An order of fish with 26 families and over 3,000 species. This order includes the families CYPRINIDAE (minnows and CARPS), Cobitidae (loaches), and Catostomidae (suckers).
A family of freshwater fish comprising the minnows or CARPS.
An order of fish with eight families and numerous species of both egg-laying and livebearing fish. Families include Cyprinodontidae (egg-laying KILLIFISHES;), FUNDULIDAEl; (topminnows), Goodeidae (Mexican livebearers), Jenynsiidae (jenynsiids), Poeciliidae (livebearers), Profundulidae (Middle American killifishes), Aplocheilidae, and Rivulidae (rivulines). In the family Poeciliidae, the guppy and molly belong to the genus POECILIA.
One of a set of bone-like structures in the mouth used for biting and chewing.
The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.
Double-stranded DNA of MITOCHONDRIA. In eukaryotes, the mitochondrial GENOME is circular and codes for ribosomal RNAs, transfer RNAs, and about 10 proteins.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
A plant genus of the family ONAGRACEAE. Members contain oenotheins.
A plant species of the family POLYGONACEAE. Itadori tea is prepared from the root of this genus.
Surgical fixation of the stomach to the abdominal wall.
A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
Water containing no significant amounts of salts, such as water from RIVERS and LAKES.
STOMACH herniation located at or near the diaphragmatic opening for the ESOPHAGUS, the esophageal hiatus.
A family of marine mollusks in the class BIVALVIA, commonly known as oysters. They have a rough irregular shell closed by a single adductor muscle.

Genomic organization and sequence of the mud loach (Misgurnus mizolepis) growth hormone gene: a comparative analysis of teleost growth hormone genes. (1/72)

The mud loach (Misgurnus mizolepis) growth hormone (GH) gene was cloned and a comparative analysis on its genomic organization was performed. Based on Southern analysis using various kinds of restriction endonucleases, the GH gene proved to exist as a single-copy gene in the mud loach. The complete nucleotide sequences of a 5.1 kb SacI/EcoRI genomic fragment containing the mud loach GH gene and its 5' flanking sequences as well as a mud loach GH cDNA obtained by rapid amplification of a reverse transcriptase-PCR have been determined. The GH gene spans 2.0 kb from the start codon to the polyadenylation signal, and contains five exons and four introns similar to those of carps and mammals. The evolutionary relation of the mud loach GH gene, inferred by comparative analyses of gene structures and sequences in each exon and intron of representative teleost GH genes, reflects the major phylogenetic groupings of teleost.  (+info)

Haff disease: from the Baltic Sea to the U.S. shore. (2/72)

Haff disease, identified in Europe in 1924, is unexplained rhabdomyolysis in a person who ate fish in the 24 hours before onset of illness. We describe a series of six U.S. patients from 1997 and report new epidemiologic and etiologic aspects. Although Haff disease is traditionally an epidemic foodborne illness, these six cases occurred in two clusters and as one sporadic case.  (+info)

Isolation of a lethal rhabdovirus from the cultured Chinese sucker Myxocyprinus asiaticus. (3/72)

A rhabdovirus was found to be associated with a lethal hemorrhagic disease in the cultured Chinese sucker Myxocyprinus asiaticus Bleeker. The rhabdovirus was amplified and isolated from the infected GCO (grass carp ovary) cells. In ultrathin sections of liver cells from the diseased fish, the virus particles exhibited the characteristic bacilliform morphology, and budded through vesicle membranes of the infected cells. The isolated rhabdovirus particles were found to have a bacilliform morphology with 2 rounded ends rather than a typical flat base. The virus particles were measured and ranged in size from 150 to 200 nm in length and 50 to 60 nm in diameter. Most other characteristics, including their size, extensive virus infectivity to fish cell lines, strong cytopathogenic effects, stability at high temperatures, vesicle formation in infected cells, structure protein electrophoretic patterns and the presence of an RNA genome, very closely resembled those of other fish rhabdoviruses. At present it is not known if this is a novel virus species or if it is an isolate of a known fish rhabdovirus. Until a confirmed identification can be made, we will temporarily refer to this virus as Chinese sucker rhabdovirus (CSRV).  (+info)

Fish shoal composition: mechanisms and constraints. (4/72)

