A malignant neoplasm derived from glandular epithelium, in which cystic accumulations of retained secretions are formed. The neoplastic cells manifest varying degrees of anaplasia and invasiveness, and local extension and metastases occur. Cystadenocarcinomas develop frequently in the ovaries, where pseudomucinous and serous types are recognized. (Stedman, 25th ed)
A malignant cystic or semisolid tumor most often occurring in the ovary. Rarely, one is solid. This tumor may develop from a mucinous cystadenoma, or it may be malignant at the onset. The cysts are lined with tall columnar epithelial cells; in others, the epithelium consists of many layers of cells that have lost normal structure entirely. In the more undifferentiated tumors, one may see sheets and nests of tumor cells that have very little resemblance to the parent structure. (Hughes, Obstetric-Gynecologic Terminology, 1972, p184)
A benign neoplasm derived from glandular epithelium, in which cystic accumulations of retained secretions are formed. In some instances, considerable portions of the neoplasm, or even the entire mass, may be cystic. (Stedman, 25th ed)
An adenocarcinoma in which the tumor elements are arranged as finger-like processes or as a solid spherical nodule projecting from an epithelial surface.
A malignant cystic or semicystic neoplasm. It often occurs in the ovary and usually bilaterally. The external surface is usually covered with papillary excrescences. Microscopically, the papillary patterns are predominantly epithelial overgrowths with differentiated and undifferentiated papillary serous cystadenocarcinoma cells. Psammoma bodies may be present. The tumor generally adheres to surrounding structures and produces ascites. (From Hughes, Obstetric-Gynecologic Terminology, 1972, p185)
A multilocular tumor with mucin secreting epithelium. They are most often found in the ovary, but are also found in the pancreas, appendix, and rarely, retroperitoneal and in the urinary bladder. They are considered to have low-grade malignant potential.
Tumors or cancer of the APPENDIX.
A retention cyst of the salivary gland, lacrimal sac, paranasal sinuses, appendix, or gallbladder. (Stedman, 26th ed)
Any fluid-filled closed cavity or sac that is lined by an EPITHELIUM. Cysts can be of normal, abnormal, non-neoplastic, or neoplastic tissues.
Distention of KIDNEY with the presence of PUS and suppurative destruction of the renal parenchyma. It is often associated with renal obstruction and can lead to total or nearly total loss of renal function.
A sarcoma of the body of the uterus arising in older women, composed of more than one mesenchymal tissue, especially including striated muscle cells. It is associated with previous pelvic radiation exposure in 20% of patients. (Stedman, 25th ed; Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1702)
Tumors or cancer of the OVARY. These neoplasms can be benign or malignant. They are classified according to the tissue of origin, such as the surface EPITHELIUM, the stromal endocrine cells, and the totipotent GERM CELLS.
Tumors or cancer in the BILIARY TRACT including the BILE DUCTS and the GALLBLADDER.
A benign neoplasm of the ovary.
Tumors or cancer of the PAROTID GLAND.
A compound used as an x-ray contrast medium that occurs in nature as the mineral barite. It is also used in various manufacturing applications and mixed into heavy concrete to serve as a radiation shield.
A condition characterized by poorly-circumscribed gelatinous masses filled with malignant mucin-secreting cells. Forty-five percent of pseudomyxomas arise from the ovary, usually in a mucinous cystadenocarcinoma (CYSTADENOCARCINOMA, MUCINOUS), which has prognostic significance. Pseudomyxoma peritonei must be differentiated from mucinous spillage into the peritoneum by a benign mucocele of the appendix. (Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)
Passages within the liver for the conveyance of bile. Includes right and left hepatic ducts even though these may join outside the liver to form the common hepatic duct.
Tumors or cancer of the BILE DUCTS.
Retroperitoneal neoplasms are a diverse group of tumors that originate in the retroperitoneal space, which is the area behind the peritoneum and includes the kidneys, adrenal glands, pancreas, and major blood vessels.
Tumors or cancer of the PANCREAS. Depending on the types of ISLET CELLS present in the tumors, various hormones can be secreted: GLUCAGON from PANCREATIC ALPHA CELLS; INSULIN from PANCREATIC BETA CELLS; and SOMATOSTATIN from the SOMATOSTATIN-SECRETING CELLS. Most are malignant except the insulin-producing tumors (INSULINOMA).
Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.
Tumors or cancer of the SALIVARY GLANDS.
Surgical removal of the pancreas. (Dorland, 28th ed)
Organic compounds containing both the hydroxyl and carboxyl radicals.
The excision of the head of the pancreas and the encircling loop of the duodenum to which it is connected.

Increased expression of the RIalpha subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A is associated with advanced stage ovarian cancer. (1/526)

The primary element in the cAMP signal transduction pathway is the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Expression of the RIalpha subunit of type I PKA is elevated in a variety of human tumours and cancer cell lines. The purpose of this study was to assess the prognostic importance of RIalpha expression in patients with ovarian cancer. We have evaluated the expression of RIalpha in a panel of human ovarian tumours (n = 40) and five human ovarian cancer cell lines using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot analysis. The human ovarian cell lines OAW42 and OTN14 express high endogenous levels of RIalpha mRNA and protein (at significantly higher mRNA levels than high tissue expressors, P < 0.05). The ovarian cell line A2780 expresses low endogenous levels of RIalpha mRNA and protein (also at higher mRNA levels than low tissue expressors, P < 0.05). Quantitative RT-PCR revealed no significant difference in RIalpha mRNA expression between different ovarian histological subtypes in this study. No associations were found between RIalpha mRNA expression and differentiation state. RIalpha mRNA expression was significantly associated with tumour stage (P = 0.0036), and this remained significant in univariate analysis (P = 0.0002). A trend emerged between RIalpha mRNA expression levels and overall survival in univariate analysis (P = 0.051), however, by multivariate analysis, stage remained the major determinant of overall survival (P = 0.0001). This study indicates that in ovarian epithelial tumours high RIalpha mRNA expression is associated with advanced stage disease. RIalpha expression may be of predictive value in ovarian cancer and may be associated with dysfunctional signalling pathways in this cancer type.  (+info)

The expression of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) in the human ovary in vivo: specific increase in C/EBPbeta during epithelial tumour progression. (2/526)

The CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) family of transcription factors is involved in metabolism and differentiation of cells, especially in rodent liver cells and adipocytes. Their roles in vivo and in particular during pathophysiological conditions in humans are largely unknown. We have investigated the presence of C/EBPalpha, -beta, -delta and -zeta in normal ovaries and in epithelial ovarian tumours of different stages. Immunohistochemical experiments demonstrated that C/EBPalpha and C/EBPbeta were preferentially expressed in epithelial/tumour cells irrespective of stage or grade of the tumour. C/EBPbeta was located in the nuclei of the cells, in contrast to C/EBPalpha, which was present only in the cytoplasm of these cells. The nuclear localization of C/EBPbeta indicates an active role of this transcription factor in tumour cells, whereas the cytoplasmic distribution suggests a more passive function of C/EBPalpha. C/EBPdelta and -zeta demonstrated a more diverse distribution with predominant localization to epithelial cells, but stromal distribution was also noted. The intracellular distribution was confined to both the nucleus and the cytoplasm for C/EBPdelta and -zeta. Western blotting demonstrated that C/EBPalpha, -beta, -delta and -zeta were present in a majority of the samples. The amount of C/EBPbeta increased markedly with malignancy, i.e. with degree of dedifferentiation, while the other members of the C/EBP family displayed a more constant expression level. These results demonstrate an association between the expression of members of the C/EBP family and the formation of epithelial ovarian tumours, with C/EBPbeta as a potential marker for these tumours. As C/EBPbeta is known to be expressed during proliferation of cells in vitro, it may participate in the proliferative process of ovarian epithelial tumour cells in vivo and play a central role in tumour progression.  (+info)

Overexpression of H-Ryk in mouse fibroblasts confers transforming ability in vitro and in vivo: correlation with up-regulation in epithelial ovarian cancer. (3/526)

