A cyclin B subtype that colocalizes with MICROTUBULES during INTERPHASE and is transported into the CELL NUCLEUS at the end of the G2 PHASE.
A cyclin subtype that is transported into the CELL NUCLEUS at the end of the G2 PHASE. It stimulates the G2/M phase transition by activating CDC2 PROTEIN KINASE.
Protein encoded by the bcl-1 gene which plays a critical role in regulating the cell cycle. Overexpression of cyclin D1 is the result of bcl-1 rearrangement, a t(11;14) translocation, and is implicated in various neoplasms.
A cyclin subtype that has specificity for CDC2 PROTEIN KINASE and CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE 2. It plays a role in progression of the CELL CYCLE through G1/S and G2/M phase transitions.
A 50-kDa protein that complexes with CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE 2 in the late G1 phase of the cell cycle.
Phosphoprotein with protein kinase activity that functions in the G2/M phase transition of the CELL CYCLE. It is the catalytic subunit of the MATURATION-PROMOTING FACTOR and complexes with both CYCLIN A and CYCLIN B in mammalian cells. The maximal activity of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 is achieved when it is fully dephosphorylated.
A cyclin D subtype which is regulated by GATA4 TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR. Experiments using KNOCKOUT MICE suggest a role for cyclin D2 in granulosa cell proliferation and gonadal development.
A broadly expressed type D cyclin. Experiments using KNOCKOUT MICE suggest a role for cyclin D3 in LYMPHOCYTE development.
A cyclin A subtype primarily found in male GERM CELLS. It may play a role in the passage of SPERMATOCYTES into meiosis I.
A widely-expressed cyclin A subtype that functions during the G1/S and G2/M transitions of the CELL CYCLE.
A cyclin subtype that is specific for CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE 4 and CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE 6. Unlike most cyclins, cyclin D expression is not cyclical, but rather it is expressed in response to proliferative signals. Cyclin D may therefore play a role in cellular responses to mitogenic signals.
A large family of regulatory proteins that function as accessory subunits to a variety of CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASES. They generally function as ENZYME ACTIVATORS that drive the CELL CYCLE through transitions between phases. A subset of cyclins may also function as transcriptional regulators.
A type of CELL NUCLEUS division by means of which the two daughter nuclei normally receive identical complements of the number of CHROMOSOMES of the somatic cells of the species.
A cyclin G subtype that is constitutively expressed throughout the cell cycle. Cyclin G1 is considered a major transcriptional target of TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEIN P53 and is highly induced in response to DNA damage.
A cyclin subtype that is found associated with CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE 5; cyclin G associated kinase, and PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE 2.
Protein kinases that control cell cycle progression in all eukaryotes and require physical association with CYCLINS to achieve full enzymatic activity. Cyclin-dependent kinases are regulated by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation events.
The complex series of phenomena, occurring between the end of one CELL DIVISION and the end of the next, by which cellular material is duplicated and then divided between two daughter cells. The cell cycle includes INTERPHASE, which includes G0 PHASE; G1 PHASE; S PHASE; and G2 PHASE, and CELL DIVISION PHASE.
The period of the CELL CYCLE following DNA synthesis (S PHASE) and preceding M PHASE (cell division phase). The CHROMOSOMES are tetraploid in this point.
A cyclin subtype that binds to the CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE 3 and CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE 8. Cyclin C plays a dual role as a transcriptional regulator and a G1 phase CELL CYCLE regulator.
A cyclin B subtype that colocalizes with GOLGI APPARATUS during INTERPHASE and is transported into the CELL NUCLEUS at the end of the G2 PHASE.
Proteins that control the CELL DIVISION CYCLE. This family of proteins includes a wide variety of classes, including CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASES, mitogen-activated kinases, CYCLINS, and PHOSPHOPROTEIN PHOSPHATASES as well as their putative substrates such as chromatin-associated proteins, CYTOSKELETAL PROTEINS, and TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS.
A key regulator of CELL CYCLE progression. It partners with CYCLIN E to regulate entry into S PHASE and also interacts with CYCLIN A to phosphorylate RETINOBLASTOMA PROTEIN. Its activity is inhibited by CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE INHIBITOR P27 and CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE INHIBITOR P21.
Protein kinase that drives both the mitotic and meiotic cycles in all eukaryotic organisms. In meiosis it induces immature oocytes to undergo meiotic maturation. In mitosis it has a role in the G2/M phase transition. Once activated by CYCLINS; MPF directly phosphorylates some of the proteins involved in nuclear envelope breakdown, chromosome condensation, spindle assembly, and the degradation of cyclins. The catalytic subunit of MPF is PROTEIN P34CDC2.
A cyclin subtype that is found associated with CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE 9. Unlike traditional cyclins, which regulate the CELL CYCLE, type T cyclins appear to regulate transcription and are components of positive transcriptional elongation factor B.
A family of cell cycle-dependent kinases that are related in structure to CDC28 PROTEIN KINASE; S CEREVISIAE; and the CDC2 PROTEIN KINASE found in mammalian species.
A subclass of dual specificity phosphatases that play a role in the progression of the CELL CYCLE. They dephosphorylate and activate CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASES.
An unusual cyclin subtype that is found highly expressed in terminally differentiated cells. Unlike conventional cyclins increased expression of cyclin G2 is believed to cause a withdrawal of cells from the CELL CYCLE.
A cyclin subtype that is found as a component of a heterotrimeric complex containing cyclin-dependent kinase 7 and CDK-activating kinase assembly factor. The complex plays a role in cellular proliferation by phosphorylating several CYCLIN DEPENDENT KINASES at specific regulatory threonine sites.
The period of the CELL CYCLE preceding DNA REPLICATION in S PHASE. Subphases of G1 include "competence" (to respond to growth factors), G1a (entry into G1), G1b (progression), and G1c (assembly). Progression through the G1 subphases is effected by limiting growth factors, nutrients, or inhibitors.
Cyclin-dependent kinase 4 is a key regulator of G1 PHASE of the CELL CYCLE. It partners with CYCLIN D to phosphorylate RETINOBLASTOMA PROTEIN. CDK4 activity is inhibited by CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE INHIBITOR P16.
Phase of the CELL CYCLE following G1 and preceding G2 when the entire DNA content of the nucleus is replicated. It is achieved by bidirectional replication at multiple sites along each chromosome.
Echinoderms having bodies of usually five radially disposed arms coalescing at the center.
The introduction of a phosphoryl group into a compound through the formation of an ester bond between the compound and a phosphorus moiety.
Female germ cells derived from OOGONIA and termed OOCYTES when they enter MEIOSIS. The primary oocytes begin meiosis but are arrested at the diplotene state until OVULATION at PUBERTY to give rise to haploid secondary oocytes or ova (OVUM).
An aspect of protein kinase (EC 2.7.1.37) in which serine residues in protamines and histones are phosphorylated in the presence of ATP.
A group of enzymes that catalyzes the phosphorylation of serine or threonine residues in proteins, with ATP or other nucleotides as phosphate donors.
Complexes of enzymes that catalyze the covalent attachment of UBIQUITIN to other proteins by forming a peptide bond between the C-terminal GLYCINE of UBIQUITIN and the alpha-amino groups of LYSINE residues in the protein. The complexes play an important role in mediating the selective-degradation of short-lived and abnormal proteins. The complex of enzymes can be broken down into three components that involve activation of ubiquitin (UBIQUITIN-ACTIVATING ENZYMES), conjugation of ubiquitin to the ligase complex (UBIQUITIN-CONJUGATING ENZYMES), and ligation of ubiquitin to the substrate protein (UBIQUITIN-PROTEIN LIGASES).
A cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor that coordinates the activation of CYCLIN and CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASES during the CELL CYCLE. It interacts with active CYCLIN D complexed to CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE 4 in proliferating cells, while in arrested cells it binds and inhibits CYCLIN E complexed to CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE 2.
A type of CELL NUCLEUS division, occurring during maturation of the GERM CELLS. Two successive cell nucleus divisions following a single chromosome duplication (S PHASE) result in daughter cells with half the number of CHROMOSOMES as the parent cells.
Product of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor gene. It is a nuclear phosphoprotein hypothesized to normally act as an inhibitor of cell proliferation. Rb protein is absent in retinoblastoma cell lines. It also has been shown to form complexes with the adenovirus E1A protein, the SV40 T antigen, and the human papilloma virus E7 protein.
The fission of a CELL. It includes CYTOKINESIS, when the CYTOPLASM of a cell is divided, and CELL NUCLEUS DIVISION.
Cellular proteins encoded by the c-mos genes (GENES, MOS). They function in the cell cycle to maintain MATURATION PROMOTING FACTOR in the active state and have protein-serine/threonine kinase activity. Oncogenic transformation can take place when c-mos proteins are expressed at the wrong time.
The phase of cell nucleus division following PROMETAPHASE, in which the CHROMOSOMES line up across the equatorial plane of the SPINDLE APPARATUS prior to separation.
The first continuously cultured human malignant CELL LINE, derived from the cervical carcinoma of Henrietta Lacks. These cells are used for VIRUS CULTIVATION and antitumor drug screening assays.
A cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor that mediates TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEIN P53-dependent CELL CYCLE arrest. p21 interacts with a range of CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASES and associates with PROLIFERATING CELL NUCLEAR ANTIGEN and CASPASE 3.
A cyclin subtype that is found abundantly in post-mitotic tissues. In contrast to the classical cyclins, its level does not fluctuate during the cell cycle.
The phase of cell nucleus division following PROPHASE, when the breakdown of the NUCLEAR ENVELOPE occurs and the MITOTIC SPINDLE APPARATUS enters the nuclear region and attaches to the KINETOCHORES.
An aquatic genus of the family, Pipidae, occurring in Africa and distinguished by having black horny claws on three inner hind toes.
Proteins obtained from various species of Xenopus. Included here are proteins from the African clawed frog (XENOPUS LAEVIS). Many of these proteins have been the subject of scientific investigations in the area of MORPHOGENESIS and development.
An E3 ubiquitin ligase primarily involved in regulation of the metaphase-to-anaphase transition during MITOSIS through ubiquitination of specific CELL CYCLE PROTEINS. Enzyme activity is tightly regulated through subunits and cofactors, which modulate activation, inhibition, and substrate specificity. The anaphase-promoting complex, or APC-C, is also involved in tissue differentiation in the PLACENTA, CRYSTALLINE LENS, and SKELETAL MUSCLE, and in regulation of postmitotic NEURONAL PLASTICITY and excitability.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
The phase of cell nucleus division following METAPHASE, in which the CHROMATIDS separate and migrate to opposite poles of the spindle.
Securin is involved in the control of the metaphase-anaphase transition during MITOSIS. It promotes the onset of anaphase by blocking SEPARASE function and preventing proteolysis of cohesin and separation of sister CHROMATIDS. Overexpression of securin is associated with NEOPLASTIC CELL TRANSFORMATION and tumor formation.
Within a eukaryotic cell, a membrane-limited body which contains chromosomes and one or more nucleoli (CELL NUCLEOLUS). The nuclear membrane consists of a double unit-type membrane which is perforated by a number of pores; the outermost membrane is continuous with the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM. A cell may contain more than one nucleus. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)
A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.
All of the processes involved in increasing CELL NUMBER including CELL DIVISION.
Nocodazole is an antineoplastic agent which exerts its effect by depolymerizing microtubules.
A microtubule structure that forms during CELL DIVISION. It consists of two SPINDLE POLES, and sets of MICROTUBULES that may include the astral microtubules, the polar microtubules, and the kinetochore microtubules.
RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.
A family of enzymes that catalyze the conversion of ATP and a protein to ADP and a phosphoprotein.
Cdh1 is an activator of the anaphase-promoting complex-cyclosome, and is involved in substrate recognition. It associates with the complex in late MITOSIS from anaphase through G1 to regulate activity of CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASES and to prevent premature DNA replication.
Proteins coded by oncogenes. They include proteins resulting from the fusion of an oncogene and another gene (ONCOGENE PROTEINS, FUSION).
The B-cell leukemia/lymphoma-1 genes, associated with various neoplasms when overexpressed. Overexpression results from the t(11;14) translocation, which is characteristic of mantle zone-derived B-cell lymphomas. The human c-bcl-1 gene is located at 11q13 on the long arm of chromosome 11.
Proteins found in the nucleus of a cell. Do not confuse with NUCLEOPROTEINS which are proteins conjugated with nucleic acids, that are not necessarily present in the nucleus.
Cyclin-dependent kinase 6 associates with CYCLIN D and phosphorylates RETINOBLASTOMA PROTEIN during G1 PHASE of the CELL CYCLE. It helps regulate the transition to S PHASE and its kinase activity is inhibited by CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE INHIBITOR P18.
One of the mechanisms by which CELL DEATH occurs (compare with NECROSIS and AUTOPHAGOCYTOSIS). Apoptosis is the mechanism responsible for the physiological deletion of cells and appears to be intrinsically programmed. It is characterized by distinctive morphologic changes in the nucleus and cytoplasm, chromatin cleavage at regularly spaced sites, and the endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA; (DNA FRAGMENTATION); at internucleosomal sites. This mode of cell death serves as a balance to mitosis in regulating the size of animal tissues and in mediating pathologic processes associated with tumor growth.
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
Nuclear phosphoprotein encoded by the p53 gene (GENES, P53) whose normal function is to control CELL PROLIFERATION and APOPTOSIS. A mutant or absent p53 protein has been found in LEUKEMIA; OSTEOSARCOMA; LUNG CANCER; and COLORECTAL CANCER.
Highly conserved proteins that specifically bind to and activate the anaphase-promoting complex-cyclosome, promoting ubiquitination and proteolysis of cell-cycle-regulatory proteins. Cdc20 is essential for anaphase-promoting complex activity, initiation of anaphase, and cyclin proteolysis during mitosis.
Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.
Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
High molecular weight proteins found in the MICROTUBULES of the cytoskeletal system. Under certain conditions they are required for TUBULIN assembly into the microtubules and stabilize the assembled microtubules.
The commonest and widest ranging species of the clawed "frog" (Xenopus) in Africa. This species is used extensively in research. There is now a significant population in California derived from escaped laboratory animals.
The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.
Proteins that are normally involved in holding cellular growth in check. Deficiencies or abnormalities in these proteins may lead to unregulated cell growth and tumor development.
The first phase of cell nucleus division, in which the CHROMOSOMES become visible, the CELL NUCLEUS starts to lose its identity, the SPINDLE APPARATUS appears, and the CENTRIOLES migrate toward opposite poles.
Recombinant proteins produced by the GENETIC TRANSLATION of fused genes formed by the combination of NUCLEIC ACID REGULATORY SEQUENCES of one or more genes with the protein coding sequences of one or more genes.
Cells grown in vitro from neoplastic tissue. If they can be established as a TUMOR CELL LINE, they can be propagated in cell culture indefinitely.
The cell center, consisting of a pair of CENTRIOLES surrounded by a cloud of amorphous material called the pericentriolar region. During interphase, the centrosome nucleates microtubule outgrowth. The centrosome duplicates and, during mitosis, separates to form the two poles of the mitotic spindle (MITOTIC SPINDLE APPARATUS).
A mature haploid female germ cell extruded from the OVARY at OVULATION.
Preparations of cell constituents or subcellular materials, isolates, or substances.
A family of proteins that share the F-BOX MOTIF and are involved in protein-protein interactions. They play an important role in process of protein ubiquition by associating with a variety of substrates and then associating into SCF UBIQUITIN LIGASE complexes. They are held in the ubiquitin-ligase complex via binding to SKP DOMAIN PROTEINS.
Conversion of an inactive form of an enzyme to one possessing metabolic activity. It includes 1, activation by ions (activators); 2, activation by cofactors (coenzymes); and 3, conversion of an enzyme precursor (proenzyme or zymogen) to an active enzyme.
The interval between two successive CELL DIVISIONS during which the CHROMOSOMES are not individually distinguishable. It is composed of the G phases (G1 PHASE; G0 PHASE; G2 PHASE) and S PHASE (when DNA replication occurs).
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in neoplastic tissue.
Products of proto-oncogenes. Normally they do not have oncogenic or transforming properties, but are involved in the regulation or differentiation of cell growth. They often have protein kinase activity.
Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.
The uptake of naked or purified DNA by CELLS, usually meaning the process as it occurs in eukaryotic cells. It is analogous to bacterial transformation (TRANSFORMATION, BACTERIAL) and both are routinely employed in GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUES.
A negative regulatory effect on physiological processes at the molecular, cellular, or systemic level. At the molecular level, the major regulatory sites include membrane receptors, genes (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION), mRNAs (RNA, MESSENGER), and proteins.
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.
The part of a cell that contains the CYTOSOL and small structures excluding the CELL NUCLEUS; MITOCHONDRIA; and large VACUOLES. (Glick, Glossary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 1990)
Nuclear antigen with a role in DNA synthesis, DNA repair, and cell cycle progression. PCNA is required for the coordinated synthesis of both leading and lagging strands at the replication fork during DNA replication. PCNA expression correlates with the proliferation activity of several malignant and non-malignant cell types.
CELL CYCLE regulatory signaling systems that are triggered by DNA DAMAGE or lack of nutrients during G2 PHASE. When triggered they restrain cells transitioning from G2 phase to M PHASE.
DNA sequences which are recognized (directly or indirectly) and bound by a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase during the initiation of transcription. Highly conserved sequences within the promoter include the Pribnow box in bacteria and the TATA BOX in eukaryotes.
A family of basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors that control expression of a variety of GENES involved in CELL CYCLE regulation. E2F transcription factors typically form heterodimeric complexes with TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR DP1 or transcription factor DP2, and they have N-terminal DNA binding and dimerization domains. E2F transcription factors can act as mediators of transcriptional repression or transcriptional activation.
Small double-stranded, non-protein coding RNAs (21-31 nucleotides) involved in GENE SILENCING functions, especially RNA INTERFERENCE (RNAi). Endogenously, siRNAs are generated from dsRNAs (RNA, DOUBLE-STRANDED) by the same ribonuclease, Dicer, that generates miRNAs (MICRORNAS). The perfect match of the siRNAs' antisense strand to their target RNAs mediates RNAi by siRNA-guided RNA cleavage. siRNAs fall into different classes including trans-acting siRNA (tasiRNA), repeat-associated RNA (rasiRNA), small-scan RNA (scnRNA), and Piwi protein-interacting RNA (piRNA) and have different specific gene silencing functions.
A protein kinase encoded by the Saccharomyces cerevisiae CDC28 gene and required for progression from the G1 PHASE to the S PHASE in the CELL CYCLE.
Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.
Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.
Technique using an instrument system for making, processing, and displaying one or more measurements on individual cells obtained from a cell suspension. Cells are usually stained with one or more fluorescent dyes specific to cell components of interest, e.g., DNA, and fluorescence of each cell is measured as it rapidly transverses the excitation beam (laser or mercury arc lamp). Fluorescence provides a quantitative measure of various biochemical and biophysical properties of the cell, as well as a basis for cell sorting. Other measurable optical parameters include light absorption and light scattering, the latter being applicable to the measurement of cell size, shape, density, granularity, and stain uptake.
The biosynthesis of RNA carried out on a template of DNA. The biosynthesis of DNA from an RNA template is called REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION.
Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.
Regulatory signaling systems that control the progression through the CELL CYCLE. They ensure that the cell has completed, in the correct order and without mistakes, all the processes required to replicate the GENOME and CYTOPLASM, and divide them equally between two daughter cells. If cells sense they have not completed these processes or that the environment does not have the nutrients and growth hormones in place to proceed, then the cells are restrained (or "arrested") until the processes are completed and growth conditions are suitable.
The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.
A heterotrimeric DNA-binding protein that binds to CCAAT motifs in the promoters of eukaryotic genes. It is composed of three subunits: A, B and C.
The process of germ cell development in the female from the primordial germ cells through OOGONIA to the mature haploid ova (OVUM).
Compounds or agents that combine with an enzyme in such a manner as to prevent the normal substrate-enzyme combination and the catalytic reaction.
A highly evolutionarily conserved subunit of the anaphase-promoting complex (APC-C) containing multiple 34-amino-acid tetratricopeptide repeats. These domains, also found in Apc subunits 6, 7, and 8, have been shown to mediate protein-protein interactions, suggesting that Apc3 may assist in coordinating the juxtaposition of the catalytic and substrate recognition module subunits relative to co-activators and APC-C inhibitors.
Proteins which bind to DNA. The family includes proteins which bind to both double- and single-stranded DNA and also includes specific DNA binding proteins in serum which can be used as markers for malignant diseases.
Genes that code for proteins that regulate the CELL DIVISION CYCLE. These genes form a regulatory network that culminates in the onset of MITOSIS by activating the p34cdc2 protein (PROTEIN P34CDC2).
A series of heterocyclic compounds that are variously substituted in nature and are known also as purine bases. They include ADENINE and GUANINE, constituents of nucleic acids, as well as many alkaloids such as CAFFEINE and THEOPHYLLINE. Uric acid is the metabolic end product of purine metabolism.
A quiescent state of cells during G1 PHASE.
The developmental entity of a fertilized egg (ZYGOTE) in animal species other than MAMMALS. For chickens, use CHICK EMBRYO.
The process by which a DNA molecule is duplicated.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
An E2F transcription factor that interacts directly with RETINOBLASTOMA PROTEIN and CYCLIN A and activates GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION required for CELL CYCLE entry and DNA synthesis. E2F1 is involved in DNA REPAIR and APOPTOSIS.
A large multisubunit complex that plays an important role in the degradation of most of the cytosolic and nuclear proteins in eukaryotic cells. It contains a 700-kDa catalytic sub-complex and two 700-kDa regulatory sub-complexes. The complex digests ubiquitinated proteins and protein activated via ornithine decarboxylase antizyme.
Serologic tests in which a positive reaction manifested by visible CHEMICAL PRECIPITATION occurs when a soluble ANTIGEN reacts with its precipitins, i.e., ANTIBODIES that can form a precipitate.
A specific inhibitor of phosphoserine/threonine protein phosphatase 1 and 2a. It is also a potent tumor promoter. (Thromb Res 1992;67(4):345-54 & Cancer Res 1993;53(2):239-41)
Mad2 is a component of the spindle-assembly checkpoint apparatus. It binds to and inhibits the Cdc20 activator subunit of the anaphase-promoting complex, preventing the onset of anaphase until all chromosomes are properly aligned at the metaphase plate. Mad2 is required for proper microtubule capture at KINETOCHORES.
The injection of very small amounts of fluid, often with the aid of a microscope and microsyringes.
The chromosomal constitution of a cell containing multiples of the normal number of CHROMOSOMES; includes triploidy (symbol: 3N), tetraploidy (symbol: 4N), etc.
Cell lines whose original growing procedure consisted being transferred (T) every 3 days and plated at 300,000 cells per plate (J Cell Biol 17:299-313, 1963). Lines have been developed using several different strains of mice. Tissues are usually fibroblasts derived from mouse embryos but other types and sources have been developed as well. The 3T3 lines are valuable in vitro host systems for oncogenic virus transformation studies, since 3T3 cells possess a high sensitivity to CONTACT INHIBITION.
An essential amino acid occurring naturally in the L-form, which is the active form. It is found in eggs, milk, gelatin, and other proteins.
The cellular signaling system that halts the progression of cells through MITOSIS or MEIOSIS if a defect that will affect CHROMOSOME SEGREGATION is detected.
A gene silencing phenomenon whereby specific dsRNAs (RNA, DOUBLE-STRANDED) trigger the degradation of homologous mRNA (RNA, MESSENGER). The specific dsRNAs are processed into SMALL INTERFERING RNA (siRNA) which serves as a guide for cleavage of the homologous mRNA in the RNA-INDUCED SILENCING COMPLEX. DNA METHYLATION may also be triggered during this process.
Immunologic method used for detecting or quantifying immunoreactive substances. The substance is identified by first immobilizing it by blotting onto a membrane and then tagging it with labeled antibodies.
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
An antiviral antibiotic produced by Cephalosporium aphidicola and other fungi. It inhibits the growth of eukaryotic cells and certain animal viruses by selectively inhibiting the cellular replication of DNA polymerase II or the viral-induced DNA polymerases. The drug may be useful for controlling excessive cell proliferation in patients with cancer, psoriasis or other dermatitis with little or no adverse effect upon non-multiplying cells.
A continuous cell line of high contact-inhibition established from NIH Swiss mouse embryo cultures. The cells are useful for DNA transfection and transformation studies. (From ATCC [Internet]. Virginia: American Type Culture Collection; c2002 [cited 2002 Sept 26]. Available from http://www.atcc.org/)
A product of the p16 tumor suppressor gene (GENES, P16). It is also called INK4 or INK4A because it is the prototype member of the INK4 CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE INHIBITORS. This protein is produced from the alpha mRNA transcript of the p16 gene. The other gene product, produced from the alternatively spliced beta transcript, is TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEIN P14ARF. Both p16 gene products have tumor suppressor functions.
Connective tissue cells which secrete an extracellular matrix rich in collagen and other macromolecules.
A family of proteins that are structurally-related to Ubiquitin. Ubiquitins and ubiquitin-like proteins participate in diverse cellular functions, such as protein degradation and HEAT-SHOCK RESPONSE, by conjugation to other proteins.
A non-essential amino acid occurring in natural form as the L-isomer. It is synthesized from GLYCINE or THREONINE. It is involved in the biosynthesis of PURINES; PYRIMIDINES; and other amino acids.
A family of structurally-related proteins that were originally identified by their ability to complex with cyclin proteins (CYCLINS). They share a common domain that binds specifically to F-BOX MOTIFS. They take part in SKP CULLIN F-BOX PROTEIN LIGASES, where they can bind to a variety of F-BOX PROTEINS.
Slender, cylindrical filaments found in the cytoskeleton of plant and animal cells. They are composed of the protein TUBULIN and are influenced by TUBULIN MODULATORS.
Proteins that originate from insect species belonging to the genus DROSOPHILA. The proteins from the most intensely studied species of Drosophila, DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER, are the subject of much interest in the area of MORPHOGENESIS and development.
A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.
A negative regulator of the CELL CYCLE that undergoes PHOSPHORYLATION by CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASES. It contains a conserved pocket region that binds E2F4 TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR and interacts with viral ONCOPROTEINS such as POLYOMAVIRUS TUMOR ANTIGENS; ADENOVIRUS E1A PROTEINS; and PAPILLOMAVIRUS E7 PROTEINS.
Microscopy of specimens stained with fluorescent dye (usually fluorescein isothiocyanate) or of naturally fluorescent materials, which emit light when exposed to ultraviolet or blue light. Immunofluorescence microscopy utilizes antibodies that are labeled with fluorescent dye.
Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.
A class of enzymes that catalyze the formation of a bond between two substrate molecules, coupled with the hydrolysis of a pyrophosphate bond in ATP or a similar energy donor. (Dorland, 28th ed) EC 6.
Injuries to DNA that introduce deviations from its normal, intact structure and which may, if left unrepaired, result in a MUTATION or a block of DNA REPLICATION. These deviations may be caused by physical or chemical agents and occur by natural or unnatural, introduced circumstances. They include the introduction of illegitimate bases during replication or by deamination or other modification of bases; the loss of a base from the DNA backbone leaving an abasic site; single-strand breaks; double strand breaks; and intrastrand (PYRIMIDINE DIMERS) or interstrand crosslinking. Damage can often be repaired (DNA REPAIR). If the damage is extensive, it can induce APOPTOSIS.
The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.
Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.
The addition of a tail of polyadenylic acid (POLY A) to the 3' end of mRNA (RNA, MESSENGER). Polyadenylation involves recognizing the processing site signal, (AAUAAA), and cleaving of the mRNA to create a 3' OH terminal end to which poly A polymerase (POLYNUCLEOTIDE ADENYLYLTRANSFERASE) adds 60-200 adenylate residues. The 3' end processing of some messenger RNAs, such as histone mRNA, is carried out by a different process that does not include the addition of poly A as described here.
The biosynthesis of PEPTIDES and PROTEINS on RIBOSOMES, directed by MESSENGER RNA, via TRANSFER RNA that is charged with standard proteinogenic AMINO ACIDS.
Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.
Transport proteins that carry specific substances in the blood or across cell membranes.
Any of various enzymatically catalyzed post-translational modifications of PEPTIDES or PROTEINS in the cell of origin. These modifications include carboxylation; HYDROXYLATION; ACETYLATION; PHOSPHORYLATION; METHYLATION; GLYCOSYLATION; ubiquitination; oxidation; proteolysis; and crosslinking and result in changes in molecular weight and electrophoretic motility.
Proteins whose abnormal expression (gain or loss) are associated with the development, growth, or progression of NEOPLASMS. Some neoplasm proteins are tumor antigens (ANTIGENS, NEOPLASM), i.e. they induce an immune reaction to their tumor. Many neoplasm proteins have been characterized and are used as tumor markers (BIOMARKERS, TUMOR) when they are detectable in cells and body fluids as monitors for the presence or growth of tumors. Abnormal expression of ONCOGENE PROTEINS is involved in neoplastic transformation, whereas the loss of expression of TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEINS is involved with the loss of growth control and progression of the neoplasm.
Either of the two longitudinally adjacent threads formed when a eukaryotic chromosome replicates prior to mitosis. The chromatids are held together at the centromere. Sister chromatids are derived from the same chromosome. (Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)
A highly conserved 76-amino acid peptide universally found in eukaryotic cells that functions as a marker for intracellular PROTEIN TRANSPORT and degradation. Ubiquitin becomes activated through a series of complicated steps and forms an isopeptide bond to lysine residues of specific proteins within the cell. These "ubiquitinated" proteins can be recognized and degraded by proteosomes or be transported to specific compartments within the cell.
Agents that interact with TUBULIN to inhibit or promote polymerization of MICROTUBULES.
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action during the developmental stages of an organism.
A CELL CYCLE and tumor growth marker which can be readily detected using IMMUNOCYTOCHEMISTRY methods. Ki-67 is a nuclear antigen present only in the nuclei of cycling cells.
The sequence at the 3' end of messenger RNA that does not code for product. This region contains transcription and translation regulating sequences.
A group of acylated oligopeptides produced by Actinomycetes that function as protease inhibitors. They have been known to inhibit to varying degrees trypsin, plasmin, KALLIKREINS, papain and the cathepsins.
Gated transport mechanisms by which proteins or RNA are moved across the NUCLEAR MEMBRANE.
A genus of small, two-winged flies containing approximately 900 described species. These organisms are the most extensively studied of all genera from the standpoint of genetics and cytology.
A transcription factor that possesses DNA-binding and E2F-binding domains but lacks a transcriptional activation domain. It is a binding partner for E2F TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS and enhances the DNA binding and transactivation function of the DP-E2F complex.
A multifunctional CDC2 kinase-related kinase that plays roles in transcriptional elongation, CELL DIFFERENTIATION, and APOPTOSIS. It is found associated with CYCLIN T and is a component of POSITIVE TRANSCRIPTIONAL ELONGATION FACTOR B.
Small chromosomal proteins (approx 12-20 kD) possessing an open, unfolded structure and attached to the DNA in cell nuclei by ionic linkages. Classification into the various types (designated histone I, histone II, etc.) is based on the relative amounts of arginine and lysine in each.
Substances that inhibit or prevent the proliferation of NEOPLASMS.
A group of enzymes removing the SERINE- or THREONINE-bound phosphate groups from a wide range of phosphoproteins, including a number of enzymes which have been phosphorylated under the action of a kinase. (Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992)
A class in the phylum MOLLUSCA comprised of mussels; clams; OYSTERS; COCKLES; and SCALLOPS. They are characterized by a bilaterally symmetrical hinged shell and a muscular foot used for burrowing and anchoring.
Cellular DNA-binding proteins encoded by the c-myc genes. They are normally involved in nucleic acid metabolism and in mediating the cellular response to growth factors. Elevated and deregulated (constitutive) expression of c-myc proteins can cause tumorigenesis.
A class of enzymes that form a thioester bond to UBIQUITIN with the assistance of UBIQUITIN-ACTIVATING ENZYMES. They transfer ubiquitin to the LYSINE of a substrate protein with the assistance of UBIQUITIN-PROTEIN LIGASES.
A diverse class of enzymes that interact with UBIQUITIN-CONJUGATING ENZYMES and ubiquitination-specific protein substrates. Each member of this enzyme group has its own distinct specificity for a substrate and ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme. Ubiquitin-protein ligases exist as both monomeric proteins multiprotein complexes.
A ubiquitously expressed regulatory protein that contains a retinoblastoma protein binding domain and an AT-rich interactive domain. The protein may play a role in recruiting HISTONE DEACETYLASES to the site of RETINOBLASTOMA PROTEIN-containing transcriptional repressor complexes.
A family of proteins involved in NUCLEOCYTOPLASMIC TRANSPORT. Karyopherins are heteromeric molecules composed two major types of components, ALPHA KARYOPHERINS and BETA KARYOPHERINS, that function together to transport molecules through the NUCLEAR PORE COMPLEX. Several other proteins such as RAN GTP BINDING PROTEIN and CELLULAR APOPTOSIS SUSCEPTIBILITY PROTEIN bind to karyopherins and participate in the transport process.
The process by which the CELL NUCLEUS is divided.
A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).
Protein kinases that catalyze the PHOSPHORYLATION of TYROSINE residues in proteins with ATP or other nucleotides as phosphate donors.
Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.
The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.
Agents that arrest cells in MITOSIS, most notably TUBULIN MODULATORS.
A positive regulatory effect on physiological processes at the molecular, cellular, or systemic level. At the molecular level, the major regulatory sites include membrane receptors, genes (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION), mRNAs (RNA, MESSENGER), and proteins.
A furanyl adenine found in PLANTS and FUNGI. It has plant growth regulation effects.
Cell changes manifested by escape from control mechanisms, increased growth potential, alterations in the cell surface, karyotypic abnormalities, morphological and biochemical deviations from the norm, and other attributes conferring the ability to invade, metastasize, and kill.
Single-stranded complementary DNA synthesized from an RNA template by the action of RNA-dependent DNA polymerase. cDNA (i.e., complementary DNA, not circular DNA, not C-DNA) is used in a variety of molecular cloning experiments as well as serving as a specific hybridization probe.
The orderly segregation of CHROMOSOMES during MEIOSIS or MITOSIS.
Proteins which maintain the transcriptional quiescence of specific GENES or OPERONS. Classical repressor proteins are DNA-binding proteins that are normally bound to the OPERATOR REGION of an operon, or the ENHANCER SEQUENCES of a gene until a signal occurs that causes their release.
The aggregation of soluble ANTIGENS with ANTIBODIES, alone or with antibody binding factors such as ANTI-ANTIBODIES or STAPHYLOCOCCAL PROTEIN A, into complexes large enough to fall out of solution.
A family of rat kangaroos found in and around Australia. Genera include Potorous and Bettongia.
Cleavage of proteins into smaller peptides or amino acids either by PROTEASES or non-enzymatically (e.g., Hydrolysis). It does not include Protein Processing, Post-Translational.
Hormones produced by invertebrates, usually insects, mollusks, annelids, and helminths.
Processes that stimulate the GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION of a gene or set of genes.

