Cytokinins: Plant hormones that promote the separation of daughter cells after mitotic division of a parent cell. Frequently they are purine derivatives.Zeatin: An aminopurine factor in plant extracts that induces cell division. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dict, 5th ed)Kinetin: A furanyl adenine found in PLANTS and FUNGI. It has plant growth regulation effects.Isopentenyladenosine: N(6)-[delta(3)-isopentenyl]adenosine. Isopentenyl derivative of adenosine which is a member of the cytokinin family of plant growth regulators.Plant Growth Regulators: Any of the hormones produced naturally in plants and active in controlling growth and other functions. There are three primary classes: auxins, cytokinins, and gibberellins.Plant Roots: The usually underground portions of a plant that serve as support, store food, and through which water and mineral nutrients enter the plant. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982; Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Plant Shoots: New immature growth of a plant including stem, leaves, tips of branches, and SEEDLINGS.Plant Leaves: Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)Gene Expression Regulation, Plant: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in plants.Helleborus: A plant genus of the family RANUNCULACEAE. Members contain hellebrin (BUFANOLIDES). The extract is the basis of Boicil preparation used to treat rheumatism.Arabidopsis: A plant genus of the family BRASSICACEAE that contains ARABIDOPSIS PROTEINS and MADS DOMAIN PROTEINS. The species A. thaliana is used for experiments in classical plant genetics as well as molecular genetic studies in plant physiology, biochemistry, and development.Indoleacetic Acids: Acetic acid derivatives of the heterocyclic compound indole. (Merck Index, 11th ed)Plants, Genetically Modified: PLANTS, or their progeny, whose GENOME has been altered by GENETIC ENGINEERING.Arabidopsis Proteins: Proteins that originate from plants species belonging to the genus ARABIDOPSIS. The most intensely studied species of Arabidopsis, Arabidopsis thaliana, is commonly used in laboratory experiments.Meristem: A group of plant cells that are capable of dividing infinitely and whose main function is the production of new growth at the growing tip of a root or stem. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Xylem: Plant tissue that carries water up the root and stem. Xylem cell walls derive most of their strength from LIGNIN. The vessels are similar to PHLOEM sieve tubes but lack companion cells and do not have perforated sides and pores.Alkyl and Aryl Transferases: A somewhat heterogeneous class of enzymes that catalyze the transfer of alkyl or related groups (excluding methyl groups). EC 2.5.Adenine: A purine base and a fundamental unit of ADENINE NUCLEOTIDES.Scopoletin: Plant growth factor derived from the root of Scopolia carniolica or Scopolia japonica.Crassulaceae: The stonecrop plant family of the order ROSALES, subclass Rosidae, class Magnoliopsida that grow in warm, dry regions. The leaves are thick. The flower clusters are red, yellow, or white.Plant Proteins: Proteins found in plants (flowers, herbs, shrubs, trees, etc.). The concept does not include proteins found in vegetables for which VEGETABLE PROTEINS is available.Tobacco: A plant genus of the family SOLANACEAE. Members contain NICOTINE and other biologically active chemicals; its dried leaves are used for SMOKING.Abscisic Acid: Abscission-accelerating plant growth substance isolated from young cotton fruit, leaves of sycamore, birch, and other plants, and from potatoes, lemons, avocados, and other fruits.Coleus: A plant genus of the family Lamiaceae. The species of Coleus should be distinguished from PLECTRANTHUS BARBATUS - which is also known as Coleus forskohlii.Seedling: Very young plant after GERMINATION of SEEDS.Plant Stems: Parts of plants that usually grow vertically upwards towards the light and support the leaves, buds, and reproductive structures. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Sophora: A plant genus of the family FABACEAE.Genes, Plant: The functional hereditary units of PLANTS.Naphthaleneacetic Acids: Naphthalene derivatives containing the -CH2CCO2H radical at the 1-position, the 2-position, or both. Compounds are used as plant growth regulators to delay sprouting, exert weed control, thin fruit, etc.Photoreceptors, Plant: Plant proteins that mediate LIGHT SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION. They are involved in PHOTOTROPISM and other light adaption responses during plant growth and development . They include the phototropins, phytochromes (PHYTOCHROME), and members of the ubiquitous cryptochrome family.Plant Development: Processes orchestrated or driven by a plethora of genes, plant hormones, and inherent biological timing mechanisms facilitated by secondary molecules, which result in the systematic transformation of plants and plant parts, from one stage of maturity to another.Plants, Toxic: Plants or plant parts which are harmful to man or other animals.Bryopsida: A class of