that is sourced from sustainable family farms." In ... the ultrafiltration process removes the lactose and much of the sugar and leaves behind more of the protein and calcium. ... and commented on the removal of sugar in Fairlife milk with, "I never looked at the sugar in milk as a problem." Meredith Engel ...
"Sweet Acidophilus", a dairy product for persons with a lactose intolerance, had been made through the co-operation of the ... with Miles producing the lactobacillus acidophilus bacteria cultures that aided in the breakdown of lactose sugar. The 200th ... university, the North Carolina Dairy Foundation, and Miles Laboratories, ...
Zero Sugar, Oatmeal Cookie Creamer Food portal Drink portal Almond milk Lactose intolerance List of dishes made using coconut ... Silk is an American brand of dairy-substitute products (including soy milk, soy yogurt, almond milk, almond yogurt, cashew milk ... milk Milk substitute Non-dairy creamer - some items discussed in article that may include dairy excipients Plant cream Soy ... Dairy-free yogurt alternative: Peach Almond, Strawberry Almond, Vanilla Almond, Dark Chocolate Coconut Almond, Plain Almond, ...
... is a common condition caused by a decreased ability to digest lactose, a sugar found in dairy products.[1] ... Typical lactose levels in dairy products[49] Dairy product. Serving size. Lactose content. Percentage ... Low-lactose and lactose-free versions of foods are often available to replace dairy-based foods for those with lactose ... Lactose is found primarily in dairy products, which vary in the amount of lactose they contain: *Milk - unprocessed cow's milk ...
Johnson, Kelsey (April 22, 2017). "Dairy 101: The Canada-U.S. milk spat explained". ipolitics.ca. Smith, Wally (May 4, 2016). " ... Specifically, ultra filtration allows the smaller lactose, water, mineral, and vitamin molecules to pass through the membrane, ... lower sugar content, and creamier taste. According to at least one publication, ultrafiltration and diafiltration are ... Johnson, Kelsey (22 April 2017). "Dairy 101: The Canada-U.S. milk spat explained". iPolitics. Eaves, Ali (24 August 2015). "Is ...
... enzyme to break down the sugar lactose found in dairy. As a result of this deficiency, undigested lactose is not absorbed and ... Sugar uptake. Polysaccharidases and disaccharidases in the glycocalyx break down large sugar molecules, which are then absorbed ... Lactose intolerance is the most common problem of carbohydrate digestion and occurs when the human body doesn't produce a ... There bacteria metabolize the lactose and in doing so release gas and metabolic products that enhance colonic motility. This ...
... the process serves to boost the protein and also remove some of the lactose (the sugar found naturally in milk). Elworthy, ... Kerning (or 'kerned') refers to an ancient Somerset term for 'thickening' predominantly used in relation to dairy products. The ...
An 1869 dictionary entry for "eggnog" defines it as a mixture of wine, spirits, eggs and sugar; there is no mention of dairy ... lactose intolerance or other dietary restrictions. The history of non-dairy eggnogs goes back to 1899 when Almeda Lambert, in ... In the 2000s, low-fat and sugar-free commercial versions are available using sugar substitutes and skimmed or low fat milk. The ... "Welcome to Dairy Ingredients Inc. , Beverages & Fluid Dairy Products". Dairyingredientsinc.com. Archived from the original on ...
... the lactose content of dairy products can be visualized. This is useful because many people are lactose intolerant and avoid ... those analyses could only differentiate between reducing and non-reducing sugars. Since both glucose and lactose molecules have ... "How to visualize the different lactose content of dairy products by Fearon's test and Woehlk test in classroom experiments and ... With lactose, the tested urine develops a significant red color, with glucose, only a yellow dye develops, and with sucrose, ...
L. lactis is mainly isolated from either the dairy environment, or plant material. Dairy isolates are suggested to have evolved ... Lactose fermentation by L. lactis produces acetate that reduces the intracellular pH of Salmonella, which in turn slows the ... meaning they produce lactic acid from sugars. They've also been reported to produce exclusive L-(+)-lactic acid. However, ... Lactose fermentation In Shuichi Nakamura's, Yusuke V. Marimoto, and Seishi Kudo's study, they sought to prove that some ...
