A plant species of the genus CYNARA, family ASTERACEAE. The flower bud is the familiar artichoke eaten as a vegetable.
A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE.
A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE with a name that is similar to CYNARA SCOLYMUS. Members contain taraxasteryl acetate.
Polysaccharides composed of D-fructose units.
A large plant family of the order Asterales, subclass Asteridae, class Magnoliopsida. The family is also known as Compositae. Flower petals are joined near the base and stamens alternate with the corolla lobes. The common name of "daisy" refers to several genera of this family including Aster; CHRYSANTHEMUM; RUDBECKIA; TANACETUM.

Fructan biosynthesis in transgenic plants. (1/19)

Data from plants transformed to accumulate fructan are assessed in the context of natural concentrations of reserve carbohydrates and natural fluxes of carbon in primary metabolism: Transgenic fructan accumulation is universally reported as an instantaneous endpoint concentration. In exceptional cases, concentrations of 60-160 mg g(-1) fresh mass were reported and compare favourably with naturally occurring maximal starch and fructan content in leaves and storage organs. Generally, values were less than 20 mg g(-1) for plants transformed with bacterial genes and <9 mg g(-1) for plant-plant transformants. Superficially, the results indicate a marked modification of carbon partitioning. However, transgenic fructan accumulation was generally constitutive and involved accumulation over time-scales of weeks or months. When calculated as a function of accumulation period, fluxes into the transgenic product were low, in the range 0.00002-0.03 nkat g(-1). By comparison with an estimated minimum daily carbohydrate flux in leaves for a natural fructan-accumulating plant in field conditions (37 nkat g(-1)), transgenic fructan accumulation was only 0.00005-0.08% of primary carbohydrate flux and does not indicate radical modification of carbon partitioning, but rather, a quantitatively minor leakage into transgenic fructan. Possible mechanisms for this low fructan accumulation in the transformants are considered and include: (i) rare codon usage in bacterial genes compared with eukaryotes, (ii) low transgene mRNA concentrations caused by low expression and/or high turnover, (iii) resultant low expression of enzyme protein, (iv) resultant low total enzyme activity, (v) inappropriate kinetic properties of the gene products with respect to substrate concentrations in the host, (vi) in situ product hydrolysis, and (vii) levan toxicity. Transformants expressing bacterial fructan synthesis exhibited a number of aberrant phenotypes such as stunting, leaf bleaching, necrosis, reduced tuber number and mass, tuber cortex discoloration, reduction in starch accumulation, and chloroplast agglutination. In severe cases of developmental aberration, potato tubers were replaced by florets. Possible mechanisms to explain these aberrations are discussed. In most instances, the attempted subcellular targeting of the transgene product was not demonstrated. Where localization was attempted, the transgene product generally mis-localized, for example, to the cell perimeter or to the endomembrane system, instead of the intended target, the vacuole. Fructosyltransferases exhibited different product specificities in planta than in vitro, expression in planta generally favouring the formation of larger fructan oligomers and polymers. This implies a direct influence of the intracellular environment on the capacity for polymerization of fructosyltransferases and may have implications for the mechanism of natural fructan polymerization in vivo.  (+info)

Artichoke cultivars (var. "Blanca de Tudela") under elevated ozone concentrations. (2/19)

Ozone concentrations rise to phytotoxic levels from spring to autumn at western Mediterranean basin coastal sites, where artichoke is one of the most important crops. Simultaneously, from year to year and especially since the early 1980s, resprouting of the stumps has been decreasing in Valencian Community artichoke plantations. To see if ozone might be playing a role in this decrease, a number of plants were exposed to different levels of ozone. Results of the ozone treatments showed reduced biomass in the offshoots of plants exposed to the highest ozone treatment. The exposure to ambient ozone during the stump-establishment period, when compared to filtered-air conditions, resulted in a reduction in yield when plants were transplanted in the field under ambient ozone concentrations. And when plants were exposed to acute short picks, typical ozone visual injury appeared in the older leaves.  (+info)

Efficacy of artichoke leaf extract in the treatment of patients with functional dyspepsia: a six-week placebo-controlled, double-blind, multicentre trial. (3/19)