C-myc overexpression and p53 loss cooperate to promote genomic instability. (1/1429)

p53 monitors genomic integrity at the G1 and G2/M cell cycle checkpoints. Cells lacking p53 may show gene amplification as well as the polyploidy or aneuploidy typical of many tumors. The pathways through which this develops, however, are not well defined. We demonstrate here that the combination of p53 inactivation and c-myc overexpression in diploid cells markedly accelerates the spontaneous development of tetraploidy. This is not seen with either N-myc or L-myc. Tetraploidy is accompanied by significantly higher levels of cyclin B and its associated cdc2 kinase activity. Mitotic spindle poisons accelerate the appearance of tetraploidy in cells either lacking functional p53 or overexpressing c-myc whereas the combination is additive. Restoration of p53 function in cells overexpressing c-myc causing rapid apoptosis, indicating that cells yet to become tetraploid have nonetheless suffered irreversible genomic and/or mitotic spindle damage. In the face of normal p53 function, such damage would either be repaired or trigger apoptotis. We propose that loss of p53 and overexpression of c-myc permits the emergence and survival of cells with increasingly severe damage and the eventual development of tetraploidy.  (+info)

The mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway stimulates mos mRNA cytoplasmic polyadenylation during Xenopus oocyte maturation. (2/1429)

The Mos protein kinase is a key regulator of vertebrate oocyte maturation. Oocyte-specific Mos protein expression is subject to translational control. In the frog Xenopus, the translation of Mos protein requires the progesterone-induced polyadenylation of the maternal Mos mRNA, which is present in the oocyte cytoplasm. Both the Xenopus p42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and maturation-promoting factor (MPF) signaling pathways have been proposed to mediate progesterone-stimulated oocyte maturation. In this study, we have determined the relative contributions of the MAPK and MPF signaling pathways to Mos mRNA polyadenylation. We report that progesterone-induced Mos mRNA polyadenylation was attenuated in oocytes expressing the MAPK phosphatase rVH6. Moreover, inhibition of MAPK signaling blocked progesterone-induced Mos protein accumulation. Activation of the MAPK pathway by injection of RNA encoding Mos was sufficient to induce both the polyadenylation of synthetic Mos mRNA substrates and the accumulation of endogenous Mos protein in the absence of MPF signaling. Activation of MPF, by injection of cyclin B1 RNA or purified cyclin B1 protein, also induced both Mos protein accumulation and Mos mRNA polyadenylation. However, this action of MPF required MAPK activity. By contrast, the cytoplasmic polyadenylation of maternal cyclin B1 mRNA was stimulated by MPF in a MAPK-independent manner, thus revealing a differential regulation of maternal mRNA polyadenylation by the MAPK and MPF signaling pathways. We propose that MAPK-stimulated Mos mRNA cytoplasmic polyadenylation is a key component of the positive-feedback loop, which contributes to the all-or-none process of oocyte maturation.  (+info)

Involvement of p21 in the PKC-induced regulation of the G2/M cell cycle transition. (3/1429)

Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) inhibits cell cycle progression at the G1/S and G2/M transitions. We found that phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) induced upregulation of p21, not only in MCF-7 cells arrested in the G1 phase as previously shown, but also in cells delayed in the G2 phase. This increase in p21 in cells accumulated in the G1 and G2/M phases of the cell cycle after PMA treatment was inhibited by the PKC inhibitor GF109203X. This indicates that PKC activity is required for PMA-induced p21 upregulation and cell cycle arrest in the G1 and G2/M phases of the cell cycle. To further assess the role of p21 in the PKC-induced G2/M cell cycle arrest independently of its G1 arrest, we used aphidicolin-synchronised MCF-7 cells. Our results show that, in parallel with the inhibition of cdc2 activity, PMA addition enhanced the associations between p21 and either cyclin B or cdc2. Furthermore, we found that after PMA treatment p21 was able to associate with the active Tyr-15 dephosphorylated form of cdc2, but this complex was devoid of kinase activity indicating that p21 may play a role in inhibition of cdc2 induced by PMA. Taken together, these observations provide evidence that p21 is involved in integrating the PKC signaling pathway to the cell cycle machinery at the G2/M cell cycle checkpoint.  (+info)

p53 regulates a G2 checkpoint through cyclin B1. (4/1429)

The p53 tumor suppressor controls multiple cell cycle checkpoints regulating the mammalian response to DNA damage. To identify the mechanism by which p53 regulates G2, we have derived a human ovarian cell that undergoes p53-dependent G2 arrest at 32 degrees C. We have found that p53 prevents G2/M transition by decreasing intracellular levels of cyclin B1 protein and attenuating the activity of the cyclin B1 promoter. Cyclin B1 is the regulatory subunit of the cdc2 kinase and is a protein required for mitotic initiation. The ability of p53 to control mitotic initiation by regulating intracellular cyclin B1 levels suggests that the cyclin B-dependent G2 checkpoint has a role in preventing neoplastic transformation.  (+info)

gigas, a Drosophila homolog of tuberous sclerosis gene product-2, regulates the cell cycle. (5/1429)

Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominant disorder leading to the widespread development of benign tumors that often contain giant cells. We show that the Drosophila gene gigas encodes a homolog of TSC2, a gene mutated in half of TSC patients. Clones of gigas mutant cells induced in imaginal discs differentiate normally to produce adult structures. However, the cells in these clones are enlarged and repeat S phase without entering M phase. Our results suggest that the TSC disorder may result from an underlying defect in cell cycle control. We have also identified a Drosophila homolog of TSC1.  (+info)

Activation of integrin and ceramide signalling pathways can inhibit the mitogenic effect of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) in human breast cancer cell lines. (6/1429)

Cell counting, cell cycle analysis and Western immunoblotting were used to examine the effects of non-apoptotic doses of a ceramide analogue, C2, and a synthetic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD)-containing peptide, RGD, in MCF-7 and T47D cells to determine whether activation of these signalling pathways could alter the mitogenic potential of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I). IGF-I alone increased total cell number in both cell lines, associated with a rise in the percentage of cells in the S-phase of the cell cycle and a co-incident increase in cyclin A production. Treatments alone had no effects on cell number or cyclin A production relative to controls. C2 inhibited IGF-I-induced mitogenesis in both lines, whereas RGD was only effective in the T47D line. Despite inhibition of cell proliferation, IGF-I stimulation of cells in S-phase and of cyclin A levels were unaffected; however, an IGF-I-induced increase in cyclin B1 levels was inhibited by 30%. Low-dose induction of integrin and ceramide signalling pathways causes cells to be blocked in S-phase, thereby inhibiting the normal cycle of events associated with the IGF-I-induced mitotic signal. Activating these pathways may not only restrict tumour growth by induction of apoptosis but they may also directly inhibit IGF-I-induced cell proliferation.  (+info)

Posttranslational regulation of the retinoblastoma gene family member p107 by calpain protease. (7/1429)

The retinoblastoma protein plays a critical role in regulating the G1/S transition. Less is known about the function and regulation of the homologous pocket protein p107. Here we present evidence for the posttranslational regulation of p107 by the Ca2+-activated protease calpain. Three negative growth regulators, the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor lovastatin, the antimetabolite 5-fluorouracil, and the cyclic nucleotide dibutyryl cAMP were found to induce cell type-specific loss of p107 protein which was reversible by the calpain inhibitor leucyl-leucyl-norleucinal but not by the serine protease inhibitor phenylmethylsulfonylfluoride, caspase inhibitors, or lactacystin, a specific inhibitor of the 26S proteasome. Purified calpain induced Ca2+-dependent p107 degradation in cell lysates. Transient expression of the specific calpain inhibitor calpastatin blocked the loss of p107 protein in lovastatin-treated cells, and the half-life of p107 was markedly lengthened in lovastatian-treated cells stably transfected with a calpastatin expression vector versus cells transfected with vector alone. The data presented here demonstrate down-regulation of p107 protein in response to various antiproliferative signals, and implicate calpain in p107 posttranslational regulation.  (+info)

The cyclin B2 promoter depends on NF-Y, a trimer whose CCAAT-binding activity is cell-cycle regulated. (8/1429)

Cyclin B2 is a regulator of p34cdc2 kinase, involved in G2/M progression of the cell cycle, whose gene is strictly regulated at the transcriptional level in cycling cells. The mouse promoter was cloned and three conserved CCAAT boxes were found. In this study, we analysed the mechanisms leading to activation of the cyclin B2 CCAAT boxes: a combination of (i) genomic footprinting, (ii) transfections with single, double and triple mutants, (iii) EMSAs with nuclear extracts, antibodies and NF-Y recombinant proteins and (iv) transfections with an NF-YA dominant negative mutant established the positive role of the three CCAAT sequences and proved that NF-Y plays a crucial role in their activation. NF-Y, an ubiquitous trimer containing histone fold subunits, activates several other promoters regulated during the cell cycle. To analyse the levels of NF-Y subunits in the different phases of the cycle, we separated MEL cells by elutriation, obtaining fractions >80% pure. The mRNA and protein levels of the histone-fold containing NF-YB and NF-YC were invariant, whereas the NF-YA protein, but not its mRNA, was maximal in mid-S and decreased in G2/M. EMSA confirmed that the CCAAT-binding activity followed the amount of NF-YA, indicating that this subunit is limiting within the NF-Y complex, and suggesting that post-transcriptional mechanisms regulate NF-YA levels. Our results support a model whereby fine tuning of this activator is important for phase-specific transcription of CCAAT-containing promoters.  (+info)

Cyclin B1 is a type of cyclin protein that regulates the cell cycle, specifically the transition from G2 phase to mitosis (M phase) in eukaryotic cells. It forms a complex with and acts as a regulatory subunit of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1), also known as CDC2. During the G2 phase, Cyclin B1 levels accumulate and upon reaching a certain threshold, it binds to CDK1 to form the maturation promoting factor (MPF). The activation of MPF triggers the onset of mitosis by promoting nuclear envelope breakdown, chromosome condensation, and other events required for cell division. After the completion of mitosis, Cyclin B1 is degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system, allowing the cell cycle to progress back into G1 phase.

Cyclin B is a type of cyclin protein that regulates the cell cycle, specifically the transition from G2 phase to mitosis (M phase) in eukaryotic cells. Cyclin B binds and activates cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1), forming the complex known as M-phase promoting factor (MPF). This complex triggers the events leading to cell division, such as chromosome condensation, nuclear envelope breakdown, and spindle formation. The levels of cyclin B increase during the G2 phase and are degraded by the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) at the onset of anaphase, allowing the cell cycle to progress into the next phase.

Cyclin D1 is a type of cyclin protein that plays a crucial role in the regulation of the cell cycle, which is the process by which cells divide and grow. Specifically, Cyclin D1 is involved in the transition from the G1 phase to the S phase of the cell cycle. It does this by forming a complex with and acting as a regulatory subunit of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) or CDK6, which phosphorylates and inactivates the retinoblastoma protein (pRb). This allows the E2F transcription factors to be released and activate the transcription of genes required for DNA replication and cell cycle progression.

Overexpression of Cyclin D1 has been implicated in the development of various types of cancer, as it can lead to uncontrolled cell growth and division. Therefore, Cyclin D1 is an important target for cancer therapy, and inhibitors of CDK4/6 have been developed to treat certain types of cancer that overexpress Cyclin D1.

Cyclin A is a type of cyclin protein that regulates the progression of the cell cycle, particularly through the G1 and S phases. It forms a complex with and acts as a regulatory subunit for cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), specifically CDK2 and CDK1. The activation of Cyclin A-CDK complexes leads to phosphorylation of various target proteins, which in turn regulates DNA replication and the transition to mitosis.

Cyclin A levels rise during the late G1 phase and peak during the S phase, after which they decline rapidly during the G2 phase. Any abnormalities in Cyclin A regulation or expression can contribute to uncontrolled cell growth and cancer development.

Cyclin E is a type of cyclin protein that plays a crucial role in the regulation of the cell cycle, particularly during the G1 phase and the transition to the S phase. It functions as a regulatory subunit of the Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) complex, which is responsible for promoting the progression of the cell cycle.

Cyclin E is synthesized during the late G1 phase of the cell cycle and accumulates to high levels until it forms a complex with CDK2. The Cyclin E-CDK2 complex then phosphorylates several target proteins, leading to the activation of various downstream pathways that promote DNA replication and cell cycle progression.

The regulation of Cyclin E expression and activity is tightly controlled through multiple mechanisms, including transcriptional regulation, protein stability, and proteasomal degradation. Dysregulation of Cyclin E has been implicated in various human cancers, including breast, ovarian, and lung cancer, due to its role in promoting uncontrolled cell proliferation and genomic instability.

CDC2 protein kinase, also known as cell division cycle 2 or CDK1, is a type of enzyme that plays a crucial role in the regulation of the cell cycle. The cell cycle is the series of events that cells undergo as they grow, replicate their DNA, and divide into two daughter cells.

CDC2 protein kinase is a member of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) family, which are serine/threonine protein kinases that are activated by binding to regulatory subunits called cyclins. CDC2 protein kinase is primarily associated with the regulation of the G2 phase and the entry into mitosis, the stage of the cell cycle where nuclear and cytoplasmic division occur.

CDC2 protein kinase functions by phosphorylating various target proteins, which alters their activity and contributes to the coordination of the different events that occur during the cell cycle. The activity of CDC2 protein kinase is tightly regulated through a variety of mechanisms, including phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, as well as the binding and destruction of cyclin subunits.

Dysregulation of CDC2 protein kinase has been implicated in various human diseases, including cancer, where uncontrolled cell division can lead to the formation of tumors. Therefore, understanding the regulation and function of CDC2 protein kinase is an important area of research in molecular biology and medicine.

Cyclin D2 is a type of cyclin protein that regulates the cell cycle, particularly in the G1 phase. It forms a complex with and acts as a regulatory subunit of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) or CDK6, promoting the transition from G1 to S phase of the cell cycle. The expression of cyclin D2 is regulated by various growth factors, hormones, and oncogenes, and its dysregulation has been implicated in the development of several types of cancer.

Cyclin D3 is a type of cyclin protein that regulates the cell cycle, particularly during the G1 phase. It forms a complex with and acts as a regulatory subunit of CDK4 or CDK6, which are cyclin-dependent kinases. This complex plays a crucial role in phosphorylating and inactivating the retinoblastoma protein (pRb), leading to the release of E2F transcription factors that promote the expression of genes required for DNA replication and cell cycle progression into the S phase.

Cyclin D3 is primarily expressed in activated lymphocytes and is essential for normal immune function, as well as in certain tissues during development. Alterations in CYCLIN D3 gene expression or function have been implicated in several types of cancer, such as leukemias and lymphomas, due to their role in uncontrolled cell proliferation.

Cyclin A1 is a type of cyclin protein that regulates the cell cycle, particularly during the S and G2 phases. It forms a complex with and acts as a regulatory subunit of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2), helping to control the transition from the G1 phase to the S phase and from the S phase to the G2 phase. Cyclin A1 is expressed in various tissues, including ovary, testis, bone marrow, and lymphoid cells. Overexpression or dysregulation of cyclin A1 has been implicated in several types of cancer, making it a potential target for cancer therapy.

Cyclin A2 is a type of cyclin protein that regulates the cell cycle, which is the series of events that cells undergo as they grow and divide. Specifically, Cyclin A2 plays a role in the progression from the G1 phase to the S phase (DNA synthesis phase) and from the G2 phase to the M phase (mitosis phase) of the cell cycle. It does this by binding to and activating cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), which are enzymes that help regulate the cell cycle.

Cyclin A2 is expressed at various points during the cell cycle, but its levels peak during the S and G2 phases. The protein is degraded during mitosis, ensuring that it is not present in excess during the next cell cycle. Dysregulation of Cyclin A2 has been implicated in the development of cancer, as uncontrolled cell growth and division are hallmarks of this disease.

Cyclin D is a type of cyclin protein that plays a crucial role in the regulation of the cell cycle, which is the process by which cells grow and divide. Specifically, Cyclin D is involved in the G1 phase of the cell cycle and works in conjunction with its partner enzyme, cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) or CDK6, to phosphorylate and regulate the activity of several key proteins that control the transition from G1 to S phase.

There are several different types of Cyclin D proteins, including Cyclin D1, Cyclin D2, and Cyclin D3, which are encoded by different genes but share similar structures and functions. Overexpression or dysregulation of Cyclin D has been implicated in the development of various human cancers, as it can lead to uncontrolled cell growth and division. Therefore, understanding the role of Cyclin D in the cell cycle and its regulation is important for developing potential cancer therapies.

Cyclins are a family of regulatory proteins that play a crucial role in the cell cycle, which is the series of events that take place as a cell grows, divides, and produces two daughter cells. They are called cyclins because their levels fluctuate or cycle during the different stages of the cell cycle.

Cyclins function as subunits of serine/threonine protein kinase complexes, forming an active enzyme that adds phosphate groups to other proteins, thereby modifying their activity. This post-translational modification is a critical mechanism for controlling various cellular processes, including the regulation of the cell cycle.