... they are unsuitable for consumption by people who are lactose intolerant. Brocciu is lower in lactose. Whey cheese is produced ... Whey cheese is a dairy product made of whey, the by-product of cheesemaking. After the production of most cheeses, about 50% of ... Norwegian brown cheeses, made by boiling down the whey to concentrate the sugar, and consisting primarily of caramelized milk ... This type has a relatively low lactose content and a white to yellowish color. It is possible to ripen whey cheeses made with ...
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Many people are able to have these foods and beverages without problem, but some individuals are unable to break this sugar ... Lactose intolerance is a problem digesting foods that contain lactose. ... Lactose intolerance is a problem digesting foods that contain lactose. Lactose is a naturally occurring sugar found in dairy ... Lactose-Controlled Diet. If you are lactose intolerant, you will need to limit foods containing this milk sugar. ...
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Sugar free (diabetic). *. Gluten free (coeliac). *. Lactose free (dairy free). *. Low potassium ...
Sugar free (diabetic). *. Gluten free (coeliac). *. Lactose free (dairy free). *. Low potassium ...
Sugar free (diabetic). *. Gluten free (coeliac). *. Lactose free (dairy free). *. Low potassium ...
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Sugar free (diabetic). *. Gluten free (coeliacs). *. Lactose free (dairy free). *. Nut free ...
Sugar free (diabetic) *. Gluten free (coeliacs) *. Lactose free (dairy free) *. Low sodium ...
Sugar free (diabetic). *. Gluten free (coeliacs). *. Lactose free (dairy free). *. Nut free ...
Sugar free (diabetic). *. Gluten free (coeliacs). *. Lactose free (dairy free). *. Nut free ...
Sugar free (diabetic). *. Gluten free (coeliac). *. Lactose free (dairy free). *. Low potassium ...
Sugar free (diabetic). *. Gluten free (coeliacs). *. Lactose free (dairy free). *. Low potassium ...
In addition, there are dairy foods that contain less lactose, which is a milk sugar produced by mammals; these include yogurt, ... Lactose for a lactose-intolerant person is not all or nothing. There is a dose response in lactose intolerance, which means ... which is unfortunate as he loves dairy food. Lactaid drops that are meant to neutralize the lactose in dairy products do not ... As a result, he has had to cut anything dairy out of his diet.. In addition, hes become bothered by the idea of eating any ...
Carrageenan, added sugar, lactose, and cholesterol, soy, GMOs, dairy. *These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and ...
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Lactose intolerance is when you cant digest lactose, the sugar found in dairy products. Youll often get sym.... ... Dont get lactose intolerance confused with a milk allergy. Theyre not the same thing. ...
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  • Lactase (also known as lactase-phlorizin hydrolase, or LPH), a part of the β-galactosidase family of enzymes, is a glycoside hydrolase involved in the hydrolysis of the disaccharide lactose into constituent galactose and glucose monomers. (wikipedia.org)
  • In metabolism, the β-glycosidic bond in D-lactose is hydrolyzed to form D-galactose and D-glucose, which can be absorbed through the intestinal walls and into the bloodstream. (wikipedia.org)
  • Drinking alcohol is produced from natural sugars like glucose. (wikipedia.org)
  • Technology to produce lactose-free milk, ice cream and yogurt was developed by the USDA Agricultural Research Service in 1985. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dairy products like cheese and yogurt can also be made through fermentation using microbes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Without it they cannot break down the natural lactose in milk, leaving them with diarrhea, gas and bloating when drinking regular milk. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lacking lactase, a person consuming dairy products may experience the symptoms of lactose intolerance. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lactase can be purchased as a food supplement, and is added to milk to produce "lactose-free" milk products. (wikipedia.org)
  • Its primary commercial use, in supplements such as Lacteeze and Lactaid, is to break down lactose in milk to make it suitable for people with lactose intolerance, However, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has not formally evaluated the effectiveness of these products. (wikipedia.org)
  • The catalytic mechanism of D-lactose hydrolysis retains the substrate anomeric configuration in the products. (wikipedia.org)

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