Abnormalities in the function of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) have been demonstrated to be important in the pathogenesis of cancer. H-Ryk, a new member of the RTK family, is an unusual RTK in that it is catalytically inactive because of amino acid substitutions of conserved residues in the catalytic domain. We show by immunohistochemistry that it is expressed in the epithelium, stroma, and blood vessels of normal tissues. Evaluation of a panel of 33 primary ovarian tumors (2 benign, 8 borderline, and 23 malignant) was performed. H-Ryk was overexpressed in borderline and malignant ovarian tumors. In serous and clear cell subtypes, there was increased expression in the epithelium, stroma, and blood vessels. Consistent with this observation, overexpression of H-Ryk in the mouse fibroblast cell line NIH3T3 induces anchorage-independent growth and tumorigenicity in nude mice. This implies that overexpression of the receptor can be transforming and may therefore be significant in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer.  (+info)

Borderline ovarian tumours in Vaud, Switzerland: incidence, survival and second neoplasms. (4/526)

Between 1976 and 1996, 176 borderline ovarian tumours were registered in the Cancer Registry of the Swiss canton of Vaud, corresponding to an age-adjusted incidence (world standard) of 2.7 in 100,000. Incidence rose from 1.7 per 100,000 during 1976-81 to 2.7 per 100,000 during 1987-91, and then levelled off; 58% of cases were serous and 41% mucinous. Relative survival was 94% at 10 years; 18 second neoplasms were observed, compared with 10.3 expected, and there was a significant excess of invasive ovarian cancers (four observed, including three synchronous, compared with 0.4 expected).  (+info)

Three dimensional ultrasound and power doppler in assessment of uterine and ovarian angiogenesis: a prospective study. (5/526)

AIM: To determine whether three-dimensional power Doppler can improve the recognition of pelvic tumor morphology and angiogenesis. METHODS: Using this technique we analyzed 180 adnexal masses and 110 uterine lesions. Tumor volume, morphology, and vascularity were evaluated in each patient. Irregular and randomly dispersed vessels with complex branching depicted by comprehensive three dimensional display were suggestive of pelvic malignancy, while linear-like vascular morphology, single vessel arrangement and regular branching were typical for benign structures. RESULTS: Addition of qualitative analysis of vascular architecture of adnexal tumor to morphological parameters reached 96.15% sensitivity and 98.73% specificity. When endometrial lesions were prospectively analyzed, sensitivity and specificity were 91.67% and 98.49%, respectively. Because the lowest positive predictive value of 16.67% was obtained for myometrial lesions, this method should not be advised for their eva luation. CONCLUSION: Good results achieved by three dimensional ultrasound can be explained by improved recognition of the pelvic lesion anatomy, characterization of the surface features, detection of the tumor infiltration, and precise depiction of the size and volume. Three dimensional power Doppler imaging can detect structural abnormalities of the malignant tumor vessels, such as arteriovenous shunts, microaneurysms, tumoral lakes, disproportional calibration, coiling, and dichotomous branching. Therefore it enhances and facilitates the morphologic and functional evaluation of both benign and malignant pelvic tumors.  (+info)

Evaluation of the tyrosine kinase domain of the Met proto-oncogene in sporadic ovarian carcinomas*. (6/526)

Most of the ovarian cancers originate from the ovarian surface epithelium derived from the coelomic mesothelium. The Met proto-oncogene encodes a transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptor (Met) that has the capacity to regulate cell proliferation and differentation and it is activated by hepatocyte growth factor. Trisomy of chromosome 7 and Met protein overexpression have been were observed in ovarian carcinomas, the papillary renal cancers and other solid tumors. Frequent mutations of Met proto-oncogene have been found in hereditary papillary renal cancer (HPRC) and most of the mutations are located in the tyrosine kinase domain. The aim of this study to perform a mutation analysis of exons 17 19 of Met proto-oncogene in epithelial ovarian tumors (EOTs). We have examined 24 tumor samples from patients, operated with EOTs. Mutation was detected in exon 18 in only one sample of 24 EOTs. Our results indicate that mutations located in the Met proto-oncogene is not a common event in EOT. It is not clear whether the mutation plays a role in the tumorigenesis or progression of EOT or not.  (+info)

Prognostic significance of p53 expression in advanced-stage ovarian serous borderline tumors. (7/526)

The purpose of this study was to investigate the frequency of p53 overexpression in the primary ovarian tumors of patients with stages II and III serous borderline tumors (SBTs) and to determine the relationship between p53 overexpression and risk of progression/recurrence and survival. Of 112 patients with stages II-IV SBTs, paraffin-embedded tissue from the primary ovarian tumor was available in 68 cases. Immunohistochemical staining for p53 was performed. Clinical information was abstracted from the medical records. The major end points selected for analysis were time to progression/relapse, disease-free survival, overall survival, and cause-specific survival. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were also performed. The median patient age was 37 years (range, 17-67 years). Twenty-two patients had stage II disease, and 46 had stage III disease. The mean follow-up time was 105 months. Nineteen patients (28%) had either disease progression (1 patient) or relapse (18 patients). Eleven patients died: 10 patients died of their tumor, and 1 patient died of other causes. Thirteen cases (19%) had positive immunostaining for p53. Overexpression of p53 was significantly associated with an increased probability of progression/recurrence (P = 0.005) and a decreased overall survival (P = 0.012). After adjusting for age, International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage, the presence of residual tumor, and the presence of invasive implants, patients whose tumors overexpressed p53 had a 4-fold increased risk of progression/ recurrence. Similarly, women whose tumor overexpressed p53 had an approximately 6-fold increased risk of death. p53 overexpression in the ovarian tumors of patients with stage II and III SBTs is significantly associated with increased probability of relapse and decreased overall survival. This information should provide better prognostic data to patients and their families and allow us to select patients who might benefit from postoperative treatment.  (+info)

Allelotyping defines minimal imbalance at chromosomal region 17q25 in non-serous epithelial ovarian cancers. (8/526)

Allelic deletions of multiple chromosome 17q loci in sporadic ovarian cancer of epithelial origin suggest that inactivation of tumor suppressor gene(s) in these regions may be important for ovarian tumorigenesis. To further define the pattern of allelic imbalance in epithelial ovarian tumors of different histologies, a PCR-based assay was used to assess loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of polymorphic markers representative of TP53, BRCA1, NME1 and GH1, and region 17q23-25. LOH was observed for at least one marker in 68% of malignant tumors (n=60) and in 18% tumors of borderline malignancy (n=11), but not in benign tumors (n=5). The highest frequency of LOH in malignant tumors (64%) was observed with D17S801 on 17q25. Ten of 39 malignant ovarian tumors displaying LOH of at least one 17q marker, displayed a LOH pattern enabling the determination of a minimal region of overlapping deletion defined by D17S795 and D17S801. One borderline tumor also displayed an interstitial LOH pattern that overlapped this 17q25 minimal region of deletion. The histologies of malignant tumors displaying a pattern indicative of interstitial 17q deletions were of the endometrioid, clear cell and mucinous epithelial types. As the minimal region of overlap defined by these tumors overlap regions deleted in malignant tumors of all histologic types, and in a tumor of borderline malignancy, the 17q25-tumor suppressor may be implicated in the development of all types of epithelial ovarian tumors.  (+info)

Cystadenocarcinoma is a type of tumor that arises from the epithelial lining of a cyst, and it has the potential to invade surrounding tissues and spread (metastasize) to other parts of the body. It typically affects glandular organs such as the ovaries, pancreas, and salivary glands.

Cystadenocarcinomas can be classified into two types: serous and mucinous. Serous cystadenocarcinomas produce a watery fluid, while mucinous cystadenocarcinomas produce a thick, mucus-like fluid. Both types of tumors can be benign or malignant, but malignant cystadenocarcinomas are more aggressive and have a higher risk of metastasis.