There are several types of cyclins (A, B, D, and E), each of which is active during specific phases of the cell cycle:

1. Cyclin D: Expressed in the G1 phase, it helps to initiate the cell cycle by activating cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) that promote progression through the G1 restriction point.
2. Cyclin E: Active during late G1 and early S phases, it forms a complex with CDK2 to regulate the transition from G1 to S phase, where DNA replication occurs.
3. Cyclin A: Expressed in the S and G2 phases, it associates with both CDK2 and CDK1 to control the progression through the S and G2 phases and entry into mitosis (M phase).
4. Cyclin B: Active during late G2 and M phases, it partners with CDK1 to regulate the onset of mitosis by controlling the breakdown of the nuclear envelope, chromosome condensation, and spindle formation.

The activity of cyclins is tightly controlled through several mechanisms, including transcriptional regulation, protein degradation, and phosphorylation/dephosphorylation events. Dysregulation of cyclin expression or function can lead to uncontrolled cell growth and proliferation, which are hallmarks of cancer.

Mitosis is a type of cell division in which the genetic material of a single cell, called the mother cell, is equally distributed into two identical daughter cells. It's a fundamental process that occurs in multicellular organisms for growth, maintenance, and repair, as well as in unicellular organisms for reproduction.

The process of mitosis can be broken down into several stages: prophase, prometaphase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase. During prophase, the chromosomes condense and become visible, and the nuclear envelope breaks down. In prometaphase, the nuclear membrane is completely disassembled, and the mitotic spindle fibers attach to the chromosomes at their centromeres.

During metaphase, the chromosomes align at the metaphase plate, an imaginary line equidistant from the two spindle poles. In anaphase, sister chromatids are pulled apart by the spindle fibers and move toward opposite poles of the cell. Finally, in telophase, new nuclear envelopes form around each set of chromosomes, and the chromosomes decondense and become less visible.

Mitosis is followed by cytokinesis, a process that divides the cytoplasm of the mother cell into two separate daughter cells. The result of mitosis and cytokinesis is two genetically identical cells, each with the same number and kind of chromosomes as the original parent cell.

Cyclin G1 is a type of protein that belongs to the cyclin family, which are involved in the regulation of the cell cycle. The cell cycle is the series of events that take place as a cell grows, copies its DNA, and divides into two daughter cells.

Cyclin G1 regulates the cell cycle by interacting with various cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), which are enzymes that help control the progression of the cell cycle. Specifically, Cyclin G1 has been shown to inhibit the activity of CDK1 and CDK2, which play important roles in regulating the transition from the G1 phase to the S phase of the cell cycle.

Cyclin G1 has also been implicated in other cellular processes, including DNA damage repair, apoptosis (programmed cell death), and tumor suppression. Dysregulation of Cyclin G1 has been linked to various types of cancer, making it a potential target for cancer therapy.

Cyclin G is a type of protein that belongs to the cyclin family, which are involved in the regulation of the cell cycle. The human Cyclin G gene encodes two isoforms, Cyclin G1 and Cyclin G2, which share a similar structure but have different functions.

Cyclin G1 is known to play a role in the negative regulation of the cell cycle, particularly during the G1 phase. It interacts with several proteins, including CDKs (cyclin-dependent kinases), to regulate the activity of various transcription factors and other signaling pathways that control cell growth and division.

Cyclin G2, on the other hand, has been implicated in the regulation of DNA damage response and apoptosis (programmed cell death). It interacts with CDKs and other proteins to modulate the activity of various signaling pathways involved in these processes.

Overall, Cyclin G plays important roles in regulating cell cycle progression, DNA damage response, and apoptosis, and its dysregulation has been linked to several human diseases, including cancer.

Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are a family of serine/threonine protein kinases that play crucial roles in regulating the cell cycle, transcription, and other cellular processes. They are activated by binding to cyclin proteins, which accumulate and degrade at specific stages of the cell cycle. The activation of CDKs leads to phosphorylation of various downstream target proteins, resulting in the promotion or inhibition of different cell cycle events. Dysregulation of CDKs has been implicated in several human diseases, including cancer, and they are considered important targets for drug development.

The cell cycle is a series of events that take place in a cell leading to its division and duplication. It consists of four main phases: G1 phase, S phase, G2 phase, and M phase.

During the G1 phase, the cell grows in size and synthesizes mRNA and proteins in preparation for DNA replication. In the S phase, the cell's DNA is copied, resulting in two complete sets of chromosomes. During the G2 phase, the cell continues to grow and produces more proteins and organelles necessary for cell division.

The M phase is the final stage of the cell cycle and consists of mitosis (nuclear division) and cytokinesis (cytoplasmic division). Mitosis results in two genetically identical daughter nuclei, while cytokinesis divides the cytoplasm and creates two separate daughter cells.

The cell cycle is regulated by various checkpoints that ensure the proper completion of each phase before progressing to the next. These checkpoints help prevent errors in DNA replication and division, which can lead to mutations and cancer.

The G2 phase, also known as the "gap 2 phase," is a stage in the cell cycle that occurs after DNA replication (S phase) and before cell division (mitosis). During this phase, the cell prepares for mitosis by completing the synthesis of proteins and organelles needed for chromosome separation. The cell also checks for any errors or damage to the DNA before entering mitosis. This phase is a critical point in the cell cycle where proper regulation ensures the faithful transmission of genetic information from one generation of cells to the next. If significant DNA damage is detected during G2, the cell may undergo programmed cell death (apoptosis) instead of dividing.

Cyclin C is a type of cyclin protein that plays a crucial role in the regulation of the cell cycle, which is the process by which cells grow and divide. Specifically, Cyclin C is involved in the transition from the G1 phase to the S phase of the cell cycle, during which DNA replication occurs.

Cyclin C forms a complex with cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8) and other regulatory subunits to form the CDK8 module, which is part of the mediator complex that regulates gene transcription. The activity of Cyclin C/CDK8 is regulated by various mechanisms, including phosphorylation and degradation, to ensure proper control of the cell cycle and prevent uncontrolled cell growth and division.

Mutations in the gene encoding Cyclin C have been associated with certain types of cancer, highlighting its importance in maintaining genomic stability and preventing tumorigenesis.

Cyclin B2 is a type of cyclin protein that regulates the cell cycle, particularly at the G2 phase and the beginning of mitosis. It forms a complex with and acts as a regulatory subunit of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1), which plays a crucial role in the transition from G2 phase to mitosis. The expression and activity of Cyclin B2 are tightly regulated during the cell cycle, and its dysregulation can lead to abnormal cell division and contribute to the development of cancer.

Cell cycle proteins are a group of regulatory proteins that control the progression of the cell cycle, which is the series of events that take place in a eukaryotic cell leading to its division and duplication. These proteins can be classified into several categories based on their functions during different stages of the cell cycle.

The major groups of cell cycle proteins include:

1. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs): CDKs are serine/threonine protein kinases that regulate key transitions in the cell cycle. They require binding to a regulatory subunit called cyclin to become active. Different CDK-cyclin complexes are activated at different stages of the cell cycle.
2. Cyclins: Cyclins are a family of regulatory proteins that bind and activate CDKs. Their levels fluctuate throughout the cell cycle, with specific cyclins expressed during particular phases. For example, cyclin D is important for the G1 to S phase transition, while cyclin B is required for the G2 to M phase transition.
3. CDK inhibitors (CKIs): CKIs are regulatory proteins that bind to and inhibit CDKs, thereby preventing their activation. CKIs can be divided into two main families: the INK4 family and the Cip/Kip family. INK4 family members specifically inhibit CDK4 and CDK6, while Cip/Kip family members inhibit a broader range of CDKs.
4. Anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C): APC/C is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets specific proteins for degradation by the 26S proteasome. During the cell cycle, APC/C regulates the metaphase to anaphase transition and the exit from mitosis by targeting securin and cyclin B for degradation.
5. Other regulatory proteins: Several other proteins play crucial roles in regulating the cell cycle, such as p53, a transcription factor that responds to DNA damage and arrests the cell cycle, and the polo-like kinases (PLKs), which are involved in various aspects of mitosis.

Overall, cell cycle proteins work together to ensure the proper progression of the cell cycle, maintain genomic stability, and prevent uncontrolled cell growth, which can lead to cancer.

Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 2 (CDK2) is a type of enzyme that plays a crucial role in the regulation of the cell cycle, which is the process by which cells grow and divide. CDK2 is activated when it binds to a regulatory subunit called a cyclin.

During the cell cycle, CDK2 helps to control the progression from the G1 phase to the S phase, where DNA replication occurs. Specifically, CDK2 phosphorylates various target proteins that are involved in the regulation of DNA replication and the initiation of mitosis, which is the process of cell division.

CDK2 activity is tightly regulated through a variety of mechanisms, including phosphorylation, dephosphorylation, and protein degradation. Dysregulation of CDK2 activity has been implicated in various human diseases, including cancer. Therefore, CDK2 is an important target for the development of therapies aimed at treating these diseases.

Maturation-Promoting Factor (MPF) is not a medical term per se, but it is commonly used in the field of cell biology and cancer research. MPF refers to a complex of two proteins that play a crucial role in regulating the cell cycle, specifically during the transition from the G2 phase to mitosis (M phase).

MPF is composed of a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK1) and a regulatory subunit called cyclin B. During the late G2 phase, the levels of cyclin B increase, which leads to the activation of CDK1. Once activated, MPF triggers a series of events that promote mitosis, including chromosome condensation, nuclear envelope breakdown, and spindle formation.

In summary, Maturation-Promoting Factor (MPF) is a protein complex made up of CDK1 and cyclin B, which regulates the transition from the G2 phase to mitosis during the cell cycle.

Cyclin T is a type of cyclin protein that is encoded by the CCNT2 gene in humans. Cyclins are a family of regulatory proteins that play a crucial role in the cell cycle, which is the series of events that cells undergo as they grow and divide. Specifically, cyclin T is a component of the CDK9/cyclin T complex, also known as positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb), which plays a key role in regulating gene expression by controlling the elongation phase of RNA polymerase II-mediated transcription.

Cyclin T is expressed at various stages of the cell cycle and has been shown to interact with several other proteins involved in cell cycle regulation, including the retinoblastoma protein (pRb) and the E2F family of transcription factors. Dysregulation of cyclin T expression or activity has been implicated in several human diseases, including cancer.

CDC2 and CDC28 are members of the Serine/Threonine protein kinase family, which play crucial roles in the regulation of the cell cycle. These kinases were originally identified in yeast (CDC28) and humans (CDC2), but they are highly conserved across eukaryotes.

CDC2-CDC28 Kinases function as a part of larger complexes, often associated with cyclins, to control different phases of the cell cycle by phosphorylating specific substrates at key regulatory points. The activity of CDC2-CDC28 Kinases is tightly regulated through various mechanisms, including phosphorylation, dephosphorylation, and protein binding interactions.

During the G2 phase of the cell cycle, CDC2-CDC28 Kinases are inactivated by phosphorylation at specific residues (Tyr15 and Thr14). As the cell approaches mitosis, a family of phosphatases called Cdc25 removes these inhibitory phosphates, leading to activation of the kinase. Activated CDC2-CDC28 Kinases then initiate mitotic processes such as chromosome condensation and nuclear envelope breakdown.

In summary, CDC2-CDC28 Kinases are essential regulators of the eukaryotic cell cycle, controlling various aspects of cell division through phosphorylation of specific substrates. Their activity is tightly regulated to ensure proper progression through the cell cycle and prevent uncontrolled cell growth, which can lead to diseases such as cancer.

CDC25 phosphatases are a group of enzymes that play crucial roles in the regulation of the cell cycle, which is the series of events that cells undergo as they grow and divide. Specifically, CDC25 phosphatases function to remove inhibitory phosphates from certain cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), thereby activating them and allowing the cell cycle to progress.

There are three main types of CDC25 phosphatases in humans, known as CDC25A, CDC25B, and CDC25C. These enzymes are named after the original yeast homolog, called Cdc25, which was discovered to be essential for cell cycle progression.

CDC25 phosphatases are tightly regulated during the cell cycle, with their activity being controlled by various mechanisms such as phosphorylation, protein-protein interactions, and subcellular localization. Dysregulation of CDC25 phosphatases has been implicated in several human diseases, including cancer, where they can contribute to uncontrolled cell growth and division. Therefore, understanding the functions and regulation of CDC25 phosphatases is an important area of research in molecular biology and medicine.

Cyclin G2 is a type of protein that belongs to the cyclin family, which are involved in the regulation of the cell cycle. The cell cycle is the series of events that cells undergo as they grow and divide. Specifically, Cyclin G2 regulates the G1 phase of the cell cycle, which is the phase where the cell prepares to divide.

Cyclin G2 has been found to play a role in several important cellular processes, including DNA damage response, apoptosis (programmed cell death), and differentiation. It has also been implicated in the development of certain diseases, such as cancer. For example, Cyclin G2 has been shown to have tumor-suppressive functions, and its expression is often reduced in cancer cells.

In summary, Cyclin G2 is a regulatory protein that plays a critical role in controlling the cell cycle and maintaining genomic stability. Its dysregulation has been associated with various diseases, including cancer.

Cyclin H is a type of protein that is classified as a cyclin, which is a regulatory subunit of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). Specifically, Cyclin H forms a complex with CDK7 and functions as an essential component of the cell cycle transcriptional coactivator known as TFIIH.

TFIIH plays a crucial role in the initiation of transcription by RNA polymerase II and also participates in the process of DNA repair. The Cyclin H-CDK7 complex phosphorylates the carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II, which is a critical step in the transcription cycle. Additionally, Cyclin H-CDK7 also plays a role in regulating the cell cycle by controlling the activity of certain cell cycle regulators, such as E2F transcription factors.

Mutations in the gene that encodes Cyclin H have been associated with certain human diseases, including a rare inherited disorder called Cockayne syndrome, which is characterized by developmental abnormalities, neurological dysfunction, and premature aging.

The G1 phase, or Gap 1 phase, is the first phase of the cell cycle, during which the cell grows in size and synthesizes mRNA and proteins in preparation for subsequent steps leading to mitosis. During this phase, the cell also checks its growth and makes sure that it is large enough to proceed through the cell cycle. If the cell is not large enough, it will arrest in the G1 phase until it has grown sufficiently. The G1 phase is followed by the S phase, during which DNA replication occurs.

Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 4 (CDK4) is a type of enzyme, specifically a serine/threonine protein kinase, that plays a crucial role in the regulation of the cell cycle. The cell cycle is the series of events that take place in a cell leading to its division and duplication. CDK4, when activated by binding to cyclin D, helps to promote the transition from the G1 phase to the S phase of the cell cycle. This transition is a critical point in the regulation of cell growth and division, and dysregulation of this process can lead to uncontrolled cell growth and cancer. CDK4 inhibitors are used in the treatment of certain types of cancer, such as breast and lung cancer, to block the activity of CDK4 and prevent tumor cell proliferation.

In the context of cell biology, "S phase" refers to the part of the cell cycle during which DNA replication occurs. The "S" stands for synthesis, reflecting the active DNA synthesis that takes place during this phase. It is preceded by G1 phase (gap 1) and followed by G2 phase (gap 2), with mitosis (M phase) being the final stage of the cell cycle.

During S phase, the cell's DNA content effectively doubles as each chromosome is replicated to ensure that the two resulting daughter cells will have the same genetic material as the parent cell. This process is carefully regulated and coordinated with other events in the cell cycle to maintain genomic stability.

I believe you may be mistakenly using the term "starfish" to refer to a medical condition. If so, the correct term is likely " asterixis," which is a medical sign characterized by rapid, rhythmic flapping or tremulous movements of the hands when they are extended and the wrist is dorsiflexed (held with the back of the hand facing upwards). This is often seen in people with certain neurological conditions such as liver failure or certain types of poisoning.

However, if you are indeed referring to the marine animal commonly known as a "starfish," there isn't a specific medical definition for it. Starfish, also known as sea stars, are marine animals belonging to the class Asteroidea in the phylum Echinodermata. They have a distinctive shape with five or more arms radiating from a central disc, and they move slowly along the ocean floor using their tube feet. Some species of starfish have the ability to regenerate lost body parts, including entire limbs or even their central disc.

Phosphorylation is the process of adding a phosphate group (a molecule consisting of one phosphorus atom and four oxygen atoms) to a protein or other organic molecule, which is usually done by enzymes called kinases. This post-translational modification can change the function, localization, or activity of the target molecule, playing a crucial role in various cellular processes such as signal transduction, metabolism, and regulation of gene expression. Phosphorylation is reversible, and the removal of the phosphate group is facilitated by enzymes called phosphatases.

An oocyte, also known as an egg cell or female gamete, is a large specialized cell found in the ovary of female organisms. It contains half the number of chromosomes as a normal diploid cell, as it is the product of meiotic division. Oocytes are surrounded by follicle cells and are responsible for the production of female offspring upon fertilization with sperm. The term "oocyte" specifically refers to the immature egg cell before it reaches full maturity and is ready for fertilization, at which point it is referred to as an ovum or egg.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Protamine Kinase" is not a widely recognized or established term in medical or biological sciences. Protamines are small, arginine-rich proteins found in the sperm cells of many organisms, and they play a crucial role in the packaging and protection of DNA during spermatogenesis.

Kinases, on the other hand, are enzymes that catalyze the transfer of phosphate groups from ATP to specific amino acids in proteins, thereby modulating their function, localization, or stability.

A search of scientific literature reveals only a few instances where "protamine kinase" is mentioned, usually in the context of potential regulatory mechanisms during sperm maturation or fertilization. However, there is no widely accepted or well-characterized enzyme known as "protamine kinase." Therefore, it would be challenging to provide a concise and accurate medical definition for this term.

Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases (PSTKs) are a type of protein kinase that catalyzes the transfer of a phosphate group from ATP to the hydroxyl side chains of serine or threonine residues on target proteins. This phosphorylation process plays a crucial role in various cellular signaling pathways, including regulation of metabolism, gene expression, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis. PSTKs are involved in many physiological and pathological processes, and their dysregulation has been implicated in several diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative disorders.

Ubiquitin-Protein Ligase Complexes, also known as E3 ubiquitin ligases, are a group of enzymes that play a crucial role in the ubiquitination process. Ubiquitination is a post-translational modification where ubiquitin molecules are attached to specific target proteins, marking them for degradation by the proteasome or altering their function, localization, or interaction with other proteins.

The ubiquitination process involves three main steps:

1. Ubiquitin activation: Ubiquitin is activated by an E1 ubiquitin-activating enzyme in an ATP-dependent reaction.
2. Ubiquitin conjugation: The activated ubiquitin is then transferred to an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme.
3. Ubiquitin ligation: Finally, the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme interacts with a specific E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, which facilitates the transfer and ligation of ubiquitin to the target protein.

Ubiquitin-Protein Ligase Complexes are responsible for recognizing and binding to specific substrate proteins, ensuring that ubiquitination occurs on the correct targets. They can be divided into three main categories based on their structural features and mechanisms of action:

1. Really Interesting New Gene (RING) finger E3 ligases: These E3 ligases contain a RING finger domain, which directly interacts with both the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme and the substrate protein. They facilitate the transfer of ubiquitin from the E2 to the target protein by bringing them into close proximity.
2. Homologous to E6-AP C terminus (HECT) E3 ligases: These E3 ligases contain a HECT domain, which interacts with the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme and forms a thioester bond with ubiquitin before transferring it to the substrate protein.
3. RING-between-RING (RBR) E3 ligases: These E3 ligases contain both RING finger and HECT-like domains, which allow them to function similarly to both RING finger and HECT E3 ligases. They first form a thioester bond with ubiquitin using their RING1 domain before transferring it to the substrate protein via their RING2 domain.

Dysregulation of Ubiquitin-Protein Ligase Complexes has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. Understanding their mechanisms and functions can provide valuable insights into disease pathogenesis and potential therapeutic strategies.

Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p27, also known as CDKN1B or p27Kip1, is a protein that regulates the cell cycle. It inhibits the activity of certain cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), which are enzymes that play key roles in regulating the progression of the cell cycle.

The cell cycle is a series of events that cells undergo as they grow and divide. Cyclins and CDKs help to control the different stages of the cell cycle by activating and deactivating various proteins at specific times. The p27 protein acts as a brake on the cell cycle, preventing cells from dividing too quickly or abnormally.

When p27 binds to a CDK-cyclin complex, it prevents the complex from phosphorylating its target proteins, which are necessary for the progression of the cell cycle. By inhibiting CDK activity, p27 helps to ensure that cells divide only when the proper conditions are met.

Mutations in the CDKN1B gene, which encodes p27, have been associated with several types of cancer, including breast, lung, and prostate cancer. These mutations can lead to decreased levels of p27 or impaired function, allowing cells to divide uncontrollably and form tumors.

Meiosis is a type of cell division that results in the formation of four daughter cells, each with half the number of chromosomes as the parent cell. It is a key process in sexual reproduction, where it generates gametes or sex cells (sperm and eggs).

The process of meiosis involves one round of DNA replication followed by two successive nuclear divisions, meiosis I and meiosis II. In meiosis I, homologous chromosomes pair, form chiasma and exchange genetic material through crossing over, then separate from each other. In meiosis II, sister chromatids separate, leading to the formation of four haploid cells. This process ensures genetic diversity in offspring by shuffling and recombining genetic information during the formation of gametes.

Retinoblastoma Protein (pRb or RB1) is a tumor suppressor protein that plays a critical role in regulating the cell cycle and preventing uncontrolled cell growth. It is encoded by the RB1 gene, located on chromosome 13. The retinoblastoma protein functions as a regulatory checkpoint in the cell cycle, preventing cells from progressing into the S phase (DNA synthesis phase) until certain conditions are met.

When pRb is in its active state, it binds to and inhibits the activity of E2F transcription factors, which promote the expression of genes required for DNA replication and cell cycle progression. Phosphorylation of pRb by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) leads to the release of E2F factors, allowing them to activate their target genes and drive the cell into S phase.

Mutations in the RB1 gene can result in the production of a nonfunctional or reduced amount of pRb protein, leading to uncontrolled cell growth and an increased risk of developing retinoblastoma, a rare form of eye cancer, as well as other types of tumors.

Cell division is the process by which a single eukaryotic cell (a cell with a true nucleus) divides into two identical daughter cells. This complex process involves several stages, including replication of DNA, separation of chromosomes, and division of the cytoplasm. There are two main types of cell division: mitosis and meiosis.

Mitosis is the type of cell division that results in two genetically identical daughter cells. It is a fundamental process for growth, development, and tissue repair in multicellular organisms. The stages of mitosis include prophase, prometaphase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase, followed by cytokinesis, which divides the cytoplasm.

Meiosis, on the other hand, is a type of cell division that occurs in the gonads (ovaries and testes) during the production of gametes (sex cells). Meiosis results in four genetically unique daughter cells, each with half the number of chromosomes as the parent cell. This process is essential for sexual reproduction and genetic diversity. The stages of meiosis include meiosis I and meiosis II, which are further divided into prophase, prometaphase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase.

In summary, cell division is the process by which a single cell divides into two daughter cells, either through mitosis or meiosis. This process is critical for growth, development, tissue repair, and sexual reproduction in multicellular organisms.

Proto-oncogene proteins c-mos are a type of serine/threonine protein kinase that play crucial roles in cell cycle regulation, particularly during the G2 phase and the transition to mitosis. The c-mos gene is a normal version of an oncogene, which can become cancer-causing when mutated or overexpressed. In its normal form, the c-mos protein is involved in controlling the progression of the cell cycle, meiosis, and also has been implicated in neuronal development and synaptic plasticity. Dysregulation of c-mos proto-oncogene proteins can contribute to tumorigenesis and cancer development.

Metaphase is a phase in the cell division process (mitosis or meiosis) where the chromosomes align in the middle of the cell, also known as the metaphase plate or equatorial plane. During this stage, each chromosome consists of two sister chromatids attached to each other by a protein complex called the centromere. The spindle fibers from opposite poles of the cell attach to the centromeres of each chromosome, and through a process called congression, they align the chromosomes in the middle of the cell. This alignment allows for accurate segregation of genetic material during the subsequent anaphase stage.

HeLa cells are a type of immortalized cell line used in scientific research. They are derived from a cancer that developed in the cervical tissue of Henrietta Lacks, an African-American woman, in 1951. After her death, cells taken from her tumor were found to be capable of continuous division and growth in a laboratory setting, making them an invaluable resource for medical research.

HeLa cells have been used in a wide range of scientific studies, including research on cancer, viruses, genetics, and drug development. They were the first human cell line to be successfully cloned and are able to grow rapidly in culture, doubling their population every 20-24 hours. This has made them an essential tool for many areas of biomedical research.

It is important to note that while HeLa cells have been instrumental in numerous scientific breakthroughs, the story of their origin raises ethical questions about informed consent and the use of human tissue in research.

Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21, also known as CDKN1A or p21/WAF1/CIP1, is a protein that regulates the cell cycle. It inhibits the activity of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), which are enzymes that play crucial roles in controlling the progression of the cell cycle.

The binding of p21 to CDKs prevents the phosphorylation and activation of downstream targets, leading to cell cycle arrest. This protein is transcriptionally activated by tumor suppressor protein p53 in response to DNA damage or other stress signals, and it functions as an important mediator of p53-dependent growth arrest.

By inhibiting CDKs, p21 helps to ensure that cells do not proceed through the cell cycle until damaged DNA has been repaired, thereby preventing the propagation of potentially harmful mutations. Additionally, p21 has been implicated in other cellular processes such as apoptosis, differentiation, and senescence. Dysregulation of p21 has been associated with various human diseases, including cancer.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but a specific medical definition for 'Cyclin I' could not be found. Cyclins are a family of proteins that regulate the cell cycle in cells. They are so named because their levels fluctuate or cycle during different phases of the cell cycle. However, there is no specific cyclin referred to as "Cyclin I" in current medical and scientific literature.