Observations were made on three fish species (banded killifish (Fundulus diaphanus), golden shiner (Notemigonus crysoleucas) and white sucker (Catostomus commersoni)) in a temperate lake (New Brunswick, Canada) in order to investigate the relationship between shoal choice behaviour of individual fishes and shoal composition. Encounters between shoals were observed to take place every 1.1 min per shoal and an encounter lasted 3.7 s on average. The duration of shoal encounters was influenced by shoal size but not by differences between shoals in either body length or species. Conversely, the outcome of shoal encounters (i.e. ences between shoals in either body length or species. Conversely, the outcome of shoal encounters (i.e. whether or not an individual changes shoal) was influenced by body length and species differences but not by shoal size. Together, these results suggest that encounter duration itself is unlikely to have an important influence on encounter outcome. The collection of ten entire fish shoals showed that they were assorted by species and body length. A simulation model demonstrated that individual shoal choice behaviour alone could account for the generation and maintenance of the observed levels of size assortedness of shoals without invoking the existence of other sorting mechanisms such as differential swimming speeds. However, the generation of species assortedness was not predicted by the model. Furthermore, our data suggest that fish density acts as a constraint on shoal choice, influencing both shoal size and composition. This work has implications for studies on information transfer and reciprocal altruism within populations.  (+info)

Preferential interaction of loach DNA polymerase delta with DNA duplexes containing single-stranded gaps. (5/72)

We studied the interaction of DNA polymerase delta (pol delta) purified from the eggs of the teleost fish Misgurnus fossilis (loach) with DNA duplexes containing single-stranded gaps of 1-13 nucleotides (nt). In the absence of processivity factors (PCNA, RF-C, and ATP), pol delta elongated primers on single-stranded DNA templates in a distributive manner. However, the enzyme was capable of processive synthesis by filling gaps of 5-9 nt in DNA duplexes. These data suggest that, upon filling a small gap, pol delta interacts with the 5'-terminus downstream of the gap as well as with the 3'-terminus of the primer. Interaction of pol delta with the proximal 5'-terminus restricting the gap was confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Analysis of the enzyme binding to DNA duplexes containing gaps of various sizes showed a much higher affinity of pol delta for duplexes with gaps of about 10 nt than for DNA substrates with primers annealed to single-stranded templates. The most efficient pol delta binding was observed in experiments with DNA substrates containing unpaired 3'-tails in primers. The data obtained suggest that DNA molecules with small gaps and single-stranded tails may serve as substrates for direct action of pol delta in the course of DNA repair.  (+info)

Identification and ultrastructural characterization of a novel virus from fish. (6/72)

During routine investigations on fish, a virus (isolate DF 24/00) with novel morphological features and hitherto undescribed morphogenesis was isolated from a white bream (Blicca bjoerkna L.; Teleostei, order Cypriniformes). Cell-free virions consist of a rod-shaped nucleocapsid (120-150x19-22 nm) similar to that seen in baculoviruses. The virion has a bacilliform shape (170-200x75-88 nm) reminiscent of rhabdoviruses with an envelope containing coronavirus-like spikes (20-25 nm). DF 24/00 replicated well in various fish cell lines. Inhibitor studies with 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine indicated that the viral genome consists of RNA and chloroform sensitivity correlated with ultrastructural demonstration of enveloped virions. The buoyant density of the virus determined in sucrose was 1.17-1.19 g/ml. Preliminary biochemical characterization revealed the presence of six antigenic glycoproteins, three of which contain sugars with concanavalin-A specificity. Ultrastructurally, morphogenesis of virus progeny was detected only in the cytoplasm. Nucleocapsids were observed to bud through membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum and/or Golgi apparatus into dilated vesicles. Egress of mature virions occurs primarily by exocytosis and, only very rarely, by budding directly at the plasma membrane. Morphologically similar viruses had previously been isolated from grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella), blue crab (Callinectis sapidus), European shore crab (Carcinus maenas) and shrimp (Penaeus monodon). To date, none of them has been classified. In summary, the first characterization of a new virus that might represent a member of a novel virus family that has morphological features resembling those found in rhabdo-, corona- and baculoviruses is presented.  (+info)

Accumulation of ammonia in the body and NH(3) volatilization from alkaline regions of the body surface during ammonia loading and exposure to air in the weather loach Misgurnus anguillicaudatus. (7/72)