plants within the Bryophyta comprising the mosses, which are found in both damp (including freshwater) and drier situations. Mosses possess erect or prostrate leafless stems, which give rise to leafless stalks bearing capsules. Spores formed in the capsules are released and grow to produce new plants. (Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990). Many small plants bearing the name moss are in fact not mosses. The "moss" found on the north side of trees is actually a green alga (CHLOROPHYTA). Irish moss is really a red alga (RHODOPHYTA). Beard lichen (beard moss), Iceland moss, oak moss, and reindeer moss are actually LICHENS. Spanish moss is a common name for both LICHENS and an air plant (TILLANDSIA usneoides) of the pineapple family. Club moss is an evergreen herb of the family LYCOPODIACEAE.Zea mays: A plant species of the family POACEAE. It is a tall grass grown for its EDIBLE GRAIN, corn, used as food and animal FODDER.Oxidoreductases: The class of all enzymes catalyzing oxidoreduction reactions. The substrate that is oxidized is regarded as a hydrogen donor. The systematic name is based on donor:acceptor oxidoreductase. The recommended name will be dehydrogenase, wherever this is possible; as an alternative, reductase can be used. Oxidase is only used in cases where O2 is the acceptor. (Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992, p9)Seeds: The encapsulated embryos of flowering plants. They are used as is or for animal feed because of the high content of concentrated nutrients like starches, proteins, and fats. Rapeseed, cottonseed, and sunflower seed are also produced for the oils (fats) they yield.Plant Tumors: A localized proliferation of plant tissue forming a swelling or outgrowth, commonly with a characteristic shape and unlike any organ of the normal plant. Plant tumors or galls usually form in response to the action of a pathogen or a pest. (Holliday, P., A Dictionary of Plant Pathology, 1989, p330)RNA, Plant: Ribonucleic acid in plants having regulatory and catalytic roles as well as involvement in protein synthesis.Flowers: The reproductive organs of plants.Benzyl CompoundsPlant Immunity: The inherent or induced capacity of plants to withstand or ward off biological attack by pathogens.Hypocotyl: The region of the stem beneath the stalks of the seed leaves (cotyledons) and directly above the young root of the embryo plant. It grows rapidly in seedlings showing epigeal germination and lifts the cotyledons above the soil surface. In this region (the transition zone) the arrangement of vascular bundles in the root changes to that of the stem. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)beta-Fructofuranosidase: A glycoside hydrolase found primarily in PLANTS and YEASTS. It has specificity for beta-D-fructofuranosides such as SUCROSE.Plants: Multicellular, eukaryotic life forms of kingdom Plantae (sensu lato), comprising the VIRIDIPLANTAE; RHODOPHYTA; and GLAUCOPHYTA; all of which acquired chloroplasts by direct endosymbiosis of CYANOBACTERIA. They are characterized by a mainly photosynthetic mode of nutrition; essentially unlimited growth at localized regions of cell divisions (MERISTEMS); cellulose within cells providing rigidity; the absence of organs of locomotion; absence of nervous and sensory systems; and an alternation of haploid and diploid generations.Ethylenes: Derivatives of ethylene, a simple organic gas of biological origin with many industrial and biological use.Plant Structures: The parts of plants, including SEEDS.Gibberellins: A class of plant growth hormone isolated from cultures of Gibberella fujikuroi, a fungus causing Bakanae disease in rice. There are many different members of the family as well as mixtures of multiple members; all are diterpenoid acids based on the gibberellane skeleton.Chlorophyll: Porphyrin derivatives containing magnesium that act to convert light energy in photosynthetic organisms.GlucosidesPubMed: A bibliographic database that includes MEDLINE as its primary subset. It is produced by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), part of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. PubMed, which is searchable through NLM's Web site, also includes access to additional citations to selected life sciences journals not in MEDLINE, and links to other resources such as the full-text of articles at participating publishers' Web sites, NCBI's molecular biology databases, and PubMed Central.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.BooksPublishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.MEDLINE: The premier bibliographic database of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. MEDLINE® (MEDLARS Online) is the primary subset of PUBMED and can be searched on NLM's Web site in PubMed or the NLM Gateway. MEDLINE references are indexed with MEDICAL SUBJECT HEADINGS (MeSH).Serial Publications: Publications in any medium issued in successive parts bearing numerical or chronological designations and intended to be continued indefinitely. (ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983, p203)

