A malignant neoplasm derived from glandular epithelium, in which cystic accumulations of retained secretions are formed. The neoplastic cells manifest varying degrees of anaplasia and invasiveness, and local extension and metastases occur. Cystadenocarcinomas develop frequently in the ovaries, where pseudomucinous and serous types are recognized. (Stedman, 25th ed)
A malignant cystic or semisolid tumor most often occurring in the ovary. Rarely, one is solid. This tumor may develop from a mucinous cystadenoma, or it may be malignant at the onset. The cysts are lined with tall columnar epithelial cells; in others, the epithelium consists of many layers of cells that have lost normal structure entirely. In the more undifferentiated tumors, one may see sheets and nests of tumor cells that have very little resemblance to the parent structure. (Hughes, Obstetric-Gynecologic Terminology, 1972, p184)
A benign neoplasm derived from glandular epithelium, in which cystic accumulations of retained secretions are formed. In some instances, considerable portions of the neoplasm, or even the entire mass, may be cystic. (Stedman, 25th ed)
An adenocarcinoma in which the tumor elements are arranged as finger-like processes or as a solid spherical nodule projecting from an epithelial surface.
A malignant cystic or semicystic neoplasm. It often occurs in the ovary and usually bilaterally. The external surface is usually covered with papillary excrescences. Microscopically, the papillary patterns are predominantly epithelial overgrowths with differentiated and undifferentiated papillary serous cystadenocarcinoma cells. Psammoma bodies may be present. The tumor generally adheres to surrounding structures and produces ascites. (From Hughes, Obstetric-Gynecologic Terminology, 1972, p185)
A multilocular tumor with mucin secreting epithelium. They are most often found in the ovary, but are also found in the pancreas, appendix, and rarely, retroperitoneal and in the urinary bladder. They are considered to have low-grade malignant potential.
Tumors or cancer of the APPENDIX.
A retention cyst of the salivary gland, lacrimal sac, paranasal sinuses, appendix, or gallbladder. (Stedman, 26th ed)
Any fluid-filled closed cavity or sac that is lined by an EPITHELIUM. Cysts can be of normal, abnormal, non-neoplastic, or neoplastic tissues.
Distention of KIDNEY with the presence of PUS and suppurative destruction of the renal parenchyma. It is often associated with renal obstruction and can lead to total or nearly total loss of renal function.
A sarcoma of the body of the uterus arising in older women, composed of more than one mesenchymal tissue, especially including striated muscle cells. It is associated with previous pelvic radiation exposure in 20% of patients. (Stedman, 25th ed; Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1702)
Tumors or cancer of the OVARY. These neoplasms can be benign or malignant. They are classified according to the tissue of origin, such as the surface EPITHELIUM, the stromal endocrine cells, and the totipotent GERM CELLS.
Tumors or cancer in the BILIARY TRACT including the BILE DUCTS and the GALLBLADDER.
A benign neoplasm of the ovary.
Tumors or cancer of the PAROTID GLAND.
A compound used as an x-ray contrast medium that occurs in nature as the mineral barite. It is also used in various manufacturing applications and mixed into heavy concrete to serve as a radiation shield.
A condition characterized by poorly-circumscribed gelatinous masses filled with malignant mucin-secreting cells. Forty-five percent of pseudomyxomas arise from the ovary, usually in a mucinous cystadenocarcinoma (CYSTADENOCARCINOMA, MUCINOUS), which has prognostic significance. Pseudomyxoma peritonei must be differentiated from mucinous spillage into the peritoneum by a benign mucocele of the appendix. (Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)
Passages within the liver for the conveyance of bile. Includes right and left hepatic ducts even though these may join outside the liver to form the common hepatic duct.
Tumors or cancer of the BILE DUCTS.
Retroperitoneal neoplasms are a diverse group of tumors that originate in the retroperitoneal space, which is the area behind the peritoneum and includes the kidneys, adrenal glands, pancreas, and major blood vessels.
Tumors or cancer of the PANCREAS. Depending on the types of ISLET CELLS present in the tumors, various hormones can be secreted: GLUCAGON from PANCREATIC ALPHA CELLS; INSULIN from PANCREATIC BETA CELLS; and SOMATOSTATIN from the SOMATOSTATIN-SECRETING CELLS. Most are malignant except the insulin-producing tumors (INSULINOMA).
Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.
Tumors or cancer of the SALIVARY GLANDS.
Surgical removal of the pancreas. (Dorland, 28th ed)
Organic compounds containing both the hydroxyl and carboxyl radicals.
The excision of the head of the pancreas and the encircling loop of the duodenum to which it is connected.
Loss of structural differentiation and useful function of neoplastic cells.
Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)

Mucin Hypersecreting Intraductal Papillary Neoplasm of the pancreas. (1/165)

Mucin Hypersecreting Intraductal Papillary Neoplasm is a rare neoplasm that arises from ductal epithelial cells. This entity is distinct from the more commonly known Mucinous Cystadenoma or Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma. Despite this distinction, it has been erroneously categorized with these more common cystic neoplasms. Characteristic clinical presentation, radiographic, and endoscopic findings help distinguish this neoplasm from the cystadenomas and cystadenocarcinomas. Histopathologic identification is not crucial to the preoperative diagnosis. This neoplasm is considered to represent a premalignant condition and, therefore, surgical resection is warranted. Prognosis, following resection, is felt to be curative for the majority of patients. We present two cases of Mucin Hypersecreting Intraductal Papillary Neoplasm and discuss their diagnosis and surgical therapy.  (+info)

Cystadenomas and cystadenocarcinomas of the pancreas: a multiinstitutional retrospective study of 398 cases. French Surgical Association. (2/165)

OBJECTIVE: To review the features of patients with benign and malignant cystadenomas of the pancreas, focusing on preoperative diagnostic accuracy and long-term outcome, especially for nonoperated serous cystadenomas and resected cystadenocarcinomas. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Serous cystadenomas (SCAs) are benign tumors. Mucinous cystic neoplasms should be resected because of the risk of malignant progression. A correct preoperative diagnosis of tumor type is based on morphologic criteria. Despite the high quality of recent imaging procedures, the diagnosis frequently remains uncertain. Invasive investigations such as endosonography and diagnostic aspiration of cystic fluid may be helpful, but their assessment is limited to small series. The management of typical SCA may require resection or observation. Survival after pancreatic resection seems better for cystadenocarcinomas (MCACs) than for ductal adenocarcinomas of the pancreas. METHODS: Three hundred ninety-eight cases of cystadenomas of the pancreas were collected between 1984 and 1996 in 73 institutions of the French Surgical Association. Clinical presentation, radiologic evaluation, and surgical procedures were analyzed for 144 operated SCAs, 150 mucinous cystadenomas (MCAs), and 78 MCACs. The outcome of 372 operated patients and 26 nonoperated patients with SCA was analyzed. RESULTS: Cystadenomas represented 76% of all primary pancreatic cystic tumors (398/522). An asymptomatic tumor was discovered in 32% of patients with SCA, 26% of those with MCA, and 13% of those with MCAC. The tumor was located in the head or uncinate process of the pancreas in 38% of those with SCA, 27% of those with MCA, and 49% of those with MCAC. A communication between the cyst and pancreatic duct was discovered in 0.6% of those with SCA, 6% of those with MCA, and 10% of those with MCAC. The main investigations were ultrasonography and computed tomography (94% for SCA, MCA, and MCAC), endosonography (34%, 28%, and 22% for SCA, MCA, and MCAC respectively), endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (16%, 14%, 22%), and cyst fluid analysis (22%, 31%, 35%). An accurate preoperative diagnosis of tumor type was proposed for 20% of those with SCA (144 cases), 30% of those with MCA, and 29% of those with MCAC. An atypical unilocular macrocyst was observed in 10% of SCA cases. The most common misdiagnosis for mucinous cystic tumors was pseudocyst (9% of MCAs, 15% of MCACs). Intraoperative frozen sections (126 cases) allowed a diagnosis according to definitive histologic examination in 50% of those with SCA and MCA and 62% of those with MCAC. For management, 93% of patients underwent surgery. Nonoperated patients (7%) had exclusively typical SCA. A complete cyst excision was performed in 94% of benign cystadenomas, with an operative mortality rate of 2% for SCA and 1.4% for MCA. Resection was possible in 74% of cases of MCAC. Mean follow-up of 26 patients with nonresected SCAs was 38 months, and no patients required surgery. For resected MCACs, the actuarial 5-year survival rate was 63%. CONCLUSIONS: Spiral computed tomography is the examination of choice for a correct prediction of tumor type. Endosonography may be useful to detect the morphologic criteria of small tumors. Diagnostic aspiration of the cyst allows differentiation of the macrocystic form of SCA (10% of cases) and the unilocular type of mucinous cystic neoplasm from a pseudocyst. Surgical resection should be performed for symptomatic SCAs, all mucinous cystic neoplasms, and cystic tumors that are not clearly defined. Conservative management is wholly justified for a well-documented SCA with no symptoms. An extensive resection is warranted for MCAC because the 5-year survival rate may exceed 60%.  (+info)