The weather loach Misgurnus anguillicaudatus inhabits rice fields that experience drought in summer and ammonia loading during agricultural fertilisation. Exposure of specimens to ammonia led to the accumulation of ammonia in muscle, liver and blood. The level of ammonia reached in the plasma was the highest reported among fishes. Ammonia was not detoxified to urea, and urea excretion rate was unaffected by ammonia exposure. Fish acidified the water to reduce ammonia loading. Ammonia loading, unlike aerial exposure, did not induce glutamine synthesis, and there was no accumulation of glutamine. This is a unique observation different from those reported for other fishes in the literature. An initial switch to partial amino acid catabolism led to the accumulation of alanine and was probably associated with a decreased rate of ammonia production. Aerial exposure led to decreases in rates of ammonia and urea excretion, as well as the accumulation of tissue ammonia. As the internal ammonia levels increased, M. anguillicaudatus was able to excrete some ammonia in the gaseous form (NH(3)). The percentage of ammonia excreted as NH(3) increased with time of exposure and with increasing temperature. It appears that air-breathing through the gut is involved, with the anterior portion of the digestive tract playing a central role: it became significantly more alkaline in fish exposed to air or to environmental ammonia. The skin, which also became more alkaline during air exposure, may also be involved in ammonia volatilization in air-exposed fish. This represents the first report of a fish using volatilization of NH(3) as part of a defence against ammonia toxicity. It can be concluded that the main strategy adopted by M. anguillicaudatus confronted with ammonia loading or air exposure is to tolerate high ammonia levels in the tissues. During periods of elevated tissue ammonia levels, some ammonia is lost by volatilization via air-breathing using the gut. In addition, some ammonia may be lost across the skin during air exposure.  (+info)

Motility of minute intestinal fluke, Haplorchinae spp, metacercariae in fish dishes prepared by different uncooked methods. (8/72)

CONTEXT: Fish-borne trematode is a worldwide problem, with the number of people infected by liver flukes alone estimated at 21 million. In addition to the major liver flukes, Opisthorchis viverrini and Clonorchis sinensis, several types of intestinal flukes also use cyprinoid fish as the intermediate host. Traditional ingestion of undercooked and uncooked fish preparations is a major factor in pathogen acquisition. OBJECTIVE: To examine the motility of Haplorchinae spp metacercariae in matched minnows using a number of preparation methods that mimic traditional practices. DESIGN: Several freshly killed freshwater fish, Cyclocheilichthys armatus, were purchased from the local market and sent to the authors' laboratory to be examined under a stereoscopic microscope for active Haplorchinae spp metacercariae. A total of 10 fish were infected with many active metacercariae and used in the preparation of uncooked fish dishes. Five different raw fish dishes that mimic traditional meals (2 fishes/dish) were prepared using the following methods: 1) left to dry at room temperature; 2) frozen at -20 Celsius; 3) refrigerated at 4 Celsius; 4) marinated in saline (5% sodium chloride solution); and 5) marinated in 5% acetic acid solution to mimic traditional vinegar. The motility of the metacercariae in each of these dishes was examined under a stereoscopic microscope. Motility was estimated as the level of activity or degeneration of the metacercariae at the start of the experiment and then every 30 minutes until all the parasites appeared degenerate (and therefore, presumably not viable). RESULTS: Degeneration of the parasites was slowed by cooling: degeneration of all metacercariae took approximately 5 hours in the refrigerated or frozen fish, compared with 3 hours in all other dishes left at room temperature. CONCLUSION: The study substantiates the epidemiologic data demonstrating transmission of these types of pathogens despite freezing, pickling, and salting. Although the tradition of eating uncooked fish is deeply rooted in Thailand, constant efforts need to be made to discourage this practice.  (+info)

Cypriniformes is an order of freshwater fish that includes carps, minnows, and loaches. These fish are characterized by the presence of a single pair of barbels near their mouths and the absence of teeth on their jaws. They are found primarily in North America, Europe, and Asia. Some well-known examples of Cypriniformes include the common carp, goldfish, and zebrafish. These fish are often used as model organisms in scientific research due to their relatively small size, ease of breeding, and genetic similarity to humans.

Cyprinidae is a family of fish that includes carps, minnows, and barbs. It is the largest family of freshwater fish, with over 2,400 species found worldwide, particularly in Asia and Europe. These fish are characterized by their lack of teeth on the roof of their mouths and have a single dorsal fin. Some members of this family are economically important as food fish or for aquarium trade.

Cyprinodontiformes is an order of ray-finned fish that includes several families, such as Cyprinodontidae (livebearers), Poeciliidae (including guppies and mollies), Aplocheilidae, Nothobranchiidae, Rivulidae, Valenciidae, Profundulidae, Goodeidae, Anablepidae, and Jenynsiidae. These fish are characterized by their small size, live-bearing reproduction (in most families), and the presence of a urogenital papilla in males. They inhabit a wide range of freshwater and brackish environments, with some species also found in marine habitats. Many cyprinodontiform fishes are popular as aquarium pets due to their vibrant colors and interesting behaviors.