Cytokinin activation of Arabidopsis cell division through a D-type cyclin. (1/583)

Cytokinins are plant hormones that regulate plant cell division. The D-type cyclin CycD3 was found to be elevated in a mutant of Arabidopsis with a high level of cytokinin and to be rapidly induced by cytokinin application in both cell cultures and whole plants. Constitutive expression of CycD3 in transgenic plants allowed induction and maintenance of cell division in the absence of exogenous cytokinin. Results suggest that cytokinin activates Arabidopsis cell division through induction of CycD3 at the G1-S cell cycle phase transition.  (+info)

Detection of membrane-bound cytokinin-binding proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana cells. (2/583)

In order to isolate cytokinin-binding proteins (CBPs), we have developed new affinity probes constituted of a cytokinin such as zeatin riboside ([9R]Z) conjugated to a carrier protein. These probes were used for detecting CBPs in an ELISA procedure. The efficiency of the cytokinin conjugate in detecting CBPs was controlled with protein model: proteins having an affinity for cytokinin such as the monoclonal anti-[9R]Z antibodies did bind the cytokinin conjugate whereas proteins unable to bind cytokinin such as bovine serum albumin did not. Using these new affinity probes, we showed that CBPs are present in the membrane fraction of in vitro cultured Arabidopsis thaliana cells. The nature of the protein at the detected binding sites was demonstrated by submitting the microsomal proteins to a proteolytic treatment, which was found to eradicate the binding. Free biologically active cytokinins or monoclonal anti-[9R]Z antibodies inhibited the binding, thus showing the specificity of the interaction. The detected CBPs were partially solubilized from the membranes with potassium chloride, indicating their peripheral membrane location. The separation by anion exchange chromatography of solubilized microsomal proteins revealed the existence of two different CBPs. They were present at higher levels in cells during the exponential growth phase.  (+info)

A gene encoding the cytokinin enzyme zeatin O-xylosyltransferase of Phaseolus vulgaris. (3/583)

Zeatin is the most active and ubiquitous form of the naturally occurring cytokinins. Glycosyl conjugates of zeatin are found in many plant tissues and are considered important for storage and protection against degradative enzymes. Two enzymes catalyzing the formation of O-glycosyl derivatives of zeatin have been characterized, O-glucosyltransferase and O-xylosyltransferase, occurring in seeds of lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus) and bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), respectively. Recently, the ZOG1 gene (zeatin O-glucosyltansferase) was isolated from P. lunatis (). Based on the ZOG1 sequence, the ZOX1 gene (zeatin O-xylosyltransferase) was cloned from P. vulgaris. ZOX1 contains an open reading frame of 1362 bp that codes for a 454-amino acid peptide of 51 kD. The recombinant protein has properties identical to the native enzyme: it catalyzes O-xylosylzeatin formation with UDP-Xyl as a glycosyl donor but does not recognize UDP-Glucose as a substrate. The ZOX1 and ZOG1 genes exhibit 93% identity at the nucleotide level and 90% similarity at the amino acid level. Neither gene contains introns. These zeatin-specific genes and their promoters will be useful for studies of the regulation of active versus storage forms of cytokinins. Comparison of sequences encoding similar enzymes with distinct substrate specificity may lead to identification of epitopes specific to cytokinin and glycosyl donor molecules.  (+info)