Human ovarian cancer, cell lines, and primary ascites cells express the human Mullerian inhibiting substance (MIS) type II receptor, bind, and are responsive to MIS. (3/165)

Six human ovarian cancer cell lines and samples of ascites cells isolated from 27 patients with stage III or IV ovarian papillary serous cystadenocarcinoma were studied individually to test whether recombinant human Mullerian inhibiting substance (rhMIS) acts via its receptor. To do these experiments, we scaled up production of rhMIS and labeled it successfully with biotin for binding studies, cloned the human MIS type II receptor for mRNA detection, and raised antibodies to an extracellular domain peptide for protein detection. These probes were first tested on the human ovarian cancer cell lines and then applied to primary ovarian ascites cells. rhMIS inhibited colony growth of five of six cell lines that expressed the human MIS type II receptor mRNA by Northern analysis while not inhibiting receptor-negative COS cells. Flow cytometry performed on MIS-sensitive ovarian cancer cell lines demonstrated specific and saturable binding of rhMIS (Kd = 10.2 nM). Ascites cells from 15 of 27 or 56% of patients tested bound biotinylated MIS (MIS-biotin) and, of the 11 that grew in soft agarose, 9 of 11 or 82% showed statistically significant inhibition of colony formation. Of the 15 patients who bound biotinylated MIS, mRNA was available for analysis from 9, and 8 of 9 expressed MIS type II receptor mRNA by reverse transcription-PCR, showing a statistically significant correlation, compared with binding, by chi2 analysis (P = 0.025). Solid ovarian cancers were positive for the MIS type II receptor protein by immunohistochemical staining, which colocalized with staining for antibody to CA-125 (OC-125). Thus, the detection of the MIS type I receptor by flow cytometry may be a useful predictor of therapeutic response to MIS and may be a modality to rapidly choose patients with late-stage ovarian cancer for treatment with MIS.  (+info)

Mucobilia in association with a biliary cystadenocarcinoma of the caudate duct: a rare cause of malignant biliary obstruction. (4/165)

Mucobilia is a rare condition characterized by the accumulation of abundant mucus within the intra- or extrahepatic biliary tree. A variety of hepatobiliary and pancreatic neoplasms are mucin producing and have been associated with the development of mucobilia including biliary mucinosis, biliary papillomatosis, mucin-producing cholangiocarcinoma (MPCC), or cystic neoplasms of the pancreas or biliary tree (cystadenoma or cystadenocarcinoma). We report the case of 46 year-old male with a biliary cystadenocarcinoma of the caudate lobe which resulted in chronic biliary obstruction and relapsing cholangitis. A review of the literature for both mucobilia and biliary cystadenocarcinoma is provided along with a discussion addressing the clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis for this rare entity.  (+info)

Fluorescent neoglycolipids. Improved probes for oligosaccharide ligand discovery. (5/165)

A second generation of lipid-linked oligosaccharide probes, fluorescent neoglycolipids, has been designed and synthesized for ligand discovery within highly complex mixtures of oligosaccharides. The aminolipid 1,2-dihexadecyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DHPE), which has been used extensively to generate neoglycolipids for biological and structural studies, has been modified to incorporate a fluorescent label, anthracene. This new lipid reagent, N-aminoacetyl-N-(9-anthracenylmethyl)-1, 2-dihexadecyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (ADHP), synthesized from anthracenaldehyde and DHPE gives an intense fluorescence under UV light. Fluorescent neoglycolipids derived from a variety of neutral and acidic oligosaccharides by conjugation to ADHP, by reductive amination, can be detected and quantified by spectrophotometry and scanning densitometry, and resolved by TLC and HPLC with subpicomole detection. Antigenicities of the ADHP-neoglycolipids are well retained, and picomole levels can be detected using monoclonal carbohydrate sequence-specific antibodies. Among O-glycans from an ovarian cystadenoma mucin, isomeric oligosaccharide sequences, sialyl-Lea- and sialyl-Lex-active, could be resolved by HPLC as fluorescent neoglycolipids, and sequenced by liquid secondary-ion mass spectrometry. Thus the neoglycolipid technology now uniquely combines high sensitivity of immuno-detection with a comparable sensitivity of chemical detection. Principles are thus established for a streamlined technology whereby an oligosaccharide population is carried through ligand detection and ligand isolation steps, and sequence determination by mass spectrometry, enzymatic sequencing and other state-of-the-art technologies for carbohydrate analysis.  (+info)

Regulation of UT-OC-3 ovarian carcinoma cells by cytokines: inhibitory effects on cell proliferation and activation of transcription factors AP-1 and NF-kappaB. (6/165)

The present study was designed to investigate the growth regulatory effects of cytokines in UT-OC-3 ovarian cystadenocarcinoma cells in vitro. The effects of interleukin-6 (IL-6), interferons alpha (IFN-alpha) and gamma (IFN-gamma), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), and transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1) were investigated by (125)I-deoxyuridine ((125)IUdR) incorporation assay. In order to understand better the molecular mechanisms of the observed effects, the activation of DNA-binding proteins was studied by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. In addition, cellular DNA was tested by fragmentation analysis to determine if the most growth inhibitory cytokines are able to induce programmed cell death (apoptosis). After 48h in culture, TGF-beta1, TNF-alpha, IFN-alpha and IL-6 showed a clear inhibitory effect on (125)IUdR incorporation (P<0.005), and IFN-gamma and GM-CSF caused even more significant inhibition (P<0.001). IFN-alpha and IFN-gamma were both growth inhibitory after 72h in culture (P<0.005). Similarly, GM-CSF induced a slight inhibition (P<0.05), whereas TGF-beta1 and TNF-alpha almost blocked DNA synthesis (P<0.001) after 72h. IL-6 had no statistically significant effect on cell proliferation after 72h. Transcription factors AP-1 and NF-kappaB were both constitutively expressed in UT-OC-3 cells. The binding activity of AP-1 was found to be stimulated by the growth inhibitory cytokines, TGF-beta1 and TNF-alpha, and the binding of NF-kappaB was stimulated by TNF-alpha. Apoptosis does not seem to be induced by any of these cytokines in the UT-OC-3 ovarian cancer cell model.  (+info)

Genetic mapping of a naturally occurring hereditary renal cancer syndrome in dogs. (7/165)

Canine hereditary multifocal renal cystadenocarcinoma and nodular dermatofibrosis (RCND) is a rare, naturally occurring inherited cancer syndrome observed in dogs. Genetic linkage analysis of an RCND-informative pedigree has identified a linkage group flanking RCND (CHP14-C05.377-C05.414-FH2383-C05. 771-[RCND-CPH18]-C02608-GLUT4-TP53-ZuBe Ca6-AHT141-FH2140-FH2594) thus localizing the disease to a small region of canine chromosome 5. The closest marker, C02608, is linked to RCND with a recombination fraction (theta) of 0.016, supported by a logarithm of odds score of 16.7. C02608 and the adjacent linked markers map to a region of the canine genome corresponding to portions of human chromosomes 1p and 17p. A combination of linkage analysis and direct sequencing eliminate several likely candidate genes, including tuberous sclerosis 1 and 2 genes (TSC1 and TSC2) and the tumor suppressor gene TP53. These data suggest that RCND may be caused by a previously unidentified tumor suppressor gene and highlight the potential for canine genetics in the study of human disease predisposition.  (+info)