BACKGROUND: This study aimed to assess the efficacy of artichoke leaf extract (ALE) in the treatment of patients with functional dyspepsia (FD). METHODS: In a double-blind, randomized controlled trial (RCT), 247 patients with functional dyspepsia were recruited and treated with either a commercial ALE preparation (2 x 320 mg plant extract t.d.s.) or a placebo. The primary efficacy variable was the sum score of the patient's weekly rating of the overall change in dyspeptic symptoms (four-point scale). Secondary variables were the scores of each dyspeptic symptom and the quality of life (QOL) as assessed by the Nepean Dyspepsia Index (NDI). RESULTS: Two hundred and forty-seven patients were enrolled, and data from 244 patients (129 active treatment, 115 placebo) were suitable for inclusion in the statistical analysis (intention-to-treat). The overall symptom improvement over the 6 weeks of treatment was significantly greater with ALE than with the placebo (8.3 +/- 4.6, vs. 6.7 +/- 4.8, P < 0.01). Similarly, patients treated with ALE showed significantly greater improvement in the global quality-of-life scores (NDI) compared with the placebo-treated patients (- 41.1 +/- 47.6 vs. - 24.8 +/- 35.6, P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: The ALE preparation tested was significantly better than the placebo in alleviating symptoms and improving the disease-specific quality of life in patients with functional dyspepsia.  (+info)

Flavonoids from artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) up-regulate endothelial-type nitric-oxide synthase gene expression in human endothelial cells. (4/19)

Nitric oxide (NO) produced by endothelial nitric-oxide synthase (eNOS) represents an antithrombotic and anti-atherosclerotic principle in the vasculature. Hence, an enhanced expression of eNOS in response to pharmacological interventions could provide protection against cardiovascular diseases. In EA.hy 926 cells, a cell line derived from human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), an artichoke leaf extract (ALE) increased the activity of the human eNOS promoter (determined by luciferase reporter gene assay). An organic subfraction from ALE was more potent in this respect than the crude extract, whereas an aqueous subfraction of ALE was without effect. ALE and the organic subfraction thereof also increased eNOS mRNA expression (measured by an RNase protection assay) and eNOS protein expression (determined by Western blot) both in EA.hy 926 cells and in native HUVECs. NO production (measured by NO-ozone chemiluminescence) was increased by both extracts. In organ chamber experiments, ex vivo incubation (18 h) of rat aortic rings with the organic subfraction of ALE enhanced the NO-mediated vasodilator response to acetylcholine, indicating that the up-regulated eNOS remained functional. Caffeoylquinic acids and flavonoids are two major groups of constituents of ALE. Interestingly, the flavonoids luteolin and cynaroside increased eNOS promoter activity and eNOS mRNA expression, whereas the caffeoylquinic acids cynarin and chlorogenic acid were without effect. Thus, in addition to the lipid-lowering and antioxidant properties of artichoke, an increase in eNOS gene transcription may also contribute to its beneficial cardiovascular profile. Artichoke flavonoids are likely to represent the active ingredients mediating eNOS up-regulation.  (+info)

Antispasmodic activity of fractions and cynaropicrin from Cynara scolymus on guinea-pig ileum. (5/19)

This study describes the antispasmodic activity of some fractions and cynaropicrin, a sesquiterpene lactone from Cynara scolymus, cultivated in Brazil, against guinea-pig ileum contracted by acetylcholine. The dichloromethane fraction showed the most promising biological effects, with an IC(50) of 0.93 (0.49-1.77) mg/ml. Its main active component, the sesquiterpene lactone cynaropicrin, exhibited potent activity, with IC(50) of 0.065 (0.049-0.086) mg/ml, being about 14-fold more active than dichloromethane fraction and having similar potency to that of papaverine, a well-known antispasmodic agent. The results confirm the popular use of artichoke for the treatment of gastrointestinal disturbances, and encourage new studies on this compound, in order to obtain new antispasmodic agents.  (+info)

Evaluation of the relaxant action of some Brazilian medicinal plants in isolated guinea-pig ileum and rat duodenum. (6/19)