A tooth is a hard, calcified structure found in the jaws (upper and lower) of many vertebrates and used for biting and chewing food. In humans, a typical tooth has a crown, one or more roots, and three layers: the enamel (the outermost layer, hardest substance in the body), the dentin (the layer beneath the enamel), and the pulp (the innermost layer, containing nerves and blood vessels). Teeth are essential for proper nutrition, speech, and aesthetics. There are different types of teeth, including incisors, canines, premolars, and molars, each designed for specific functions in the mouth.

Phylogeny is the evolutionary history and relationship among biological entities, such as species or genes, based on their shared characteristics. In other words, it refers to the branching pattern of evolution that shows how various organisms have descended from a common ancestor over time. Phylogenetic analysis involves constructing a tree-like diagram called a phylogenetic tree, which depicts the inferred evolutionary relationships among organisms or genes based on molecular sequence data or other types of characters. This information is crucial for understanding the diversity and distribution of life on Earth, as well as for studying the emergence and spread of diseases.

Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is the genetic material present in the mitochondria, which are specialized structures within cells that generate energy. Unlike nuclear DNA, which is present in the cell nucleus and inherited from both parents, mtDNA is inherited solely from the mother.

MtDNA is a circular molecule that contains 37 genes, including 13 genes that encode for proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation, a process that generates energy in the form of ATP. The remaining genes encode for rRNAs and tRNAs, which are necessary for protein synthesis within the mitochondria.

Mutations in mtDNA can lead to a variety of genetic disorders, including mitochondrial diseases, which can affect any organ system in the body. These mutations can also be used in forensic science to identify individuals and establish biological relationships.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

"Oenothera" is a botanical term for a genus of plants commonly known as evening primroses. It's not typically used in a medical context, but the plants do have some medicinal uses. For instance, certain species of Oenothera are used in herbal medicine for their soothing properties, particularly for skin irritations and digestive issues. However, it's important to note that the use of these plants in a medical context should be under the guidance of a healthcare professional, as they can also have side effects and interact with other medications.

'Polygonum cuspidatum' is the botanical name for a plant species more commonly known as Japanese knotweed. Although it has some traditional medicinal uses in its native range of East Asia, it is not typically referred to as a 'medical definition.' However, it's crucial to note that Japanese knotweed has become an invasive species in many parts of the world, including North America and Europe. Its rapid growth can cause significant damage to infrastructure and negatively impact native ecosystems.

In traditional East Asian medicine, extracts from 'Polygonum cuspidatum' have been used for various purposes, such as treating Lyme disease, skin issues, and inflammation. The plant contains resveratrol, a potent antioxidant that has gained attention in recent years for its potential health benefits. However, more research is needed to confirm these effects and establish safe and effective dosages.

In summary, 'Polygonum cuspidatum' or Japanese knotweed does not have a medical definition per se, but it is a plant species with some traditional medicinal uses and potential health benefits due to its resveratrol content. It is essential to be aware of its invasive nature if you come across this plant in non-native environments.

Gastropexy is a surgical procedure in which the stomach is attached to another organ, usually the abdominal wall. This procedure is often performed as a preventative measure for gastric volvulus, a condition where the stomach twists on itself and cuts off its own blood supply. It is also done in animals, particularly dogs, to prevent gastric dilation volvulus (GDV), also known as bloat, which is a life-threatening emergency. In humans, gastropexy is sometimes performed as part of treatment for morbid obesity.

An "ecosystem" is not a term that has a specific medical definition, as it is a concept that is more commonly used in the fields of ecology and environmental science. However, I can provide you with the general ecological definition of an ecosystem:

An ecosystem is a community of living organisms interacting with each other and their non-living environment, including both biotic factors (plants, animals, microorganisms) and abiotic factors (climate, soil, water, and air). These interactions create a complex network of relationships that form the foundation of ecological processes, such as energy flow, nutrient cycling, and population dynamics.

While there is no direct medical definition for an ecosystem, understanding the principles of ecosystems can have important implications for human health. For example, healthy ecosystems can provide clean air and water, regulate climate, support food production, and offer opportunities for recreation and relaxation, all of which contribute to overall well-being. Conversely, degraded ecosystems can lead to increased exposure to environmental hazards, reduced access to natural resources, and heightened risks of infectious diseases. Therefore, maintaining the health and integrity of ecosystems is crucial for promoting human health and preventing disease.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Fresh Water" is not a medical term. It is a term used to describe water that contains low concentrations of dissolved salts and other dissolved minerals. It is distinguished from saline water, which includes saltwater found in the ocean and brackish water found in estuaries. Fresh water is essential for many biological processes and is the primary source of water for human consumption, agriculture, and industrial use.