There is a protein called "cyclin I" found in some organisms like Drosophila melanogaster (fruit flies), but it doesn't have a well-established role or equivalent in human cell cycle regulation. Therefore, it may not be relevant to provide a medical definition for a protein that is not directly involved in human physiology or pathophysiology.

Prometaphase is a stage in the cell division process called mitosis, where the nuclear membrane has broken down and the chromosomes are now moved into the center of the cell, also known as the metaphase plate. This movement is facilitated by the mitotic spindle, which attaches to specialized structures on the chromosomes called kinetochores. The prometaphase stage follows prophase and precedes metaphase in the mitosis process. It's characterized by the beginning of chromosome separation and the reorganization of the cell for the upcoming division into two daughter cells.

"Xenopus" is not a medical term, but it is a genus of highly invasive aquatic frogs native to sub-Saharan Africa. They are often used in scientific research, particularly in developmental biology and genetics. The most commonly studied species is Xenopus laevis, also known as the African clawed frog.

In a medical context, Xenopus might be mentioned when discussing their use in research or as a model organism to study various biological processes or diseases.

"Xenopus proteins" refer to the proteins that are expressed or isolated from the Xenopus species, which are primarily used as model organisms in biological and biomedical research. The most commonly used Xenopus species for research are the African clawed frogs, Xenopus laevis and Xenopus tropicalis. These proteins play crucial roles in various cellular processes and functions, and they serve as valuable tools to study different aspects of molecular biology, developmental biology, genetics, and biochemistry.

Some examples of Xenopus proteins that are widely studied include:

1. Xenopus Histones: These are the proteins that package DNA into nucleosomes, which are the fundamental units of chromatin in eukaryotic cells. They play a significant role in gene regulation and epigenetic modifications.
2. Xenopus Cyclins and Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs): These proteins regulate the cell cycle and control cell division, differentiation, and apoptosis.
3. Xenopus Transcription factors: These proteins bind to specific DNA sequences and regulate gene expression during development and in response to various stimuli.
4. Xenopus Signaling molecules: These proteins are involved in intracellular signaling pathways that control various cellular processes, such as cell growth, differentiation, migration, and survival.
5. Xenopus Cytoskeletal proteins: These proteins provide structural support to the cells and regulate their shape, motility, and organization.
6. Xenopus Enzymes: These proteins catalyze various biochemical reactions in the cell, such as metabolic pathways, DNA replication, transcription, and translation.

Overall, Xenopus proteins are essential tools for understanding fundamental biological processes and have contributed significantly to our current knowledge of molecular biology, genetics, and developmental biology.

The Anaphase-Promoting Complex/Cyclosome (APC/C) is a large E3 ubiquitin ligase complex that plays a crucial role in the regulation of the cell cycle. It is responsible for targeting specific proteins for degradation by the proteasome, which is a multi-subunit protein complex that mediates the controlled breakdown of ubiquitinated proteins.

During anaphase, the final stage of mitosis, the APC/C becomes active and triggers the degradation of several key regulatory proteins, including securin and cyclin B. The destruction of these proteins allows for the separation of chromosomes and the completion of cell division.

The APC/C is composed of multiple subunits, including a catalytic core that binds to ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes (E2s) and several coactivators that regulate its activity. The activation of the APC/C requires the binding of one of two coactivators, Cdc20 or CDH1, which recognize specific substrates for degradation.

Dysregulation of the APC/C has been implicated in various human diseases, including cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms that regulate its activity is an important area of research with potential therapeutic implications.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

Anaphase is a stage in the cell division process called mitosis, where sister chromatids (the two copies of each chromosome formed during DNA replication) separate at the centromeres and move toward opposite poles of the cell. This separation is facilitated by the attachment of microtubules from the spindle apparatus to the kinetochores, protein structures located on the centromeres of each sister chromatid. Anaphase is followed by telophase, during which the nuclear membrane reforms around each set of separated chromosomes, and cytokinesis, the division of the cytoplasm to form two separate daughter cells.

Securin is not a medical term, but rather a biological concept related to cell division. It's a protein that plays a crucial role in the regulation of chromosome separation during cell division (mitosis).

During mitosis, sister chromatids (identical copies of a chromosome) are held together by cohesin proteins until it's time for them to separate and move to opposite ends of the cell. Securin is one of the proteins that helps regulate this process. Specifically, securin inhibits an enzyme called separase, which is responsible for cleaving the cohesin rings that hold sister chromatids together.

Once the cell is ready to separate its chromosomes, a protease called separase is activated and degrades securin. This allows separase to cleave the cohesin rings, leading to the separation of sister chromatids and the continuation of mitosis. If securin function is disrupted, it can lead to errors in chromosome segregation, which can contribute to genomic instability and diseases like cancer.

The cell nucleus is a membrane-bound organelle found in the eukaryotic cells (cells with a true nucleus). It contains most of the cell's genetic material, organized as DNA molecules in complex with proteins, RNA molecules, and histones to form chromosomes.

The primary function of the cell nucleus is to regulate and control the activities of the cell, including growth, metabolism, protein synthesis, and reproduction. It also plays a crucial role in the process of mitosis (cell division) by separating and protecting the genetic material during this process. The nuclear membrane, or nuclear envelope, surrounding the nucleus is composed of two lipid bilayers with numerous pores that allow for the selective transport of molecules between the nucleoplasm (nucleus interior) and the cytoplasm (cell exterior).

The cell nucleus is a vital structure in eukaryotic cells, and its dysfunction can lead to various diseases, including cancer and genetic disorders.

A cell line that is derived from tumor cells and has been adapted to grow in culture. These cell lines are often used in research to study the characteristics of cancer cells, including their growth patterns, genetic changes, and responses to various treatments. They can be established from many different types of tumors, such as carcinomas, sarcomas, and leukemias. Once established, these cell lines can be grown and maintained indefinitely in the laboratory, allowing researchers to conduct experiments and studies that would not be feasible using primary tumor cells. It is important to note that tumor cell lines may not always accurately represent the behavior of the original tumor, as they can undergo genetic changes during their time in culture.

Cell proliferation is the process by which cells increase in number, typically through the process of cell division. In the context of biology and medicine, it refers to the reproduction of cells that makes up living tissue, allowing growth, maintenance, and repair. It involves several stages including the transition from a phase of quiescence (G0 phase) to an active phase (G1 phase), DNA replication in the S phase, and mitosis or M phase, where the cell divides into two daughter cells.

Abnormal or uncontrolled cell proliferation is a characteristic feature of many diseases, including cancer, where deregulated cell cycle control leads to excessive and unregulated growth of cells, forming tumors that can invade surrounding tissues and metastasize to distant sites in the body.

Nocodazole is not a medical condition or disease, but rather a pharmacological agent used in medical research and clinical settings. It's a synthetic chemical compound that belongs to the class of drugs known as microtubule inhibitors. Nocodazole works by binding to and disrupting the dynamic assembly and disassembly of microtubules, which are important components of the cell's cytoskeleton and play a critical role in cell division.

Nocodazole is primarily used in research settings as a tool for studying cell biology and mitosis, the process by which cells divide. It can be used to synchronize cells in the cell cycle or to induce mitotic arrest, making it useful for investigating various aspects of cell division and chromosome behavior.

In clinical settings, nocodazole has been used off-label as a component of some cancer treatment regimens, particularly in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents. Its ability to disrupt microtubules can interfere with the proliferation of cancer cells and enhance the effectiveness of certain anti-cancer drugs. However, its use is not widespread due to potential side effects and the availability of alternative treatments.

The spindle apparatus is a microtubule-based structure that plays a crucial role in the process of cell division, specifically during mitosis and meiosis. It consists of three main components:

1. The spindle poles: These are organized structures composed of microtubules and associated proteins that serve as the anchoring points for the spindle fibers. In animal cells, these poles are typically formed by centrosomes, while in plant cells, they form around nucleation sites called microtubule-organizing centers (MTOCs).
2. The spindle fibers: These are dynamic arrays of microtubules that extend between the two spindle poles. They can be categorized into three types: kinetochore fibers, which connect to the kinetochores on chromosomes; astral fibers, which radiate from the spindle poles and help position the spindle within the cell; and interpolar fibers, which lie between the two spindle poles and contribute to their separation during anaphase.
3. Regulatory proteins: Various motor proteins, such as dynein and kinesin, as well as non-motor proteins like tubulin and septins, are involved in the assembly, maintenance, and dynamics of the spindle apparatus. These proteins help to generate forces that move chromosomes, position the spindle, and ultimately segregate genetic material between two daughter cells during cell division.

The spindle apparatus is essential for ensuring accurate chromosome separation and maintaining genomic stability during cell division. Dysfunction of the spindle apparatus can lead to various abnormalities, including aneuploidy (abnormal number of chromosomes) and chromosomal instability, which have been implicated in several diseases, such as cancer and developmental disorders.

Messenger RNA (mRNA) is a type of RNA (ribonucleic acid) that carries genetic information copied from DNA in the form of a series of three-base code "words," each of which specifies a particular amino acid. This information is used by the cell's machinery to construct proteins, a process known as translation. After being transcribed from DNA, mRNA travels out of the nucleus to the ribosomes in the cytoplasm where protein synthesis occurs. Once the protein has been synthesized, the mRNA may be degraded and recycled. Post-transcriptional modifications can also occur to mRNA, such as alternative splicing and addition of a 5' cap and a poly(A) tail, which can affect its stability, localization, and translation efficiency.

Protein kinases are a group of enzymes that play a crucial role in many cellular processes by adding phosphate groups to other proteins, a process known as phosphorylation. This modification can activate or deactivate the target protein's function, thereby regulating various signaling pathways within the cell. Protein kinases are essential for numerous biological functions, including metabolism, signal transduction, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis (programmed cell death). Abnormal regulation of protein kinases has been implicated in several diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

Cdh1 proteins are part of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), which is a multi-subunit E3 ubiquitin ligase that plays a critical role in regulating the cell cycle. Cdh1, specifically, is a regulatory subunit of the APC/C and is essential for the proper progression through the cell cycle.

Cdh1 binds to and activates the APC/C in late mitosis and early G1 phase, targeting specific proteins for ubiquitination and subsequent degradation by the proteasome. This helps to ensure that key events of the cell cycle, such as chromosome segregation and mitotic exit, occur in a timely and orderly fashion.

Cdh1 has been shown to regulate the degradation of several important cell cycle regulators, including cyclins A and B, securin, and aurora kinase A. By targeting these proteins for destruction, Cdh1 helps to prevent premature entry into mitosis and ensures that cells do not exit mitosis until all chromosomes have been properly aligned and segregated.

Mutations in the genes encoding Cdh1 and other components of the APC/C have been implicated in a variety of human cancers, highlighting the importance of this complex in maintaining genomic stability.

Oncogene proteins are derived from oncogenes, which are genes that have the potential to cause cancer. Normally, these genes help regulate cell growth and division, but when they become altered or mutated, they can become overactive and lead to uncontrolled cell growth and division, which is a hallmark of cancer. Oncogene proteins can contribute to tumor formation and progression by promoting processes such as cell proliferation, survival, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Examples of oncogene proteins include HER2/neu, EGFR, and BCR-ABL.

BCL-1 (B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 1) is not a gene itself but rather a chromosomal translocation that results in the formation of an abnormal fusion gene. The BCL-1 translocation, also known as t(14;18)(q32;q21), is most commonly found in follicular lymphoma, a type of slow-growing non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

The BCL-1 translocation involves the juxtaposition of the BCL-2 gene, which is located on chromosome 18, with the IGH (immunoglobulin heavy chain) gene, which is located on chromosome 14. This translocation results in the overexpression of the BCL-2 protein, which inhibits apoptosis or programmed cell death. The overexpression of BCL-2 leads to the accumulation of cancer cells and contributes to the development and progression of follicular lymphoma.

It is important to note that while BCL-1 is a chromosomal translocation, it can also refer to the protein encoded by the BCL-2 gene when it is overexpressed due to the t(14;18) translocation. In this context, BCL-1 is considered a proto-oncogene because its overexpression promotes cancer development and progression.

Nuclear proteins are a category of proteins that are primarily found in the nucleus of a eukaryotic cell. They play crucial roles in various nuclear functions, such as DNA replication, transcription, repair, and RNA processing. This group includes structural proteins like lamins, which form the nuclear lamina, and regulatory proteins, such as histones and transcription factors, that are involved in gene expression. Nuclear localization signals (NLS) often help target these proteins to the nucleus by interacting with importin proteins during active transport across the nuclear membrane.

Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 6 (CDK6) is a type of enzyme known as a protein kinase, which adds phosphate groups to other proteins in the cell. CDK6 is primarily involved in regulating the cell cycle, the process by which cells divide and grow.

CDK6 functions by binding to cyclin proteins, forming active complexes that help drive the progression of the cell cycle from one phase to the next. Specifically, CDK6 plays a crucial role in the transition from the G1 phase to the S phase of the cell cycle, where DNA replication occurs.

CDK6 activity is tightly regulated by various mechanisms, including phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, as well as by binding to inhibitory proteins such as p16INK4a and p21CIP1. Dysregulation of CDK6 has been implicated in the development of several types of cancer, making it a potential target for cancer therapy.

Apoptosis is a programmed and controlled cell death process that occurs in multicellular organisms. It is a natural process that helps maintain tissue homeostasis by eliminating damaged, infected, or unwanted cells. During apoptosis, the cell undergoes a series of morphological changes, including cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation, and fragmentation into membrane-bound vesicles called apoptotic bodies. These bodies are then recognized and engulfed by neighboring cells or phagocytic cells, preventing an inflammatory response. Apoptosis is regulated by a complex network of intracellular signaling pathways that involve proteins such as caspases, Bcl-2 family members, and inhibitors of apoptosis (IAPs).

An amino acid sequence is the specific order of amino acids in a protein or peptide molecule, formed by the linking of the amino group (-NH2) of one amino acid to the carboxyl group (-COOH) of another amino acid through a peptide bond. The sequence is determined by the genetic code and is unique to each type of protein or peptide. It plays a crucial role in determining the three-dimensional structure and function of proteins.

Tumor suppressor protein p53, also known as p53 or tumor protein p53, is a nuclear phosphoprotein that plays a crucial role in preventing cancer development and maintaining genomic stability. It does so by regulating the cell cycle and acting as a transcription factor for various genes involved in apoptosis (programmed cell death), DNA repair, and cell senescence (permanent cell growth arrest).

In response to cellular stress, such as DNA damage or oncogene activation, p53 becomes activated and accumulates in the nucleus. Activated p53 can then bind to specific DNA sequences and promote the transcription of target genes that help prevent the proliferation of potentially cancerous cells. These targets include genes involved in cell cycle arrest (e.g., CDKN1A/p21), apoptosis (e.g., BAX, PUMA), and DNA repair (e.g., GADD45).

Mutations in the TP53 gene, which encodes p53, are among the most common genetic alterations found in human cancers. These mutations often lead to a loss or reduction of p53's tumor suppressive functions, allowing cancer cells to proliferate uncontrollably and evade apoptosis. As a result, p53 has been referred to as "the guardian of the genome" due to its essential role in preventing tumorigenesis.

CDC20 proteins are a type of regulatory protein that play a crucial role in the cell cycle, which is the process by which cells grow and divide. Specifically, CDC20 proteins are involved in the transition from metaphase to anaphase during mitosis, the phase of the cell cycle where chromosomes are separated and distributed to two daughter cells.

CDC20 proteins function as part of a larger complex called the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), which targets specific proteins for degradation by the proteasome. During metaphase, CDC20 binds to the APC/C and helps to activate it, leading to the degradation of securin and cyclin B, two proteins that are essential for maintaining the proper attachment of chromosomes to the spindle apparatus.

Once these proteins are degraded, the sister chromatids can be separated and moved to opposite poles of the cell, allowing for the completion of mitosis and the formation of two genetically identical daughter cells. In addition to their role in mitosis, CDC20 proteins have also been implicated in other cellular processes, including meiosis, DNA damage repair, and apoptosis.

Western blotting is a laboratory technique used in molecular biology to detect and quantify specific proteins in a mixture of many different proteins. This technique is commonly used to confirm the expression of a protein of interest, determine its size, and investigate its post-translational modifications. The name "Western" blotting distinguishes this technique from Southern blotting (for DNA) and Northern blotting (for RNA).

The Western blotting procedure involves several steps:

1. Protein extraction: The sample containing the proteins of interest is first extracted, often by breaking open cells or tissues and using a buffer to extract the proteins.
2. Separation of proteins by electrophoresis: The extracted proteins are then separated based on their size by loading them onto a polyacrylamide gel and running an electric current through the gel (a process called sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis or SDS-PAGE). This separates the proteins according to their molecular weight, with smaller proteins migrating faster than larger ones.
3. Transfer of proteins to a membrane: After separation, the proteins are transferred from the gel onto a nitrocellulose or polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane using an electric current in a process called blotting. This creates a replica of the protein pattern on the gel but now immobilized on the membrane for further analysis.
4. Blocking: The membrane is then blocked with a blocking agent, such as non-fat dry milk or bovine serum albumin (BSA), to prevent non-specific binding of antibodies in subsequent steps.
5. Primary antibody incubation: A primary antibody that specifically recognizes the protein of interest is added and allowed to bind to its target protein on the membrane. This step may be performed at room temperature or 4°C overnight, depending on the antibody's properties.
6. Washing: The membrane is washed with a buffer to remove unbound primary antibodies.
7. Secondary antibody incubation: A secondary antibody that recognizes the primary antibody (often coupled to an enzyme or fluorophore) is added and allowed to bind to the primary antibody. This step may involve using a horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated or alkaline phosphatase (AP)-conjugated secondary antibody, depending on the detection method used later.
8. Washing: The membrane is washed again to remove unbound secondary antibodies.
9. Detection: A detection reagent is added to visualize the protein of interest by detecting the signal generated from the enzyme-conjugated or fluorophore-conjugated secondary antibody. This can be done using chemiluminescent, colorimetric, or fluorescent methods.
10. Analysis: The resulting image is analyzed to determine the presence and quantity of the protein of interest in the sample.

Western blotting is a powerful technique for identifying and quantifying specific proteins within complex mixtures. It can be used to study protein expression, post-translational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and more. However, it requires careful optimization and validation to ensure accurate and reproducible results.

A cell line is a culture of cells that are grown in a laboratory for use in research. These cells are usually taken from a single cell or group of cells, and they are able to divide and grow continuously in the lab. Cell lines can come from many different sources, including animals, plants, and humans. They are often used in scientific research to study cellular processes, disease mechanisms, and to test new drugs or treatments. Some common types of human cell lines include HeLa cells (which come from a cancer patient named Henrietta Lacks), HEK293 cells (which come from embryonic kidney cells), and HUVEC cells (which come from umbilical vein endothelial cells). It is important to note that cell lines are not the same as primary cells, which are cells that are taken directly from a living organism and have not been grown in the lab.

A base sequence in the context of molecular biology refers to the specific order of nucleotides in a DNA or RNA molecule. In DNA, these nucleotides are adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T). In RNA, uracil (U) takes the place of thymine. The base sequence contains genetic information that is transcribed into RNA and ultimately translated into proteins. It is the exact order of these bases that determines the genetic code and thus the function of the DNA or RNA molecule.

Medical Definition:
Microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) are a diverse group of proteins that bind to microtubules, which are key components of the cytoskeleton in eukaryotic cells. MAPs play crucial roles in regulating microtubule dynamics and stability, as well as in mediating interactions between microtubules and other cellular structures. They can be classified into several categories based on their functions, including:

1. Microtubule stabilizers: These MAPs promote the assembly of microtubules and protect them from disassembly by enhancing their stability. Examples include tau proteins and MAP2.
2. Microtubule dynamics regulators: These MAPs modulate the rate of microtubule polymerization and depolymerization, allowing for dynamic reorganization of the cytoskeleton during cell division and other processes. Examples include stathmin and XMAP215.
3. Microtubule motor proteins: These MAPs use energy from ATP hydrolysis to move along microtubules, transporting various cargoes within the cell. Examples include kinesin and dynein.
4. Adapter proteins: These MAPs facilitate interactions between microtubules and other cellular structures, such as membranes, organelles, or signaling molecules. Examples include MAP4 and CLASPs.

Dysregulation of MAPs has been implicated in several diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's disease (where tau proteins form abnormal aggregates called neurofibrillary tangles) and cancer (where altered microtubule dynamics can contribute to uncontrolled cell division).

"Xenopus laevis" is not a medical term itself, but it refers to a specific species of African clawed frog that is often used in scientific research, including biomedical and developmental studies. Therefore, its relevance to medicine comes from its role as a model organism in laboratories.

In a broader sense, Xenopus laevis has contributed significantly to various medical discoveries, such as the understanding of embryonic development, cell cycle regulation, and genetic research. For instance, the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded in 1963 to John R. B. Gurdon and Sir Michael J. Bishop for their discoveries concerning the genetic mechanisms of organism development using Xenopus laevis as a model system.

Protein binding, in the context of medical and biological sciences, refers to the interaction between a protein and another molecule (known as the ligand) that results in a stable complex. This process is often reversible and can be influenced by various factors such as pH, temperature, and concentration of the involved molecules.

In clinical chemistry, protein binding is particularly important when it comes to drugs, as many of them bind to proteins (especially albumin) in the bloodstream. The degree of protein binding can affect a drug's distribution, metabolism, and excretion, which in turn influence its therapeutic effectiveness and potential side effects.

Protein-bound drugs may be less available for interaction with their target tissues, as only the unbound or "free" fraction of the drug is active. Therefore, understanding protein binding can help optimize dosing regimens and minimize adverse reactions.

Tumor suppressor proteins are a type of regulatory protein that helps control the cell cycle and prevent cells from dividing and growing in an uncontrolled manner. They work to inhibit tumor growth by preventing the formation of tumors or slowing down their progression. These proteins can repair damaged DNA, regulate gene expression, and initiate programmed cell death (apoptosis) if the damage is too severe for repair.

Mutations in tumor suppressor genes, which provide the code for these proteins, can lead to a decrease or loss of function in the resulting protein. This can result in uncontrolled cell growth and division, leading to the formation of tumors and cancer. Examples of tumor suppressor proteins include p53, Rb (retinoblastoma), and BRCA1/2.

Prophase is the first phase of mitosis, the process by which eukaryotic cells divide and reproduce. During prophase, the chromosomes condense and become visible. The nuclear envelope breaks down, allowing the spindle fibers to attach to the centromeres of each chromatid in the chromosome. This is a critical step in preparing for the separation of genetic material during cell division. Prophase is also marked by the movement of the centrosomes to opposite poles of the cell, forming the mitotic spindle.

Recombinant fusion proteins are artificially created biomolecules that combine the functional domains or properties of two or more different proteins into a single protein entity. They are generated through recombinant DNA technology, where the genes encoding the desired protein domains are linked together and expressed as a single, chimeric gene in a host organism, such as bacteria, yeast, or mammalian cells.

The resulting fusion protein retains the functional properties of its individual constituent proteins, allowing for novel applications in research, diagnostics, and therapeutics. For instance, recombinant fusion proteins can be designed to enhance protein stability, solubility, or immunogenicity, making them valuable tools for studying protein-protein interactions, developing targeted therapies, or generating vaccines against infectious diseases or cancer.

Examples of recombinant fusion proteins include:

1. Etaglunatide (ABT-523): A soluble Fc fusion protein that combines the heavy chain fragment crystallizable region (Fc) of an immunoglobulin with the extracellular domain of the human interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R). This fusion protein functions as a decoy receptor, neutralizing IL-6 and its downstream signaling pathways in rheumatoid arthritis.
2. Etanercept (Enbrel): A soluble TNF receptor p75 Fc fusion protein that binds to tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and inhibits its proinflammatory activity, making it a valuable therapeutic option for treating autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and psoriasis.
3. Abatacept (Orencia): A fusion protein consisting of the extracellular domain of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) linked to the Fc region of an immunoglobulin, which downregulates T-cell activation and proliferation in autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis.
4. Belimumab (Benlysta): A monoclonal antibody that targets B-lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) protein, preventing its interaction with the B-cell surface receptor and inhibiting B-cell activation in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).
5. Romiplostim (Nplate): A fusion protein consisting of a thrombopoietin receptor agonist peptide linked to an immunoglobulin Fc region, which stimulates platelet production in patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenia (ITP).
6. Darbepoetin alfa (Aranesp): A hyperglycosylated erythropoiesis-stimulating protein that functions as a longer-acting form of recombinant human erythropoietin, used to treat anemia in patients with chronic kidney disease or cancer.
7. Palivizumab (Synagis): A monoclonal antibody directed against the F protein of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), which prevents RSV infection and is administered prophylactically to high-risk infants during the RSV season.
8. Ranibizumab (Lucentis): A recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody fragment that binds and inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), used in the treatment of age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and other ocular disorders.
9. Cetuximab (Erbitux): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that binds to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), used in the treatment of colorectal cancer and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.
10. Adalimumab (Humira): A fully humanized monoclonal antibody that targets tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), used in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and Crohn's disease.
11. Bevacizumab (Avastin): A recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to VEGF-A, used in the treatment of various cancers, including colorectal, lung, breast, and kidney cancer.
12. Trastuzumab (Herceptin): A humanized monoclonal antibody that targets HER2/neu receptor, used in the treatment of breast cancer.
13. Rituximab (Rituxan): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that binds to CD20 antigen on B cells, used in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and rheumatoid arthritis.
14. Palivizumab (Synagis): A humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to the F protein of respiratory syncytial virus, used in the prevention of respiratory syncytial virus infection in high-risk infants.
15. Infliximab (Remicade): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases, including Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis.
16. Natalizumab (Tysabri): A humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to α4β1 integrin, used in the treatment of multiple sclerosis and Crohn's disease.
17. Adalimumab (Humira): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, Crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis.
18. Golimumab (Simponi): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and ulcerative colitis.
19. Certolizumab pegol (Cimzia): A PEGylated Fab' fragment of a humanized monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and Crohn's disease.
20. Ustekinumab (Stelara): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-12 and IL-23, used in the treatment of psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and Crohn's disease.
21. Secukinumab (Cosentyx): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-17A, used in the treatment of psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis.
22. Ixekizumab (Taltz): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-17A, used in the treatment of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.
23. Brodalumab (Siliq): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-17 receptor A, used in the treatment of psoriasis.
24. Sarilumab (Kevzara): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets the IL-6 receptor, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.
25. Tocilizumab (Actemra): A humanized monoclonal antibody that targets the IL-6 receptor, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis, polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis, giant cell arteritis, and chimeric antigen receptor T-cell-induced cytokine release syndrome.
26. Siltuximab (Sylvant): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that targets IL-6, used in the treatment of multicentric Castleman disease.
27. Satralizumab (Enspryng): A humanized monoclonal antibody that targets IL-6 receptor alpha, used in the treatment of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder.
28. Sirukumab (Plivensia): A human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-6, used in the treatment

'Tumor cells, cultured' refers to the process of removing cancerous cells from a tumor and growing them in controlled laboratory conditions. This is typically done by isolating the tumor cells from a patient's tissue sample, then placing them in a nutrient-rich environment that promotes their growth and multiplication.