Frequent activation of AKT2 and induction of apoptosis by inhibition of phosphoinositide-3-OH kinase/Akt pathway in human ovarian cancer. (8/165)

We previously demonstrated that AKT2, a member of protein kinase B family, is activated by a number of growth factors via Ras and PI 3-kinase signaling pathways. Here, we report the frequent activation of AKT2 in human primary ovarian cancer and induction of apoptosis by inhibition of phosphoinositide-3-OH kinase (PI 3-kinase)/Akt pathway. In vitro AKT2 kinase assay analyses in 91 ovarian cancer specimens revealed elevated levels of AKT2 activity (>3-fold) in 33 cases (36.3%). The majority of tumors displaying activated AKT2 were high grade and stages III and IV. Immunostaining and Western blot analyses using a phospho-ser-473 Akt antibody that detects the activated form of AKT2 (AKT2 phosphorylated at serine-474) confirmed the frequent activation of AKT2 in ovarian cancer specimens. Phosphorylated AKT2 in tumor specimens localized to the cell membrane and cytoplasm but not the nucleus. To address the mechanism of AKT2 activation, we measured in vitro PI 3-kinase activity in 43 ovarian cancer specimens, including the 33 cases displaying elevated AKT2 activation. High levels of PI 3-kinase activity were observed in 20 cases, 15 of which also exhibited AKT2 activation. The remaining five cases displayed elevated AKT1 activation. Among the cases with elevated AKT2, but not PI 3-kinase activity (18 cases), three showed down-regulation of PTEN protein expression. Inhibition of PI 3-kinase/AKT2 by wortmannin or LY294002 induces apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells exhibiting activation of the PI 3-kinase/AKT2 pathway. These findings demonstrate for the first time that activation of AKT2 is a common occurrence in human ovarian cancer and that PI 3-kinase/Akt pathway may be an important target for ovarian cancer intervention.  (+info)

Cystadenocarcinoma is a type of tumor that arises from the epithelial lining of a cyst, and it has the potential to invade surrounding tissues and spread (metastasize) to other parts of the body. It typically affects glandular organs such as the ovaries, pancreas, and salivary glands.

Cystadenocarcinomas can be classified into two types: serous and mucinous. Serous cystadenocarcinomas produce a watery fluid, while mucinous cystadenocarcinomas produce a thick, mucus-like fluid. Both types of tumors can be benign or malignant, but malignant cystadenocarcinomas are more aggressive and have a higher risk of metastasis.

Symptoms of cystadenocarcinoma depend on the location and size of the tumor. In some cases, there may be no symptoms until the tumor has grown large enough to cause pain or other problems. Treatment typically involves surgical removal of the tumor, along with any affected surrounding tissue. Chemotherapy and radiation therapy may also be used in some cases to help prevent recurrence or spread of the cancer.

Mucinous cystadenocarcinoma is a type of cancer that arises from the mucin-producing cells in the lining of a cyst. It is a subtype of cystadenocarcinoma, which is a malignant tumor that develops within a cyst. Mucinous cystadenocarcinomas are typically found in the ovary or pancreas but can also occur in other organs such as the appendix and the respiratory tract.

These tumors are characterized by the production of large amounts of mucin, a gel-like substance that can accumulate within the cyst and cause it to grow. Mucinous cystadenocarcinomas tend to grow slowly but can become quite large and may eventually spread (metastasize) to other parts of the body if left untreated.

Symptoms of mucinous cystadenocarcinoma depend on the location and size of the tumor, but they may include abdominal pain or discomfort, bloating, changes in bowel movements, or vaginal bleeding. Treatment typically involves surgical removal of the tumor, followed by chemotherapy or radiation therapy to kill any remaining cancer cells. The prognosis for mucinous cystadenocarcinoma depends on several factors, including the stage of the disease at diagnosis and the patient's overall health.

Cystadenoma is a type of benign tumor (not cancerous), which arises from glandular epithelial cells and is covered by a thin layer of connective tissue. These tumors can develop in various locations within the body, including the ovaries, pancreas, and other organs that contain glands.

There are two main types of cystadenomas: serous and mucinous. Serous cystadenomas are filled with a clear or watery fluid, while mucinous cystadenomas contain a thick, gelatinous material. Although they are generally not harmful, these tumors can grow quite large and cause discomfort or other symptoms due to their size or location. In some cases, cystadenomas may undergo malignant transformation and develop into cancerous tumors, known as cystadenocarcinomas. Regular medical follow-up and monitoring are essential for individuals diagnosed with cystadenomas to ensure early detection and treatment of any potential complications.

Papillary cystadenocarcinoma is a type of cancer that arises from the epithelial cells lining a cyst. It is called "papillary" because the tumor has finger-like projections called papillae, which are made up of fibrovascular cores covered by neoplastic cells.

Cystadenocarcinoma is a malignant tumor that has the potential to invade surrounding tissues and spread (metastasize) to other parts of the body. Papillary cystadenocarcinomas can occur in various organs, including the ovaries, pancreas, and lungs.

The symptoms of papillary cystadenocarcinoma depend on the location of the tumor. For example, an ovarian papillary cystadenocarcinoma may cause abdominal pain or bloating, while a lung papillary cystadenocarcinoma may cause coughing or shortness of breath.

The diagnosis of papillary cystadenocarcinoma typically involves imaging tests such as ultrasound, CT scan, or MRI, followed by a biopsy to confirm the presence of cancer cells. Treatment options include surgery to remove the tumor, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. The prognosis for papillary cystadenocarcinoma depends on several factors, including the stage of the disease at diagnosis, the location of the tumor, and the patient's overall health.

Cystadenocarcinoma, serous is a type of cystic tumor that arises from the lining of the abdominal or pelvic cavity (the peritoneum). It is called "serous" because the tumor cells produce a thin, watery fluid similar to serum.

Cystadenocarcinoma is a malignant (cancerous) tumor that can invade surrounding tissues and spread (metastasize) to other parts of the body. It typically affects women over the age of 50 and can cause symptoms such as abdominal pain, bloating, and changes in bowel or bladder habits.

Serous cystadenocarcinoma is a subtype of ovarian cancer that arises from the surface of the ovary. It can also occur in other organs, including the fallopian tubes, peritoneum, and endometrium. This type of tumor tends to grow slowly but can spread widely throughout the abdominal cavity, making it difficult to treat.

Treatment for serous cystadenocarcinoma typically involves surgery to remove the tumor and any affected tissues, followed by chemotherapy to kill any remaining cancer cells. The prognosis for this type of cancer depends on several factors, including the stage of the disease at diagnosis, the patient's age and overall health, and the response to treatment.

Mucinous cystadenoma is a type of benign tumor that arises from the epithelial cells lining the mucous membranes of the body. It is most commonly found in the ovary, but can also occur in other locations such as the pancreas or appendix.

Mucinous cystadenomas are characterized by the production of large amounts of mucin, a slippery, gel-like substance that accumulates inside the tumor and causes it to grow into a cystic mass. These tumors can vary in size, ranging from a few centimeters to over 20 centimeters in diameter.

While mucinous cystadenomas are generally benign, they have the potential to become cancerous (mucinous cystadenocarcinoma) if left untreated. Symptoms of mucinous cystadenoma may include abdominal pain or swelling, bloating, and changes in bowel movements or urinary habits. Treatment typically involves surgical removal of the tumor.