Symptoms of cystadenocarcinoma depend on the location and size of the tumor. In some cases, there may be no symptoms until the tumor has grown large enough to cause pain or other problems. Treatment typically involves surgical removal of the tumor, along with any affected surrounding tissue. Chemotherapy and radiation therapy may also be used in some cases to help prevent recurrence or spread of the cancer.

Mucinous cystadenocarcinoma is a type of cancer that arises from the mucin-producing cells in the lining of a cyst. It is a subtype of cystadenocarcinoma, which is a malignant tumor that develops within a cyst. Mucinous cystadenocarcinomas are typically found in the ovary or pancreas but can also occur in other organs such as the appendix and the respiratory tract.

These tumors are characterized by the production of large amounts of mucin, a gel-like substance that can accumulate within the cyst and cause it to grow. Mucinous cystadenocarcinomas tend to grow slowly but can become quite large and may eventually spread (metastasize) to other parts of the body if left untreated.

Symptoms of mucinous cystadenocarcinoma depend on the location and size of the tumor, but they may include abdominal pain or discomfort, bloating, changes in bowel movements, or vaginal bleeding. Treatment typically involves surgical removal of the tumor, followed by chemotherapy or radiation therapy to kill any remaining cancer cells. The prognosis for mucinous cystadenocarcinoma depends on several factors, including the stage of the disease at diagnosis and the patient's overall health.

Cystadenoma is a type of benign tumor (not cancerous), which arises from glandular epithelial cells and is covered by a thin layer of connective tissue. These tumors can develop in various locations within the body, including the ovaries, pancreas, and other organs that contain glands.

There are two main types of cystadenomas: serous and mucinous. Serous cystadenomas are filled with a clear or watery fluid, while mucinous cystadenomas contain a thick, gelatinous material. Although they are generally not harmful, these tumors can grow quite large and cause discomfort or other symptoms due to their size or location. In some cases, cystadenomas may undergo malignant transformation and develop into cancerous tumors, known as cystadenocarcinomas. Regular medical follow-up and monitoring are essential for individuals diagnosed with cystadenomas to ensure early detection and treatment of any potential complications.

Papillary cystadenocarcinoma is a type of cancer that arises from the epithelial cells lining a cyst. It is called "papillary" because the tumor has finger-like projections called papillae, which are made up of fibrovascular cores covered by neoplastic cells.

Cystadenocarcinoma is a malignant tumor that has the potential to invade surrounding tissues and spread (metastasize) to other parts of the body. Papillary cystadenocarcinomas can occur in various organs, including the ovaries, pancreas, and lungs.

The symptoms of papillary cystadenocarcinoma depend on the location of the tumor. For example, an ovarian papillary cystadenocarcinoma may cause abdominal pain or bloating, while a lung papillary cystadenocarcinoma may cause coughing or shortness of breath.

The diagnosis of papillary cystadenocarcinoma typically involves imaging tests such as ultrasound, CT scan, or MRI, followed by a biopsy to confirm the presence of cancer cells. Treatment options include surgery to remove the tumor, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. The prognosis for papillary cystadenocarcinoma depends on several factors, including the stage of the disease at diagnosis, the location of the tumor, and the patient's overall health.

Cystadenocarcinoma, serous is a type of cystic tumor that arises from the lining of the abdominal or pelvic cavity (the peritoneum). It is called "serous" because the tumor cells produce a thin, watery fluid similar to serum.

Cystadenocarcinoma is a malignant (cancerous) tumor that can invade surrounding tissues and spread (metastasize) to other parts of the body. It typically affects women over the age of 50 and can cause symptoms such as abdominal pain, bloating, and changes in bowel or bladder habits.

Serous cystadenocarcinoma is a subtype of ovarian cancer that arises from the surface of the ovary. It can also occur in other organs, including the fallopian tubes, peritoneum, and endometrium. This type of tumor tends to grow slowly but can spread widely throughout the abdominal cavity, making it difficult to treat.

Treatment for serous cystadenocarcinoma typically involves surgery to remove the tumor and any affected tissues, followed by chemotherapy to kill any remaining cancer cells. The prognosis for this type of cancer depends on several factors, including the stage of the disease at diagnosis, the patient's age and overall health, and the response to treatment.

Mucinous cystadenoma is a type of benign tumor that arises from the epithelial cells lining the mucous membranes of the body. It is most commonly found in the ovary, but can also occur in other locations such as the pancreas or appendix.

Mucinous cystadenomas are characterized by the production of large amounts of mucin, a slippery, gel-like substance that accumulates inside the tumor and causes it to grow into a cystic mass. These tumors can vary in size, ranging from a few centimeters to over 20 centimeters in diameter.

While mucinous cystadenomas are generally benign, they have the potential to become cancerous (mucinous cystadenocarcinoma) if left untreated. Symptoms of mucinous cystadenoma may include abdominal pain or swelling, bloating, and changes in bowel movements or urinary habits. Treatment typically involves surgical removal of the tumor.

Appendiceal neoplasms refer to various types of tumors that can develop in the appendix, a small tube-like structure attached to the large intestine. These neoplasms can be benign or malignant and can include:

1. Adenomas: These are benign tumors that arise from the glandular cells lining the appendix. They are usually slow-growing and may not cause any symptoms.
2. Carcinoids: These are neuroendocrine tumors that arise from the hormone-producing cells in the appendix. They are typically small and slow-growing, but some can be aggressive and spread to other parts of the body.
3. Mucinous neoplasms: These are tumors that produce mucin, a slippery substance that can cause the appendix to become distended and filled with mucus. They can be low-grade (less aggressive) or high-grade (more aggressive) and may spread to other parts of the abdomen.
4. Adenocarcinomas: These are malignant tumors that arise from the glandular cells lining the appendix. They are relatively rare but can be aggressive and spread to other parts of the body.
5. Pseudomyxoma peritonei: This is a condition in which mucin produced by an appendiceal neoplasm leaks into the abdominal cavity, causing a jelly-like accumulation of fluid and tissue. It can be caused by both benign and malignant tumors.

Treatment for appendiceal neoplasms depends on the type and stage of the tumor, as well as the patient's overall health. Treatment options may include surgery, chemotherapy, or radiation therapy.

A mucocele is a mucus-containing cystic lesion that results from the accumulation of mucin within a damaged minor salivary gland duct or mucous gland. It is typically caused by trauma, injury, or blockage of the duct. Mucocele appears as a round, dome-shaped, fluid-filled swelling, which may be bluish or clear in color. They are most commonly found on the lower lip but can also occur on other areas of the oral cavity. Mucocele is generally painless unless it becomes secondarily infected; however, it can cause discomfort during speaking, chewing, or swallowing, and may affect aesthetics. Treatment usually involves surgical excision of the mucocele to prevent recurrence.

A cyst is a closed sac, having a distinct membrane and division between the sac and its surrounding tissue, that contains fluid, air, or semisolid material. Cysts can occur in various parts of the body, including the skin, internal organs, and bones. They can be caused by various factors, such as infection, genetic predisposition, or blockage of a duct or gland. Some cysts may cause symptoms, such as pain or discomfort, while others may not cause any symptoms at all. Treatment for cysts depends on the type and location of the cyst, as well as whether it is causing any problems. Some cysts may go away on their own, while others may need to be drained or removed through a surgical procedure.

Pyonephrosis is a medical condition characterized by the presence of pus in the renal pelvis, which is the part of the kidney where urine collects before flowing into the ureter. This occurs as a result of a severe infection that has spread to the kidney and caused pus to accumulate within the renal pelvis. Pyonephrosis can lead to serious complications such as sepsis, kidney damage, or even kidney failure if left untreated. It is typically treated with antibiotics and may require surgical intervention to drain the pus and remove any infected tissue.

A "mixed tumor, mesodermal" is not a widely recognized or currently used medical term in pathology. However, based on the context, it may refer to a type of tumor that contains a mixture of different cell types derived from the mesoderm, one of the three primary germ layers during embryonic development.