The resulting cultured tumor cells can be used for various research purposes, including the study of cancer biology, drug development, and toxicity testing. They provide a valuable tool for researchers to better understand the behavior and characteristics of cancer cells outside of the human body, which can lead to the development of more effective cancer treatments.

It is important to note that cultured tumor cells may not always behave exactly the same way as they do in the human body, so findings from cell culture studies must be validated through further research, such as animal models or clinical trials.

A centrosome is a microtubule-organizing center found in animal cells. It consists of two barrel-shaped structures called centrioles, which are surrounded by a protein matrix called the pericentriolar material. The centrosome plays a crucial role in organizing the microtubules that form the cell's cytoskeleton and help to shape the cell, as well as in separating the chromosomes during cell division.

During mitosis, the two centrioles of the centrosome separate and move to opposite poles of the cell, where they nucleate the formation of the spindle fibers that pull the chromosomes apart. The centrosome also helps to ensure that the genetic material is equally distributed between the two resulting daughter cells.

It's worth noting that while centrioles are present in many animal cells, they are not always present in all types of cells. For example, plant cells do not have centrioles or centrosomes, and instead rely on other mechanisms to organize their microtubules.

An ovum is the female reproductive cell, or gamete, produced in the ovaries. It is also known as an egg cell and is released from the ovary during ovulation. When fertilized by a sperm, it becomes a zygote, which can develop into a fetus. The ovum contains half the genetic material necessary to create a new individual.

Cell extracts refer to the mixture of cellular components that result from disrupting or breaking open cells. The process of obtaining cell extracts is called cell lysis. Cell extracts can contain various types of molecules, such as proteins, nucleic acids (DNA and RNA), carbohydrates, lipids, and metabolites, depending on the methods used for cell disruption and extraction.

Cell extracts are widely used in biochemical and molecular biology research to study various cellular processes and pathways. For example, cell extracts can be used to measure enzyme activities, analyze protein-protein interactions, characterize gene expression patterns, and investigate metabolic pathways. In some cases, specific cellular components can be purified from the cell extracts for further analysis or application, such as isolating pure proteins or nucleic acids.

It is important to note that the composition of cell extracts may vary depending on the type of cells, the growth conditions, and the methods used for cell disruption and extraction. Therefore, it is essential to optimize the experimental conditions to obtain representative and meaningful results from cell extract studies.

F-box proteins are a family of proteins that are characterized by the presence of an F-box domain, which is a motif of about 40-50 amino acids. This domain is responsible for binding to Skp1, a component of the SCF (Skp1-Cul1-F-box protein) E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. The F-box proteins serve as the substrate recognition subunit of this complex and are involved in targeting specific proteins for ubiquitination and subsequent degradation by the 26S proteasome.

There are multiple types of F-box proteins, including FBXW (also known as β-TrCP), FBXL, and FBLX, each with different substrate specificities. These proteins play important roles in various cellular processes such as cell cycle regulation, signal transduction, and DNA damage response by controlling the stability of key regulatory proteins.

Abnormal regulation of F-box proteins has been implicated in several human diseases, including cancer, developmental disorders, and neurodegenerative diseases.

Enzyme activation refers to the process by which an enzyme becomes biologically active and capable of carrying out its specific chemical or biological reaction. This is often achieved through various post-translational modifications, such as proteolytic cleavage, phosphorylation, or addition of cofactors or prosthetic groups to the enzyme molecule. These modifications can change the conformation or structure of the enzyme, exposing or creating a binding site for the substrate and allowing the enzymatic reaction to occur.

For example, in the case of proteolytic cleavage, an inactive precursor enzyme, known as a zymogen, is cleaved into its active form by a specific protease. This is seen in enzymes such as trypsin and chymotrypsin, which are initially produced in the pancreas as inactive precursors called trypsinogen and chymotrypsinogen, respectively. Once they reach the small intestine, they are activated by enteropeptidase, a protease that cleaves a specific peptide bond, releasing the active enzyme.

Phosphorylation is another common mechanism of enzyme activation, where a phosphate group is added to a specific serine, threonine, or tyrosine residue on the enzyme by a protein kinase. This modification can alter the conformation of the enzyme and create a binding site for the substrate, allowing the enzymatic reaction to occur.

Enzyme activation is a crucial process in many biological pathways, as it allows for precise control over when and where specific reactions take place. It also provides a mechanism for regulating enzyme activity in response to various signals and stimuli, such as hormones, neurotransmitters, or changes in the intracellular environment.

Interphase is a phase in the cell cycle during which the cell primarily performs its functions of growth and DNA replication. It is the longest phase of the cell cycle, consisting of G1 phase (during which the cell grows and prepares for DNA replication), S phase (during which DNA replication occurs), and G2 phase (during which the cell grows further and prepares for mitosis). During interphase, the chromosomes are in their relaxed, extended form and are not visible under the microscope. Interphase is followed by mitosis, during which the chromosomes condense and separate to form two genetically identical daughter cells.

Neoplastic gene expression regulation refers to the processes that control the production of proteins and other molecules from genes in neoplastic cells, or cells that are part of a tumor or cancer. In a normal cell, gene expression is tightly regulated to ensure that the right genes are turned on or off at the right time. However, in cancer cells, this regulation can be disrupted, leading to the overexpression or underexpression of certain genes.

Neoplastic gene expression regulation can be affected by a variety of factors, including genetic mutations, epigenetic changes, and signals from the tumor microenvironment. These changes can lead to the activation of oncogenes (genes that promote cancer growth and development) or the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes (genes that prevent cancer).

Understanding neoplastic gene expression regulation is important for developing new therapies for cancer, as targeting specific genes or pathways involved in this process can help to inhibit cancer growth and progression.

Proto-oncogene proteins are normal cellular proteins that play crucial roles in various cellular processes, such as signal transduction, cell cycle regulation, and apoptosis (programmed cell death). They are involved in the regulation of cell growth, differentiation, and survival under physiological conditions.

When proto-oncogene proteins undergo mutations or aberrations in their expression levels, they can transform into oncogenic forms, leading to uncontrolled cell growth and division. These altered proteins are then referred to as oncogene products or oncoproteins. Oncogenic mutations can occur due to various factors, including genetic predisposition, environmental exposures, and aging.

Examples of proto-oncogene proteins include:

1. Ras proteins: Involved in signal transduction pathways that regulate cell growth and differentiation. Activating mutations in Ras genes are found in various human cancers.
2. Myc proteins: Regulate gene expression related to cell cycle progression, apoptosis, and metabolism. Overexpression of Myc proteins is associated with several types of cancer.
3. EGFR (Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor): A transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase that regulates cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation. Mutations or overexpression of EGFR are linked to various malignancies, such as lung cancer and glioblastoma.
4. Src family kinases: Intracellular tyrosine kinases that regulate signal transduction pathways involved in cell proliferation, survival, and migration. Dysregulation of Src family kinases is implicated in several types of cancer.
5. Abl kinases: Cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases that regulate various cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, and stress responses. Aberrant activation of Abl kinases, as seen in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), leads to uncontrolled cell proliferation.

Understanding the roles of proto-oncogene proteins and their dysregulation in cancer development is essential for developing targeted cancer therapies that aim to inhibit or modulate these aberrant signaling pathways.

Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is a technique used in pathology and laboratory medicine to identify specific proteins or antigens in tissue sections. It combines the principles of immunology and histology to detect the presence and location of these target molecules within cells and tissues. This technique utilizes antibodies that are specific to the protein or antigen of interest, which are then tagged with a detection system such as a chromogen or fluorophore. The stained tissue sections can be examined under a microscope, allowing for the visualization and analysis of the distribution and expression patterns of the target molecule in the context of the tissue architecture. Immunohistochemistry is widely used in diagnostic pathology to help identify various diseases, including cancer, infectious diseases, and immune-mediated disorders.

Transfection is a term used in molecular biology that refers to the process of deliberately introducing foreign genetic material (DNA, RNA or artificial gene constructs) into cells. This is typically done using chemical or physical methods, such as lipofection or electroporation. Transfection is widely used in research and medical settings for various purposes, including studying gene function, producing proteins, developing gene therapies, and creating genetically modified organisms. It's important to note that transfection is different from transduction, which is the process of introducing genetic material into cells using viruses as vectors.

Down-regulation is a process that occurs in response to various stimuli, where the number or sensitivity of cell surface receptors or the expression of specific genes is decreased. This process helps maintain homeostasis within cells and tissues by reducing the ability of cells to respond to certain signals or molecules.

In the context of cell surface receptors, down-regulation can occur through several mechanisms:

1. Receptor internalization: After binding to their ligands, receptors can be internalized into the cell through endocytosis. Once inside the cell, these receptors may be degraded or recycled back to the cell surface in smaller numbers.
2. Reduced receptor synthesis: Down-regulation can also occur at the transcriptional level, where the expression of genes encoding for specific receptors is decreased, leading to fewer receptors being produced.
3. Receptor desensitization: Prolonged exposure to a ligand can lead to a decrease in receptor sensitivity or affinity, making it more difficult for the cell to respond to the signal.

In the context of gene expression, down-regulation refers to the decreased transcription and/or stability of specific mRNAs, leading to reduced protein levels. This process can be induced by various factors, including microRNA (miRNA)-mediated regulation, histone modification, or DNA methylation.

Down-regulation is an essential mechanism in many physiological processes and can also contribute to the development of several diseases, such as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders.

'Gene expression regulation' refers to the processes that control whether, when, and where a particular gene is expressed, meaning the production of a specific protein or functional RNA encoded by that gene. This complex mechanism can be influenced by various factors such as transcription factors, chromatin remodeling, DNA methylation, non-coding RNAs, and post-transcriptional modifications, among others. Proper regulation of gene expression is crucial for normal cellular function, development, and maintaining homeostasis in living organisms. Dysregulation of gene expression can lead to various diseases, including cancer and genetic disorders.

Cytoplasm is the material within a eukaryotic cell (a cell with a true nucleus) that lies between the nuclear membrane and the cell membrane. It is composed of an aqueous solution called cytosol, in which various organelles such as mitochondria, ribosomes, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, lysosomes, and vacuoles are suspended. Cytoplasm also contains a variety of dissolved nutrients, metabolites, ions, and enzymes that are involved in various cellular processes such as metabolism, signaling, and transport. It is where most of the cell's metabolic activities take place, and it plays a crucial role in maintaining the structure and function of the cell.

Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) is a protein that plays an essential role in the process of DNA replication and repair in eukaryotic cells. It functions as a cofactor for DNA polymerase delta, enhancing its activity during DNA synthesis. PCNA forms a sliding clamp around DNA, allowing it to move along the template and coordinate the actions of various enzymes involved in DNA metabolism.

PCNA is often used as a marker for cell proliferation because its levels increase in cells that are actively dividing or have been stimulated to enter the cell cycle. Immunostaining techniques can be used to detect PCNA and determine the proliferative status of tissues or cultures. In this context, 'proliferating' refers to the rapid multiplication of cells through cell division.

The G2 phase cell cycle checkpoint is a point in the cell cycle, specifically in the G2 phase, where the cell checks for any DNA damage or other issues that may have occurred during the DNA synthesis phase (S phase) before proceeding to mitosis. This checkpoint serves as a quality control mechanism to ensure that the genetic material is accurately and completely replicated and that the cell is ready to divide. If DNA damage or other problems are detected, the cell cycle is halted at the G2 checkpoint until the issues can be resolved. If the damage is too severe or cannot be repaired, the cell may undergo programmed cell death (apoptosis) to prevent the propagation of potentially harmful mutations.

Promoter regions in genetics refer to specific DNA sequences located near the transcription start site of a gene. They serve as binding sites for RNA polymerase and various transcription factors that regulate the initiation of gene transcription. These regulatory elements help control the rate of transcription and, therefore, the level of gene expression. Promoter regions can be composed of different types of sequences, such as the TATA box and CAAT box, and their organization and composition can vary between different genes and species.

E2F transcription factors are a family of proteins that play crucial roles in the regulation of the cell cycle, DNA repair, and apoptosis (programmed cell death). These factors bind to specific DNA sequences called E2F responsive elements, located in the promoter regions of target genes. They can act as either transcriptional activators or repressors, depending on which E2F family member is involved, the presence of co-factors, and the phase of the cell cycle.

The E2F family consists of eight members, divided into two groups based on their functions: activator E2Fs (E2F1, E2F2, and E2F3a) and repressor E2Fs (E2F3b, E2F4, E2F5, E2F6, and E2F7). Activator E2Fs promote the expression of genes required for cell cycle progression, DNA replication, and repair. Repressor E2Fs, on the other hand, inhibit the transcription of these same genes as well as genes involved in differentiation and apoptosis.

Dysregulation of E2F transcription factors has been implicated in various human diseases, including cancer. Overexpression or hyperactivation of activator E2Fs can lead to uncontrolled cell proliferation and tumorigenesis, while loss of function or inhibition of repressor E2Fs can result in impaired differentiation and increased susceptibility to malignancies. Therefore, understanding the roles and regulation of E2F transcription factors is essential for developing novel therapeutic strategies against cancer and other diseases associated with cell cycle dysregulation.

Small interfering RNA (siRNA) is a type of short, double-stranded RNA molecule that plays a role in the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. The RNAi pathway is a natural cellular process that regulates gene expression by targeting and destroying specific messenger RNA (mRNA) molecules, thereby preventing the translation of those mRNAs into proteins.

SiRNAs are typically 20-25 base pairs in length and are generated from longer double-stranded RNA precursors called hairpin RNAs or dsRNAs by an enzyme called Dicer. Once generated, siRNAs associate with a protein complex called the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), which uses one strand of the siRNA (the guide strand) to recognize and bind to complementary sequences in the target mRNA. The RISC then cleaves the target mRNA, leading to its degradation and the inhibition of protein synthesis.

SiRNAs have emerged as a powerful tool for studying gene function and have shown promise as therapeutic agents for a variety of diseases, including viral infections, cancer, and genetic disorders. However, their use as therapeutics is still in the early stages of development, and there are challenges associated with delivering siRNAs to specific cells and tissues in the body.

CDC28 protein kinase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker's yeast) is a crucial cell cycle regulator, specifically a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK). It plays a pivotal role in controlling the G1 to S phase transition during the cell division cycle. CDC28 forms complexes with various cyclins, such as G1 cyclins CLN1, CLN2, and CLN3, and S phase cyclin CLB5, to regulate different stages of the cell cycle. The activity of CDC28 is tightly controlled through phosphorylation, dephosphorylation, and proteolysis of the cyclin subunits. Inhibition or mutation of CDC28 can lead to cell cycle arrest and various developmental defects in yeast.

A mutation is a permanent change in the DNA sequence of an organism's genome. Mutations can occur spontaneously or be caused by environmental factors such as exposure to radiation, chemicals, or viruses. They may have various effects on the organism, ranging from benign to harmful, depending on where they occur and whether they alter the function of essential proteins. In some cases, mutations can increase an individual's susceptibility to certain diseases or disorders, while in others, they may confer a survival advantage. Mutations are the driving force behind evolution, as they introduce new genetic variability into populations, which can then be acted upon by natural selection.

Transcription factors are proteins that play a crucial role in regulating gene expression by controlling the transcription of DNA to messenger RNA (mRNA). They function by binding to specific DNA sequences, known as response elements, located in the promoter region or enhancer regions of target genes. This binding can either activate or repress the initiation of transcription, depending on the properties and interactions of the particular transcription factor. Transcription factors often act as part of a complex network of regulatory proteins that determine the precise spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression during development, differentiation, and homeostasis in an organism.

Flow cytometry is a medical and research technique used to measure physical and chemical characteristics of cells or particles, one cell at a time, as they flow in a fluid stream through a beam of light. The properties measured include:

* Cell size (light scatter)
* Cell internal complexity (granularity, also light scatter)
* Presence or absence of specific proteins or other molecules on the cell surface or inside the cell (using fluorescent antibodies or other fluorescent probes)

The technique is widely used in cell counting, cell sorting, protein engineering, biomarker discovery and monitoring disease progression, particularly in hematology, immunology, and cancer research.

Genetic transcription is the process by which the information in a strand of DNA is used to create a complementary RNA molecule. This process is the first step in gene expression, where the genetic code in DNA is converted into a form that can be used to produce proteins or functional RNAs.

During transcription, an enzyme called RNA polymerase binds to the DNA template strand and reads the sequence of nucleotide bases. As it moves along the template, it adds complementary RNA nucleotides to the growing RNA chain, creating a single-stranded RNA molecule that is complementary to the DNA template strand. Once transcription is complete, the RNA molecule may undergo further processing before it can be translated into protein or perform its functional role in the cell.

Transcription can be either "constitutive" or "regulated." Constitutive transcription occurs at a relatively constant rate and produces essential proteins that are required for basic cellular functions. Regulated transcription, on the other hand, is subject to control by various intracellular and extracellular signals, allowing cells to respond to changing environmental conditions or developmental cues.

"Cells, cultured" is a medical term that refers to cells that have been removed from an organism and grown in controlled laboratory conditions outside of the body. This process is called cell culture and it allows scientists to study cells in a more controlled and accessible environment than they would have inside the body. Cultured cells can be derived from a variety of sources, including tissues, organs, or fluids from humans, animals, or cell lines that have been previously established in the laboratory.

Cell culture involves several steps, including isolation of the cells from the tissue, purification and characterization of the cells, and maintenance of the cells in appropriate growth conditions. The cells are typically grown in specialized media that contain nutrients, growth factors, and other components necessary for their survival and proliferation. Cultured cells can be used for a variety of purposes, including basic research, drug development and testing, and production of biological products such as vaccines and gene therapies.

It is important to note that cultured cells may behave differently than they do in the body, and results obtained from cell culture studies may not always translate directly to human physiology or disease. Therefore, it is essential to validate findings from cell culture experiments using additional models and ultimately in clinical trials involving human subjects.

Cell cycle checkpoints are control mechanisms that regulate the cell cycle and ensure the accurate and timely progression through different phases of the cell cycle. These checkpoints monitor specific cellular events, such as DNA replication and damage, chromosome separation, and proper attachment of the mitotic spindle to the chromosomes. If any of these events fail to occur properly or are delayed, the cell cycle checkpoints trigger a response that can halt the cell cycle until the problem is resolved. This helps to prevent cells with damaged or incomplete genomes from dividing and potentially becoming cancerous.

There are three main types of cell cycle checkpoints:

1. G1 Checkpoint: Also known as the restriction point, this checkpoint controls the transition from the G1 phase to the S phase of the cell cycle. It monitors the availability of nutrients, growth factors, and the integrity of the genome before allowing the cell to proceed into DNA replication.
2. G2 Checkpoint: This checkpoint regulates the transition from the G2 phase to the M phase of the cell cycle. It checks for completion of DNA replication and absence of DNA damage before allowing the cell to enter mitosis.
3. Mitotic (M) Checkpoint: Also known as the spindle assembly checkpoint, this checkpoint ensures that all chromosomes are properly attached to the mitotic spindle before anaphase begins. It prevents the separation of sister chromatids until all kinetochores are correctly attached and tension is established between them.

Cell cycle checkpoints play a crucial role in maintaining genomic stability, preventing tumorigenesis, and ensuring proper cell division. Dysregulation of these checkpoints can lead to various diseases, including cancer.

Signal transduction is the process by which a cell converts an extracellular signal, such as a hormone or neurotransmitter, into an intracellular response. This involves a series of molecular events that transmit the signal from the cell surface to the interior of the cell, ultimately resulting in changes in gene expression, protein activity, or metabolism.

The process typically begins with the binding of the extracellular signal to a receptor located on the cell membrane. This binding event activates the receptor, which then triggers a cascade of intracellular signaling molecules, such as second messengers, protein kinases, and ion channels. These molecules amplify and propagate the signal, ultimately leading to the activation or inhibition of specific cellular responses.

Signal transduction pathways are highly regulated and can be modulated by various factors, including other signaling molecules, post-translational modifications, and feedback mechanisms. Dysregulation of these pathways has been implicated in a variety of diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

CCAAT-binding factor (CBF) is a transcription factor that binds to the CCAAT box, a specific DNA sequence found in the promoter regions of many genes. The CBF complex is composed of three subunits, NF-YA, NF-YB, and NF-YC, which are required for its DNA binding activity. The CBF complex plays important roles in various biological processes, including cell cycle regulation, differentiation, and stress response.

Oogenesis is the biological process of formation and maturation of female gametes, or ova or egg cells, in the ovary. It begins during fetal development and continues throughout a woman's reproductive years. The process involves the division and differentiation of a germ cell (oogonium) into an immature ovum (oocyte), which then undergoes meiotic division to form a mature ovum capable of being fertilized by sperm.

The main steps in oogenesis include:

1. Multiplication phase: The oogonia divide mitotically to increase their number.
2. Growth phase: One of the oogonia becomes primary oocyte and starts to grow, accumulating nutrients and organelles required for future development.
3. First meiotic division: The primary oocyte undergoes an incomplete first meiotic division, resulting in two haploid cells - a secondary oocyte and a smaller cell called the first polar body. This division is arrested in prophase I until puberty.
4. Second meiotic division: At ovulation or just before fertilization, the secondary oocyte completes the second meiotic division, producing another small cell, the second polar body, and a mature ovum (egg) with 23 chromosomes.
5. Fertilization: The mature ovum can be fertilized by a sperm, restoring the normal diploid number of chromosomes in the resulting zygote.

Oogenesis is a complex and highly regulated process that involves various hormonal signals and cellular interactions to ensure proper development and maturation of female gametes for successful reproduction.

Enzyme inhibitors are substances that bind to an enzyme and decrease its activity, preventing it from catalyzing a chemical reaction in the body. They can work by several mechanisms, including blocking the active site where the substrate binds, or binding to another site on the enzyme to change its shape and prevent substrate binding. Enzyme inhibitors are often used as drugs to treat various medical conditions, such as high blood pressure, abnormal heart rhythms, and bacterial infections. They can also be found naturally in some foods and plants, and can be used in research to understand enzyme function and regulation.

APC3 (Anaphase-Promoting Complex-Cyclosome) subunit, also known as CDC27 or ANAPC4, is a component of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), which is a multi-subunit E3 ubiquitin ligase that plays a critical role in regulating the cell cycle. Specifically, APC3 is a part of the core subcomplex of the APC/C and helps to mediate the ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of key regulatory proteins involved in mitosis and meiosis, such as securin and cyclin B. This allows for the proper progression of these cell cycle stages and ensures faithful chromosome segregation. Mutations in APC3 have been implicated in various human cancers, highlighting its importance in maintaining genomic stability.

DNA-binding proteins are a type of protein that have the ability to bind to DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid), the genetic material of organisms. These proteins play crucial roles in various biological processes, such as regulation of gene expression, DNA replication, repair and recombination.

The binding of DNA-binding proteins to specific DNA sequences is mediated by non-covalent interactions, including electrostatic, hydrogen bonding, and van der Waals forces. The specificity of binding is determined by the recognition of particular nucleotide sequences or structural features of the DNA molecule.

DNA-binding proteins can be classified into several categories based on their structure and function, such as transcription factors, histones, and restriction enzymes. Transcription factors are a major class of DNA-binding proteins that regulate gene expression by binding to specific DNA sequences in the promoter region of genes and recruiting other proteins to modulate transcription. Histones are DNA-binding proteins that package DNA into nucleosomes, the basic unit of chromatin structure. Restriction enzymes are DNA-binding proteins that recognize and cleave specific DNA sequences, and are widely used in molecular biology research and biotechnology applications.

I'm happy to help! However, I believe there may be a slight mistake in your question. The abbreviation "cdc" is not typically associated with genetics or genes in the context of medical definitions.

If you meant to ask for a definition of "genes," here it is:

Genes are segments of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) that contain the instructions for the development, function, and reproduction of all living organisms. They are the basic units of heredity, passed down from one generation to the next. Genes encode specific proteins or RNA molecules that play critical roles in the structure, function, and regulation of the body's cells, tissues, and organs.

If you had a different term in mind, please let me know, and I will be happy to provide a definition for it!

Purines are heterocyclic aromatic organic compounds that consist of a pyrimidine ring fused to an imidazole ring. They are fundamental components of nucleotides, which are the building blocks of DNA and RNA. In the body, purines can be synthesized endogenously or obtained through dietary sources such as meat, seafood, and certain vegetables.

Once purines are metabolized, they are broken down into uric acid, which is excreted by the kidneys. Elevated levels of uric acid in the body can lead to the formation of uric acid crystals, resulting in conditions such as gout or kidney stones. Therefore, maintaining a balanced intake of purine-rich foods and ensuring proper kidney function are essential for overall health.

G0 phase, also known as the resting phase or quiescent stage, is a part of the cell cycle in which cells are not actively preparing to divide. In this phase, cells are metabolically active and can carry out their normal functions, but they are not synthesizing DNA or dividing. Cells in G0 phase have left the cell cycle and may remain in this phase for an indefinite period of time, until they receive signals to re-enter the cell cycle and begin preparing for division again.