Appendiceal neoplasms refer to various types of tumors that can develop in the appendix, a small tube-like structure attached to the large intestine. These neoplasms can be benign or malignant and can include:

1. Adenomas: These are benign tumors that arise from the glandular cells lining the appendix. They are usually slow-growing and may not cause any symptoms.
2. Carcinoids: These are neuroendocrine tumors that arise from the hormone-producing cells in the appendix. They are typically small and slow-growing, but some can be aggressive and spread to other parts of the body.
3. Mucinous neoplasms: These are tumors that produce mucin, a slippery substance that can cause the appendix to become distended and filled with mucus. They can be low-grade (less aggressive) or high-grade (more aggressive) and may spread to other parts of the abdomen.
4. Adenocarcinomas: These are malignant tumors that arise from the glandular cells lining the appendix. They are relatively rare but can be aggressive and spread to other parts of the body.
5. Pseudomyxoma peritonei: This is a condition in which mucin produced by an appendiceal neoplasm leaks into the abdominal cavity, causing a jelly-like accumulation of fluid and tissue. It can be caused by both benign and malignant tumors.

Treatment for appendiceal neoplasms depends on the type and stage of the tumor, as well as the patient's overall health. Treatment options may include surgery, chemotherapy, or radiation therapy.

A mucocele is a mucus-containing cystic lesion that results from the accumulation of mucin within a damaged minor salivary gland duct or mucous gland. It is typically caused by trauma, injury, or blockage of the duct. Mucocele appears as a round, dome-shaped, fluid-filled swelling, which may be bluish or clear in color. They are most commonly found on the lower lip but can also occur on other areas of the oral cavity. Mucocele is generally painless unless it becomes secondarily infected; however, it can cause discomfort during speaking, chewing, or swallowing, and may affect aesthetics. Treatment usually involves surgical excision of the mucocele to prevent recurrence.

A cyst is a closed sac, having a distinct membrane and division between the sac and its surrounding tissue, that contains fluid, air, or semisolid material. Cysts can occur in various parts of the body, including the skin, internal organs, and bones. They can be caused by various factors, such as infection, genetic predisposition, or blockage of a duct or gland. Some cysts may cause symptoms, such as pain or discomfort, while others may not cause any symptoms at all. Treatment for cysts depends on the type and location of the cyst, as well as whether it is causing any problems. Some cysts may go away on their own, while others may need to be drained or removed through a surgical procedure.

Pyonephrosis is a medical condition characterized by the presence of pus in the renal pelvis, which is the part of the kidney where urine collects before flowing into the ureter. This occurs as a result of a severe infection that has spread to the kidney and caused pus to accumulate within the renal pelvis. Pyonephrosis can lead to serious complications such as sepsis, kidney damage, or even kidney failure if left untreated. It is typically treated with antibiotics and may require surgical intervention to drain the pus and remove any infected tissue.

A "mixed tumor, mesodermal" is not a widely recognized or currently used medical term in pathology. However, based on the context, it may refer to a type of tumor that contains a mixture of different cell types derived from the mesoderm, one of the three primary germ layers during embryonic development.

In general, a mixed tumor is a tumor composed of more than one type of tissue or cell type. In the context of soft tissue tumors, a "mixed tumor" may refer to a tumor with elements of both epithelial and mesenchymal differentiation, such as a pleomorphic adenoma.

However, in the context of mesodermal tissues, mixed tumors are not typically used to describe soft tissue tumors. Instead, the term "mixed" is more commonly used in the classification of certain types of ovarian tumors that contain both epithelial and mesenchymal elements, such as a Brenner tumor or a mullerian mixed tumor.

Therefore, it's important to provide more context or specify the body site when using the term "mixed tumor, mesodermal" to ensure accurate communication and understanding.

Ovarian neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the ovary, which can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). These growths can originate from various cell types within the ovary, including epithelial cells, germ cells, and stromal cells. Ovarian neoplasms are often classified based on their cell type of origin, histological features, and potential for invasive or metastatic behavior.

Epithelial ovarian neoplasms are the most common type and can be further categorized into several subtypes, such as serous, mucinous, endometrioid, clear cell, and Brenner tumors. Some of these epithelial tumors have a higher risk of becoming malignant and spreading to other parts of the body.

Germ cell ovarian neoplasms arise from the cells that give rise to eggs (oocytes) and can include teratomas, dysgerminomas, yolk sac tumors, and embryonal carcinomas. Stromal ovarian neoplasms develop from the connective tissue cells supporting the ovary and can include granulosa cell tumors, thecomas, and fibromas.

It is essential to diagnose and treat ovarian neoplasms promptly, as some malignant forms can be aggressive and potentially life-threatening if not managed appropriately. Regular gynecological exams, imaging studies, and tumor marker tests are often used for early detection and monitoring of ovarian neoplasms. Treatment options may include surgery, chemotherapy, or radiation therapy, depending on the type, stage, and patient's overall health condition.

Biliary tract neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors that develop in the biliary system, which includes the gallbladder, bile ducts inside and outside the liver, and the ducts that connect the liver to the small intestine. These neoplasms can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous).

Malignant biliary tract neoplasms are often referred to as cholangiocarcinoma if they originate in the bile ducts, or gallbladder cancer if they arise in the gallbladder. These cancers are relatively rare but can be aggressive and difficult to treat. They can cause symptoms such as jaundice (yellowing of the skin and eyes), abdominal pain, weight loss, and dark urine.

Risk factors for biliary tract neoplasms include chronic inflammation of the biliary system, primary sclerosing cholangitis, liver cirrhosis, hepatitis B or C infection, parasitic infections, and certain genetic conditions. Early detection and treatment can improve outcomes for patients with these neoplasms.

Papillary cystadenoma is a type of benign (non-cancerous) tumor that arises from the glandular cells in various organs. It is characterized by the growth of finger-like projections (papillae) inside the cysts. These tumors can occur in different parts of the body, including the ovaries, pancreas, and the lining of the abdominal cavity (peritoneum).

In general, papillary cystadenomas are slow-growing and do not typically spread to other organs. However, they can cause symptoms such as pain or discomfort if they become large enough to press on surrounding tissues. Treatment usually involves surgical removal of the tumor. It is important to note that while papillary cystadenomas are generally benign, there is a small risk that they may undergo malignant transformation and develop into cancerous tumors over time. Regular follow-up with a healthcare provider is recommended to monitor for any changes in the tumor or the development of new symptoms.

Parotid neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the parotid gland, which is the largest of the salivary glands and is located in front of the ear and extends down the neck. These neoplasms can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous).

Benign parotid neoplasms are typically slow-growing, painless masses that may cause facial asymmetry or difficulty in chewing or swallowing if they become large enough to compress surrounding structures. The most common type of benign parotid tumor is a pleomorphic adenoma.

Malignant parotid neoplasms, on the other hand, are more aggressive and can invade nearby tissues and spread to other parts of the body. They may present as rapidly growing masses that are firm or fixed to surrounding structures. Common types of malignant parotid tumors include mucoepidermoid carcinoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, and squamous cell carcinoma.

The diagnosis of parotid neoplasms typically involves a thorough clinical evaluation, imaging studies such as CT or MRI scans, and fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) to determine the nature of the tumor. Treatment options depend on the type, size, and location of the neoplasm but may include surgical excision, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy.

Barium sulfate is a medication that is commonly used as a contrast material in medical imaging procedures, such as X-rays and CT scans. It works by coating the inside of the digestive tract, making it visible on an X-ray or CT scan and allowing doctors to see detailed images of the stomach, intestines, and other parts of the digestive system.

Barium sulfate is a white, chalky powder that is mixed with water to create a thick, milky liquid. It is generally safe and does not cause significant side effects when used in medical imaging procedures. However, it should not be taken by individuals who have a known allergy to barium or who have certain digestive conditions, such as obstructions or perforations of the bowel.

It's important to note that while barium sulfate is an important tool for medical diagnosis, it is not a treatment for any medical condition and should only be used under the direction of a healthcare professional.

Pseudomyxoma Peritonei (PMP) is a rare, slow-growing, and invasive cancer that typically starts in the appendix as a low-grade mucinous neoplasm, although it can also arise from other organs of the abdominal cavity. The primary characteristic of PMP is the accumulation of copious amounts of gelatinous ascites (peritoneal fluid containing mucin) within the peritoneal cavity, causing progressive abdominal distension and discomfort.