Leaf senescence is delayed in tobacco plants expressing the maize homeobox gene knotted1 under the control of a senescence-activated promoter. (4/583)

Leaf senescence is an active process involving remobilization of nutrients from senescing leaves to other parts of the plant. Whereas senescence is accompanied by a decline in leaf cytokinin content, supplemental cytokinin delays senescence. Plants that overexpress isopentenyl transferase (ipt), a cytokinin-producing gene, or knotted1 (kn1), a homeobox gene, have many phenotypes in common. Many of these phenotypes are characteristic of altered cytokinin physiology. The effect of kn1 on leaf senescence was tested by driving its expression using the promoter of the senescence-associated gene SAG12. SAG:kn1 tobacco plants showed a marked delay in leaf senescence but otherwise developed normally. The delay in senescence was revealed by an increase in chlorophyll content in SAG:kn1 leaves relative to leaves of the control plants and by a decrease in the number of dead leaves. Senescence was also delayed in detached leaves of SAG:kn1 plants. Delayed senescence was accompanied by increased leaf cytokinin content in older leaves expressing kn1. These experiments extend the current understanding of kn1 function and suggest that in addition to mediating meristem maintenance, kn1 is capable of regulating the onset of senescence in leaves.  (+info)

Multiubiquitin chain binding subunit MCB1 (RPN10) of the 26S proteasome is essential for developmental progression in Physcomitrella patens. (5/583)

The 26S proteasome, a multisubunit complex, is the primary protease of the ubiquitin-mediated proteolytic system in eukaryotes. We have recently characterized MCB1 (RPN10), a subunit of the 26S complex that has affinity for multiubiquitin chains in vitro and as a result may function as a receptor for ubiquitinated substrates. To define the role of MCB1 further, we analyzed its function in Physcomitrella patens by generating MCB1 gene disruptions using homologous recombination. PpMCB1, which is 50 to 75% similar to orthologs from other eukaryotes, is present in the 26S proteasome complex and has a similar affinity for multiubiquitin chains, using a conserved hydrophobic domain within the C-terminal half of the polypeptide. Unlike yeast Deltamcb1 strains, which grow normally, P. patens Deltamcb1 strains are viable but are under developmental arrest, generating abnormal caulonema that are unable to form buds and gametophores. Treatment with auxin and cytokinin restored bud formation and subsequent partial development of gametophores. Complementation of a Deltamcb1 strain with mutated versions of PpMCB1 revealed that the multiubiquitin chain binding site is not essential for the wild-type phenotype. These results show that MCB1 has an important function in the 26S proteasome of higher order eukaryotes in addition to its ability to bind multiubiquitin chains, and they provide further support for a role of the ubiquitin/26S proteasome proteolytic pathway in plant developmental processes triggered by hormones.  (+info)

Cytokinins in tobacco and wheat chloroplasts. Occurrence and changes due to light/dark treatment. (6/583)