In general, a mixed tumor is a tumor composed of more than one type of tissue or cell type. In the context of soft tissue tumors, a "mixed tumor" may refer to a tumor with elements of both epithelial and mesenchymal differentiation, such as a pleomorphic adenoma.

However, in the context of mesodermal tissues, mixed tumors are not typically used to describe soft tissue tumors. Instead, the term "mixed" is more commonly used in the classification of certain types of ovarian tumors that contain both epithelial and mesenchymal elements, such as a Brenner tumor or a mullerian mixed tumor.

Therefore, it's important to provide more context or specify the body site when using the term "mixed tumor, mesodermal" to ensure accurate communication and understanding.

Ovarian neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the ovary, which can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). These growths can originate from various cell types within the ovary, including epithelial cells, germ cells, and stromal cells. Ovarian neoplasms are often classified based on their cell type of origin, histological features, and potential for invasive or metastatic behavior.

Epithelial ovarian neoplasms are the most common type and can be further categorized into several subtypes, such as serous, mucinous, endometrioid, clear cell, and Brenner tumors. Some of these epithelial tumors have a higher risk of becoming malignant and spreading to other parts of the body.

Germ cell ovarian neoplasms arise from the cells that give rise to eggs (oocytes) and can include teratomas, dysgerminomas, yolk sac tumors, and embryonal carcinomas. Stromal ovarian neoplasms develop from the connective tissue cells supporting the ovary and can include granulosa cell tumors, thecomas, and fibromas.

It is essential to diagnose and treat ovarian neoplasms promptly, as some malignant forms can be aggressive and potentially life-threatening if not managed appropriately. Regular gynecological exams, imaging studies, and tumor marker tests are often used for early detection and monitoring of ovarian neoplasms. Treatment options may include surgery, chemotherapy, or radiation therapy, depending on the type, stage, and patient's overall health condition.

Biliary tract neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors that develop in the biliary system, which includes the gallbladder, bile ducts inside and outside the liver, and the ducts that connect the liver to the small intestine. These neoplasms can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous).

Malignant biliary tract neoplasms are often referred to as cholangiocarcinoma if they originate in the bile ducts, or gallbladder cancer if they arise in the gallbladder. These cancers are relatively rare but can be aggressive and difficult to treat. They can cause symptoms such as jaundice (yellowing of the skin and eyes), abdominal pain, weight loss, and dark urine.

Risk factors for biliary tract neoplasms include chronic inflammation of the biliary system, primary sclerosing cholangitis, liver cirrhosis, hepatitis B or C infection, parasitic infections, and certain genetic conditions. Early detection and treatment can improve outcomes for patients with these neoplasms.

Papillary cystadenoma is a type of benign (non-cancerous) tumor that arises from the glandular cells in various organs. It is characterized by the growth of finger-like projections (papillae) inside the cysts. These tumors can occur in different parts of the body, including the ovaries, pancreas, and the lining of the abdominal cavity (peritoneum).

In general, papillary cystadenomas are slow-growing and do not typically spread to other organs. However, they can cause symptoms such as pain or discomfort if they become large enough to press on surrounding tissues. Treatment usually involves surgical removal of the tumor. It is important to note that while papillary cystadenomas are generally benign, there is a small risk that they may undergo malignant transformation and develop into cancerous tumors over time. Regular follow-up with a healthcare provider is recommended to monitor for any changes in the tumor or the development of new symptoms.

Parotid neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the parotid gland, which is the largest of the salivary glands and is located in front of the ear and extends down the neck. These neoplasms can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous).

Benign parotid neoplasms are typically slow-growing, painless masses that may cause facial asymmetry or difficulty in chewing or swallowing if they become large enough to compress surrounding structures. The most common type of benign parotid tumor is a pleomorphic adenoma.

Malignant parotid neoplasms, on the other hand, are more aggressive and can invade nearby tissues and spread to other parts of the body. They may present as rapidly growing masses that are firm or fixed to surrounding structures. Common types of malignant parotid tumors include mucoepidermoid carcinoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, and squamous cell carcinoma.

The diagnosis of parotid neoplasms typically involves a thorough clinical evaluation, imaging studies such as CT or MRI scans, and fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) to determine the nature of the tumor. Treatment options depend on the type, size, and location of the neoplasm but may include surgical excision, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy.

Barium sulfate is a medication that is commonly used as a contrast material in medical imaging procedures, such as X-rays and CT scans. It works by coating the inside of the digestive tract, making it visible on an X-ray or CT scan and allowing doctors to see detailed images of the stomach, intestines, and other parts of the digestive system.

Barium sulfate is a white, chalky powder that is mixed with water to create a thick, milky liquid. It is generally safe and does not cause significant side effects when used in medical imaging procedures. However, it should not be taken by individuals who have a known allergy to barium or who have certain digestive conditions, such as obstructions or perforations of the bowel.

It's important to note that while barium sulfate is an important tool for medical diagnosis, it is not a treatment for any medical condition and should only be used under the direction of a healthcare professional.

Pseudomyxoma Peritonei (PMP) is a rare, slow-growing, and invasive cancer that typically starts in the appendix as a low-grade mucinous neoplasm, although it can also arise from other organs of the abdominal cavity. The primary characteristic of PMP is the accumulation of copious amounts of gelatinous ascites (peritoneal fluid containing mucin) within the peritoneal cavity, causing progressive abdominal distension and discomfort.

The condition is classified into three main histological subtypes: disseminated peritoneal adenomucinosis (DPAM), peritoneal mucinous carcinomatosis (PMCA), and hybrid tumors. DPAM is the least aggressive form, while PMCA is more invasive and has a worse prognosis.

The primary treatment for Pseudomyxoma Peritonei involves cytoreductive surgery (CRS) combined with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC). This approach aims to remove all visible tumors and destroy any remaining cancer cells within the abdominal cavity. Early diagnosis and aggressive treatment can significantly improve the prognosis for patients with PMP, although long-term survival rates remain variable due to the disease's rarity and heterogeneity.

Intrahepatic bile ducts are the small tubular structures inside the liver that collect bile from the liver cells (hepatocytes). Bile is a digestive fluid produced by the liver that helps in the absorption of fats and fat-soluble vitamins from food. The intrahepatic bile ducts merge to form larger ducts, which eventually exit the liver and join with the cystic duct from the gallbladder to form the common bile duct. The common bile duct then empties into the duodenum, the first part of the small intestine, where bile aids in digestion. Intrahepatic bile ducts can become obstructed or damaged due to various conditions such as gallstones, tumors, or inflammation, leading to complications like jaundice, liver damage, and infection.

Bile duct neoplasms, also known as cholangiocarcinomas, refer to a group of malignancies that arise from the bile ducts. These are the tubes that carry bile from the liver to the gallbladder and small intestine. Bile duct neoplasms can be further classified based on their location as intrahepatic (within the liver), perihilar (at the junction of the left and right hepatic ducts), or distal (in the common bile duct).

These tumors are relatively rare, but their incidence has been increasing in recent years. They can cause a variety of symptoms, including jaundice, abdominal pain, weight loss, and fever. The diagnosis of bile duct neoplasms typically involves imaging studies such as CT or MRI scans, as well as blood tests to assess liver function. In some cases, a biopsy may be necessary to confirm the diagnosis.

Treatment options for bile duct neoplasms depend on several factors, including the location and stage of the tumor, as well as the patient's overall health. Surgical resection is the preferred treatment for early-stage tumors, while chemotherapy and radiation therapy may be used in more advanced cases. For patients who are not candidates for surgery, palliative treatments such as stenting or bypass procedures may be recommended to relieve symptoms and improve quality of life.

Retroperitoneal neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors that develop in the retroperitoneal space. This is the area located behind the peritoneum, which is the membrane that lines the abdominal cavity and covers the abdominal organs. The retroperitoneal space contains several vital structures such as the kidneys, adrenal glands, pancreas, aorta, and lymphatic vessels.