PURPOSE: The present study aimed to evaluate the possible antispasmodic activity in vitro of methanolic extracts (ME) of six Brazilian medicinal plants. METHODS: The extracts were evaluated on isolated guinea-pig ileum and rat duodenum preparations. RESULTS: Rubus imperialis, Maytenus robusta, Ipomoea pes caprae and Epidendrum mosenii did not inhibit the contractile response elicited by acetylcholine on guinea-pig ileum. On the other hand, ME from Calophyllum brasiliense and Cynara scolymus exhibited significant inhibitory activity for the contractile response elicited by acetylcholine on guinea-pig ileum and on rat duodenum in a noncompetitive and concentration-dependent manner. CONCLUSIONS: The current study suggests that, of the six medicinal plants evaluated, only the ME of Calophyllum brasiliense and Cynara scolymus show probable antispasmodic activity, confirming and justifying their use in folk medicine for the treatment of intestinal disorders.  (+info)

In vitro and in vivo survival and transit tolerance of potentially probiotic strains carried by artichokes in the gastrointestinal tract. (7/19)

The ability of potentially probiotic strains of Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus paracasei to survive on artichokes for at least 90 days was shown. The anchorage of bacterial strains to artichokes improved their survival in simulated gastrointestinal digestion. L. paracasei IMPC2.1 was further used in an artichoke human feeding study involving four volunteers, and it was shown that the organism could be recovered from stools.  (+info)

Daily polyphenol intake in France from fruit and vegetables. (8/19)

The objective of this study was to create a French database on the polyphenol content of fruit and vegetables as uncooked fruits and vegetables and then to evaluate polyphenol intake through fruit and vegetable consumption in France. To achieve this, we used the Folin-Ciocalteu method adapted to fruit and vegetable polyphenol quantitation (1). Vegetables with the highest polyphenol concentration were artichokes, parsley, and brussels sprouts [>250 mg of gallic acid equivalent (GAE)/100 g fresh edible portion (FEP)]; fruits with the highest concentrations were strawberries, lychees, and grapes (>180 mg of GAE/100 g FEP). Conversely, melons (Cantaloupe cv.) and avocados had the lowest polyphenol concentration for fruits and vegetables, respectively. Based on fruit consumption data, apples and strawberries are the main sources of polyphenols in the French diet, whereas potatoes, lettuces, and onions are the most important vegetable sources. Total polyphenol intake from fruit is about 3 times higher than from vegetables, due to the lower polyphenol concentration in vegetables. The calculation of polyphenol intake, based on both assessment methods used [(Societe d'Etudes de la Communication, Distribution et Publicite (SECODIP) and Supplementation en Vitamines et Mineraux Antioxydants (SUVIMAX)], showed that apples and potatoes provide approximatively half of the total polyphenol intake from fruit and vegetables in the French diet.  (+info)

'Cynara scolymus' is the scientific name for the plant species more commonly known as artichoke. It belongs to the family Asteraceae and is native to the Mediterranean region. The artichoke plant produces large, purple flower buds that are eaten as a vegetable. The edible portion of the bud consists of the fleshy bases of the scales (or bracts) and the heart, which is the base of the bud. Artichokes are rich in antioxidants, fiber, and various nutrients, making them a valuable addition to a healthy diet.

"Cynara" is a genus name in botany, which includes several species of plants commonly known as artichokes. The most well-known and widely consumed species is Cynara scolymus, which is the source of the edible part of the artichoke plant.

The medical community may use the term "Cynara" to refer to this plant or its extracts in the context of discussing potential health benefits or therapeutic uses. Some studies have suggested that compounds found in Cynara, such as cynarin and silymarin, may have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and liver-protective effects. However, more research is needed to confirm these potential benefits and establish safe and effective dosages for medical use.

"Scolymus" is the genus name for a group of plants commonly known as golden thistles. The most well-known species is Scolymus hispanicus, which is native to the Mediterranean region. These plants have spiny leaves and stems, and produce large, yellow flowers that are followed by seeds with tufts of white hairs.

In a medical context, "Scolymus" is not commonly used as a term. While some species of thistle have been used in traditional medicine for their purported anti-inflammatory and diuretic properties, there is limited scientific evidence to support these claims. It's important to note that consuming any part of a wild thistle plant can be dangerous due to the presence of spines and other potentially toxic compounds. Therefore, it's recommended to consult with a healthcare professional before using any herbal remedies or supplements.

Fructans are a type of carbohydrate known as oligosaccharides, which are made up of chains of fructose molecules. They are found in various plants, including wheat, onions, garlic, and artichokes. Some people may have difficulty digesting fructans due to a lack of the enzyme needed to break them down, leading to symptoms such as bloating, diarrhea, and stomach pain. This condition is known as fructan intolerance or fructose malabsorption. Fructans are also considered a type of FODMAP (Fermentable Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides, and Polyols), which are short-chain carbohydrates that can be poorly absorbed by the body and may cause digestive symptoms in some individuals.