The condition is classified into three main histological subtypes: disseminated peritoneal adenomucinosis (DPAM), peritoneal mucinous carcinomatosis (PMCA), and hybrid tumors. DPAM is the least aggressive form, while PMCA is more invasive and has a worse prognosis.

The primary treatment for Pseudomyxoma Peritonei involves cytoreductive surgery (CRS) combined with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC). This approach aims to remove all visible tumors and destroy any remaining cancer cells within the abdominal cavity. Early diagnosis and aggressive treatment can significantly improve the prognosis for patients with PMP, although long-term survival rates remain variable due to the disease's rarity and heterogeneity.

Intrahepatic bile ducts are the small tubular structures inside the liver that collect bile from the liver cells (hepatocytes). Bile is a digestive fluid produced by the liver that helps in the absorption of fats and fat-soluble vitamins from food. The intrahepatic bile ducts merge to form larger ducts, which eventually exit the liver and join with the cystic duct from the gallbladder to form the common bile duct. The common bile duct then empties into the duodenum, the first part of the small intestine, where bile aids in digestion. Intrahepatic bile ducts can become obstructed or damaged due to various conditions such as gallstones, tumors, or inflammation, leading to complications like jaundice, liver damage, and infection.

Bile duct neoplasms, also known as cholangiocarcinomas, refer to a group of malignancies that arise from the bile ducts. These are the tubes that carry bile from the liver to the gallbladder and small intestine. Bile duct neoplasms can be further classified based on their location as intrahepatic (within the liver), perihilar (at the junction of the left and right hepatic ducts), or distal (in the common bile duct).

These tumors are relatively rare, but their incidence has been increasing in recent years. They can cause a variety of symptoms, including jaundice, abdominal pain, weight loss, and fever. The diagnosis of bile duct neoplasms typically involves imaging studies such as CT or MRI scans, as well as blood tests to assess liver function. In some cases, a biopsy may be necessary to confirm the diagnosis.

Treatment options for bile duct neoplasms depend on several factors, including the location and stage of the tumor, as well as the patient's overall health. Surgical resection is the preferred treatment for early-stage tumors, while chemotherapy and radiation therapy may be used in more advanced cases. For patients who are not candidates for surgery, palliative treatments such as stenting or bypass procedures may be recommended to relieve symptoms and improve quality of life.

Retroperitoneal neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors that develop in the retroperitoneal space. This is the area located behind the peritoneum, which is the membrane that lines the abdominal cavity and covers the abdominal organs. The retroperitoneal space contains several vital structures such as the kidneys, adrenal glands, pancreas, aorta, and lymphatic vessels.

Retroperitoneal neoplasms can be benign or malignant (cancerous). Malignant retroperitoneal neoplasms are often aggressive and can invade surrounding tissues and organs, leading to various complications. Common types of retroperitoneal neoplasms include lymphomas, sarcomas, and metastatic tumors from other primary sites. Symptoms may vary depending on the size and location of the tumor but can include abdominal or back pain, weight loss, and swelling in the legs. Diagnosis typically involves imaging studies such as CT scans or MRI, followed by a biopsy to determine the type and grade of the tumor. Treatment options may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these approaches.

Pancreatic neoplasms refer to abnormal growths in the pancreas that can be benign or malignant. The pancreas is a gland located behind the stomach that produces hormones and digestive enzymes. Pancreatic neoplasms can interfere with the normal functioning of the pancreas, leading to various health complications.

Benign pancreatic neoplasms are non-cancerous growths that do not spread to other parts of the body. They are usually removed through surgery to prevent any potential complications, such as blocking the bile duct or causing pain.

Malignant pancreatic neoplasms, also known as pancreatic cancer, are cancerous growths that can invade and destroy surrounding tissues and organs. They can also spread (metastasize) to other parts of the body, such as the liver, lungs, or bones. Pancreatic cancer is often aggressive and difficult to treat, with a poor prognosis.

There are several types of pancreatic neoplasms, including adenocarcinomas, neuroendocrine tumors, solid pseudopapillary neoplasms, and cystic neoplasms. The specific type of neoplasm is determined through various diagnostic tests, such as imaging studies, biopsies, and blood tests. Treatment options depend on the type, stage, and location of the neoplasm, as well as the patient's overall health and preferences.

X-ray computed tomography (CT or CAT scan) is a medical imaging method that uses computer-processed combinations of many X-ray images taken from different angles to produce cross-sectional (tomographic) images (virtual "slices") of the body. These cross-sectional images can then be used to display detailed internal views of organs, bones, and soft tissues in the body.

The term "computed tomography" is used instead of "CT scan" or "CAT scan" because the machines take a series of X-ray measurements from different angles around the body and then use a computer to process these data to create detailed images of internal structures within the body.

CT scanning is a noninvasive, painless medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. CT imaging provides detailed information about many types of tissue including lung, bone, soft tissue and blood vessels. CT examinations can be performed on every part of the body for a variety of reasons including diagnosis, surgical planning, and monitoring of therapeutic responses.

In computed tomography (CT), an X-ray source and detector rotate around the patient, measuring the X-ray attenuation at many different angles. A computer uses this data to construct a cross-sectional image by the process of reconstruction. This technique is called "tomography". The term "computed" refers to the use of a computer to reconstruct the images.

CT has become an important tool in medical imaging and diagnosis, allowing radiologists and other physicians to view detailed internal images of the body. It can help identify many different medical conditions including cancer, heart disease, lung nodules, liver tumors, and internal injuries from trauma. CT is also commonly used for guiding biopsies and other minimally invasive procedures.

In summary, X-ray computed tomography (CT or CAT scan) is a medical imaging technique that uses computer-processed combinations of many X-ray images taken from different angles to produce cross-sectional images of the body. It provides detailed internal views of organs, bones, and soft tissues in the body, allowing physicians to diagnose and treat medical conditions.

Salivary gland neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors that develop in the salivary glands. These glands are responsible for producing saliva, which helps in digestion, lubrication of food and maintaining oral health. Salivary gland neoplasms can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous).

Benign neoplasms are slow-growing and typically do not spread to other parts of the body. They may cause symptoms such as swelling, painless lumps, or difficulty swallowing if they grow large enough to put pressure on surrounding tissues.

Malignant neoplasms, on the other hand, can be aggressive and have the potential to invade nearby structures and metastasize (spread) to distant organs. Symptoms of malignant salivary gland neoplasms may include rapid growth, pain, numbness, or paralysis of facial nerves.

Salivary gland neoplasms can occur in any of the major salivary glands (parotid, submandibular, and sublingual glands) or in the minor salivary glands located throughout the mouth and throat. The exact cause of these neoplasms is not fully understood, but risk factors may include exposure to radiation, certain viral infections, and genetic predisposition.

A pancreatectomy is a surgical procedure in which all or part of the pancreas is removed. There are several types of pancreatectomies, including:

* **Total pancreatectomy:** Removal of the entire pancreas, as well as the spleen and nearby lymph nodes. This type of pancreatectomy is usually done for patients with cancer that has spread throughout the pancreas or for those who have had multiple surgeries to remove pancreatic tumors.
* **Distal pancreatectomy:** Removal of the body and tail of the pancreas, as well as nearby lymph nodes. This type of pancreatectomy is often done for patients with tumors in the body or tail of the pancreas.
* **Partial (or segmental) pancreatectomy:** Removal of a portion of the head or body of the pancreas, as well as nearby lymph nodes. This type of pancreatectomy is often done for patients with tumors in the head or body of the pancreas that can be removed without removing the entire organ.
* **Pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy (PPPD):** A type of surgery used to treat tumors in the head of the pancreas, as well as other conditions such as chronic pancreatitis. In this procedure, the head of the pancreas, duodenum, gallbladder, and bile duct are removed, but the stomach and lower portion of the esophagus (pylorus) are left in place.