Retroperitoneal neoplasms can be benign or malignant (cancerous). Malignant retroperitoneal neoplasms are often aggressive and can invade surrounding tissues and organs, leading to various complications. Common types of retroperitoneal neoplasms include lymphomas, sarcomas, and metastatic tumors from other primary sites. Symptoms may vary depending on the size and location of the tumor but can include abdominal or back pain, weight loss, and swelling in the legs. Diagnosis typically involves imaging studies such as CT scans or MRI, followed by a biopsy to determine the type and grade of the tumor. Treatment options may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these approaches.

Pancreatic neoplasms refer to abnormal growths in the pancreas that can be benign or malignant. The pancreas is a gland located behind the stomach that produces hormones and digestive enzymes. Pancreatic neoplasms can interfere with the normal functioning of the pancreas, leading to various health complications.

Benign pancreatic neoplasms are non-cancerous growths that do not spread to other parts of the body. They are usually removed through surgery to prevent any potential complications, such as blocking the bile duct or causing pain.

Malignant pancreatic neoplasms, also known as pancreatic cancer, are cancerous growths that can invade and destroy surrounding tissues and organs. They can also spread (metastasize) to other parts of the body, such as the liver, lungs, or bones. Pancreatic cancer is often aggressive and difficult to treat, with a poor prognosis.

There are several types of pancreatic neoplasms, including adenocarcinomas, neuroendocrine tumors, solid pseudopapillary neoplasms, and cystic neoplasms. The specific type of neoplasm is determined through various diagnostic tests, such as imaging studies, biopsies, and blood tests. Treatment options depend on the type, stage, and location of the neoplasm, as well as the patient's overall health and preferences.

X-ray computed tomography (CT or CAT scan) is a medical imaging method that uses computer-processed combinations of many X-ray images taken from different angles to produce cross-sectional (tomographic) images (virtual "slices") of the body. These cross-sectional images can then be used to display detailed internal views of organs, bones, and soft tissues in the body.

The term "computed tomography" is used instead of "CT scan" or "CAT scan" because the machines take a series of X-ray measurements from different angles around the body and then use a computer to process these data to create detailed images of internal structures within the body.

CT scanning is a noninvasive, painless medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. CT imaging provides detailed information about many types of tissue including lung, bone, soft tissue and blood vessels. CT examinations can be performed on every part of the body for a variety of reasons including diagnosis, surgical planning, and monitoring of therapeutic responses.

In computed tomography (CT), an X-ray source and detector rotate around the patient, measuring the X-ray attenuation at many different angles. A computer uses this data to construct a cross-sectional image by the process of reconstruction. This technique is called "tomography". The term "computed" refers to the use of a computer to reconstruct the images.

CT has become an important tool in medical imaging and diagnosis, allowing radiologists and other physicians to view detailed internal images of the body. It can help identify many different medical conditions including cancer, heart disease, lung nodules, liver tumors, and internal injuries from trauma. CT is also commonly used for guiding biopsies and other minimally invasive procedures.

In summary, X-ray computed tomography (CT or CAT scan) is a medical imaging technique that uses computer-processed combinations of many X-ray images taken from different angles to produce cross-sectional images of the body. It provides detailed internal views of organs, bones, and soft tissues in the body, allowing physicians to diagnose and treat medical conditions.

Salivary gland neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors that develop in the salivary glands. These glands are responsible for producing saliva, which helps in digestion, lubrication of food and maintaining oral health. Salivary gland neoplasms can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous).

Benign neoplasms are slow-growing and typically do not spread to other parts of the body. They may cause symptoms such as swelling, painless lumps, or difficulty swallowing if they grow large enough to put pressure on surrounding tissues.

Malignant neoplasms, on the other hand, can be aggressive and have the potential to invade nearby structures and metastasize (spread) to distant organs. Symptoms of malignant salivary gland neoplasms may include rapid growth, pain, numbness, or paralysis of facial nerves.

Salivary gland neoplasms can occur in any of the major salivary glands (parotid, submandibular, and sublingual glands) or in the minor salivary glands located throughout the mouth and throat. The exact cause of these neoplasms is not fully understood, but risk factors may include exposure to radiation, certain viral infections, and genetic predisposition.

A pancreatectomy is a surgical procedure in which all or part of the pancreas is removed. There are several types of pancreatectomies, including:

* **Total pancreatectomy:** Removal of the entire pancreas, as well as the spleen and nearby lymph nodes. This type of pancreatectomy is usually done for patients with cancer that has spread throughout the pancreas or for those who have had multiple surgeries to remove pancreatic tumors.
* **Distal pancreatectomy:** Removal of the body and tail of the pancreas, as well as nearby lymph nodes. This type of pancreatectomy is often done for patients with tumors in the body or tail of the pancreas.
* **Partial (or segmental) pancreatectomy:** Removal of a portion of the head or body of the pancreas, as well as nearby lymph nodes. This type of pancreatectomy is often done for patients with tumors in the head or body of the pancreas that can be removed without removing the entire organ.
* **Pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy (PPPD):** A type of surgery used to treat tumors in the head of the pancreas, as well as other conditions such as chronic pancreatitis. In this procedure, the head of the pancreas, duodenum, gallbladder, and bile duct are removed, but the stomach and lower portion of the esophagus (pylorus) are left in place.

After a pancreatectomy, patients may experience problems with digestion and blood sugar regulation, as the pancreas plays an important role in these functions. Patients may need to take enzyme supplements to help with digestion and may require insulin therapy to manage their blood sugar levels.

Hydroxy acids are a class of chemical compounds that contain both a carboxylic acid group and a hydroxyl group. They are commonly used in dermatology and cosmetic products for their exfoliating, moisturizing, and anti-aging properties. The two main types of hydroxy acids used in skincare are alpha-hydroxy acids (AHAs) and beta-hydroxy acids (BHAs).

Alpha-hydroxy acids include compounds such as glycolic acid, lactic acid, malic acid, tartaric acid, and citric acid. They work by breaking down the "glue" that holds dead skin cells together, promoting cell turnover and helping to improve the texture and tone of the skin. AHAs are also known for their ability to improve the appearance of fine lines, wrinkles, and age spots.

Beta-hydroxy acids, on the other hand, are primarily represented by salicylic acid. BHAs are oil-soluble, which allows them to penetrate deeper into the pores and exfoliate dead skin cells and excess sebum that can lead to clogged pores and acne breakouts.

It is important to note that hydroxy acids can cause skin irritation and sensitivity to sunlight, so it is recommended to use sunscreen and start with lower concentrations when first incorporating them into a skincare routine.

Pancreaticoduodenectomy, also known as the Whipple procedure, is a complex surgical operation that involves the removal of the head of the pancreas, the duodenum (the first part of the small intestine), the gallbladder, and the distal common bile duct. In some cases, a portion of the stomach may also be removed. The remaining parts of the pancreas, bile duct, and intestines are then reconnected to allow for the digestion of food and drainage of bile.

This procedure is typically performed as a treatment for various conditions affecting the pancreas, such as tumors (including pancreatic cancer), chronic pancreatitis, or traumatic injuries. It is a major surgical operation that requires significant expertise and experience to perform safely and effectively.