Although cytokinins (CKs) affect a number of processes connected with chloroplasts, it has never been rigorously proven that chloroplasts contain CKs. We isolated intact chloroplasts from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv SR1) and wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv Ritmo) leaves and determined their CKs by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectroscopy. Chloroplasts from both species contained a whole spectrum of CKs, including free bases (zeatin and isopentenyladenine), ribosides (zeatin riboside, and isopentenyladenosine), ribotides (isopentenyladenosine-5'-monophosphate, zeatin riboside-5'-monophosphate, and dihydrozeatin riboside-5'-monophosphate), and N-glucosides (zeatin-N(9)-glucoside, dihydrozeatin-N(9)-glucoside, zeatin-N(7)-glucoside, and isopentenyladenine-N-glucosides). In chloroplasts there was a moderately higher relative amount of bases, ribosides, and ribotides than in leaves, and a significantly increased level of N(9)-glucosides of zeatin and dihydrozeatin. Tobacco and wheat chloroplasts were prepared from leaves at the end of either a dark or light period. After a dark period, chloroplasts accumulated more CKs than after a light period. The differences were moderate for free bases and ribosides, but highly significant for glucosides. Tobacco chloroplasts from dark-treated leaves contained zeatin riboside-O-glucoside and dihydrozeatin riboside-O-glucoside, as well as a relatively high CK oxidase activity. These data show that chloroplasts contain a whole spectrum of CKs and the enzymatic activity necessary for their metabolism.  (+info)

Auxin and cytokinin have opposite effects on amyloplast development and the expression of starch synthesis genes in cultured bright yellow-2 tobacco cells. (7/583)

In cultured Bright Yellow-2 (BY-2) tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cells, the depletion of auxin (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid) in the culture medium induces the accumulation of starch. This is accelerated by the addition of cytokinin (benzyladenine). Light and electron microscopic observations revealed that this amyloplast formation involves drastic changes in plastid morphology. The effects of auxin and cytokinin on amyloplast development were investigated by adding auxin or cytokinin to cells grown in a hormone-free culture. Auxin repressed amyloplast development, whereas cytokinin accelerated starch accumulation regardless of the timing of hormone addition. RNA gel-blot analysis revealed that the accumulation of the ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase small subunit gene (AgpS), granule-bound starch synthase, and starch branching enzyme transcripts were also affected by hormonal conditions. High levels of AgpS, granule-bound starch synthase, and starch branching enzyme transcripts accumulated in amyloplast-developing cells grown in auxin-depleted conditions. Furthermore, the addition of auxin to the cells cultured in hormone-free medium reduced the level of AgpS transcripts, whereas the addition of cytokinin increased it, irrespective of the timing of hormone addition. These results suggest that auxin and cytokinin exert opposite effects on amyloplast development by regulating the expression of the genes required for starch biosynthesis.  (+info)

Cell-division factors from Vinca rosca L. crown gall tumor tissue. (8/583)

A cell-division factor has been precipitated from extracts of cultured Vinca rosea L. crown gall tumor tissue by using the mercuric acetate procedure previously employed by Wood and colleagues to obtain their "cytokinesin I." On the basis of its mass spectrum, ultraviolet light absorbancy spectra, solubilities, chromatographic migration values, and growth activity, the factor is ribosyl-trans-zeatin, that is, 6-(4-hydroxy-3-methyl-trans-2-butenylamino)-9-beta-D-ribofuranosylpurine. Ribosylzeatin has now been isolated from tumor tissue by four experimental techniques; any possibility that it is an artifact seems to have been eliminated. Contrary to the report by Wood and colleagues, synthetic ribosylzeatin is precipitated from an aqueous solution by mercuric acetate, provided the complete precipitation procedure is utilized. These facts and others discussed strongly support our suggestion that ribosylzeatin was present in the preparation ("cytokinesin I") examined by Wood and colleagues in several biological assays. The reasons advanced by Wood and others for rejecting this suggestion have been found either not to be pertinent to the question or to have insufficient experimental bases.  (+info)