Asteraceae is a family of flowering plants commonly known as the daisy family or sunflower family. It is one of the largest and most diverse families of vascular plants, with over 1,900 genera and 32,000 species. The family includes a wide variety of plants, ranging from annual and perennial herbs to shrubs and trees.

The defining characteristic of Asteraceae is the presence of a unique type of inflorescence called a capitulum, which resembles a single flower but is actually composed of many small flowers (florets) arranged in a dense head. The florets are typically bisexual, with both male and female reproductive structures, and are radially symmetrical.

Asteraceae includes many economically important plants, such as sunflowers, daisies, artichokes, lettuce, chicory, and ragweed. Some species of Asteraceae are also used in traditional medicine and have been found to contain bioactive compounds with potential therapeutic uses.

It's worth noting that the taxonomy of this family has undergone significant revisions in recent years, and some genera and species have been moved to other families or renamed.

"Cynara scolymus". MaltaWildPlants.com. Retrieved 2022-01-04. Mifsud, Stephen. "Cynara scolymus cardunculus". MaltaWildPlants. ... "Scolymus hispanicus". MaltaWildPlants.com. Retrieved 2022-01-04. Mifsud, Stephen. "Scolymus maculatus". MaltaWildPlants.com. ... "Cynara cardunculus". MaltaWildPlants.com. Retrieved 2022-01-04. Mifsud, Stephen. " ... "Scolymus grandiflorus". MaltaWildPlants.com. Retrieved 2022-01-04. Mifsud, Stephen. " ...
Canary Islands Cynara makrisii Cynara scolymus (syn. C. cardunculus var. scolymus) - artichoke - area of origins unclear but ... Cynara scolymus (syn. C. cardunculus var. scolymus) is the common edible globe artichoke. It differs from C. cardunculus in ... Media related to Cynara at Wikimedia Commons Data related to Cynara at Wikispecies GRIN Species Records of Cynara. Germplasm ... Portugal Cynara auranitica - Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Israel, Palestine, Jordan, Turkey Cynara baetica - Spain, Morocco Cynara ...
The larvae feed on Arctium, Carduus, Cirsium, Cynara and Silybum species. They are a pest of Cynara scolymus. The females lay ...
Cynara scolymus). They mine the leaves of their host plant in a sizable blotch with an ample quantity of frass. The larva may ...
The larva feeds on the roots of Cynara scolymus. Meigen, Johann Wilhelm (1822). Systematische Beschreibung der bekannten ...
The larvae feed on Scrophularia, Cynara scolymus and Stachys species. They hollow out the terminal shoots of their host plant ...
It is a minor pest of Liliaceae, parsnip, carrot, potato, asparagus, artichoke roots (Cynara scolymus). Chandler, Peter J. ( ...
... was first isolated from the leaves of the Cynara scolymus L. (artichoke) in 1959 by a group of researchers of the ... On hydrogenation products of cynaropicrin, the bitter principle of artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.)". Collection of Czechoslovak ... Cynara scolymus L.): structure requirement and mode of action". Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters. 13 (2): 223-228. doi: ... "Lipophilic Extracts of Cynara cardunculus L. var. altilis (DC): A Source of Valuable Bioactive Terpenic Compounds". Journal of ...
The larvae are polyphagous feeding on various herbaceous plants including Beta vulgaris, Cynara scolymus, Medicago sativa and ...
Cynara scolymus, Cynara cardunculus var. scolymus) Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus) Jicama (Pachyrhizus erosus) ...
Cynara cardunculus Scolymus Group, sometimes distinguished as Cynara scolymus or C. cardunculus var. scolymus (L.) Fiori), ... Cynara scolymus L. Atlas of Living Australia. "Cynara cardunculus : Artichoke Thistle - Atlas of Living Australia". ala.org.au ... A Cynara cardunculus plant at anthesis bearing white flowers Cardoon (Cynara cardunculus) Zaghouan,Tunisia "The Plant List: A ... Cynara cardunculus - MHNT Young leaves of a spiny wild plant Inflorescence bud Plants Garden plant in bloom Cultivated cardoons ...