... is a type of tumor in the cystadenocarcinoma grouping. Most commonly, the primary site of serous ... August 2005). "Serous cystadenocarcinoma of the pancreas: management of a rare entity". Pancreas. 31 (2): 182-187. doi:10.1097/ ... King JC, Ng TT, White SC, Cortina G, Reber HA, Hines OJ (October 2009). "Pancreatic serous cystadenocarcinoma: a case report ... with the majority of microcystic pancreatic masses representing alternate disease processes such as the more benign serous ...
Ovarian papillary serous cystadenocarcinoma at WebPath, The Internet Pathology Laboratory for Medical Education at Mercer ... Papillary serous cystadenocarcinomas may exhibit psammoma bodies upon histopathology. Papillary serous cystadenoma Kosary CL ( ... Papillary serous cystadenocarcinomas are the most common form of malignant ovarian cancer making up 26 percent of ovarian ...
"Ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma". , Radiology Reference Article. Radiopaedia.org. Retrieved 2019-09-21. v t e v t e (Articles ... Serous ovarian cystadenocarcinomas account for ~25% of serous tumours. Ovarian cancer Pancreatic serous cystadenoma Serous ... also called serous borderline tumours, that may transform into serous carcinoma. Serous cystadenomas (of the ovary) are not ... Ovarian serous cystadenoma, also (less precisely) known as serous cystadenoma, is the most common ovarian neoplasm, ...
... of ovarian Papillary serous cystadenocarcinoma (almost all amplifications); ~5% of colorectal cancers (~60 amplifications, 40% ...
Bilateral presentation is common with serous cystadenocarcinoma. Papillary serous cystadenocarcinoma Ovarian serous cystadenoma ... "Pancreatic serous cystadenocarcinoma: a case report and review of the literature". Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery. 13 (10 ... Cystadenocarcinoma is a malignant form of a cystadenoma and is a cancer derived from glandular epithelium, in which cystic ... A cystadenocarcinoma contains complex multi-loculated cyst but with exuberant solid areas in places. It usually presents with ...
... "serous cystadenocarcinoma".[citation needed] These lesions rarely require surgery unless they are symptomatic or the diagnosis ... Those that are benign, that have not spread to other organs, are designated "serous cystadenoma". Serous cystadenomas can be ... There are some exceptions; rare case reports have described isolated malignant serous cystadenocarcinomas. In addition, serous ... Pancreatic serous cystadenoma is a benign tumour of the pancreas. It is usually solitary and found in the body or tail of the ...
Ovarian papillary serous cystadenocarcinoma at WebPath, The Internet Pathology Laboratory for Medical Education at Mercer ... Papillary thyroid carcinoma Papillary renal cell carcinoma Ovarian papillary serous cystadenoma and cystadenocarcinoma ... Endometrial adenocarcinomas (Papillary serous carcinoma ~3%-4%) Meningiomas, in the central nervous system Peritoneal and ...
Low-grade serous carcinoma is less aggressive than high-grade serous carcinomas, though it does not typically respond well to ... Mucinous tumors include mucinous adenocarcinoma and mucinous cystadenocarcinoma. Mucinous adenocarcinomas make up 5-10% of ... Serous carcinomas are thought to begin in the Fallopian tube. High grade serous carcinoma accounts for 75% of all epithelial ... Serous carcinomas may develop from serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma, rather than developing spontaneously from ovarian ...
... ovarian cancer cell line derived from the ascites of a 64-year-old Caucasian female with an ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma. ...
... the Serous cystadenocarcinoma type of ovarian cancer, and uterine cervical carcinoma. Other studies have implicated BLT2 in ...
... ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma and ovarian cancer cell lines: down-regulation of ER-beta in neoplastic tissues". The Journal ...
ISBN 978-1-4160-2999-1. Serous cystadenoma of pancreas at eMedicine Biliary cystadenoma/cystadenocarcinoma at eMedicine v t e ( ... When malignant, it is called cystadenocarcinoma. When not otherwise specified, the ICD-O coding is 8440/0. However, the ... following classifications also exist: serous cystadenoma (8441-8442) papillary cystadenoma (8450-8451, 8561) mucinous ...
... cystadenocarcinoma, papillary MeSH C04.557.470.200.025.480.240 - cystadenocarcinoma, serous MeSH C04.557.470.200.025.540 - ... cystadenocarcinoma, papillary MeSH C04.557.470.590.480.240 - cystadenocarcinoma, serous MeSH C04.557.470.590.485 - cystadenoma ... cystadenocarcinoma MeSH C04.557.470.200.025.480.225 - cystadenocarcinoma, mucinous MeSH C04.557.470.200.025.480.230 - ... cystadenocarcinoma MeSH C04.557.470.590.480.225 - cystadenocarcinoma, mucinous MeSH C04.557.470.590.480.230 - ...
75% are benign or of borderline malignancy, and 25% are malignant The malignant form of this tumor, serous cystadenocarcinoma, ... lined by tall, columnar, ciliated epithelial cells filled with clear serous fluid the term serous which originated as a ... Malignant serous tumors occur later in life on average, although somewhat earlier in familial cases. 20% of benign, 30% of ... The overall prognosis is somewhat worse than for serous or mucinous tumors, and the 5-year survival rate for patients with ...
... mucinous/serous) Cystadenocarcinoma Islet cell tumors (neuroendocrine tumors) Papillary cystic neoplasms Lymphoma Acinar cell ...
... ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma, lung squamous cell carcinoma, adrenocortical carcinoma, Diffuse Large B-cell lymphoma, ... Serous cystadenocarcinoma Canada: Pancreatic cancer - Ductal adenocarcinoma and prostate cancer - adenocarcinoma China: Gastric ...
NOS Serous cystoma Serous microcystic adenoma M8441/3 Serous cystadenocarcinoma, NOS (C56.9) Serous adenocarcinoma, NOS Serous ... M8460/0 Papillary serous cystadenoma, NOS (C56.9) M8460/3 Papillary serous cystadenocarcinoma (C56.9) Papillary serous ... Serous cystadenofibroma of borderline malignancy M9014/3 Serous adenocarcinofibroma Malignant serous adenofibroma Serous ... M8461/3 Serous surface papillary carcinoma (C56.9) Primary serous papillary carcinoma of peritoneum (C48.1) M8462/1 Serous ...
... ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma, lung squamous cell carcinoma, adrenocortical carcinoma, Diffuse Large B-cell lymphoma, ... Three tumor types were explored during the pilot phase, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and high-grade serous ovarian ... and ovarian serous adenocarcinoma. In 2009, it expanded into phase II, which planned to complete the genomic characterization ... and exome sequencing of 316 tumor samples of high grade serous ovarian cancer in Nature in June 2011. The researchers found ...
Pancreatic serous cystadenoma Pancreatic serous cystadenocarcinoma Pancreatic mucinous cystic tumors (13.4%) Pancreatic ... Pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous tumors (most common diagnosis - 52.6%) Pancreatic serous cystic tumors (20.6%) ... mucinous cystadenoma Pancreatic mucinous cystadenocarcinoma (Articles needing additional references from January 2017, All ...
Biliary cystadenoma and cystadenocarcinoma constitute less than 5% of intrahepatic cysts originating from the bile duct. ... On an average, mucinous accounts for 40-50% of cystic tumors, and serous cytadenoma accounts for 30% of it. Mucinous ...
Serous cystadenocarcinoma is a type of tumor in the cystadenocarcinoma grouping. Most commonly, the primary site of serous ... August 2005). "Serous cystadenocarcinoma of the pancreas: management of a rare entity". Pancreas. 31 (2): 182-187. doi:10.1097/ ... King JC, Ng TT, White SC, Cortina G, Reber HA, Hines OJ (October 2009). "Pancreatic serous cystadenocarcinoma: a case report ... with the majority of microcystic pancreatic masses representing alternate disease processes such as the more benign serous ...