A hiatal hernia is a type of hernia that occurs when a part of the stomach protrudes or squeezes through an opening (hiatus) in the diaphragm, the muscular partition between the chest and abdominal cavities. Normally, the esophagus passes through this opening to connect to the stomach, but in a hiatal hernia, a portion of the stomach also moves up into the chest cavity through the hiatus.

There are two main types of hiatal hernias: sliding and paraesophageal. In a sliding hiatal hernia, the junction between the esophagus and stomach (gastroesophageal junction) slides upward into the chest cavity, which is the most common type. Paraesophageal hiatal hernias are less common but can be more severe, as they involve the stomach herniating alongside the esophagus, potentially leading to complications like obstruction or strangulation of the blood supply to the stomach.

Many people with hiatal hernias do not experience symptoms, but some may have heartburn, acid reflux, regurgitation, difficulty swallowing, chest pain, or shortness of breath. Treatment depends on the severity and associated symptoms, ranging from lifestyle modifications and medications to surgical repair in severe cases.

Ostreidae is a family of marine bivalve mollusks, commonly known as oysters. These are characterized by a laterally compressed, asymmetrical shell with a rough, scaly or barnacle-encrusted exterior and a smooth, often highly colored interior. The shells are held together by a hinge ligament and the animals use a powerful adductor muscle to close the shell.

Oysters are filter feeders, using their gills to extract plankton and organic particles from the water. They are important ecologically, as they help to filter and clean the water in which they live. Some species are also economically important as a source of food for humans, with the meat being eaten both raw and cooked in various dishes.

It's worth noting that Ostreidae is just one family within the larger grouping of oysters, known as the superfamily Ostreoidea. Other families within this superfamily include the pearl oysters (Pteriidae) and the saddle oysters (Anomiidae).