It is made from 13 herbs and plants, predominant among which is the artichoke (Cynara scolymus), from which the drink derives ...
Perennial border - includes artichoke (Cynara scolymus), Japanese forest grass (Hakonechloa macra), giant hyssop (Hyssopus ...
In food It can be found in dandelion (the highest concentration in the flowers, but also in the roots) and in Cynara scolymus ( ...
The globe artichoke (Cynara cardunculus var. scolymus) is a species of thistle cultivated as a food. Artichoke may also refer ...
Cynara scolymus and Opuntia ficus-indica, researchers concluded that "no compelling evidence exists to suggest that any ...
Xanthium strumarium and Cynara scolymus. They skeletonize the leaves of their host plant. They rest along the midrib of the ...
... cynara MeSH B06.388.100.100.269.500 - cynara scolymus MeSH B06.388.100.100.289 - dahlia MeSH B06.388.100.100.310 - echinacea ... scolymus MeSH B06.388.100.100.775 - scorzonera MeSH B06.388.100.100.800 - senecio MeSH B06.388.100.100.816 - solidago MeSH ...
... sea kale Cynara cardunculus, cardoon Cynara scolymus, artichoke Dioscorea bulbifera, air potato Helianthus tuberosus, Jerusalem ...
Cynara scolymus) is now allotted to people as ḥurfesh beni adam, while its wild variety (Cynara syriaca) as ḥurfesh el-ḥamir is ... Andrew Watson, in his work The Arab Agricultural Revolution (1974), proposed that artichoke (Cynara scolymus) was only an ... It is to be noted, however, that the vast majority of Talmudic exegetes explain the sense of this word as meaning Cynara (= ... Although inconclusive, the reference here may have been to Scolymus maculatus, an edible plant eaten either raw or cooked, and ...
Cynara scolymus) Banana blossom Basil (Ocimum basilicum) Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) Bergamot (Monarda didyma) Black locust (only ...
Media related to Cynara scolymus at Wikimedia Commons Artichoke at the Wikibooks Cookbook subproject (CS1 French-language ... The globe artichoke (Cynara cardunculus var. scolymus /ˈsɪnərə kɑːrˈdʌnkjʊləs ˈskɒlɪməs/), also known by the names French ... "Cynara". Merriam-Webster Dictionary. "Botanary: cardunculus". Dave's Garden. Retrieved December 19, 2022. "Scolymus". Merriam- ... The artichoke is a domesticated variety of the wild cardoon (Cynara cardunculus), which is native to the Mediterranean area. ...
1791 Mazza scolymus (Gmelin, 1791) Turbinellus scolymus (Gmelin, 1791) Fusus cynara Röding, 1798 Fasciolaria cardoscolym G. ... Xancus angulata (Lightfoot, 1786) Voluta angulata Lightfoot, 1786 Murex scolymus Gmelin, ...
rapa Capsicum Cucumis sativus Cynara cardunculus var. scolymus Fragaria including Fragaria ananassa Gladiolus hybrids Lactuca ...
Milk Cheese Manufactured with Extracts from Flowers of Cynara cardunculus and Cynara humilis as Coagulants". Journal of ... also known as Scots or Scotch thistle Scolymus - golden thistle or oyster thistle Silybum - milk thistle Sonchus - sow thistle ... The genus Cynara includes commercially important species of artichoke and some species regarded as major weeds are commercial ... blessed thistle Cynara - artichoke, cardoon Echinops - globe thistle Notobasis - Syrian thistle Onopordum - cotton thistle, ...
Cynara L. - artichoke Cyrtocymura H.Rob. Contents: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z References External ... bogbutton Sclerorhachis (Rech.f.) Rech.f. Scolymus Tourn. ex L. - golden thistle Scorzonera L. - salsify Scorzoneroides Moench ...
Artichoke, Globe-Cynara scolymus L.1. James M. Stephens 2 The globe artichoke is also known as French artichoke and green ...
Globe Artichoke. Large, mauve thistle flowers, in summer, over huge, silver-grey, serrated leaves. Buds should be picked before opening, for culinary use. Sun, well-drained soil. H: 1.5m. ...