For multiple hypothesis correction, Q value is the False Discovery Rate (FDR) analogue of the P value (Benjamini and Hochberg 1995), defined as the minimum FDR at which the test may be called significant. We used the Benjamini and Hochberg method of p.adjust function in R to convert P values into Q values. ...
A comparison of pseudocysts, serous cystadenomas, mucinous cystic neoplasms, and mucinous cystadenocarcinoma. Ann Surg. 1993 ...
serous cystadenocarcinoma cell line:HTOA.CNhs11827.10693-109F9. 0.00. signet ring carcinoma cell line:Kato III.CNhs10753.10436- ... serous adenocarcinoma cell line:JHOS-2.CNhs11746.10639-108I9. 0.00. serous adenocarcinoma cell line:SK-OV-3-R after co-culture ... mucinous cystadenocarcinoma cell line:MCAS.CNhs11873.10784-110H1. 0.00. mycosis fungoides, T cell lymphoma cell line:HuT 102 ... serous adenocarcinoma cell line:SK-OV-3-R, biol_rep1.CNhs13099.11841-124H5. 0.00. ...
Cystadenocarcinoma, Serous. *Cytochrome P-450 CYP1A2. *Cytochrome P-450 CYP3A. *Cytogenetics. *Cytoskeletal Proteins ...
Interactive module presenting a case of ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma through pre- and post-operative contrast-enhanced CT ... The interactive module below presents a case of ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma through pre- and post-operative contrast- ... Ovarian Cancer e-Tumor Boards: Case 5: High-Grade Serous Ovarian Carcinoma with BRCA Mutation ...
8. Rare pancreatic tumors including acinar cell carcinoma, mucinous cystadenocarcinoma or serous cystadenocarcinoma. Pancreatic ...
Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma (TCGA, Nature 2011). • Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma (TCGA, Cell 2014). ...
Papillary serous cystadenocarcinoma Active Synonym false false 3852374018 Papillary serous adenocarcinoma Active Synonym false ...
Cystadenocarcinoma, Serous 4 0 Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 4 0 Head and Neck Neoplasms 3 0 ...
... serous cystadenocarcinoma (12.5); malignant teratoma 2(5) and endodermal sinus tumour (5). There were 2 cases of metastatic ... Mucinous cystadenocarcinoma was the ommonest malignant ovarian tumour 14(35) and was closely followed by granulosa cell tumour ...
A comparison of pseudocysts, serous cystadenomas, mucinous cystic neoplasms, and mucinous cystadenocarcinoma. Ann Surg. 1993 ...
However, more than a half (57.1%) had serous cyst adenocarcinoma in malignant tumors. In LDH for evaluation of malignancy, true ... Serous cystadenoma and mucinous cyst adenoma were more common in benign tumors, which were 38.9% and 20.4% respectively. ...
DNA methylation-regulated microRNA pathways in ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma: A meta-analysis David Agustriawan 1 , Chien- ... DNA methylation-regulated microRNA pathways in ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma: A meta-analysis David Agustriawan et al. ... Ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma (OSC) was therefore chosen as a tumor model for the present work. Twelve batches of OSC data ... Characterization of microRNA expression in serous ovarian carcinoma. Li Y, Yao L, Liu F, Hong J, Chen L, Zhang B, Zhang W. Li Y ...
Serous cystadenoma. *. Mucinous cystadenocarcinoma. View the correct answer.. CTisus. 2004;5(8) © 2004 Advanced Medical Imaging ...
A comparison of pseudocysts, serous cystadenomas, mucinous cystic neoplasms, and mucinous cystadenocarcinoma. Ann Surg. 1993 ...
Serous/epidemiology*; Cystadenocarcinoma, Serous/etiology; Estrogen Replacement Therapy/adverse effects*; Estrogens/therapeutic ... Compared with them, current or recent estrogen-only therapy use was associated with an increased risk for the serous (51.4%, ... MeSH Terms: Carcinoma, Endometrioid/epidemiology*; Carcinoma, Endometrioid/etiology; Cystadenocarcinoma, ... 001 for serous and endometrioid). Compared with women in the control group, current or recent users for 10 years or more had ...
Serous papillary cystadenocarcinoma in supernumerary ovary.. Nomelini RS; Oliveira LJ; Jammal MP; Adad SJ; Murta EF. J Obstet ... Primary retroperitoneal serous cystadenocarcinoma of ovarian-type: US and CT findings.. Caruncho M; Pombo F; Arnal-Monreal F ... 3. Malignant transformation of a serous borderline tumor and early metastasis of associated low-grade serous carcinoma detected ... Case Report of a Purely Noninvasive High-grade Serous Carcinoma Mimicking an Ovarian Serous Borderline Tumor.. Katsakhyan L; ...
Serous Cystadenocarcinoma,o,1462,,1,0,1,,, 517,29992,Assault - Other Specified Means,z,12508,OTHER;NOS;NEC;OTHR,1,0,2,,, 518, ... Serous Cystadenoma,y,1897,,1,1,2,,, 511,5629,Paronychia,d,6909,,0,0,0,,, 512,10717,Prurigo of Pregnancy,d,7000,,0,0,0,,, 513, ... Cystadenocarcinoma,o,1576,,1,0,1,,, 2692,20020,Epidural Anesthetic Catheter,O,,CATH;CATHETER,1,0,2,,, 2693,8260,Abdominal Pain ...
Cystadenocarcinoma, Serous / drug therapy* Actions. * Search in PubMed * Search in MeSH * Add to Search ... We assessed the effect of maintenance olaparib on overall survival in patients with platinum-sensitive recurrent serous ovarian ... Background: In patients with platinum-sensitive recurrent serous ovarian cancer, maintenance monotherapy with the PARP ... Interpretation: Despite not reaching statistical significance, patients with BRCA-mutated platinum-sensitive recurrent serous ...
The three tumor types are: glioblastoma multiforme, squamous cell lung carcinoma and serous cystadenocarcinoma of the ovary. ...
8. Rare Pancreatic tumors including acinar cell carcinoma, mucinous cystadenocarcinoma or serous cystadenocarcinoma 9. ...
The pilot project focused mainly on three tumor types [glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), serous cystadenocarcinoma of the ovary, ...
serous cystadenocarcinoma cell line:HTOA.CNhs11827.10693-109F9. 0.00. signet ring carcinoma cell line:Kato III.CNhs10753.10436- ... serous adenocarcinoma cell line:JHOS-2.CNhs11746.10639-108I9. 0.00. serous adenocarcinoma cell line:SK-OV-3-R after co-culture ... mucinous cystadenocarcinoma cell line:MCAS.CNhs11873.10784-110H1. 0.00. mycosis fungoides, T cell lymphoma cell line:HuT 102 ... serous adenocarcinoma cell line:SK-OV-3-R, biol_rep1.CNhs13099.11841-124H5. 3.82. ...
Serous_Cystadenocarcinoma,modify,30-APR-07,(null),(null) C5728,Solid_Pseudopapillary_Carcinoma_of_the_Pancreas,modify,30-APR-07 ... Serous_Cystadenoma,modify,30-APR-07,(null),(null) C3777,Papillary_Cystadenocarcinoma,modify,30-APR-07,(null),(null) C2973, ... Serous_Cystadenocarcinoma,modify,30-APR-07,(null),(null) C5719,Pancreatic_Intraductal_Papillary-Mucinous_Neoplasm_with_Moderate ... Serous_Adenofibroma,modify,30-APR-07,(null),(null) C67090,Serous_Adenofibroma,create,30-APR-07,(null),(null) C40079,Ovarian_ ...
Although CA125 expressed a remarkable diagnostic efficiency with serous cystadenocarcinoma, it was less efficient with mucinous ... of serous cystadenocarcinomas), while specificity of benign ovarian tumors was 91.1%. Diagnostic characteristics of CA125 and ... especially for monitoring mucinous cystadenocarcinoma, and it is localized in the microvilli and apical cytoplasmic membrane of ... cystadenocarcinoma. CA72-4, however, was highly detectable for any histological type of ovarian cancer. Immunohistochemical ...