It's important to note that not all cells go through the G0 phase. Some cells, such as stem cells and certain types of immune cells, may spend most of their time in G0 phase and only enter the cell cycle when they are needed to replace damaged or dying cells. Other cells, such as those lining the digestive tract, continuously divide and do not have a G0 phase.

A nonmammalian embryo refers to the developing organism in animals other than mammals, from the fertilized egg (zygote) stage until hatching or birth. In nonmammalian species, the developmental stages and terminology differ from those used in mammals. The term "embryo" is generally applied to the developing organism up until a specific stage of development that is characterized by the formation of major organs and structures. After this point, the developing organism is referred to as a "larva," "juvenile," or other species-specific terminology.

The study of nonmammalian embryos has played an important role in our understanding of developmental biology and evolutionary developmental biology (evo-devo). By comparing the developmental processes across different animal groups, researchers can gain insights into the evolutionary origins and diversification of body plans and structures. Additionally, nonmammalian embryos are often used as model systems for studying basic biological processes, such as cell division, gene regulation, and pattern formation.

DNA replication is the biological process by which DNA makes an identical copy of itself during cell division. It is a fundamental mechanism that allows genetic information to be passed down from one generation of cells to the next. During DNA replication, each strand of the double helix serves as a template for the synthesis of a new complementary strand. This results in the creation of two identical DNA molecules. The enzymes responsible for DNA replication include helicase, which unwinds the double helix, and polymerase, which adds nucleotides to the growing strands.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

E2F1 is a member of the E2F family of transcription factors, which are involved in the regulation of cell cycle progression and apoptosis (programmed cell death). Specifically, E2F1 plays a role as a transcriptional activator, binding to specific DNA sequences and promoting the expression of genes required for the G1/S transition of the cell cycle.

In more detail, E2F1 forms a complex with a retinoblastoma protein (pRb) in the G0 and early G1 phases of the cell cycle. When pRb is phosphorylated by cyclin-dependent kinases during the late G1 phase, E2F1 is released and can then bind to its target DNA sequences and activate transcription of genes involved in DNA replication and cell cycle progression.

However, if E2F1 is overexpressed or activated inappropriately, it can also promote apoptosis, making it a key player in both cell proliferation and cell death pathways. Dysregulation of E2F1 has been implicated in the development of various human cancers, including breast, lung, and prostate cancer.

The proteasome endopeptidase complex is a large protein complex found in the cells of eukaryotic organisms, as well as in archaea and some bacteria. It plays a crucial role in the degradation of damaged or unneeded proteins through a process called proteolysis. The proteasome complex contains multiple subunits, including both regulatory and catalytic particles.

The catalytic core of the proteasome is composed of four stacked rings, each containing seven subunits, forming a structure known as the 20S core particle. Three of these rings are made up of beta-subunits that contain the proteolytic active sites, while the fourth ring consists of alpha-subunits that control access to the interior of the complex.

The regulatory particles, called 19S or 11S regulators, cap the ends of the 20S core particle and are responsible for recognizing, unfolding, and translocating targeted proteins into the catalytic chamber. The proteasome endopeptidase complex can cleave peptide bonds in various ways, including hydrolysis of ubiquitinated proteins, which is an essential mechanism for maintaining protein quality control and regulating numerous cellular processes, such as cell cycle progression, signal transduction, and stress response.

In summary, the proteasome endopeptidase complex is a crucial intracellular machinery responsible for targeted protein degradation through proteolysis, contributing to various essential regulatory functions in cells.

A precipitin test is a type of immunodiagnostic test used to detect and measure the presence of specific antibodies or antigens in a patient's serum. The test is based on the principle of antigen-antibody interaction, where the addition of an antigen to a solution containing its corresponding antibody results in the formation of an insoluble immune complex known as a precipitin.

In this test, a small amount of the patient's serum is added to a solution containing a known antigen or antibody. If the patient has antibodies or antigens that correspond to the added reagent, they will bind and form a visible precipitate. The size and density of the precipitate can be used to quantify the amount of antibody or antigen present in the sample.

Precipitin tests are commonly used in the diagnosis of various infectious diseases, autoimmune disorders, and allergies. They can also be used in forensic science to identify biological samples. However, they have largely been replaced by more modern immunological techniques such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and radioimmunoassays (RIAs).

Okadaic acid is a type of toxin that is produced by certain species of marine algae, including Dinophysis and Prorocentrum. It is a potent inhibitor of protein phosphatases 1 and 2A, which are important enzymes that help regulate cellular processes in the body.

Okadaic acid can accumulate in shellfish that feed on these algae, and consumption of contaminated seafood can lead to a serious illness known as diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP). Symptoms of DSP include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal cramps. In severe cases, it can also cause neurological symptoms such as dizziness, disorientation, and tingling or numbness in the lips, tongue, and fingers.

It is important to note that okadaic acid is not only a marine toxin but also used in scientific research as a tool to study the role of protein phosphatases in cellular processes. However, exposure to this compound should be avoided due to its toxic effects.

The Mad2 (Mitotic Arrest Deficient 2) proteins are a part of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), which is a crucial surveillance mechanism that ensures accurate chromosome segregation during cell division. The primary function of Mad2 proteins is to prevent the onset of anaphase until all chromosomes have achieved proper attachment and tension on the mitotic spindle.

Mad2 proteins exist in two major conformational states: open (O-Mad2) and closed (C-Mad2). The transition between these two forms plays a critical role in the regulation of the SAC. In response to unattached kinetochores, Mad2 proteins bind to and inhibit the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), thereby preventing premature chromosome separation.

There are two main isoforms of Mad2 in humans: Mad2L1 (Mad2A) and Mad2L2 (Mad2B). While both isoforms share similar functions, they exhibit distinct biochemical properties and interact with other SAC components differently. Dysregulation of the Mad2 proteins has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders.

Microinjection is a medical technique that involves the use of a fine, precise needle to inject small amounts of liquid or chemicals into microscopic structures, cells, or tissues. This procedure is often used in research settings to introduce specific substances into individual cells for study purposes, such as introducing DNA or RNA into cell nuclei to manipulate gene expression.

In clinical settings, microinjections may be used in various medical and cosmetic procedures, including:

1. Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection (ICSI): A type of assisted reproductive technology where a single sperm is injected directly into an egg to increase the chances of fertilization during in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatments.
2. Botulinum Toxin Injections: Microinjections of botulinum toxin (Botox, Dysport, or Xeomin) are used for cosmetic purposes to reduce wrinkles and fine lines by temporarily paralyzing the muscles responsible for their formation. They can also be used medically to treat various neuromuscular disorders, such as migraines, muscle spasticity, and excessive sweating (hyperhidrosis).
3. Drug Delivery: Microinjections may be used to deliver drugs directly into specific tissues or organs, bypassing the systemic circulation and potentially reducing side effects. This technique can be particularly useful in treating localized pain, delivering growth factors for tissue regeneration, or administering chemotherapy agents directly into tumors.
4. Gene Therapy: Microinjections of genetic material (DNA or RNA) can be used to introduce therapeutic genes into cells to treat various genetic disorders or diseases, such as cystic fibrosis, hemophilia, or cancer.

Overall, microinjection is a highly specialized and precise technique that allows for the targeted delivery of substances into small structures, cells, or tissues, with potential applications in research, medical diagnostics, and therapeutic interventions.

Polyploidy is a condition in which a cell or an organism has more than two sets of chromosomes, unlike the typical diploid state where there are only two sets (one from each parent). Polyploidy can occur through various mechanisms such as errors during cell division, fusion of egg and sperm cells that have an abnormal number of chromosomes, or through the reproduction process in plants.

Polyploidy is common in the plant kingdom, where it often leads to larger size, increased biomass, and sometimes hybrid vigor. However, in animals, polyploidy is less common and usually occurs in only certain types of cells or tissues, as most animals require a specific number of chromosomes for normal development and reproduction. In humans, polyploidy is typically not compatible with life and can lead to developmental abnormalities and miscarriage.

3T3 cells are a type of cell line that is commonly used in scientific research. The name "3T3" is derived from the fact that these cells were developed by treating mouse embryo cells with a chemical called trypsin and then culturing them in a flask at a temperature of 37 degrees Celsius.

Specifically, 3T3 cells are a type of fibroblast, which is a type of cell that is responsible for producing connective tissue in the body. They are often used in studies involving cell growth and proliferation, as well as in toxicity tests and drug screening assays.

One particularly well-known use of 3T3 cells is in the 3T3-L1 cell line, which is a subtype of 3T3 cells that can be differentiated into adipocytes (fat cells) under certain conditions. These cells are often used in studies of adipose tissue biology and obesity.

It's important to note that because 3T3 cells are a type of immortalized cell line, they do not always behave exactly the same way as primary cells (cells that are taken directly from a living organism). As such, researchers must be careful when interpreting results obtained using 3T3 cells and consider any potential limitations or artifacts that may arise due to their use.

Threonine is an essential amino acid, meaning it cannot be synthesized by the human body and must be obtained through the diet. Its chemical formula is HO2CCH(NH2)CH(OH)CH3. Threonine plays a crucial role in various biological processes, including protein synthesis, immune function, and fat metabolism. It is particularly important for maintaining the structural integrity of proteins, as it is often found in their hydroxyl-containing regions. Foods rich in threonine include animal proteins such as meat, dairy products, and eggs, as well as plant-based sources like lentils and soybeans.

M Phase cell cycle checkpoints are control mechanisms that ensure the proper completion of the M phase (mitosis or meiosis) of the cell cycle. These checkpoints verify that certain conditions are met before the cell proceeds to the next phase of the cell cycle, thus helping to maintain genomic stability and prevent errors such as chromosomal mutations or aneuploidy.

There are two main M Phase cell cycle checkpoints:

1. The G2/M Checkpoint: This checkpoint is activated at the end of the G2 phase and verifies that all DNA has been replicated accurately, and that there are no DNA damages or other issues that could interfere with mitosis. If any problems are detected, the cell cycle is halted until they can be resolved.
2. The Mitotic Spindle Checkpoint: This checkpoint ensures that all chromosomes have attached properly to the spindle apparatus and that they will be equally distributed to the two resulting daughter cells during mitosis. If any chromosomes are not properly attached or if there is an issue with the spindle apparatus, the cell cycle is paused until these problems are corrected.

These checkpoints play a crucial role in maintaining genomic stability and preventing the development of cancer and other diseases.

RNA interference (RNAi) is a biological process in which RNA molecules inhibit the expression of specific genes. This process is mediated by small RNA molecules, including microRNAs (miRNAs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), that bind to complementary sequences on messenger RNA (mRNA) molecules, leading to their degradation or translation inhibition.

RNAi plays a crucial role in regulating gene expression and defending against foreign genetic elements, such as viruses and transposons. It has also emerged as an important tool for studying gene function and developing therapeutic strategies for various diseases, including cancer and viral infections.

Immunoblotting, also known as western blotting, is a laboratory technique used in molecular biology and immunogenetics to detect and quantify specific proteins in a complex mixture. This technique combines the electrophoretic separation of proteins by gel electrophoresis with their detection using antibodies that recognize specific epitopes (protein fragments) on the target protein.

The process involves several steps: first, the protein sample is separated based on size through sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Next, the separated proteins are transferred onto a nitrocellulose or polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane using an electric field. The membrane is then blocked with a blocking agent to prevent non-specific binding of antibodies.

After blocking, the membrane is incubated with a primary antibody that specifically recognizes the target protein. Following this, the membrane is washed to remove unbound primary antibodies and then incubated with a secondary antibody conjugated to an enzyme such as horseradish peroxidase (HRP) or alkaline phosphatase (AP). The enzyme catalyzes a colorimetric or chemiluminescent reaction that allows for the detection of the target protein.

Immunoblotting is widely used in research and clinical settings to study protein expression, post-translational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and disease biomarkers. It provides high specificity and sensitivity, making it a valuable tool for identifying and quantifying proteins in various biological samples.

Biological models, also known as physiological models or organismal models, are simplified representations of biological systems, processes, or mechanisms that are used to understand and explain the underlying principles and relationships. These models can be theoretical (conceptual or mathematical) or physical (such as anatomical models, cell cultures, or animal models). They are widely used in biomedical research to study various phenomena, including disease pathophysiology, drug action, and therapeutic interventions.

Examples of biological models include:

1. Mathematical models: These use mathematical equations and formulas to describe complex biological systems or processes, such as population dynamics, metabolic pathways, or gene regulation networks. They can help predict the behavior of these systems under different conditions and test hypotheses about their underlying mechanisms.
2. Cell cultures: These are collections of cells grown in a controlled environment, typically in a laboratory dish or flask. They can be used to study cellular processes, such as signal transduction, gene expression, or metabolism, and to test the effects of drugs or other treatments on these processes.
3. Animal models: These are living organisms, usually vertebrates like mice, rats, or non-human primates, that are used to study various aspects of human biology and disease. They can provide valuable insights into the pathophysiology of diseases, the mechanisms of drug action, and the safety and efficacy of new therapies.
4. Anatomical models: These are physical representations of biological structures or systems, such as plastic models of organs or tissues, that can be used for educational purposes or to plan surgical procedures. They can also serve as a basis for developing more sophisticated models, such as computer simulations or 3D-printed replicas.

Overall, biological models play a crucial role in advancing our understanding of biology and medicine, helping to identify new targets for therapeutic intervention, develop novel drugs and treatments, and improve human health.

Aphidicolin is an antimicrotubule agent that is specifically a inhibitor of DNA polymerase alpha. It is an antibiotic that is produced by the fungus Cephalosporium aphidicola and is used in research to study the cell cycle and DNA replication. In clinical medicine, it has been explored as a potential anticancer agent, although its use is not currently approved for this indication.

NIH 3T3 cells are a type of mouse fibroblast cell line that was developed by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The "3T3" designation refers to the fact that these cells were derived from embryonic Swiss mouse tissue and were able to be passaged (i.e., subcultured) more than three times in tissue culture.

NIH 3T3 cells are widely used in scientific research, particularly in studies involving cell growth and differentiation, signal transduction, and gene expression. They have also been used as a model system for studying the effects of various chemicals and drugs on cell behavior. NIH 3T3 cells are known to be relatively easy to culture and maintain, and they have a stable, flat morphology that makes them well-suited for use in microscopy studies.

It is important to note that, as with any cell line, it is essential to verify the identity and authenticity of NIH 3T3 cells before using them in research, as contamination or misidentification can lead to erroneous results.

Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p16, also known as CDKN2A or INK4a, is a protein that regulates the cell cycle. It functions as an inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) 4 and 6, which are enzymes that play a crucial role in regulating the progression of the cell cycle.

The p16 protein is produced in response to various signals, including DNA damage and oncogene activation, and its main function is to prevent the phosphorylation and activation of the retinoblastoma protein (pRb) by CDK4/6. When pRb is not phosphorylated, it binds to and inhibits the E2F transcription factor, which results in the suppression of genes required for cell cycle progression.

Therefore, p16 acts as a tumor suppressor protein by preventing the uncontrolled proliferation of cells that can lead to cancer. Mutations or deletions in the CDKN2A gene, which encodes the p16 protein, have been found in many types of human cancers, including lung, breast, and head and neck cancers.

Fibroblasts are specialized cells that play a critical role in the body's immune response and wound healing process. They are responsible for producing and maintaining the extracellular matrix (ECM), which is the non-cellular component present within all tissues and organs, providing structural support and biochemical signals for surrounding cells.

Fibroblasts produce various ECM proteins such as collagens, elastin, fibronectin, and laminins, forming a complex network of fibers that give tissues their strength and flexibility. They also help in the regulation of tissue homeostasis by controlling the turnover of ECM components through the process of remodeling.

In response to injury or infection, fibroblasts become activated and start to proliferate rapidly, migrating towards the site of damage. Here, they participate in the inflammatory response, releasing cytokines and chemokines that attract immune cells to the area. Additionally, they deposit new ECM components to help repair the damaged tissue and restore its functionality.

Dysregulation of fibroblast activity has been implicated in several pathological conditions, including fibrosis (excessive scarring), cancer (where they can contribute to tumor growth and progression), and autoimmune diseases (such as rheumatoid arthritis).

Ubiquitin is a small protein that is present in most tissues in the body. It plays a critical role in regulating many important cellular processes, such as protein degradation and DNA repair. Ubiquitin can attach to other proteins in a process called ubiquitination, which can target the protein for degradation or modify its function.

Ubiquitination involves a series of enzymatic reactions that ultimately result in the attachment of ubiquitin molecules to specific lysine residues on the target protein. The addition of a single ubiquitin molecule is called monoubiquitination, while the addition of multiple ubiquitin molecules is called polyubiquitination.

Polyubiquitination can serve as a signal for proteasomal degradation, where the target protein is broken down into its component amino acids by the 26S proteasome complex. Monoubiquitination and other forms of ubiquitination can also regulate various cellular processes, such as endocytosis, DNA repair, and gene expression.

Dysregulation of ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation has been implicated in a variety of diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and inflammatory conditions.

Serine is an amino acid, which is a building block of proteins. More specifically, it is a non-essential amino acid, meaning that the body can produce it from other compounds, and it does not need to be obtained through diet. Serine plays important roles in the body, such as contributing to the formation of the protective covering of nerve fibers (myelin sheath), helping to synthesize another amino acid called tryptophan, and taking part in the metabolism of fatty acids. It is also involved in the production of muscle tissues, the immune system, and the forming of cell structures. Serine can be found in various foods such as soy, eggs, cheese, meat, peanuts, lentils, and many others.

S-phase kinase-associated proteins (Skp2) are a group of proteins that are associated with the S-phase kinase, which is a type of enzyme that helps to regulate the cell cycle. Specifically, Skp2 is involved in the ubiquitination and degradation of certain proteins that play a role in controlling the progression of the cell cycle.

Skp2 is a member of the F-box protein family, which are components of the Skp1-Cul1-F-box (SCF) complex, a type of E3 ubiquitin ligase. The SCF complex recognizes and binds to specific proteins, tagging them for ubiquitination and subsequent degradation by the proteasome.

One of the key targets of Skp2 is the tumor suppressor protein p27, which inhibits the activity of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and helps to regulate the transition from the G1 phase to the S phase of the cell cycle. By targeting p27 for degradation, Skp2 promotes the progression of the cell cycle and has been implicated in the development of various types of cancer.

Overall, Skp2 plays a critical role in regulating the cell cycle and has important implications for the development and treatment of various diseases, including cancer.

Microtubules are hollow, cylindrical structures composed of tubulin proteins in the cytoskeleton of eukaryotic cells. They play crucial roles in various cellular processes such as maintaining cell shape, intracellular transport, and cell division (mitosis and meiosis). Microtubules are dynamic, undergoing continuous assembly and disassembly, which allows them to rapidly reorganize in response to cellular needs. They also form part of important cellular structures like centrioles, basal bodies, and cilia/flagella.

'Drosophila proteins' refer to the proteins that are expressed in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. This organism is a widely used model system in genetics, developmental biology, and molecular biology research. The study of Drosophila proteins has contributed significantly to our understanding of various biological processes, including gene regulation, cell signaling, development, and aging.

Some examples of well-studied Drosophila proteins include:

1. HSP70 (Heat Shock Protein 70): A chaperone protein involved in protein folding and protection from stress conditions.
2. TUBULIN: A structural protein that forms microtubules, important for cell division and intracellular transport.
3. ACTIN: A cytoskeletal protein involved in muscle contraction, cell motility, and maintenance of cell shape.
4. BETA-GALACTOSIDASE (LACZ): A reporter protein often used to monitor gene expression patterns in transgenic flies.
5. ENDOGLIN: A protein involved in the development of blood vessels during embryogenesis.
6. P53: A tumor suppressor protein that plays a crucial role in preventing cancer by regulating cell growth and division.
7. JUN-KINASE (JNK): A signaling protein involved in stress response, apoptosis, and developmental processes.
8. DECAPENTAPLEGIC (DPP): A member of the TGF-β (Transforming Growth Factor Beta) superfamily, playing essential roles in embryonic development and tissue homeostasis.

These proteins are often studied using various techniques such as biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and structural biology to understand their functions, interactions, and regulation within the cell.

Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) is a laboratory technique used in molecular biology to amplify and detect specific DNA sequences. This technique is particularly useful for the detection and quantification of RNA viruses, as well as for the analysis of gene expression.

The process involves two main steps: reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In the first step, reverse transcriptase enzyme is used to convert RNA into complementary DNA (cDNA) by reading the template provided by the RNA molecule. This cDNA then serves as a template for the PCR amplification step.

In the second step, the PCR reaction uses two primers that flank the target DNA sequence and a thermostable polymerase enzyme to repeatedly copy the targeted cDNA sequence. The reaction mixture is heated and cooled in cycles, allowing the primers to anneal to the template, and the polymerase to extend the new strand. This results in exponential amplification of the target DNA sequence, making it possible to detect even small amounts of RNA or cDNA.

RT-PCR is a sensitive and specific technique that has many applications in medical research and diagnostics, including the detection of viruses such as HIV, hepatitis C virus, and SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19). It can also be used to study gene expression, identify genetic mutations, and diagnose genetic disorders.

Retinoblastoma-like protein p107, also known as RBL1 or p107, is a tumor suppressor protein that belongs to the family of "pocket proteins." This protein is encoded by the RBL1 gene in humans. It plays a crucial role in regulating the cell cycle and preventing uncontrolled cell growth, which can lead to cancer.

The p107 protein is structurally similar to the retinoblastoma protein (pRb) and functions in a related manner. Both proteins interact with E2F transcription factors to control the expression of genes required for DNA replication and cell division. When the p107 protein is phosphorylated by cyclin-dependent kinases during the G1 phase of the cell cycle, it releases E2F transcription factors, allowing them to activate the transcription of target genes necessary for S phase entry and DNA replication.

Retinoblastoma-like protein p107 is often inactivated or mutated in various human cancers, including retinoblastoma, small cell lung cancer, and certain types of sarcomas. Loss of p107 function can lead to uncontrolled cell growth and tumor formation. However, it's important to note that the role of p107 in cancer development is complex and may depend on its interactions with other proteins and signaling pathways.

Fluorescence microscopy is a type of microscopy that uses fluorescent dyes or proteins to highlight and visualize specific components within a sample. In this technique, the sample is illuminated with high-energy light, typically ultraviolet (UV) or blue light, which excites the fluorescent molecules causing them to emit lower-energy, longer-wavelength light, usually visible light in the form of various colors. This emitted light is then collected by the microscope and detected to produce an image.

Fluorescence microscopy has several advantages over traditional brightfield microscopy, including the ability to visualize specific structures or molecules within a complex sample, increased sensitivity, and the potential for quantitative analysis. It is widely used in various fields of biology and medicine, such as cell biology, neuroscience, and pathology, to study the structure, function, and interactions of cells and proteins.

There are several types of fluorescence microscopy techniques, including widefield fluorescence microscopy, confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy, and total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, each with its own strengths and limitations. These techniques can provide valuable insights into the behavior of cells and proteins in health and disease.

Recombinant proteins are artificially created proteins produced through the use of recombinant DNA technology. This process involves combining DNA molecules from different sources to create a new set of genes that encode for a specific protein. The resulting recombinant protein can then be expressed, purified, and used for various applications in research, medicine, and industry.

Recombinant proteins are widely used in biomedical research to study protein function, structure, and interactions. They are also used in the development of diagnostic tests, vaccines, and therapeutic drugs. For example, recombinant insulin is a common treatment for diabetes, while recombinant human growth hormone is used to treat growth disorders.

The production of recombinant proteins typically involves the use of host cells, such as bacteria, yeast, or mammalian cells, which are engineered to express the desired protein. The host cells are transformed with a plasmid vector containing the gene of interest, along with regulatory elements that control its expression. Once the host cells are cultured and the protein is expressed, it can be purified using various chromatography techniques.

Overall, recombinant proteins have revolutionized many areas of biology and medicine, enabling researchers to study and manipulate proteins in ways that were previously impossible.

Ligases are a group of enzymes that catalyze the formation of a covalent bond between two molecules, usually involving the joining of two nucleotides in a DNA or RNA strand. They play a crucial role in various biological processes such as DNA replication, repair, and recombination. In DNA ligases, the enzyme seals nicks or breaks in the phosphodiester backbone of the DNA molecule by catalyzing the formation of an ester bond between the 3'-hydroxyl group and the 5'-phosphate group of adjacent nucleotides. This process is essential for maintaining genomic integrity and stability.

DNA damage refers to any alteration in the structure or composition of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), which is the genetic material present in cells. DNA damage can result from various internal and external factors, including environmental exposures such as ultraviolet radiation, tobacco smoke, and certain chemicals, as well as normal cellular processes such as replication and oxidative metabolism.

Examples of DNA damage include base modifications, base deletions or insertions, single-strand breaks, double-strand breaks, and crosslinks between the two strands of the DNA helix. These types of damage can lead to mutations, genomic instability, and chromosomal aberrations, which can contribute to the development of diseases such as cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and aging-related conditions.

The body has several mechanisms for repairing DNA damage, including base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair, mismatch repair, and double-strand break repair. However, if the damage is too extensive or the repair mechanisms are impaired, the cell may undergo apoptosis (programmed cell death) to prevent the propagation of potentially harmful mutations.

Gene expression is the process by which the information encoded in a gene is used to synthesize a functional gene product, such as a protein or RNA molecule. This process involves several steps: transcription, RNA processing, and translation. During transcription, the genetic information in DNA is copied into a complementary RNA molecule, known as messenger RNA (mRNA). The mRNA then undergoes RNA processing, which includes adding a cap and tail to the mRNA and splicing out non-coding regions called introns. The resulting mature mRNA is then translated into a protein on ribosomes in the cytoplasm through the process of translation.

The regulation of gene expression is a complex and highly controlled process that allows cells to respond to changes in their environment, such as growth factors, hormones, and stress signals. This regulation can occur at various stages of gene expression, including transcriptional activation or repression, RNA processing, mRNA stability, and translation. Dysregulation of gene expression has been implicated in many diseases, including cancer, genetic disorders, and neurological conditions.