available as a limited edition print in a variety of sizes. ...
Cynara cardunculus var. scolymus. Days To Maturity. About Quick Fact Days To Maturity. Days To Maturity. Average number of days ... Cynara cardunculus var. scolymus. Days To Maturity. About Quick Fact Days To Maturity. Days To Maturity. Average number of days ... SCIENTIFIC NAME: Cynara cardunculus var. scolymus. CULTURE: Artichokes require very fertile, well-drained soils with a pH of ...
"Cynara scolymus". MaltaWildPlants.com. Retrieved 2022-01-04. Mifsud, Stephen. "Cynara scolymus cardunculus". MaltaWildPlants. ... "Scolymus hispanicus". MaltaWildPlants.com. Retrieved 2022-01-04. Mifsud, Stephen. "Scolymus maculatus". MaltaWildPlants.com. ... "Cynara cardunculus". MaltaWildPlants.com. Retrieved 2022-01-04. Mifsud, Stephen. " ... "Scolymus grandiflorus". MaltaWildPlants.com. Retrieved 2022-01-04. Mifsud, Stephen. " ...
Liečivé rastliny - Artičok list 1000g (Artyčok zeleninový - Cynara scolymus) - Artičok je bylina pochádzajúca pravdepodobne z ... Liečivé rastliny - Artičok list 1000g (Artyčok zeleninový - Cynara scolymus). Artičok je bylina pochádzajúca pravdepodobne z ...
Texto completo: Disponível Coleções: Bases de dados internacionais Base de dados: MEDLINE Assunto principal: Cynara scolymus ... Texto completo: Disponível Coleções: Bases de dados internacionais Base de dados: MEDLINE Assunto principal: Cynara scolymus ... Cynara scolymus; Antioxidantes; Polifenóis/análise; Fenóis/análise; Fibras na Dieta/análise antioxidant activity; fiber-rich ... Variation, during Shelf Life, of Functional Properties of Biscuits Enriched with Fibers Extracted from Artichoke (Cynara ...
Cynara scolymus. L.. Alcachofa. Asteraceae. N. C. Leaf, Inflorescence. Y, Q. Scabiosa atropurpurea. L.. Ambarina. ...
Artichoke Globe - Cynara cardunculus (scolymus group) Vert Globe. £3.20. - £7.50. Select options ...
Cynara scolymus Cynodon dactylon Cynoglossum officinale Daphne mezereum Datura innoxia Datura metal Datura stramonium Datura ... Cynara scolymus *Cynodon dactylon *Cynoglossum officinale *Daphne mezereum *Datura innoxia *Datura metal *Datura stramonium * ...
Cynara Scolymus. Ipeca. Kalium Sulfuricum. Thlaspi Bursa Pastoris Granules Boripharm No 45 - Dolisos ...
Cynara scolymus. *Dianthus. *Diospyros spp.. *Eucalyptus spp.. *Eriobotrya japonica. *Ficus carica. *Fragaria vesca ...
Studies support the hypoglycemic effect of Cynarascolymus (Cs) extracts due to the content of chlorogenic acid, which is a ... Magied, M.M.A.; Din Hussien, S.E.L.; Zaki, S.M.; Said, R.M. EL Artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) Leaves and Heads Extracts as ... Protective effects of Cynara scolymus leaves extract on metabolic disorders and oxidative stress in alloxan-diabetic rats. BMC ... Studies support the hypoglycemic effect of Cynara scolymus (Cs) extracts due to the content of chlorogenic acid, which is a ...
Globe Artichoke Green Globe Improved F1 Hybrid - SeedsCynara cardunculusCynara scolymus, Cardoon. Hardy Perennial ...
acephala leaf), Chicory (Cichorium intybus root), Artichoke (Cynara scolymus flower), Collards (B. oleracea var. acephala leaf ...
What is it? An artichoke (Cynara scolymus)! We love them and they have become a delicious addition to Stone Hill Inn Breakfasts ... scolymus - commonly referred to as the golden thistle). Now, right away, doesnt that sound tasty? (ugh!) Yes, but studies have ...
Cynara scolymus : Asteraceae / the daisy family Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May. Jun. Jul. Aug. Sep. Oct. Nov. Dec. ...
Artichoke, Cynara scolymus / Compositae (Asteraceae). The packaging varies according to the destiny of the produce, whether it ...
Cynara scolymus. Cyperus alternifolius. Cyperus papyrus. Cyphostemma juttae. Cytisus arboreus. Cytisus filipes. Cytisus ...
The Imperial Star Globe Artichoke, scientifically known as Cynara scolymus Imperial Star, is a remarkable and highly sought- ...