After a pancreatectomy, patients may experience problems with digestion and blood sugar regulation, as the pancreas plays an important role in these functions. Patients may need to take enzyme supplements to help with digestion and may require insulin therapy to manage their blood sugar levels.

Hydroxy acids are a class of chemical compounds that contain both a carboxylic acid group and a hydroxyl group. They are commonly used in dermatology and cosmetic products for their exfoliating, moisturizing, and anti-aging properties. The two main types of hydroxy acids used in skincare are alpha-hydroxy acids (AHAs) and beta-hydroxy acids (BHAs).

Alpha-hydroxy acids include compounds such as glycolic acid, lactic acid, malic acid, tartaric acid, and citric acid. They work by breaking down the "glue" that holds dead skin cells together, promoting cell turnover and helping to improve the texture and tone of the skin. AHAs are also known for their ability to improve the appearance of fine lines, wrinkles, and age spots.

Beta-hydroxy acids, on the other hand, are primarily represented by salicylic acid. BHAs are oil-soluble, which allows them to penetrate deeper into the pores and exfoliate dead skin cells and excess sebum that can lead to clogged pores and acne breakouts.

It is important to note that hydroxy acids can cause skin irritation and sensitivity to sunlight, so it is recommended to use sunscreen and start with lower concentrations when first incorporating them into a skincare routine.

Pancreaticoduodenectomy, also known as the Whipple procedure, is a complex surgical operation that involves the removal of the head of the pancreas, the duodenum (the first part of the small intestine), the gallbladder, and the distal common bile duct. In some cases, a portion of the stomach may also be removed. The remaining parts of the pancreas, bile duct, and intestines are then reconnected to allow for the digestion of food and drainage of bile.

This procedure is typically performed as a treatment for various conditions affecting the pancreas, such as tumors (including pancreatic cancer), chronic pancreatitis, or traumatic injuries. It is a major surgical operation that requires significant expertise and experience to perform safely and effectively.

Anaplasia is a term used in pathology to describe the loss of differentiation and cellular organization in malignant tumors. It is characterized by the presence of large, pleomorphic cells with high mitotic activity, absence of mature tissue architecture, and lack of functional specialization. Anaplastic tumors are often aggressive and have a poor prognosis due to their rapid growth and tendency to metastasize. The term "anaplasia" is derived from the Greek words "ana," meaning "back" or "against," and "plasis," meaning "formation" or "molding."

An encyclopedia is a comprehensive reference work containing articles on various topics, usually arranged in alphabetical order. In the context of medicine, a medical encyclopedia is a collection of articles that provide information about a wide range of medical topics, including diseases and conditions, treatments, tests, procedures, and anatomy and physiology. Medical encyclopedias may be published in print or electronic formats and are often used as a starting point for researching medical topics. They can provide reliable and accurate information on medical subjects, making them useful resources for healthcare professionals, students, and patients alike. Some well-known examples of medical encyclopedias include the Merck Manual and the Stedman's Medical Dictionary.