doi:10.11646/zootaxa.4476.1.4 (HTML abstract) Wikimedia Commons has media related to Cypriniformes. Cypriniformes Tree of Life ... The Cypriniformes are thought to have originated in South-east Asia, where the most diversity of this group is found today. The ... The earliest that Cypriniformes might have diverged from Characiphysi (Characiformes and relatives) is thought to be about the ... In science, one of the most famous members of the Cypriniformes is the zebrafish (Danio rerio). The zebrafish is one of the ...
This fish is a species of freshwater ray-finned fish in the order Cypriniformes. Some defining characteristics of fish in the ... "Cypriniformes." A Dictionary of Zoology. : Oxford University Press, 2009. Oxford Reference. 2009. Date Accessed 3 May. 2014. ... Christopher Scharpf & Kenneth J. Lazara (22 September 2018). "Order CYPRINIFORMES: Family CYPRINIDAE: Subfamilies PROPARBINAE ...
Cypriniformes, Cyprinidae). (n.d.). https://bmczool.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s40850-021-00073 Wikimedia Commons has ...
The hornyhead chub (Nocomis biguttatus) is a small species of minnow in the family Cyprinidae of order Cypriniformes. It mainly ... Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes) > Cypriniformes (Carps) > Cyprinidae (Minnows or carps) > Leuciscinae. NatureServe (2013). " ...
Cypriniformes III. Science Press. ISBN 7030075757. v t e (Articles with short description, Short description matches Wikidata, ...
Christopher Scharpf & Kenneth J. Lazara (22 September 2018). "Order CYPRINIFORMES: Families BOTIIDAE, VAILLANTELLIDAE and ... Cypriniformes) from Pahiyangala, Kalu River basin., SRI LANKA NATURALIST, JOURNAL OF ECOLOGY AND NATURE, Young Zoologist's ... Cypriniformes, Cobitidae); (Unpublished). Havird, J. C. and Page, L. M. ; 2010; A Revision of Lepidocephalichthys (Teleostei: ...
Order: Cypriniformes. Family: Cyprinidae About over 320 genera, and more than 3,250 species are included in this family. 52 ...
Cypriniformes) from Pahiyangala, Kalu River basin., SRI LANKA NATURALIST, JOURNAL OF ECOLOGY AND NATURE, Young Zoologist's ... Cypriniformes, Cobitidae); (Unpublished). Havird, J. C. and Page, L. M.; 2010; A Revision of Lepidocephalichthys (Teleostei: ...
Teleostei: Cypriniformes: Cyprinidae). Zootaxa, 3768 (5): 583-590. Li, J. & Li, X.-H. (2014): Sinocyclocheilus gracilis, a new ... Cypriniformes: Cyprinidae) from Guangxi, China. Archived 2015-10-26 at the Wayback Machine Zoological Research, 34 (5): 459-463 ... Zhu, D.-G. & Zhu, Y. (2012): A new species Sinocyclycheilus flexuosdorsalis (Cypriniformes, Cyprinidae) from Guangxi, China. ... Cypriniformes), from Jinshajiang Drainage, Yunnan, China. Cave Research, 1 (2): 33-36. Lan, J., Gan, X., Wu, T. & Yang, J. ( ...
Osteichthyes: Cypriniformes III. Science, 2000 v t e (Articles with short description, Short description matches Wikidata, ...
"CYPRINIFORMES (part 10)" (PDF). The ETYFish Project Fish Name Etymology Database. Christopher Scharpf and Kenneth J. Lazara. ...
See also Order CYPRINIFORMES. (CS1 Danish-language sources (da), Articles with short description, Short description matches ...
"CYPRINIFORMES (part 10)" (PDF). The ETYFish Project Fish Name Etymology Database. Christopher Scharpf and Kenneth J. Lazara. ...
"CYPRINIFORMES (part 10)" (PDF). The ETYFish Project Fish Name Etymology Database. Christopher Scharpf and Kenneth J. Lazara. ...
Scharpf, Christopher; Lazara, Kenneth J. "Order CYPRINIFORMES". The ETYFish Project. Retrieved 2020-01-30. v t e (Articles with ...
Cypriniformes: Cyprinidae) from the Little Scarcies basin in Guinea, Africa. Zootaxa, 2998: 48-65. Stiassny, M.L.J., Liyandja, ... Cypriniformes: Cyprinidae) from southern Gabon". Journal of Fish Biology. 96 (5): 1218-1233. doi:10.1111/jfb.13995. ISSN 1095- ... Cypriniformes: Cyprinidae). Ichthyological Exploration of Freshwaters, 23 (2): 181-192. Mipounga, Hans Kevin; Cutler, Joseph; ...
Cypriniformes: Balitoridae) from Guangxi, China. Environmental Biology of Fishes, 93 (4): 483-490. Yang, Q., Wei, M.-l., Lan, J ... Cypriniformes: Balitoridae) from Guangxi, China". Zoological Research. 32 (2): 208-211. doi:10.3724/SP.J.1141.2011.02208 ( ... Cypriniformes genera, Fish of Asia, Taxa named by Albert Günther, Taxonomy articles created by Polbot, All stub articles, ... Cypriniformes: Cobitoidei)" (PDF). Raffles Bulletin of Zoology. Suppl. 26: 1-199. Froese, Rainer and Pauly, Daniel, eds. (2017 ...
Cypriniformes: Balitoridae) from Guangxi, China. Environmental Biology of Fishes, 93 (4): 483-490. v t e (CS1: long volume ... Cypriniformes: Cobitoidei)" (PDF). The Raffles Bulletin of Zoology. Supplement No. 26: 1-199. Lan, J.-H.; Gan, X.; Wu, T.-J.; ...