Roman artichokes (Cynara scolymus Carciofo Romanesco) eliminate two of the most unsavory parts of the veggie: the sharp ... scolymus. These are the ones youll typically see at the grocery store -- theyre a sunny green color, can range in size (with ... In the U.S., we primarily eat globe artichokes, which are also known as French artichokes or by their scientific name, Cynara ...
100% pure bitter melon whole plant (Cynara scolymus). No binders, fillers or additives are used. It is organically cultivated ...
Cynara scolymus) organic seeds - Globe Artichoke (Cynara scolymus) seeds - Comfrey (Symphytum officinale) see ...
Artichoke (Cynara Scolymus) Artichoke extract can help to stimulate bile secretion, which may improve fat digestion. It ...
Cynara Scolymus (Artichoke) Leaf Extract*, Potassium Sorbate, Sodium Benzoate, Citric Acid*, Fragrance (Parfum), ... Cynara Scolymus (Artichoke) Leaf Extract*, Potassium Sorbate, Sodium Benzoate, Citric Acid*, Fragrance (Parfum), ...
"People who are at risk of diabetes and other metabolic disorders would do well to add artichokes (Cynara scolymus) in their ...
Artichoke (Cynara scolymus). Artichoke helps to stimulate the flow of bile from the liver to reduce symptoms of heartburn and ...
CYNARA SCOLYMUS (ARTICHOKE) LEAF EXTRACT, AMARANTHUS CAUDATUS SEED EXTRACT, SACCHAROMYCES LYSATE EXTRACT, LARIX EUROPAEA WOOD ...
  • Cynara cardunculus var. (johnnyseeds.com)
  • In the U.S., we primarily eat globe artichokes, which are also known as French artichokes or by their scientific name, Cynara cardunculus var. (yahoo.com)
  • HS544/MV011: Artichoke, Globe-Cynara scolymus L. (ufl.edu)
  • Variation, during Shelf Life, of Functional Properties of Biscuits Enriched with Fibers Extracted from Artichoke ( Cynara scolymus L. (bvsalud.org)
  • acephala leaf), Chicory (Cichorium intybus root), Artichoke (Cynara scolymus flower), Collards (B. oleracea var. (vitacost.com)
  • The Imperial Star Globe Artichoke, scientifically known as Cynara scolymus 'Imperial Star,' is a remarkable and highly sought-after variety of artichoke. (ufseeds.com)
  • Artichoke (Cynara Scolymus) Artichoke extract can help to stimulate bile secretion, which may improve fat digestion. (herbsoflight.com)
  • Roman artichokes (Cynara scolymus 'Carciofo Romanesco') eliminate two of the most unsavory parts of the veggie: the sharp spines and the bristly choke. (yahoo.com)
  • 100% pure bitter melon whole plant (Cynara scolymus). (raintree.com)
  • Each 100 ml. contains: 1.55 g. of fluid extract of cynara scolynus (artichoke leaf, with the extract providing no less than 10 mg. of pure chlorogenic acid . (altcancer.com)
  • 18. Protective effects of Cynara scolymus leaves extract on metabolic disorders and oxidative stress in alloxan-diabetic rats. (nih.gov)
  • scolymus (L.) Hayek , (formerly Cynara scolymus L. ) is a botanical of the Asteraceae family native to the Mediterranean basin, which was previously cultivated dating back to Antiquity by the Egyptians. (mynaturalorigins.store)
  • A plant species of the genus CYNARA , family ASTERACEAE . (nih.gov)
  • Género de plantas de la familia ASTERACEAE, con un nombre similar a CYNARA SCOLYMUS. (bvsalud.org)
  • A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE with a name that is similar to CYNARA SCOLYMUS. (bvsalud.org)
  • The effect of storage temperatures on vitamin C and phenolics content of artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) heads. (mynaturalorigins.store)
  • The effects of Cynara scolymus L. supplementation on liver enzymes: A systematic review and meta-analysis. (medscape.com)
  • The globe artichoke, Cynara scolymus, is popular in both Europe and the United States. (themarthablog.com)
  • Variation, during Shelf Life, of Functional Properties of Biscuits Enriched with Fibers Extracted from Artichoke ( Cynara scolymus L. (bvsalud.org)

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