Papillary serous cystadenocarcinoma Ovarian serous cystadenoma "Ovarian papillary cystadenocarcinoma". Female Genital Pathology ... Cystadenocarcinoma is a malignant form of a cystadenoma and is a cancer derived from glandular epithelium, in which cystic ... A cystadenocarcinoma contains complex multi-loculated cyst but with exuberant solid areas in places. It usually presents with ... "Pancreatic serous cystadenocarcinoma: a case report and review of the literature". Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery. 13 (10 ...
... is a type of tumor in the cystadenocarcinoma grouping. Most commonly, the primary site of serous ... August 2005). "Serous cystadenocarcinoma of the pancreas: management of a rare entity". Pancreas. 31 (2): 182-187. doi:10.1097/ ... King JC, Ng TT, White SC, Cortina G, Reber HA, Hines OJ (October 2009). "Pancreatic serous cystadenocarcinoma: a case report ... cystadenocarcinoma is the ovary. Rare occurrence in the pancreas has been reported, although this is not typical, with the ...
... is a type of tumor in the cystadenocarcinoma grouping. It can occur in the breast as well as in the ... Honma N, Sakamoto G, Ikenaga M, Kuroiwa K, Younes M, Takubo K (August 2003). "Mucinous cystadenocarcinoma of the breast: a case ... "Ovarian mucinous cystadenocarcinoma , Radiology Reference Article". Radiopaedia.org. Retrieved 25 April 2022. v t e (Articles ...
Ovarian papillary serous cystadenocarcinoma at WebPath, The Internet Pathology Laboratory for Medical Education at Mercer ...
... (MCACL) is a very rare malignant mucus-producing neoplasm arising from the uncontrolled ... Butnor KJ, Sporn TA, Dodd LG (2001). "Fine needle aspiration cytology of mucinous cystadenocarcinoma of the lung: report of a ... Sezer O, Hoffmeier A, Bettendorf O, Franzius C, Semik M, Schmid C, Scheld HH (April 2006). "Mucinous cystadenocarcinoma--an ... Gaeta M, Blandino A, Scribano E, Ascenti G, Minutoli F, Pandolfo I (1999). "Mucinous cystadenocarcinoma of the lung: CT- ...
"Ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma". , Radiology Reference Article. Radiopaedia.org. Retrieved 2019-09-21. v t e v t e (Articles ...
When malignant, it is called cystadenocarcinoma. When not otherwise specified, the ICD-O coding is 8440/0. However, the ... ISBN 978-1-4160-2999-1. Serous cystadenoma of pancreas at eMedicine Biliary cystadenoma/cystadenocarcinoma at eMedicine v t e ( ...
"Primary Breast Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma and Review of Literature". Cureus. 14 (3): e23098. doi:10.7759/cureus.23098. PMC ...
Mucinous tumors include mucinous adenocarcinoma and mucinous cystadenocarcinoma. Mucinous adenocarcinomas make up 5-10% of ...
... of ovarian Papillary serous cystadenocarcinoma (almost all amplifications); ~5% of colorectal cancers (~60 amplifications, 40% ...
Guthrie D (July 1979). "The treatment of advanced cystadenocarcinoma of the ovary with gestronol and continuous oral ...
Biliary cystadenoma and cystadenocarcinoma constitute less than 5% of intrahepatic cysts originating from the bile duct. ...
Cancer of the bile duct (cholangiocarcinoma and cholangiocellular cystadenocarcinoma) account for approximately 6% of primary ...
... "serous cystadenocarcinoma".[citation needed] These lesions rarely require surgery unless they are symptomatic or the diagnosis ...
Ovarian papillary serous cystadenocarcinoma at WebPath, The Internet Pathology Laboratory for Medical Education at Mercer ... Papillary thyroid carcinoma Papillary renal cell carcinoma Ovarian papillary serous cystadenoma and cystadenocarcinoma ...
December 2003). "A mutation in the canine BHD gene is associated with hereditary multifocal renal cystadenocarcinoma and ...
M8470/2 Mucinous cystadenocarcinoma, non-invasive (C25._) M8470/3 Mucinous cystadenocarcinoma/ NOS (C56.9) Pseudomucinous ... NOS M8471/3 papillary mucinous cystadenocarcinoma (C56.9) Papillary pseudomucinous cystadenocarcinoma M8472/1 Mucinous cystic ... NOS M8440/3 Cystadenocarcinoma, NOS M8441/0 Serous cystadenoma, NOS Serous cystoma Serous microcystic adenoma M8441/3 Serous ... M8161/3 Bile duct cystadenocarcinoma (C22.1, C24.0) M8162/3 Klatskin tumor (C22.1, C24.0) M8170/0 Liver cell adenoma (C22.0) ( ...
... ovarian cancer cell line derived from the ascites of a 64-year-old Caucasian female with an ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma. ...
... the Serous cystadenocarcinoma type of ovarian cancer, and uterine cervical carcinoma. Other studies have implicated BLT2 in ...
... ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma and ovarian cancer cell lines: down-regulation of ER-beta in neoplastic tissues". The Journal ...
... cystadenocarcinoma, mucinous MeSH C04.557.470.200.025.480.230 - cystadenocarcinoma, papillary MeSH C04.557.470.200.025.480.240 ... cystadenocarcinoma, papillary MeSH C04.557.470.590.480.240 - cystadenocarcinoma, serous MeSH C04.557.470.590.485 - cystadenoma ... cystadenocarcinoma MeSH C04.557.470.590.480.225 - cystadenocarcinoma, mucinous MeSH C04.557.470.590.480.230 - ... cystadenocarcinoma, serous MeSH C04.557.470.200.025.540 - klatskin's tumor MeSH C04.557.470.200.025.660 - paget's disease, ...
... adenocarcinoma Sebaceous carcinoma Sebaceous lymphadenocarcinoma Cystadenocarcinoma Low-grade cribriform cystadenocarcinoma ...
75% are benign or of borderline malignancy, and 25% are malignant The malignant form of this tumor, serous cystadenocarcinoma, ...
Cystadenocarcinoma Islet cell tumors (neuroendocrine tumors) Papillary cystic neoplasms Lymphoma Acinar cell tumors Severe ...
... ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma, lung squamous cell carcinoma, adrenocortical carcinoma, Diffuse Large B-cell lymphoma, ... Serous cystadenocarcinoma Canada: Pancreatic cancer - Ductal adenocarcinoma and prostate cancer - adenocarcinoma China: Gastric ...
... multifocal renal cystadenocarcinoma) and skin tumors (nodular dermatofibrosis). They had a similar pattern of tumorigenesis to ...
... ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma, lung squamous cell carcinoma, adrenocortical carcinoma, Diffuse Large B-cell lymphoma, ...
Liver cysts Simple cysts Hydatid cysts Biliary cystadenoma Biliary cystadenocarcinoma Polycystic liver disease Adrenal cyst ( ...
Pancreatic serous cystadenoma Pancreatic serous cystadenocarcinoma Pancreatic mucinous cystic tumors (13.4%) Pancreatic ... mucinous cystadenoma Pancreatic mucinous cystadenocarcinoma (Articles needing additional references from January 2017, All ...
Papillary serous cystadenocarcinoma Ovarian serous cystadenoma "Ovarian papillary cystadenocarcinoma". Female Genital Pathology ... Cystadenocarcinoma is a malignant form of a cystadenoma and is a cancer derived from glandular epithelium, in which cystic ... A cystadenocarcinoma contains complex multi-loculated cyst but with exuberant solid areas in places. It usually presents with ... "Pancreatic serous cystadenocarcinoma: a case report and review of the literature". Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery. 13 (10 ...
Biliary (Hepatic) Cystadenoma/Cystadenocarcinoma Imaging and Diagnosis Updated: Sep 22, 2020 * Author: Mohammad Alobaidi, MD; ... Biliary cystadenoma and cystadenocarcinoma: CT and sonographic findings. AJR Am J Roentgenol. 1989 Sep. 153(3):507-11. [QxMD ... Biliary (Hepatic) Cystadenoma/Cystadenocarcinoma Imaging and Diagnosis * Sections Biliary (Hepatic) Cystadenoma/ ... Chen YW, Li CH, Liu Z, Dong JH, Zhang WZ, Jiang K. Surgical management of biliary cystadenoma and cystadenocarcinoma of the ...
":"serous-ovarian-cystadenocarcinoma","modality":"Ultrasound","series":[{"id":52903670,"content_type":"image/jpeg","frames":[{" ... Stanislavsky A, Serous ovarian cystadenocarcinoma. Case study, Radiopaedia.org (Accessed on 22 Sep 2023) https://doi.org/ ...
Tag: mucinous cystadenocarcinoma. Primary retroperitoneal mucinous cystadenocarcinoma in a male patient: a rare case report. ... Posted in Volume 17 (2013) - Issue 3 Tagged cystic neoplasm, laparotomy, male, mucinous cystadenocarcinoma, pathology, ...
Prognostic Role of Zinc Finger Homeobox 4 in Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma.. Ha M, Kim J, Park SM, Hong CM, Han ME, Song P ... Increased Expression of LYNX1 in Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma Predicts Poor Prognosis.. Liu H, Wang A, Ma Y. Biomed Res ... Increased Expression of LYNX1 in Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma Predicts Poor Prognosis.. Liu H, Wang A, Ma Y. Biomed Res ... Morphologic criteria for the prognosis of serous cystadenocarcinoma of the ovary.. Geppert M, Smyczek-Gargya B. Gynecol Obstet ...
MARIANO, Ronaldo Célio et al. Papillary mucinous cystadenocarcinoma: rare malignant tumor in minor salivary gland. RGO, Rev. ... Clinical case description of a papillary mucinous cystadenocarcinoma, extremely rare malignant tumor in the salivary gland and ... was diagnosed as papillary mucinous papillary mucinous cystadenocarcinoma. Nonetheless, the cellular atypia found was ...
... treated for ovarian cystadenocarcinoma 9-yrs before) presented a slowly increasing dyspnea. CT-scan revealed a mediastinal cyst ... Mediastinal recurrence from ovarian cystadenocarcinoma presenting as pleuro-pericardial cyst Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci Year: ... Mediastinal recurrence from ovarian cystadenocarcinoma presenting as pleuro-pericardial cyst. F. Lococo, M.-C. Charpentier, C. ... A 56 year-old woman (treated for ovarian cystadenocarcinoma 9-yrs before) presented a slowly increasing dyspnea. CT-scan ...
Renal Cystadenocarcinoma and Nodular Dermatofibrosis, for the breed: Belgian Sheepdog. ... Renal cystadenocarcinoma and nodular dermatofibrosis is inherited in an Autosomal Dominant manner in dogs meaning that dogs ... Genetic testing of the FLCN gene will reliably determine whether a dog is a genetic Carrier of renal cystadenocarcinoma and ... Renal cystadenocarcinoma and nodular dermatofibrosis is an inherited genetic predisposition to kidney, dermal and uterine ...
... ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma; PAAD, pancreatic adenocarcinoma; SARC, sarcoma other/not classified further; SCLC, small ...
The evolution of resistance in high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) cells following chemotherapy is only partially understood. To understand the selection of factors driving heterogeneity before and through adaptation to treatment, we profile single-cell RNA-sequencing (scRNA-seq) transcriptomes …
Ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma. PAAD:. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PCPG:. Pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma. PRAD:. Prostate ...
Cystadenocarcinoma, Serous / classification* * Cystadenocarcinoma, Serous / mortality * Cystadenocarcinoma, Serous / pathology ...
Serous cystadenocarcinoma. - Mucinous cystadenoma. - Mucinous borderline tumour. - Mucinous cystadenocarcinoma. - Endometrioid ...
Cyst fluid can be sent for CA 19-9 testing at the time of surgery as a marker for cystadenoma and cystadenocarcinoma. ... Cystadenoma (see the image below) and cystadenocarcinoma usually appear multiloculated with internal septations, heterogeneous ...
N. Yoshimi, S. Sugie, T. Tanaka et al., "A rare case of serous cystadenocarcinoma of the pancreas," Cancer, vol. 69, no. 10, pp ... J. C. King, T. T. Ng, S. C. White, G. Cortina, H. A. Reber, and O. J. Hines, "Pancreatic serous cystadenocarcinoma: a case ... D. H. George, F. Murphy, R. Michalski, and B. G. Ulmer, "Serous cystadenocarcinoma of the pancreas: a new entity?" American ... M. Shintaku, A. Arimoto, and N. Sakita, "Serous cystadenocarcinoma of the pancreas," Pathology International, vol. 55, no. 7, ...
mucinous appendiceal cystadenocarcinoma Sat Oct 14, 2006 10:44 am. Majafrytka. 136. Appendix cancer - Appendiceal Moderator ...
mucinous appendiceal cystadenocarcinoma Sat Oct 14, 2006 10:44 am. Majafrytka. 136. Appendix cancer - Appendiceal Moderator ...
... ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma; PAAD, pancreatic adenocarcinoma; READ, rectum adenocarcinoma; STAD, stomach adenocarcinoma; ... ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, rectum adenocarcinoma, stomach adenocarcinoma, thymoma, and ...
A comparison of pseudocysts, serous cystadenomas, mucinous cystic neoplasms, and mucinous cystadenocarcinoma. Ann Surg. 1993 ...
Renal Cystadenocarcinoma and Nodular Dermatofibrosis Renal Cystadenocarcinoma and Nodular Dermatofibrosis (RCND) is a canine ...
Unusual Presentation of Pancreatic Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma by Spontaneous Splenic Rupture Dig Surg (January,2001) ...
Inguinal Metastases from Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma of the Pancreas: A Rare Presentation. NHG Annual Scientific Congress 2004 ...
Mucinous cystadenocarcinoma Serous cystadenoma Submeter. DISCUSSION. Cytology examination revealed hyaline material, epithelial ...
Features on computed tomography raised the possibility of biliary cystadenoma or cystadenocarcinoma. She underwent a liver ...
Serous cystadenocarcinoma of the pancreas and serous cystadenoma associated with ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Formentini A ...
... a somatic mutation in PTEN was found in 10 cancer tissue samples and all were ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma. In unpublished ... 1 with an ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma diagnosed at age 24 years; and 1 displayed a heterogeneous tumor type (germ cells, ...
The pilot project focused mainly on three tumor types: glioblastoma multiforme, serous cystadenocarcinoma of the ovary, and ...
... was diagnosed with disseminated mycobacteriosis and a hepatic biliary cystadenocarcinoma. Histologically, the spleen was ...
  • Clinical case description of a papillary mucinous cystadenocarcinoma, extremely rare malignant tumor in the salivary gland and difficult to diagnose, in geriatric patient. (bvsalud.org)
  • Despite the favorable clinical features, after surgical removal, was diagnosed as papillary mucinous papillary mucinous cystadenocarcinoma. (bvsalud.org)
  • Inguinal Metastases from Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma of the Pancreas: A Rare Presentation. (sgh.com.sg)
  • With a presumptive diagnosis of mucinous cystadenoma / cystadenocarcinoma, the patient underwent abdominal exploration for a possible Whipple procedure (pancreaticoduodenectomy). (vesalius.com)
  • When Laureanno woke up from the procedure, however, he learned that he not only still had his appendix, but also that he had mucinous cystadenocarcinoma. (tuftsmedicalcenter.org)
  • Bilateral presentation is common with serous cystadenocarcinoma. (wikipedia.org)
  • A Network Pharmacology-Based Analysis of Multi-Target, Multi-Pathway, Multi-Compound Treatment for Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma. (nih.gov)
  • Hormone replacement therapy after invasive ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma treatment: the effect on survival. (nih.gov)
  • Morphologic criteria for the prognosis of serous cystadenocarcinoma of the ovary. (nih.gov)
  • Social, Genetics and Histopathological Factors Related to Titin (TTN) Gene Mutation and Survival in Women with Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma: Bioinformatics Analysis. (nih.gov)
  • Inferences of carboplatin response-related signature by integrating multiomics data in ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma. (nih.gov)
  • Expression of Yes-associated protein 1 and its clinical significance in ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma. (nih.gov)
  • A Five-Gene Expression Signature Predicts Clinical Outcome of Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma. (nih.gov)
  • The interactive module below presents a case of ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma through pre- and post-operative contrast-enhanced CT as well as a 3D reconstruction. (medscape.com)
  • Cyst fluid can be sent for CA 19-9 testing at the time of surgery as a marker for cystadenoma and cystadenocarcinoma. (medscape.com)
  • Unlike many tumors, cystadenoma and cystadenocarcinoma are rarely associated with calcifications. (medscape.com)
  • An adult male African tiger snake (Telescopts semiannulatus) was diagnosed with disseminated mycobacteriosis and a hepatic biliary cystadenocarcinoma. (diva-portal.org)
  • Cystadenocarcinoma is a malignant form of a cystadenoma and is a cancer derived from glandular epithelium, in which cystic accumulations of retained secretions are formed. (wikipedia.org)
  • The malignant counterpart is biliary cystadenocarcinoma (BCAC), which is believed to arise from the premalignant form. (medscape.com)
  • MRI signal characteristics of biliary cystadenoma/cystadenocarcinoma are not specific for the disease. (medscape.com)
  • Features on computed tomography raised the possibility of biliary cystadenoma or cystadenocarcinoma. (uwi.edu)
  • Renal cystadenocarcinoma and nodular dermatofibrosis is inherited in an Autosomal Dominant manner in dogs meaning that dogs only need to inherit one copy of the mutated gene to be at-risk for the disease. (pawprintgenetics.com)
  • therefore, breeding two dogs with renal cystadenocarcinoma and nodular dermatofibrosis may result in reduced litter size. (pawprintgenetics.com)
  • Firstly, this is the largest cystadenocarcinoma reported in the literature. (hindawi.com)
  • Bilateral presentation is common with serous cystadenocarcinoma. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cystadenocarcinoma, Serous" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicine's controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) . (musc.edu)
  • Microscopically, the papillary patterns are predominantly epithelial overgrowths with differentiated and undifferentiated papillary serous cystadenocarcinoma cells. (musc.edu)
  • This graph shows the total number of publications written about "Cystadenocarcinoma, Serous" by people in this website by year, and whether "Cystadenocarcinoma, Serous" was a major or minor topic of these publications. (musc.edu)
  • Below are the most recent publications written about "Cystadenocarcinoma, Serous" by people in Profiles. (musc.edu)
  • One GEM contains gene expression profiles for GBM, lower grade glioma (LGG), bladder urothelial carcinoma (BLCA), thyroid carcinoma (THCA), and ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma (OV) from TCGA [ 7 ] and is fully described in another publication [ 8 ]. (oncotarget.com)
  • A reference to a paper is included in the discussion afterwards, and is incorrectly cited as "papillary cystadenocarcinoma of the thyroid", when the actual article title is "papillary adenocarcinoma of the thyroid"3. (bmj.com)
  • An invasive adenocarcinoma of the accessory parotid gland: a rare example developing from a low-grade cribriform cystadenocarcinoma? (biomedcentral.com)
  • The authors state in the discussion that papillary cystadenocarcinoma (PAC) is not a rare tumor in the thyroid, ovary, or prostate. (bmj.com)
  • 15. [Hepatic cystadenocarcinoma]. (nih.gov)
  • A cystadenocarcinoma contains complex multi-loculated cyst but with exuberant solid areas in places. (wikipedia.org)
  • 14. Combined hepatocellular and cystadenocarcinoma presenting as a giant cyst of the liver--a case report. (nih.gov)
  • 18. Intracystic hemorrhage of a simple liver cyst mimicking a biliary cystadenocarcinoma. (nih.gov)
  • Low-grade cribriform cystadenocarcinoma (LGCCA) is a rare tumor of the salivary gland that exhibits clinically indolent behavior. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Delgado et al originally described low-grade cribriform cystadenocarcinoma (LGCCA) as a rare low-grade variant of salivary duct carcinoma (SDC) in 1996 [ 1 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • A mutation in the canine BHD gene is associated with hereditary multifocal renal cystadenocarcinoma and nodular dermatofibrosis in the German Shepherd dog. (wisdompanel.com)
  • 20. Clinical features and imaging diagnosis of biliary cystadenocarcinoma of the liver. (nih.gov)
  • Cystadenocarcinoma is a malignant form of a cystadenoma and is a cancer derived from glandular epithelium, in which cystic accumulations of retained secretions are formed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Renal cystadenocarcinoma and nodular dermatofibrosis is characterized by bilateral, multifocal tumors in the kidneys. (wisdompanel.com)
  • Cystadenocarcinoma is a pattern described in ovarian tumors, on the other hand it is not currently mentioned in WHO classification of tumors of female reproductive organs4. (bmj.com)
  • Scout was diagnosed with biliary Cystadenocarcinoma in September this year. (sashvets.com)