  • Here we show that another type of hormone-based inhibitory fields, generated directly downstream of auxin by intercellular movement of the cytokinin signalling inhibitor ARABIDOPSIS HISTIDINE PHOSPHOTRANSFER PROTEIN 6 (AHP6), is involved in regulating phyllotactic patterns. (cpib.ac.uk)
  • Cytokinins are perceived by three histidine kinases--CRE1/WOL/AHK4, AHK2, and AHK3--which initiate intracellular phosphotransfer. (nih.gov)
  • Different substrate specificities, and the pH profiles of cytokinin-degrading enzymes extracted from different barley tissues, are also presented. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • We demonstrate that AHP6-based fields establish patterns of cytokinin signalling in the meristem that contribute to the robustness of phyllotaxis by imposing a temporal sequence on organ initiation. (cpib.ac.uk)
  • Despite their importance in growth and development, cytokinins are among the most neglected phytohormones that are usually noticed as consequence rather than a cause of pathogen infection. (uni-wuerzburg.de)
  • Cytokinins are N6-substituted adenine derivatives that play diverse roles in plant growth and development. (omicsdi.org)
  • By mass spectrometry and other methods, 6-benzylaminopurine and its 9-β-ribofuranoside were identified as cytokinins in the extracts which also contained a 9-hexoside of 6-benzylaminopurine. (edu.au)
  • Consistent with the over-representation of genes involved in biotic stress, there is a substantial overlap in the genes regulated by cytokinin and those differentially expressed in response to pathogen infection, suggesting that cytokinin plays an integral role in the transcriptional response to pathogens in rice, including the induction of a large number of WRKY transcription factors. (transforming-science.com)
  • We discuss our identified immune hubs in light of an emerging model of cytokinin-mediated immune defense against pathogen infection in plants. (uni-wuerzburg.de)
  • Kieber, PhD, professor and associate chair of biology at UNC Chapel Hill, and Eric Schaller, PhD, professor of biological sciences and in the Molecular and Cellular Biology Graduate Program at Dartmouth College, she is applying her expertise in plant biology, bioinformatics and analytical software development to understand the role cytokinins play in the growth and development of rice. (transforming-science.com)
Plant Growth Regulators - Auxins, Gibberellins, Cytokinins, Kinetin, Abscisic & Gibberellic Acid
Plant Growth Regulators - Auxins, Gibberellins, Cytokinins, Kinetin, Abscisic & Gibberellic Acid (mpbio.com)
Mosquito Repellent, Insect Repellent, Organic fertilizer, Plant growth regulators, Cytokinins, Fish fertilizer, Hydrogen...
Mosquito Repellent, Insect Repellent, Organic fertilizer, Plant growth regulators, Cytokinins, Fish fertilizer, Hydrogen... (agriorganics.com)
Https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/318394.php
Https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/318394.php (medicalnewstoday.com)
Quo vadis plant hormone analysis? | SpringerLink
Quo vadis plant hormone analysis? | SpringerLink (link.springer.com)
Frontiers | Profiles of Endogenous Phytohormones Over the Course of Norway Spruce Somatic Embryogenesis | Plant Science
Frontiers | Profiles of Endogenous Phytohormones Over the Course of Norway Spruce Somatic Embryogenesis | Plant Science (frontiersin.org)
Coconut Juice Benefits | Livestrong.com
Coconut Juice Benefits | Livestrong.com (livestrong.com)
Cytokinins | SpringerLink
Cytokinins | SpringerLink (link.springer.com)
Plant Science Research and Practices Archives - Page 2 of 5 - Nova Science Publishers
Plant Science Research and Practices Archives - Page 2 of 5 - Nova Science Publishers (novapublishers.com)
Biochemical and Physicochemical Background of Mammalian Androgen Activity in Winter Wheat Exposed to Low Temperature |...
Biochemical and Physicochemical Background of Mammalian Androgen Activity in Winter Wheat Exposed to Low Temperature |... (link.springer.com)
Biology Archives - Page 5 of 45 - Nova Science Publishers
Biology Archives - Page 5 of 45 - Nova Science Publishers (novapublishers.com)
Plant hormone - Wikipedia
Plant hormone - Wikipedia (en.m.wikipedia.org)
The role of cytokinins in clubroot disease | SpringerLink
The role of cytokinins in clubroot disease | SpringerLink (link.springer.com)
Plant Growth Substances 1979 | Springer for Research & Development
Plant Growth Substances 1979 | Springer for Research & Development (rd.springer.com)
Novel thidiazuron-derived inhibitors of cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase | SpringerLink
Novel thidiazuron-derived inhibitors of cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase | SpringerLink (link.springer.com)
Activating Cytokinin in the Meristem | Science Signaling
Activating Cytokinin in the Meristem | Science Signaling (stke.sciencemag.org)
Hormonal Horticulture: A Breakdown of Plant Hormones, Part 2
Hormonal Horticulture: A Breakdown of Plant Hormones, Part 2 (maximumyield.com)
Frontiers | Reprogramming of the Developmental Program of Rhus javanica During Initial Stage of Gall Induction by...
Frontiers | Reprogramming of the Developmental Program of Rhus javanica During Initial Stage of Gall Induction by... (frontiersin.org)
A block on the end of a horizontal spring is pulled | bartleby
A block on the end of a horizontal spring is pulled | bartleby (bartleby.com)
Frontiers | Dancing with Hormones: A Current Perspective of Nitrate Signaling and Regulation in Arabidopsis | Plant Science
Frontiers | Dancing with Hormones: A Current Perspective of Nitrate Signaling and Regulation in Arabidopsis | Plant Science (frontiersin.org)
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of Plants, 2nd Edition | Plant Biochemistry | Plant Science | Life Sciences | Subjects |...
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of Plants, 2nd Edition | Plant Biochemistry | Plant Science | Life Sciences | Subjects |... (wiley.com)
Cytokinin production by species of the fungus Taphrina | Open Library
Cytokinin production by species of the fungus Taphrina | Open Library (openlibrary.org)
Cytokinins in the Bryophyte Physcomitrella patens: Analyses of Activity, Distribution, and Cytokinin Oxidase/Dehydrogenase...
Cytokinins in the Bryophyte Physcomitrella patens: Analyses of Activity, Distribution, and Cytokinin Oxidase/Dehydrogenase... (plantphysiol.org)
SWISS-MODEL Template Library | 5hmr.1
SWISS-MODEL Template Library | 5hmr.1 (swissmodel.expasy.org)
10 Facts On | MaximumYield.com
10 Facts On | MaximumYield.com (maximumyield.com)
Plant Physiology | 
            