Breast neoplasms refer to abnormal growths in the breast tissue that can be benign or malignant. Benign breast neoplasms are non-cancerous tumors or growths, while malignant breast neoplasms are cancerous tumors that can invade surrounding tissues and spread to other parts of the body.

Breast neoplasms can arise from different types of cells in the breast, including milk ducts, milk sacs (lobules), or connective tissue. The most common type of breast cancer is ductal carcinoma, which starts in the milk ducts and can spread to other parts of the breast and nearby structures.

Breast neoplasms are usually detected through screening methods such as mammography, ultrasound, or MRI, or through self-examination or clinical examination. Treatment options for breast neoplasms depend on several factors, including the type and stage of the tumor, the patient's age and overall health, and personal preferences. Treatment may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, hormone therapy, or targeted therapy.

Polyadenylation is a post-transcriptional modification process in which a string of adenine (A) nucleotides, known as a poly(A) tail, is added to the 3' end of a newly transcribed eukaryotic mRNA molecule. This process is essential for the stability, export, and translation of the mRNA. The addition of the poly(A) tail is catalyzed by a complex containing several proteins and the enzyme poly(A) polymerase. The length of the poly(A) tail typically ranges from 50 to 250 nucleotides and can be shortened or lengthened in response to various cellular signals, which contributes to the regulation of gene expression.

Protein biosynthesis is the process by which cells generate new proteins. It involves two major steps: transcription and translation. Transcription is the process of creating a complementary RNA copy of a sequence of DNA. This RNA copy, or messenger RNA (mRNA), carries the genetic information to the site of protein synthesis, the ribosome. During translation, the mRNA is read by transfer RNA (tRNA) molecules, which bring specific amino acids to the ribosome based on the sequence of nucleotides in the mRNA. The ribosome then links these amino acids together in the correct order to form a polypeptide chain, which may then fold into a functional protein. Protein biosynthesis is essential for the growth and maintenance of all living organisms.

DNA primers are short single-stranded DNA molecules that serve as a starting point for DNA synthesis. They are typically used in laboratory techniques such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing. The primer binds to a complementary sequence on the DNA template through base pairing, providing a free 3'-hydroxyl group for the DNA polymerase enzyme to add nucleotides and synthesize a new strand of DNA. This allows for specific and targeted amplification or analysis of a particular region of interest within a larger DNA molecule.

Carrier proteins, also known as transport proteins, are a type of protein that facilitates the movement of molecules across cell membranes. They are responsible for the selective and active transport of ions, sugars, amino acids, and other molecules from one side of the membrane to the other, against their concentration gradient. This process requires energy, usually in the form of ATP (adenosine triphosphate).

Carrier proteins have a specific binding site for the molecule they transport, and undergo conformational changes upon binding, which allows them to move the molecule across the membrane. Once the molecule has been transported, the carrier protein returns to its original conformation, ready to bind and transport another molecule.

Carrier proteins play a crucial role in maintaining the balance of ions and other molecules inside and outside of cells, and are essential for many physiological processes, including nerve impulse transmission, muscle contraction, and nutrient uptake.

Post-translational protein processing refers to the modifications and changes that proteins undergo after their synthesis on ribosomes, which are complex molecular machines responsible for protein synthesis. These modifications occur through various biochemical processes and play a crucial role in determining the final structure, function, and stability of the protein.

The process begins with the translation of messenger RNA (mRNA) into a linear polypeptide chain, which is then subjected to several post-translational modifications. These modifications can include:

1. Proteolytic cleavage: The removal of specific segments or domains from the polypeptide chain by proteases, resulting in the formation of mature, functional protein subunits.
2. Chemical modifications: Addition or modification of chemical groups to the side chains of amino acids, such as phosphorylation (addition of a phosphate group), glycosylation (addition of sugar moieties), methylation (addition of a methyl group), acetylation (addition of an acetyl group), and ubiquitination (addition of a ubiquitin protein).
3. Disulfide bond formation: The oxidation of specific cysteine residues within the polypeptide chain, leading to the formation of disulfide bonds between them. This process helps stabilize the three-dimensional structure of proteins, particularly in extracellular environments.
4. Folding and assembly: The acquisition of a specific three-dimensional conformation by the polypeptide chain, which is essential for its function. Chaperone proteins assist in this process to ensure proper folding and prevent aggregation.
5. Protein targeting: The directed transport of proteins to their appropriate cellular locations, such as the nucleus, mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, or plasma membrane. This is often facilitated by specific signal sequences within the protein that are recognized and bound by transport machinery.

Collectively, these post-translational modifications contribute to the functional diversity of proteins in living organisms, allowing them to perform a wide range of cellular processes, including signaling, catalysis, regulation, and structural support.

A neoplasm is a tumor or growth that is formed by an abnormal and excessive proliferation of cells, which can be benign or malignant. Neoplasm proteins are therefore any proteins that are expressed or produced in these neoplastic cells. These proteins can play various roles in the development, progression, and maintenance of neoplasms.

Some neoplasm proteins may contribute to the uncontrolled cell growth and division seen in cancer, such as oncogenic proteins that promote cell cycle progression or inhibit apoptosis (programmed cell death). Others may help the neoplastic cells evade the immune system, allowing them to proliferate undetected. Still others may be involved in angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels that supply the tumor with nutrients and oxygen.

Neoplasm proteins can also serve as biomarkers for cancer diagnosis, prognosis, or treatment response. For example, the presence or level of certain neoplasm proteins in biological samples such as blood or tissue may indicate the presence of a specific type of cancer, help predict the likelihood of cancer recurrence, or suggest whether a particular therapy will be effective.

Overall, understanding the roles and behaviors of neoplasm proteins can provide valuable insights into the biology of cancer and inform the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

Chromatids are defined as the individual strands that make up a duplicated chromosome. They are formed during the S phase of the cell cycle, when replication occurs and each chromosome is copied, resulting in two identical sister chromatids. These chromatids are connected at a region called the centromere and are held together by cohesin protein complexes until they are separated during mitosis or meiosis.

During mitosis, the sister chromatids are pulled apart by the mitotic spindle apparatus and distributed equally to each daughter cell. In meiosis, which is a type of cell division that occurs in the production of gametes (sex cells), homologous chromosomes pair up and exchange genetic material through a process called crossing over. After crossing over, each homologous chromosome consists of two recombinant chromatids that are separated during meiosis I, and then sister chromatids are separated during meiosis II.

Chromatids play an essential role in the faithful transmission of genetic information from one generation to the next, ensuring that each daughter cell or gamete receives a complete set of chromosomes with intact and functional genes.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that is present in all eukaryotic cells and plays a crucial role in the regulation of various cellular processes, such as protein degradation, DNA repair, and stress response. It is involved in marking proteins for destruction by attaching to them, a process known as ubiquitination. This modification can target proteins for degradation by the proteasome, a large protein complex that breaks down unneeded or damaged proteins in the cell. Ubiquitin also has other functions, such as regulating the localization and activity of certain proteins. The ability of ubiquitin to modify many different proteins and play a role in multiple cellular processes makes it an essential player in maintaining cellular homeostasis.

Tubulin modulators are a class of drugs that target and alter the function or structure of tubulin, which is a key component of microtubules in cells. These drugs can either stabilize or destabilize microtubules by interacting with tubulin, leading to various effects on cell division and other processes that rely on microtubule dynamics.

There are two main types of tubulin modulators:

1. Microtubule stabilizers: These drugs promote the assembly and stability of microtubules by binding to tubulin, preventing its disassembly. Examples include taxanes (e.g., paclitaxel) and vinca alkaloids (e.g., vinblastine). They are primarily used as anticancer agents because they interfere with the division of cancer cells.
2. Microtubule destabilizers: These drugs inhibit the formation and stability of microtubules by binding to tubulin, promoting its disassembly. Examples include colchicine, vinca alkaloids (e.g., vinorelbine), and combretastatins. They can also be used as anticancer agents because they disrupt the mitotic spindle during cell division, leading to cancer cell death.

Tubulin modulators have various other effects on cells beyond their impact on microtubules, such as interfering with intracellular transport and signaling pathways. These diverse actions contribute to their therapeutic potential in treating diseases like cancer, but they can also lead to side effects that limit their clinical use.

Developmental gene expression regulation refers to the processes that control the activation or repression of specific genes during embryonic and fetal development. These regulatory mechanisms ensure that genes are expressed at the right time, in the right cells, and at appropriate levels to guide proper growth, differentiation, and morphogenesis of an organism.

Developmental gene expression regulation is a complex and dynamic process involving various molecular players, such as transcription factors, chromatin modifiers, non-coding RNAs, and signaling molecules. These regulators can interact with cis-regulatory elements, like enhancers and promoters, to fine-tune the spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression during development.

Dysregulation of developmental gene expression can lead to various congenital disorders and developmental abnormalities. Therefore, understanding the principles and mechanisms governing developmental gene expression regulation is crucial for uncovering the etiology of developmental diseases and devising potential therapeutic strategies.

The Ki-67 antigen is a cellular protein that is expressed in all active phases of the cell cycle (G1, S, G2, and M), but not in the resting phase (G0). It is often used as a marker for cell proliferation and can be found in high concentrations in rapidly dividing cells. Immunohistochemical staining for Ki-67 can help to determine the growth fraction of a group of cells, which can be useful in the diagnosis and prognosis of various malignancies, including cancer. The level of Ki-67 expression is often associated with the aggressiveness of the tumor and its response to treatment.

3' Untranslated Regions (3' UTRs) are segments of messenger RNA (mRNA) that do not code for proteins. They are located after the last exon, which contains the coding sequence for a protein, and before the poly-A tail in eukaryotic mRNAs.

The 3' UTR plays several important roles in regulating gene expression, including:

1. Stability of mRNA: The 3' UTR contains sequences that can bind to proteins that either stabilize or destabilize the mRNA, thereby controlling its half-life and abundance.
2. Localization of mRNA: Some 3' UTRs contain sequences that direct the localization of the mRNA to specific cellular compartments, such as the synapse in neurons.
3. Translation efficiency: The 3' UTR can also contain regulatory elements that affect the translation efficiency of the mRNA into protein. For example, microRNAs (miRNAs) can bind to complementary sequences in the 3' UTR and inhibit translation or promote degradation of the mRNA.
4. Alternative polyadenylation: The 3' UTR can also contain multiple alternative polyadenylation sites, which can lead to different lengths of the 3' UTR and affect gene expression.

Overall, the 3' UTR plays a critical role in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression, and mutations or variations in the 3' UTR can contribute to human diseases.

Leupeptins are a type of protease inhibitors, which are substances that can inhibit the activity of enzymes called proteases. Proteases play a crucial role in breaking down proteins into smaller peptides or individual amino acids. Leupeptins are naturally occurring compounds found in some types of bacteria and are often used in laboratory research to study various cellular processes that involve protease activity.

Leupeptins can inhibit several different types of proteases, including serine proteases, cysteine proteases, and some metalloproteinases. They work by binding to the active site of these enzymes and preventing them from cleaving their protein substrates. Leupeptins have been used in various research applications, such as studying protein degradation, signal transduction pathways, and cell death mechanisms.

It is important to note that leupeptins are not typically used as therapeutic agents in clinical medicine due to their potential toxicity and lack of specificity for individual proteases. Instead, they are primarily used as research tools in basic science investigations.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Active Transport, Cell Nucleus" is not a widely recognized or established medical term. Active transport typically refers to the energy-dependent process by which cells move molecules across their membranes against their concentration gradient. This process is facilitated by transport proteins and requires ATP as an energy source. However, this process primarily occurs in the cell membrane and not in the cell nucleus.

The cell nucleus, on the other hand, contains genetic material (DNA) and is responsible for controlling various cellular activities such as gene expression, replication, and repair. While there are transport processes that occur within the nucleus, they do not typically involve active transport in the same way that it occurs at the cell membrane.

Therefore, a medical definition of "Active Transport, Cell Nucleus" would not be applicable or informative in this context.

"Drosophila" is a genus of small flies, also known as fruit flies. The most common species used in scientific research is "Drosophila melanogaster," which has been a valuable model organism for many areas of biological and medical research, including genetics, developmental biology, neurobiology, and aging.

The use of Drosophila as a model organism has led to numerous important discoveries in genetics and molecular biology, such as the identification of genes that are associated with human diseases like cancer, Parkinson's disease, and obesity. The short reproductive cycle, large number of offspring, and ease of genetic manipulation make Drosophila a powerful tool for studying complex biological processes.

Transcription factor DP1 (TFDP1) is not a specific medical term, but it is a term used in molecular biology and genetics. TFDP1 is a protein that functions as a transcription factor, which means it helps regulate the expression of genes by binding to specific DNA sequences and controlling the rate of transcription of those genes into messenger RNA (mRNA).

TFDP1 typically forms a complex with another transcription factor called E2F, and this complex plays a critical role in regulating the cell cycle and promoting cell division. TFDP1 can act as both a transcriptional activator and repressor, depending on which E2F family member it binds to and the specific context of the cell.

Mutations or dysregulation of TFDP1 have been implicated in various human diseases, including cancer. For example, overexpression of TFDP1 has been observed in several types of cancer, such as breast, lung, and prostate cancer, and is often associated with poor clinical outcomes. Therefore, understanding the role of TFDP1 in gene regulation and cellular processes may provide insights into the development of new therapeutic strategies for treating human diseases.

Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 9 (CDK9) is a type of serine/threonine protein kinase that plays a crucial role in the regulation of transcription. It forms a complex with cyclin T1, K or H and gets activated by phosphorylation. This complex, known as P-TEFb, is involved in the phosphorylation and activation of the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II, which is essential for the transcription elongation of most protein-coding genes. CDK9 also regulates other cellular processes such as apoptosis, differentiation, and cell cycle progression. Dysregulation of CDK9 has been implicated in various diseases including cancer.

Histones are highly alkaline proteins found in the chromatin of eukaryotic cells. They are rich in basic amino acid residues, such as arginine and lysine, which give them their positive charge. Histones play a crucial role in packaging DNA into a more compact structure within the nucleus by forming a complex with it called a nucleosome. Each nucleosome contains about 146 base pairs of DNA wrapped around an octamer of eight histone proteins (two each of H2A, H2B, H3, and H4). The N-terminal tails of these histones are subject to various post-translational modifications, such as methylation, acetylation, and phosphorylation, which can influence chromatin structure and gene expression. Histone variants also exist, which can contribute to the regulation of specific genes and other nuclear processes.

Antineoplastic agents are a class of drugs used to treat malignant neoplasms or cancer. These agents work by inhibiting the growth and proliferation of cancer cells, either by killing them or preventing their division and replication. Antineoplastic agents can be classified based on their mechanism of action, such as alkylating agents, antimetabolites, topoisomerase inhibitors, mitotic inhibitors, and targeted therapy agents.

Alkylating agents work by adding alkyl groups to DNA, which can cause cross-linking of DNA strands and ultimately lead to cell death. Antimetabolites interfere with the metabolic processes necessary for DNA synthesis and replication, while topoisomerase inhibitors prevent the relaxation of supercoiled DNA during replication. Mitotic inhibitors disrupt the normal functioning of the mitotic spindle, which is essential for cell division. Targeted therapy agents are designed to target specific molecular abnormalities in cancer cells, such as mutated oncogenes or dysregulated signaling pathways.

It's important to note that antineoplastic agents can also affect normal cells and tissues, leading to various side effects such as nausea, vomiting, hair loss, and myelosuppression (suppression of bone marrow function). Therefore, the use of these drugs requires careful monitoring and management of their potential adverse effects.

Phosphoprotein phosphatases (PPPs) are a family of enzymes that play a crucial role in the regulation of various cellular processes by removing phosphate groups from serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues on proteins. Phosphorylation is a post-translational modification that regulates protein function, localization, and stability, and dephosphorylation by PPPs is essential for maintaining the balance of this regulation.

The PPP family includes several subfamilies, such as PP1, PP2A, PP2B (also known as calcineurin), PP4, PP5, and PP6. Each subfamily has distinct substrate specificities and regulatory mechanisms. For example, PP1 and PP2A are involved in the regulation of metabolism, signal transduction, and cell cycle progression, while PP2B is involved in immune response and calcium signaling.

Dysregulation of PPPs has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and cardiovascular disease. Therefore, understanding the function and regulation of PPPs is important for developing therapeutic strategies to target these diseases.

Bivalvia is a class of mollusks, also known as "pelecypods," that have a laterally compressed body and two shells or valves. These valves are hinged together on one side and can be opened and closed to allow the animal to feed or withdraw into its shell for protection.

Bivalves include clams, oysters, mussels, scallops, and numerous other species. They are characterized by their simple body structure, which consists of a muscular foot used for burrowing or anchoring, a soft mantle that secretes the shell, and gills that serve both as respiratory organs and feeding structures.

Bivalves play an important role in aquatic ecosystems as filter feeders, helping to maintain water quality by removing particles and organic matter from the water column. They are also commercially important as a source of food for humans and other animals, and their shells have been used historically for various purposes such as tools, jewelry, and building materials.

Proto-oncogene proteins, such as c-Myc, are crucial regulators of normal cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis (programmed cell death). When proto-oncogenes undergo mutations or alterations in their regulation, they can become overactive or overexpressed, leading to the formation of oncogenes. Oncogenic forms of c-Myc contribute to uncontrolled cell growth and division, which can ultimately result in cancer development.

The c-Myc protein is a transcription factor that binds to specific DNA sequences, influencing the expression of target genes involved in various cellular processes, such as:

1. Cell cycle progression: c-Myc promotes the expression of genes required for the G1 to S phase transition, driving cells into the DNA synthesis and division phase.
2. Metabolism: c-Myc regulates genes associated with glucose metabolism, glycolysis, and mitochondrial function, enhancing energy production in rapidly dividing cells.
3. Apoptosis: c-Myc can either promote or inhibit apoptosis, depending on the cellular context and the presence of other regulatory factors.
4. Differentiation: c-Myc generally inhibits differentiation by repressing genes that are necessary for specialized cell functions.
5. Angiogenesis: c-Myc can induce the expression of pro-angiogenic factors, promoting the formation of new blood vessels to support tumor growth.

Dysregulation of c-Myc is frequently observed in various types of cancer, making it an important therapeutic target for cancer treatment.

Ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes (UBCs or E2 enzymes) are a family of enzymes that play a crucial role in the ubiquitination process, which is a post-translational modification of proteins. This process involves the covalent attachment of the protein ubiquitin to specific lysine residues on target proteins, ultimately leading to their degradation by the 26S proteasome.

Ubiquitination is a multi-step process that requires the coordinated action of three types of enzymes: E1 (ubiquitin-activating), E2 (ubiquitin-conjugating), and E3 (ubiquitin ligases). Ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes are responsible for transferring ubiquitin from the E1 enzyme to the target protein, which is facilitated by an E3 ubiquitin ligase. The human genome encodes around 40 different UBCs, each with unique substrate specificities and functions in various cellular processes, such as protein degradation, DNA repair, and signal transduction.

Ubiquitination is a highly regulated process that can be reversed by the action of deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs), which remove ubiquitin molecules from target proteins. Dysregulation of the ubiquitination pathway has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and inflammatory conditions.

Ubiquitin-protein ligases, also known as E3 ubiquitin ligases, are a group of enzymes that play a crucial role in the ubiquitination process. Ubiquitination is a post-translational modification where ubiquitin molecules are attached to specific target proteins, marking them for degradation by the proteasome or for other regulatory functions.

Ubiquitin-protein ligases catalyze the final step in this process by binding to both the ubiquitin protein and the target protein, facilitating the transfer of ubiquitin from an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme to the target protein. There are several different types of ubiquitin-protein ligases, each with their own specificity for particular target proteins and regulatory functions.

Ubiquitin-protein ligases have been implicated in various cellular processes such as protein degradation, DNA repair, signal transduction, and regulation of the cell cycle. Dysregulation of ubiquitination has been associated with several diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and inflammatory responses. Therefore, understanding the function and regulation of ubiquitin-protein ligases is an important area of research in biology and medicine.

Retinoblastoma-Binding Protein 1 (RBP1) is not a medical term itself, but it is a protein that has been studied in the context of cancer research, including retinoblastoma. According to scientific and medical literature, RBP1 is a protein that binds to the retinoblastoma protein (pRb), which is a tumor suppressor protein. The binding of RBP1 to pRb can influence the activity of this tumor suppressor and contribute to the regulation of the cell cycle and cell growth.

In the case of retinoblastoma, mutations in the RB1 gene, which encodes for the pRb protein, have been identified as a cause of this rare eye cancer in children. However, the role of RBP1 in retinoblastoma or other cancers is not well-defined and requires further research to fully understand its implications in disease development and potential therapeutic targets.

Karyopherins are a group of proteins involved in the nuclear transport of molecules across the nuclear envelope. They are responsible for recognizing and binding to specific signal sequences, known as nuclear localization signals (NLS) or nuclear export signals (NES), on cargo proteins. This interaction allows the karyopherin-cargo complex to be translocated through the nuclear pore complex (NPC) by either importin-β or exportin-β karyopherins, respectively. After the transport is complete, the cargo is released and the karyopherin is recycled back to the cytoplasm. This process plays a crucial role in regulating various cellular activities such as gene expression, DNA replication, and signal transduction.

Cell nucleus division, also known as nuclear division, is the process by which the genetic material within the cell nucleus, referred to as chromosomes, is separated into two equal sets in preparation for cell division. This process results in the formation of two daughter nuclei, each with a complete set of chromosomes.

There are two types of nuclear division: mitosis and meiosis.

Mitosis is the type of nuclear division that occurs in somatic cells (cells other than sex cells) during growth, repair, and maintenance of tissues. It results in the formation of two genetically identical daughter nuclei. The process of mitosis can be divided into several stages: prophase, prometaphase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase.

Meiosis, on the other hand, is the type of nuclear division that occurs in sex cells (sperm and egg cells) during sexual reproduction. It results in the formation of four genetically unique daughter nuclei, each with half the number of chromosomes as the parent cell. Meiosis consists of two consecutive divisions: meiosis I and meiosis II.

Both types of nuclear division are essential for the growth, development, and reproduction of living organisms.

Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the genetic material present in the cells of organisms where it is responsible for the storage and transmission of hereditary information. DNA is a long molecule that consists of two strands coiled together to form a double helix. Each strand is made up of a series of four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T) - that are linked together by phosphate and sugar groups. The sequence of these bases along the length of the molecule encodes genetic information, with A always pairing with T and C always pairing with G. This base-pairing allows for the replication and transcription of DNA, which are essential processes in the functioning and reproduction of all living organisms.

Protein-Tyrosine Kinases (PTKs) are a type of enzyme that plays a crucial role in various cellular functions, including signal transduction, cell growth, differentiation, and metabolism. They catalyze the transfer of a phosphate group from ATP to the tyrosine residues of proteins, thereby modifying their activity, localization, or interaction with other molecules.

PTKs can be divided into two main categories: receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and non-receptor tyrosine kinases (NRTKs). RTKs are transmembrane proteins that become activated upon binding to specific ligands, such as growth factors or hormones. NRTKs, on the other hand, are intracellular enzymes that can be activated by various signals, including receptor-mediated signaling and intracellular messengers.

Dysregulation of PTK activity has been implicated in several diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, and inflammatory disorders. Therefore, PTKs are important targets for drug development and therapy.

Cell differentiation is the process by which a less specialized cell, or stem cell, becomes a more specialized cell type with specific functions and structures. This process involves changes in gene expression, which are regulated by various intracellular signaling pathways and transcription factors. Differentiation results in the development of distinct cell types that make up tissues and organs in multicellular organisms. It is a crucial aspect of embryonic development, tissue repair, and maintenance of homeostasis in the body.

Sequence homology, amino acid, refers to the similarity in the order of amino acids in a protein or a portion of a protein between two or more species. This similarity can be used to infer evolutionary relationships and functional similarities between proteins. The higher the degree of sequence homology, the more likely it is that the proteins are related and have similar functions. Sequence homology can be determined through various methods such as pairwise alignment or multiple sequence alignment, which compare the sequences and calculate a score based on the number and type of matching amino acids.

Antimitotic agents are a class of chemotherapeutic drugs that work by disrupting the normal mitosis (cell division) process in cells. These agents bind to and inhibit the function of specific proteins involved in the formation of the mitotic spindle, which is essential for proper chromosome separation during cell division.

By doing so, antimitotic agents prevent cancer cells from dividing and growing, ultimately leading to their death. However, these drugs can also affect normal cells that divide rapidly, such as those in the bone marrow, digestive tract, and hair follicles, which can result in side effects like anemia, nausea, vomiting, and hair loss.

Examples of antimitotic agents include vincristine, vinblastine, paclitaxel, docetaxel, and ixabepilone. They are often used to treat various types of cancer, such as leukemia, lymphoma, breast cancer, ovarian cancer, and lung cancer.

Up-regulation is a term used in molecular biology and medicine to describe an increase in the expression or activity of a gene, protein, or receptor in response to a stimulus. This can occur through various mechanisms such as increased transcription, translation, or reduced degradation of the molecule. Up-regulation can have important functional consequences, for example, enhancing the sensitivity or response of a cell to a hormone, neurotransmitter, or drug. It is a normal physiological process that can also be induced by disease or pharmacological interventions.

Kinetin is a type of plant growth hormone, specifically a cytokinin. It plays a crucial role in cell division and differentiation, as well as promoting growth and delaying senescence (aging) in plants. Kinetin has also been studied for its potential use in various medical applications, including wound healing, tissue culture, and skin care products. However, it is primarily known for its role in plant biology.

Neoplastic cell transformation is a process in which a normal cell undergoes genetic alterations that cause it to become cancerous or malignant. This process involves changes in the cell's DNA that result in uncontrolled cell growth and division, loss of contact inhibition, and the ability to invade surrounding tissues and metastasize (spread) to other parts of the body.

Neoplastic transformation can occur as a result of various factors, including genetic mutations, exposure to carcinogens, viral infections, chronic inflammation, and aging. These changes can lead to the activation of oncogenes or the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, which regulate cell growth and division.