Neoplasms, Cystic, Mucinous, and Serous [C04.557.470.590] * Cystadenocarcinoma [C04.557.470.590.480] * Cystadenocarcinoma, ... Cystadenocarcinoma [C04.557.470.200.025.480] * Cystadenocarcinoma, Mucinous [C04.557.470.200.025.480.225] * Cystadenocarcinoma ... Cystadenocarcinoma, Serous Preferred Term Term UI T054587. Date01/01/1999. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID NLM (1994). ... Cystadenocarcinoma, Serous Preferred Concept UI. M0027515. Scope Note. A malignant cystic or semicystic neoplasm. It often ...
Neoplasms, Cystic, Mucinous, and Serous [C04.557.470.590] * Cystadenocarcinoma [C04.557.470.590.480] * Cystadenocarcinoma, ... Cystadenocarcinoma [C04.557.470.200.025.480] * Cystadenocarcinoma, Mucinous [C04.557.470.200.025.480.225] * Cystadenocarcinoma ... Cystadenocarcinoma, Serous Preferred Term Term UI T054587. Date01/01/1999. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID NLM (1994). ... Cystadenocarcinoma, Serous Preferred Concept UI. M0027515. Scope Note. A malignant cystic or semicystic neoplasm. It often ...
Serous cystadenocarcinoma of pancreas Current Synonym true false 3759796011 Pancreatic serous cystadenocarcinoma Current ... Serous cystadenocarcinoma of pancreas (disorder). Code System Preferred Concept Name. Serous cystadenocarcinoma of pancreas ( ...
Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma (TCGA, Nature 2011). • Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma (TCGA, Cell 2014). ...
Cystadenocarcinomas, Serous. Serous Cystadenocarcinoma. Serous Cystadenocarcinomas. Tree number(s):. C04.557.470.200.025.480. ... Cystadenocarcinoma, Serous - Preferred Concept UI. M0027515. Scope note. A malignant cystic or semicystic neoplasm. It often ... patterns are predominantly epithelial overgrowths with differentiated and undifferentiated papillary serous cystadenocarcinoma ... patterns are predominantly epithelial overgrowths with differentiated and undifferentiated papillary serous cystadenocarcinoma ...
Serous Cystadenocarcinoma,o,1462,,1,0,1,,, 517,29992,Assault - Other Specified Means,z,12508,OTHER;NOS;NEC;OTHR,1,0,2,,, 518, ... Serous Cystadenoma,y,1897,,1,1,2,,, 511,5629,Paronychia,d,6909,,0,0,0,,, 512,10717,Prurigo of Pregnancy,d,7000,,0,0,0,,, 513, ... Cystadenocarcinoma,o,1576,,1,0,1,,, 2692,20020,Epidural Anesthetic Catheter,O,,CATH;CATHETER,1,0,2,,, 2693,8260,Abdominal Pain ...
Serous cystadenocarcinoma (42.5%) was the commonest ovarian malignancy. Serous cystadenocarcinoma occurred between the ages of ...
... cystadenocarcinoma, serous (TUK) X CYSTADENOCARCINOMA cystadenocarcinoma, serous (TUB) papillary X CYSTADENOMA, PAPILLARY ... serous adenocarcinoma, (TOH) papillary X CYSTADENOBA, PAPILLARY serous cystadenocarcinoaa (TOfl) X CYSTADENOCARCINOMA serous ... cyst adenocarcinoma, papillary (TUM) pseudomucinous X CYSTADENOMA, MUCINOUS cyst adenocarcinoma, papillary (TUM) serous X ... serous (TUM) X CYSTADENOCARCINOMA adenocarcinoma, serous (TOM) papillary X CYSTADLNOftA, PAPILLARY adenocarcinoma, signet ring ...
Metastatic ovarian papillary cystadenocarcinoma to the small intestine serous surface: report of a case of high-grade ... a model for human serous ovarian adenocarcinoma, Gynecologic Oncology, 10.1016/j.ygyno.2004.07.061, 95:3, (530-533), Online ...
The peritoneum is a serous lining of mesothelial cells with a rich vascular and lymphatic capillary network that covers the ... Papillary serous carcinoma of the peritoneum. A review of 33 cases treated with platin-based chemotherapy. Cancer. 1990 Sep 15 ... The differential diagnosis includes lymphangioma, mesenteric-omental cysts, ovarian cystadenoma and cystadenocarcinoma, cystic ... Extraovarian peritoneal serous papillary carcinoma. A clinicopathologic study of 31 cases. Cancer. 1989 Jul 1. 64 (1):110-5. [ ...
Low grade serous cancer Hi Folks, My wife is 59 and has been diagnosed with recurrent metastatic low grade serous ovarian ... Anyone else with mucinous cyst/adenocarcinoma? Hi. Just found you all and thankful. I was wondering if I am alone with my type ... I was diagnosed with stage 2B Serous Carcinoma and had it removed (the tumor) as well as my left ovary and tube back in ... Second Opinion? Stage 2B/2C Serous Carcinoma Hello, everyone. Im pretty new to this website but I was looking to get some ...
  • The interactive module below presents a case of ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma through pre- and post-operative contrast-enhanced CT as well as a 3D reconstruction. (medscape.com)
  • Rare occurrence in the pancreas has been reported, although this is not typical, with the majority of microcystic pancreatic masses representing alternate disease processes such as the more benign serous cystadenoma. (wikipedia.org)
  • 8. Rare pancreatic tumors including acinar cell carcinoma, mucinous cystadenocarcinoma or serous cystadenocarcinoma. (gancorp.org)
  • Serous cystadenocarcinoma is a type of tumor in the cystadenocarcinoma grouping. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most commonly, the primary site of serous cystadenocarcinoma is the ovary. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although CA125 expressed a remarkable diagnostic efficiency with serous cystadenocarcinoma, it was less efficient with mucinous cystadenocarcinoma. (nih.gov)
  • Consequently, TAG-72 was useful for the detection of ovarian carcinoma, especially for monitoring mucinous cystadenocarcinoma, and it is localized in the microvilli and apical cytoplasmic membrane of cystadenocarcinoma cells. (nih.gov)
  • Microscopically, the papillary patterns are predominantly epithelial overgrowths with differentiated and undifferentiated papillary serous cystadenocarcinoma cells. (nih.gov)
  • 3. Malignant transformation of a serous borderline tumor and early metastasis of associated low-grade serous carcinoma detected on screening mammography. (nih.gov)
  • 8. Application of real-time ultrasound elastography for discrimination of low- and high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma. (nih.gov)
  • 10. Prophylactic salpingectomy and prophylactic salpingoophorectomy for adnexal high-grade serous epithelial carcinoma: A reappraisal. (nih.gov)
  • 13. The "Far Left" of the Morphologic Spectrum of Ovarian High-grade Serous Carcinoma: Case Report of a Purely Noninvasive High-grade Serous Carcinoma Mimicking an Ovarian Serous Borderline Tumor. (nih.gov)
  • 15. Low grade serous ovarian carcinoma: identifying variations in practice patterns. (nih.gov)
  • 17. Osseous Metaplasia in Low-grade Ovarian Serous Carcinoma With a BRAF Mutation: A Case Report. (nih.gov)
  • 2. Fertility Preservation Is Safe for Serous Borderline Ovarian Tumors. (nih.gov)
  • 16. Primary retroperitoneal serous cystadenocarcinoma of 'ovarian-type': US and CT findings. (nih.gov)
  • 20. Clinically occult tubal and ovarian high-grade serous carcinomas presenting in uterine samples: diagnostic pitfalls and clues to improve recognition of tumor origin. (nih.gov)
  • 5. A case of bilateral ovarian synchronous tumors (left ovarian serous papillary adenocarcinoma and right ovarian malignant mixed Müllerian tumor). (nih.gov)
  • The interactive module below presents a case of ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma through pre- and post-operative contrast-enhanced CT as well as a 3D reconstruction. (medscape.com)
  • Also, histological localization of TAG-72 in the microvilli and apical cytoplasmic membrane was demonstrated by electron microscopy using MAb B72.3 and samples of seromucinous cystadenocarcinoma (mixed type). (nih.gov)
  • 1. Management of low-grade serous ovarian neoplasm in the setting of fertility preservation. (nih.gov)
  • 18. High-Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer: Use of Machine Learning to Predict Abdominopelvic Recurrence on CT on the Basis of Serial Cancer Antigen 125 Levels. (nih.gov)
  • Is Trametinib a New Standard for Low-Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer? (medscape.com)