            Digital Textbook Library
Plant Physiology | Digital Textbook Library (tankonyvtar.hu)
The Glyoxalase System: A Possible Target for Production of Salinity-Tolerant Crop Plants | SpringerLink
The Glyoxalase System: A Possible Target for Production of Salinity-Tolerant Crop Plants | SpringerLink (link.springer.com)
Frontiers | Enhanced Conjugation of Auxin by GH3 Enzymes Leads to Poor Adventitious Rooting in Carnation Stem Cuttings | Plant...
Frontiers | Enhanced Conjugation of Auxin by GH3 Enzymes Leads to Poor Adventitious Rooting in Carnation Stem Cuttings | Plant... (frontiersin.org)
Homemade Weed Killers | Garden Guides
Homemade Weed Killers | Garden Guides (gardenguides.com)
CytokininsChemistry, Activity, and Function - David W. S. Mok, Machteld C. Mok - Google Books
CytokininsChemistry, Activity, and Function - David W. S. Mok, Machteld C. Mok - Google Books (books.google.co.uk)
Springer Handbook of Enzymes | SpringerLink
Springer Handbook of Enzymes | SpringerLink (link.springer.com)
Dr Jill Harrison - School of Biological Sciences publications
Dr Jill Harrison - School of Biological Sciences publications (bris.ac.uk)
China Apple Tech, China Apple Tech Manufacturers and Suppliers on Alibaba.com
China Apple Tech, China Apple Tech Manufacturers and Suppliers on Alibaba.com (alibaba.com)
Characterization of Cytokinins and Related Compounds by HPLC | Springer for Research & Development
Characterization of Cytokinins and Related Compounds by HPLC | Springer for Research & Development (rd.springer.com)