Christopher Scharpf & Kenneth J. Lazara (22 September 2018). "Order CYPRINIFORMES: Family CYPRINIDAE: Subfamily SMILIOGASTRINAE ...
Christopher Scharpf & Kenneth J. Lazara (22 September 2018). "Order CYPRINIFORMES: Family CYPRINIDAE: Subfamily LABEONINAE". ...
"Order CYPRINIFORMES: Family NEMACHEILIDAE (Stone Loaches)". The ETYFish Project Fish Name Etymology Database. Christopher ...
Christopher Scharpf & Kenneth J. Lazara (22 September 2018). "Order CYPRINIFORMES: Family CYPRINIDAE: Subfamily SMILIOGASTRINAE ...
Christopher Scharpf & Kenneth J. Lazara (22 September 2018). "Order CYPRINIFORMES: Family CYPRINIDAE: Subfamily LABEONINAE". ...
"Order CYPRINIFORMES: Family NEMACHEILIDAE (Stone Loaches)". The ETYFish Project Fish Name Etymology Database. Christopher ...
"Order Cypriniformes: Family Cyprinidae: Subfamily Danioninae". ETYFish. Retrieved 21 September 2017. (Articles with short ...
"Order CYPRINIFORMES: Family NEMACHEILIDAE (Stone Loaches)". The ETYFish Project Fish Name Etymology Database. Christopher ...
Christopher Scharpf & Kenneth J. Lazara (22 September 2018). "Order CYPRINIFORMES: Family NEMACHEILIDAE (r-y)". The ETYFish ...
"Cypriniformes (Part 4 of 13)" (PDF). The ETYFish Project. Christopher Scharpf and Kennth J. Lazara. Retrieved 11 November 2017 ...
Scharpf, Christopher; Lazara, Kenneth J. (22 September 2018). "Order CYPRINIFORMES: Family CYPRINIDAE: Subfamily LABEONINAE". ...
"Order CYPRINIFORMES: Family NEMACHEILIDAE (Stone Loaches)". The ETYFish Project Fish Name Etymology Database. Christopher ...
doi:10.11646/zootaxa.4476.1.4 (HTML abstract) Wikimedia Commons has media related to Cypriniformes. Cypriniformes Tree of Life ... The Cypriniformes are thought to have originated in South-east Asia, where the most diversity of this group is found today. The ... The earliest that Cypriniformes might have diverged from Characiphysi (Characiformes and relatives) is thought to be about the ... In science, one of the most famous members of the Cypriniformes is the zebrafish (Danio rerio). The zebrafish is one of the ...
"Chromosomal Studies of Masculinized Hybrids in Bitterlings (Teleostei: Cypriniformes: Acheilognathinae)" written by Takayoshi ...
Cypriniformes, Cyprinidae). (n.d.). https://bmczool.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s40850-021-00073 Wikimedia Commons has ...
Phylogenetic position of the fish genus Ellopostoma (Teleostei: Cypriniformes) using molecular genetic data. Ichthyological ... of Cypriniformes, but does not belong to any of the currently recognised families. It represents an independent lineage, ...
"Order CYPRINIFORMES: Family NEMACHEILIDAE (Stone Loaches)". The ETYFish Project Fish Name Etymology Database. Christopher ...
Ontogenetic development of the horn and hump of the Chinese cavefish Sinocyclocheilus furcodorsalis (Cypriniformes: Cyprinidae) ... title = "Ontogenetic development of the horn and hump of the Chinese cavefish Sinocyclocheilus furcodorsalis (Cypriniformes: ... T1 - Ontogenetic development of the horn and hump of the Chinese cavefish Sinocyclocheilus furcodorsalis (Cypriniformes: ... Ontogenetic development of the horn and hump of the Chinese cavefish Sinocyclocheilus furcodorsalis (Cypriniformes: Cyprinidae ...
Phylogenetic relationships of Acheilognathidae (Cypriniformes: Cyprinoidea) as revealed from evidence of both nuclear and ...
Teleostei (teleosts) > Cypriniformes (Carps) > Balitoridae (River loaches). Etymology: Sinogastromyzon: Latin, sino, sina = ...
Ordo: Cypriniformes Subordo: Cobitoidei. Familia: Gastromyzontidae. Genus: Beaufortia. Species (11): B. cyclica - B. ...
Inventaire National du Patrimoine Naturel (2021). Plan de gestion 2015 - 2019 du site du Coteau de Casserouge (47) mené par le CEN Aquitaine-Observations faunistiques (inventaire) réalisées par le CEN Aquitaine. UMS PatriNat (OFB-CNRS-MNHN), Paris. Occurrence dataset https://doi.org/10.15468/2shkx5 accessed via GBIF.org on 2024-04-23 ...
Order: Cypriniformes Class: Actinopterygii. Maximum size: 5 cm / 2 inches. Environment: freshwater. Origin: Guyana. Temperament ...
Cypriniformes (Order). Cyprinidae (Family). References. Recent Publications. *Length-weight relationships of nine freshwater ...
Cypriniformes - cyprins, meuniers, minnows, suckers. Superfamily. Cyprinoidea Family. Cyprinidae - carps, minnows, carpas y ...
Cypriniformes - cyprins, meuniers, minnows, suckers. Superfamily. Cobitoidea Family. Catostomidae - suckers, matalotes, ...
The complete mitochondrial genome of Chinese sucker Myxocyprinus asiaticus (Cypriniformes, Catostomidae).. Journal. ...
Teleostei (teleosts) > Cypriniformes (Carps) > Nemacheilidae (Brook loaches). Etymology: Schistura: Greek, schizein = to divide ... A new genus and three new species of nemacheilid loaches from northern Irrawaddy drainage, Myanmar (Teleostei: Cypriniformes). ...
cypriniformes including barbs, carp, danios, goldfish, loaches. ▽. ⌕. mqvhizc characiformes including characins, pencilfish, ...
Order : Cypriniformes. Family : Cyprinidae. Genus : Barbus. Species : Barbus parawaldroni Authority : L. © 2010 ...
Cypriniformes) for conservation needs. The Egyptian Journal of Aquatic Research. 44 (3), 245-249 ...
Cypriniformes: Cobitidae) from different drainage areas. Folia zoologica, 57: 83-89.. Papoušek I, Lusková V, Koščo J, Lusk S, ... Cypriniformes: Cobitidae) from different drainage areas. Folia zoologica, 57: 83-89.. Piálek J, Vyskočilová M, Bímová B, ...
The complete mitochondrial genome of Chinese lizard gudgeon, Saurogobio dabryi (Cypriniformes: Cyprinidae) ...
Teleostei (teleosts) > Cypriniformes (Carps) > Leuciscidae (Minnows) > Leuciscinae. Etymology: Abramis: Greek, abramis, -idos ...
Řád: Cypriniformes - máloostní. Čeleď: Cyprinidae - kaprovití. Rod: Garra Hamilton, 1822. Synonyma. Garra tana Getahun, 2000. ...
Teleostei (teleosts) > Cypriniformes (Carps) > Xenocyprididae (East Asian minnows). Etymology: Sinibrama: Latin, sino, sina = ...
Order: Cypriniformes (encompassing carps, minnows, and relatives). Family: Cyprinidae (belonging to minnows). Genus: Notropis. ...
Dactylogyridae from Serrasalmus nattereri (Cypriniformes, Serrasalmidae) and aspects of their morphologic variation and ... Dactylogyridae from Serrasalmus nattereri (Cypriniformes, Serrasalmidae) and aspects of their morphologic variation and ... Dactylogyridae from Serrasalmus nattereri (Cypriniformes, Serrasalmidae) and aspects of their morphologic variation and ... Dactylogyridae from Serrasalmus nattereri (Cypriniformes, Serrasalmidae) and aspects of their morphologic variation and ...
A revision of nemacheiline loaches (Pisces: Cypriniformes) of Thailand, Burma, Laos, Cambodia and Southern Vietnam. Verlag Dr, ...
Cypriniformes Kabanay: Cyprinidae Kahenera: Puntius Espesye: Puntius bramoides Siyentipikinhong Ngalan Puntius bramoides. ( ...
Cypriniformes. Family. Cyprinidae. Read our Complete Guide to Classification of Animals.. Carp Conservation Status. *Least ...
Detection of morphometric differentiation in Sattar snowtrout, Schizothorax curvifrons (Cypriniformes: Cyprinidae) from Kashmir ...
  • Cypriniformes, Cyprinidae). (wikipedia.org)
  • Zhao, Y. / Ontogenetic development of the horn and hump of the Chinese cavefish Sinocyclocheilus furcodorsalis (Cypriniformes: Cyprinidae) . (njit.edu)
  • A new genus and three new species of nemacheilid loaches from northern Irrawaddy drainage, Myanmar (Teleostei: Cypriniformes). (mnhn.fr)
  • nov., a new cyprinid gudgeon (Teleostei: Cypriniformes) from the Yangtze River, based on both morphological and molecular data. (bvsalud.org)
  • Ellopostoma is a member of the superfamily Cobitoidea (loaches) of Cypriniformes, but does not belong to any of the currently recognised families. (joerg-bohlen.de)
  • A revision of nemacheiline loaches (Pisces: Cypriniformes) of Thailand, Burma, Laos, Cambodia and Southern Vietnam. (mapress.com)
  • Cypriniformes is an Order within the Superorder Ostariophysi consisting of "Carp-like" Ostariophysins. (wikipedia.org)
  • Like other orders of the Ostariophysi, fishes of Cypriniformes possess a Weberian apparatus. (wikipedia.org)
  • The complete mitochondrial genome of Chinese sucker Myxocyprinus asiaticus (Cypriniformes, Catostomidae). (kegg.jp)
  • By this definition, the Cypriniformes were paraphyletic, so recently, the orders Gonorhynchiformes, Characiformes, (characins and allies), and Gymnotiformes (knifefishes and electric eels) have been separated out to form their own monophyletic orders. (wikipedia.org)
  • Further differences are the Cypriniformes' unique kinethmoid, a small median bone in the snout, and the lack of teeth in the mouth. (wikipedia.org)
  • While other groups of fish, such as cichlids, also possess pharyngeal teeth, the cypriniformes' teeth grind against a chewing pad on the base of the skull, instead of an upper pharyngeal jaw. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nemacheiline loaches from Central Vietnam with descriptions of a new genus and 14 new species (Cypriniformes: Balitoridae). (fishbase.de)
  • Cypriniformes: Cobitidae) in Severskiĭ Donets river basin]. (nih.gov)
  • 11. [Genetic structure of a diploid-polyploid complex of the spined loach Cobitis taenia (Cypriniformes: Cobitidae) from the middle Dnieper bassin]. (nih.gov)