The transformation of normal cells into cancerous cells is a complex and multi-step process that involves multiple genetic and epigenetic alterations. It is characterized by several hallmarks, including sustained proliferative signaling, evasion of growth suppressors, resistance to cell death, enabling replicative immortality, induction of angiogenesis, activation of invasion and metastasis, reprogramming of energy metabolism, and evading immune destruction.

Neoplastic cell transformation is a fundamental concept in cancer biology and is critical for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying cancer development and progression. It also has important implications for cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment, as identifying the specific genetic alterations that underlie neoplastic transformation can help guide targeted therapies and personalized medicine approaches.

Complementary DNA (cDNA) is a type of DNA that is synthesized from a single-stranded RNA molecule through the process of reverse transcription. In this process, the enzyme reverse transcriptase uses an RNA molecule as a template to synthesize a complementary DNA strand. The resulting cDNA is therefore complementary to the original RNA molecule and is a copy of its coding sequence, but it does not contain non-coding regions such as introns that are present in genomic DNA.

Complementary DNA is often used in molecular biology research to study gene expression, protein function, and other genetic phenomena. For example, cDNA can be used to create cDNA libraries, which are collections of cloned cDNA fragments that represent the expressed genes in a particular cell type or tissue. These libraries can then be screened for specific genes or gene products of interest. Additionally, cDNA can be used to produce recombinant proteins in heterologous expression systems, allowing researchers to study the structure and function of proteins that may be difficult to express or purify from their native sources.

Chromosome segregation is the process that occurs during cell division (mitosis or meiosis) where replicated chromosomes are separated and distributed equally into two daughter cells. Each chromosome consists of two sister chromatids, which are identical copies of genetic material. During chromosome segregation, these sister chromatids are pulled apart by a structure called the mitotic spindle and moved to opposite poles of the cell. This ensures that each new cell receives one copy of each chromosome, preserving the correct number and composition of chromosomes in the organism.

Repressor proteins are a type of regulatory protein in molecular biology that suppress the transcription of specific genes into messenger RNA (mRNA) by binding to DNA. They function as part of gene regulation processes, often working in conjunction with an operator region and a promoter region within the DNA molecule. Repressor proteins can be activated or deactivated by various signals, allowing for precise control over gene expression in response to changing cellular conditions.

There are two main types of repressor proteins:

1. DNA-binding repressors: These directly bind to specific DNA sequences (operator regions) near the target gene and prevent RNA polymerase from transcribing the gene into mRNA.
2. Allosteric repressors: These bind to effector molecules, which then cause a conformational change in the repressor protein, enabling it to bind to DNA and inhibit transcription.

Repressor proteins play crucial roles in various biological processes, such as development, metabolism, and stress response, by controlling gene expression patterns in cells.

Immunoprecipitation (IP) is a research technique used in molecular biology and immunology to isolate specific antigens or antibodies from a mixture. It involves the use of an antibody that recognizes and binds to a specific antigen, which is then precipitated out of solution using various methods, such as centrifugation or chemical cross-linking.

In this technique, an antibody is first incubated with a sample containing the antigen of interest. The antibody specifically binds to the antigen, forming an immune complex. This complex can then be captured by adding protein A or G agarose beads, which bind to the constant region of the antibody. The beads are then washed to remove any unbound proteins, leaving behind the precipitated antigen-antibody complex.

Immunoprecipitation is a powerful tool for studying protein-protein interactions, post-translational modifications, and signal transduction pathways. It can also be used to detect and quantify specific proteins in biological samples, such as cells or tissues, and to identify potential biomarkers of disease.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Potoroidae" is not a medical term. It is a taxonomic family within the order Diprotodontia, which includes several species of rat-kangaroos that are native to Australia. These small marsupials are known for their hopping locomotion and nocturnal behavior. If you have any questions about veterinary or medical terminology, I would be happy to help with those!

Proteolysis is the biological process of breaking down proteins into smaller polypeptides or individual amino acids by the action of enzymes called proteases. This process is essential for various physiological functions, including digestion, protein catabolism, cell signaling, and regulation of numerous biological activities. Dysregulation of proteolysis can contribute to several pathological conditions, such as cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and inflammatory disorders.

Invertebrate hormones refer to the chemical messengers that regulate various physiological processes in invertebrate animals, which include insects, mollusks, worms, and other animals without a backbone. These hormones are produced by specialized endocrine cells or glands and released into the bloodstream to target organs, where they elicit specific responses that help control growth, development, reproduction, metabolism, and behavior.

Examples of invertebrate hormones include:

1. Ecdysteroids: These are steroid hormones found in arthropods such as insects and crustaceans. They regulate molting (ecdysis) and metamorphosis by stimulating the growth and differentiation of new cuticle layers.
2. Juvenile hormone (JH): This is a sesquiterpenoid hormone produced by the corpora allata glands in insects. JH plays a crucial role in maintaining the juvenile stage, regulating reproduction, and controlling diapause (a period of suspended development during unfavorable conditions).
3. Neuropeptides: These are short chains of amino acids that act as hormones or neurotransmitters in invertebrates. They regulate various functions such as feeding behavior, growth, reproduction, and circadian rhythms. Examples include the neuropeptide F (NPF), which controls food intake and energy balance, and the insulin-like peptides (ILPs) that modulate metabolism and growth.
4. Molluscan cardioactive peptides: These are neuropeptides found in mollusks that regulate heart function by controlling heart rate and contractility. An example is FMRFamide, which has been identified in various mollusk species and influences several physiological processes, including feeding behavior, muscle contraction, and reproduction.
5. Vertebrate-like hormones: Some invertebrates produce hormones that are structurally and functionally similar to those found in vertebrates. For example, some annelids (segmented worms) and cephalopods (squid and octopus) have insulin-like peptides that regulate metabolism and growth, while certain echinoderms (starfish and sea urchins) produce steroid hormones that control reproduction.

In summary, invertebrates utilize various types of hormones to regulate their physiological functions, including neuropeptides, cardioactive peptides, insulin-like peptides, and vertebrate-like hormones. These hormones play crucial roles in controlling growth, development, reproduction, feeding behavior, and other essential processes that maintain homeostasis and ensure survival. Understanding the mechanisms of hormone action in invertebrates can provide valuable insights into the evolution of hormonal systems and their functions across different animal taxa.

Transcriptional activation is the process by which a cell increases the rate of transcription of specific genes from DNA to RNA. This process is tightly regulated and plays a crucial role in various biological processes, including development, differentiation, and response to environmental stimuli.

Transcriptional activation occurs when transcription factors (proteins that bind to specific DNA sequences) interact with the promoter region of a gene and recruit co-activator proteins. These co-activators help to remodel the chromatin structure around the gene, making it more accessible for the transcription machinery to bind and initiate transcription.

Transcriptional activation can be regulated at multiple levels, including the availability and activity of transcription factors, the modification of histone proteins, and the recruitment of co-activators or co-repressors. Dysregulation of transcriptional activation has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer and genetic disorders.

Cyclin D / CDK4, Cyclin D / CDK6, and Cyclin E / CDK2 - regulates transition from G1 to S phase. G2/M cyclins - essential for ... The rise in presence of G1/S cyclins is paralleled by a rise in S cyclins. G1 cyclins do not behave like the other cyclins, in ... G1 cyclins, G1/S cyclins, S cyclins, and M cyclins. This division is useful when talking about most cell cycles, but it is not ... Note that the cyclins are now classified according to their conserved cyclin box structure, and not all these cyclins alter in ...
The model is based on a bicyclic phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cascade involving cyclin and cdc2 kinase. By constructing ... The model is based on a bicyclic phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cascade involving cyclin and cdc2 kinase. By constructing ...
Conserved Protein Domain Family CYCLIN_RB, RB, also called p105-Rb, pRb, or pp110, is a key regulator of entry into cell ... RB contains one cyclin box. The cyclin box is a protein binding domain. ... cyclin box found in retinoblastoma-associated protein (RB) and similar proteins. RB, also called p105-Rb, pRb, or pp110, is a ... It promotes G0-G1 transition when phosphorylated by CDK3/cyclin-C. It also acts as a transcription repressor of E2F1 target ...
Here we compare the specificity of two budding yeast cyclins, the S-phase cyclin Clb5 and the M-phase cyclin Clb2, in the ... whose periodic activation is driven by cyclins. Different cyclins promote distinct cell-cycle events, but the molecular basis ... Cell-cycle events are controlled by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), ... Here we compare the specificity of two budding yeast cyclins, the S-phase cyclin Clb5 and the M-phase cyclin Clb2, in the ...
Free download of Cyclin Font. Released in 2000 by Apostrophic Lab and licensed for personal and commercial-use. Click now to ...
... regulates expression of cyclin D1. Furthermore, the group showed that many cancer patients encode a form of cyclin D1 that ... Protien Cyclin D1 governs microRNA processing in breast cancer. Date:. November 29, 2013. Source:. Thomas Jefferson University ... Cyclin D1, a protein that helps push a replicating cell through the cell cycle also mediates the processing and generation of ... Because the cyclin D1 gene has been implicated in a variety of other human cancers these findings may have broad implications ...
The Cyclin D-Cdk4,6/INK4/Rb/E2F pathway plays a key role in controlling cell growth by integrating multiple mitogenic and ... Cyclin D-dependent kinases, INK4 inhibitors and cancer Biochim Biophys Acta. 2002 Mar 14;1602(1):73-87. doi: 10.1016/s0304-419x ... The Cyclin D-Cdk4,6/INK4/Rb/E2F pathway plays a key role in controlling cell growth by integrating multiple mitogenic and ... vast majority of human tumors by genetic and epigenetic alterations that target at least some of its key members such as Cyclin ...
The discovery of a novel class of inhibitors of cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs) is described. Starting from compound 1, showing ... Orally Available Cyclin Dependent Kinase Inhibitor.. Brasca, M.G., Amboldi, N., Ballinari, D., Cameron, A.D., Casale, E., Cervi ... STRUCTURE OF CDK2-CYCLIN A WITH PHA-848125. *PDB DOI: https://doi.org/10.2210/pdb2WIH/pdb ... STRUCTURE OF CDK2-CYCLIN A WITH PHA-848125 ... CYCLIN-A2. B, D. 265. Homo sapiens. Mutation(s): 0 Gene Names: ...
Neither DmCdc2, DmCdc2c (alias DmCdk2), cyclin A, nor cyclin B co-sedimented with cyclin C. They were present in complexes in ... Because analysis of the same embryos with cyclin A and cyclin B antisera revealed mitotic destruction of these cyclins, it ... Drosophila Cdk8, a kinase partner of cyclin C that interacts with the large subunit of RNA polymerase II. A number of cyclins ... Cyclin C: Biological Overview , References Gene name - Cyclin C Synonyms - Cytological map position - 88D6-88D6 Function - ...
Learn about Cyclin A at online-medical-dictionary.org ... Cyclin, Type A. Cyclins, Type A. E1A p60. Type A Cyclin. Type A ... A cyclin subtype that has specificity for CDC2 PROTEIN KINASE and CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE 2. It plays a role in progression of ... Cyclin A. Synonyms. Adenovirus E1A Associated Protein p60. Adenovirus E1A-Associated Protein p60. ...
David Bartels lab contains the insert Cyclin D2 and is published in Cell. 2009 Aug 21. 138(4):673-84. This plasmid is ... Plasmid pMSCV Cyclin D2 long-wt from Dr. ... pMSCV Cyclin D2 long-wt was a gift from David Bartel (Addgene ...
View mouse Cdk15 Chr1:59296029-59391656 with: phenotypes, sequences, polymorphisms, proteins, references, function
View mouse Cdk9 Chr2:32595796-32603088 with: phenotypes, sequences, polymorphisms, proteins, references, function, expression
Cyclin C has been identified in both human and chicken species. Like many cyclins, the expression of cyclin C oscillates ... Cyclin C has been identified in both human and chicken species. Like many cyclins, the expression of cyclin C oscillates ... Thus, cyclins have been placed into functional groups as follows: Group 1 cyclins (A, B, D1, D2, D3, E and F) function ... Thus, cyclins have been placed into functional groups as follows: Group 1 cyclins (A, B, D1, D2, D3, E and F) function ...
Cyclin D1 from Neuroscience News features breaking science news from research labs, scientists and colleges around the world. ...
Protein target information for Cyclin 1 (Plasmodium falciparum 3D7). Find diseases associated with this biological target and ...
View Mouse Monoclonal anti-Cyclin H Antibody (1B8) (H00000902-M01). Validated Applications: WB, ELISA, ICC/IF, IHC. Validated ... Reviews for Cyclin H Antibody (H00000902-M01) (0) There are no reviews for Cyclin H Antibody (H00000902-M01). By submitting a ... Blogs on Cyclin H. There are no specific blogs for Cyclin H, but you can read our latest blog posts. ... Diseases for Cyclin H Antibody (H00000902-M01). Discover more about diseases related to Cyclin H Antibody (H00000902-M01). ...
The worlds first wiki where authorship really matters. Due credit and reputation for authors. Imagine a global collaborative knowledge base for original thoughts.
STRUCTURE OF HUMAN THR160-PHOSPHO CDK2-CYCLIN A COMPLEXED WITH A BISANILINOPYRIMIDINE INHIBITOR ... Dissecting the Determinants of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 2 and Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 4 Inhibitor Selectivity.. Pratt, D.J., ... Cyclin dependent kinases are a key family of kinases involved in cell cycle regulation and are an attractive target for cancer ... Cyclin dependent kinases are a key family of kinases involved in cell cycle regulation and are an attractive target for cancer ...
Structure of human Thr160-phospho CDK2/cyclin A complexed with the inhibitor NU6086 ... Structure-based design of a potent purine-based cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor.. Davies, T.G., Bentley, J., Arris, C.E., ... Aberrant control of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) is a central feature of the molecular pathology of cancer. Iterative ... Aberrant control of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) is a central feature of the molecular pathology of cancer. Iterative ...
Cyclin I is an atypical cyclin because it is most abundant in postmitotic cells. We previously showed that cyclin I does not ... we investigated the mechanism by which cyclin I safeguards against apoptosis and found that cyclin I bound and activated cyclin ... or p35/cyclin I (lanes 4, 8). (. B. ) To compare the kinase kinetics by which cyclin I-Cdk5 phosphorylates tau in comparison ... Cyclin I-Cdk5 showed phosphorylation kinetics similar to those of p35-Cdk5. Phosphorylation of tau was already evident after 5 ...
Elevate-KHS Pro Cyclin: 3 Podiums & The Green Jersey. Elevate-KHS Pro Cycling Sprint to First UCI America Tour Victory at Joe ...
The expression of Cyclin D1 mRNA was detected by qRT-PCR. The expression of Cyclin D1 protein was detected by enzyme-linked ... Downregulation of miR-4755-5p promotes fluoride-induced osteoblast activation via tageting Cyclin D1.. Author: Gao J, Qin Y, ... Based on our previous miRNA sequence results, bioinformatic analysis was used to predict miR-4755-5p targeting Cyclin D1. ... The relative miR-4755-5p expression showed a negative correlation with Cyclin D1 expression. Subsequently, in human osteoblasts ...
With kids bikes from balance bikes, first pedal bikes, hybrid bikes to mountain & road bikes, Rutland Cycling has a huge choice of Frog bikes available.
Rabbit Monoclonal Cyclin D1 antibody [RM241]. Validated in WB, IHC-P. Tested in Human. ... Cyclins function as regulators of CDK kinases. Different cyclins exhibit distinct expression and degradation patterns which ... This cyclin forms a complex with and functions as a regulatory subunit of CDK4 or CDK6, whose activity is required for cell ... There are currently no references for Cyclin D1 antibody [RM241] (GTX33611). Be the first to share your publications with this ...
Meanwhile, cyclins needed for the next checkpoints accumulate.. To regulate the cell cycle, cyclins must be bound to a Cyclin- ... Cyclins can be categorized as G1, G1/S, S, or M cyclins based on the cell cycle phase or transition they are most involved in. ... Cyclins and cyclin dependent kinases, or CDK.. By default, CDKs are always present in a cell in an inactivated form. They must ... The CDK is only active when bound to a cyclin. Depending on the cyclin they are bound to, CDKs are directed to different target ...
The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor AT7519 accelerates neutrophil apoptosis in sepsis-related acute respiratory distress ... The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor AT7519 accelerates neutrophil apoptosis in sepsis-related acute respiratory distress ... The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor AT7519 accelerates neutrophil apoptosis in sepsis-related acute respiratory distress ...
Detect and quantitate total cellular cyclin D1 using a homogeneous AlphaLISA® SureFire® Ultra™ assay ...
ELM data can be downloaded & distributed for non-commercial use according to the ELM Software License Agreement ...
Regulation of cyclin-substrate docking by a G1 arrest signaling pathway and the Cdk inhibitor Far1. Curr Biol. 2014 Jun 16; 24( ... "Cyclins" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicines controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) ... Ishidate T, Elewa A, Kim S, Mello CC, Shirayama M. Divide and differentiate: CDK/Cyclins and the art of development. Cell Cycle ... Notch signaling mediates G1/S cell-cycle progression in T cells via cyclin D3 and its dependent kinases. Blood. 2009 Feb 19; ...
  • Cyclins, when bound with the dependent kinases, such as the p34/cdc2/cdk1 protein, form the maturation-promoting factor. (wikipedia.org)
  • Here we show that Smad3 is a major physiological substrate of the G1 cyclin-dependent kinases CDK4 and CDK2. (nih.gov)
  • Retinoblastoma protein (Rb) interacts with cyclin-dependent kinases and regulates the transcription of genes necessary for progression through the S phase of the cell cycle. (embl-heidelberg.de)
  • Cyclins function as regulators of CDK kinases. (thermofisher.com)
  • Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are serine/threonine kinases that control the eukaryotic cell cycle. (gene-tools.com)
  • Cell cycle transitions are generally triggered by variation in the activity of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) bound to cyclins. (elifesciences.org)
  • Our results provide evidence that during Plasmodium male gametogony, this divergent cyclin/CDK pair fills the functional space of other eukaryotic cell-cycle kinases controlling DNA replication. (elifesciences.org)
  • Central components of these networks are the cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). (elifesciences.org)
  • GeneQuery™ Human Cyclins and Cyclin-dependent Kinases qPCR. (sciencellonline.com)
  • This kit is designed to facilitate gene expression profiling of 40 selected cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). (sciencellonline.com)
  • Further studies on its effect on cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) [not measured in our study] may shed light on new treatment options for COVID-19. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Binding of G1 cyclins to cyclin-dependent kinases leads to phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein and progression through G 1 and S phases of the cell cycle. (mssm.edu)
  • The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 is induced by both p53-dependent and -independent mechanisms following stress, and induction of p21 may cause cell cycle arrest. (aacrjournals.org)
  • The ubiquitin ligase SCF(Cdc4) (Skp1/Cul1/F-box protein) recognizes its substrate, the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor Sic1, in a multisite phosphorylation-dependent manner. (mshri.on.ca)
  • The expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27(kip1) in human tumors and normal tissues was investigated using a panel of novel anti-p27(kip1) mAbs. (ox.ac.uk)
  • We aimed to investigate whether there is an association between the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2B antisense RNA 1 (CDKN2B-AS1) rs1333049 and zinc finger homeobox 3 (ZFHX3) rs2106261 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and the degree of COVID-19 severity. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2B antisense RNA 1 (CDKN2B-AS1) spans approximately 126.3 kb, overlaps with cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2B (CDKN2B) (p15) at the 5´ end, comprises 20 exons that are prone to alternative splicing and is reported to be linked to CAD risk, hypertension (HTN) and stroke [ 13 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Cyclin is a family of proteins that controls the progression of a cell through the cell cycle by activating cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) enzymes or group of enzymes required for synthesis of cell cycle. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, the amino-terminal regions of S and M cyclins contain short destruction-box motifs that target these proteins for proteolysis in mitosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Modulates the activity of a cyclin-dependent protein serine/threonine kinase, enzymes of the protein kinase family that are regulated through association with cyclins and other proteins. (yeastgenome.org)
  • There are 61335 CYCLIN domains in 41443 proteins in SMART's nrdb database. (embl-heidelberg.de)
  • Taxonomic distribution of proteins containing CYCLIN domain. (embl-heidelberg.de)
  • The complete taxonomic breakdown of all proteins with CYCLIN domain is also avaliable . (embl-heidelberg.de)
  • Click on the protein counts, or double click on taxonomic names to display all proteins containing CYCLIN domain in the selected taxonomic class. (embl-heidelberg.de)
  • Structures of cyclins, Rb and TFIIB reveal that a common motif occurs in proteins regulating three consecutive events of cell-cycle control. (embl-heidelberg.de)
  • Recent results on the structures of two cyclins, cyclin A and cyclin H, and two transcription factor mediator proteins, TFIIB and the A pocket region of the retinoblastoma tumour suppressor protein (Rb), show that they share domains with a strikingly similar alpha-helical topology, despite remote sequence identity. (embl-heidelberg.de)
  • Cyclin D proteins promote proliferation in G1 and typically are down-regulated before differentiation. (ca.gov)
  • In chapter 3 of this work, I report my identification of all cyclin domain-containing proteins in A. nidulans and establish that this cyclin repertoire is well-conserved in closely and distantly related filamentous ascomycetes. (ku.edu)
  • Cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9) transcriptionally regulates several proteins and cellular pathways central to radiation induced tissue injury. (oncotarget.com)
  • Interacting selectively and non-covalently with cyclins, proteins whose levels in a cell varies markedly during the cell cycle, rising steadily until mitosis, then falling abruptly to zero. (ntu.edu.sg)
  • Cyclins are a family of proteins that control how cells proceed through the multi-step cycle of cell division. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Cells lacking cyclin B can enter mitosis and phosphorylate most mitotic proteins , because of parallel PP2AB55 phosphatase inactivation by Greatwall kinase . (bvsalud.org)
  • A cyclin forms a complex with Cdk, which begins to activate but the complete activation requires phosphorylation, as well. (wikipedia.org)
  • In addition, cyclin D1 positively regulates protein phosphorylation, mammary gland epithelial cell proliferation, and fat cell differentiation. (thermofisher.com)
  • D-type cyclin-CDK complexes act to inactivate the growth-suppressive function of the Rb protein through its phosphorylation, and titrate CDK inhibitors such as p21Cip1 and p27Kip1. (thermofisher.com)
  • Without growth factor-mediated stimulation, Cyclin D1 is unstable, and undergoes ubiquitin-mediated degradation, which is triggered by its phosphorylation. (thermofisher.com)
  • p21CIP1 is a potent, tight-binding inhibitor of Cdks and can inhibit the phosphorylation of Rb by cyclin A-Cdk2, cyclin E-Cdk2, cyclin D1-Cdk4, and cyclin D2-Cdk4 complexes. (nih.gov)
  • In many organisms, initial Cdh1 inactivation at G1/S occurs via phosphorylation by cyclin/CDK complexes which then triggers Cdh1 ubiquitination by the Skp1-Cullin1-F-box (SCF) complex. (ku.edu)
  • Beyond this point, cyclin B /Cdk1 is essential for phosphorylation of a distinct subset of mitotic Cdk1 substrates that are essential to complete cell division . (bvsalud.org)
  • Our results identify how cyclin A , cyclin B and Greatwall kinase coordinate mitotic progression by increasing levels of Cdk1-dependent substrate phosphorylation . (bvsalud.org)
  • Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 modulates nociceptive signaling through direct phosphorylation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1. (nih.gov)
  • Vanadate also increased p21 and Chk1 levels and reduced Cdc25C expression, leading to phosphorylation of Cdc2 and a slight increase in cyclin B1 expression as analyzed by Western blot. (cdc.gov)
  • Catalase, a specific antioxidant for H2O2, decreased vanadate-induced expression of p21 and Chk1, reduced phosphorylation of Cdc2Tyr15, and decreased cyclin B1 levels. (cdc.gov)
  • Several regulatory pathways are involved: (1) activation of p21, (2) an increase of Chk1 expression and inhibition of Cdc25C, which results in phosphorylation of Cdc2 and possible inactivation of cyclin B1/Cdc2 complex. (cdc.gov)
  • Cyclins themselves have no enzymatic activity but have binding sites for some substrates and target the Cdks to specific subcellular locations. (wikipedia.org)
  • IMPORTANCE Giardia lamblia CDKs (GlCDKs) and their cognate cyclins have not yet been studied. (gene-tools.com)
  • Malaria-causing parasites have a life cycle with unique cell-division cycles, and a repertoire of divergent CDKs and cyclins of poorly understood function and interdependency. (elifesciences.org)
  • Cyclin D1 (PRAD-1, bcl-1) is one of the key cell cycle regulators, and functions in association with cdk4 and/or cdk6 by phosphorylating the Rb protein. (thermofisher.com)
  • Cyclin D1 is a cytoplasmic and nuclear protein that is synthesized during G1 phase and assembles with either cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) or CDK6 in response to growth factor stimulation. (thermofisher.com)
  • Cyclin D1 forms a complex with and functions as a regulatory subunit of CDK4 or CDK6, whose activity is required for cell cycle G1/S transition. (thermofisher.com)
  • Here, we show, in diploid human fibroblasts, that cyclosporin A arrested cells in G(1) before cyclin D/cdk4 complex activation and retinoblastoma hyperphosphorylation. (duke.edu)
  • Bioinformatics algorithm analysis predicted that cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) was a direct target of miR-338-3p, and this was experimentally verified by a dual-luciferase reporter assay. (techscience.com)
  • Although one molecule of p21 is sufficient to inhibit cyclin/Cdk complexes ( 22 ), Cip/Kip CKIs have been detected in active cyclin D/Cdk4 complexes ( 24 - 27 ). (aacrjournals.org)
  • p21 was shown to stabilize interactions between Cdk4 and cyclin D and promote the formation of active complexes in a concentration-dependent manner ( 27 ). (aacrjournals.org)
  • Cell changes in the cell cycle like the assembly of mitotic spindles and alignment of sister-chromatids along the spindles are induced by M cyclin- Cdk complexes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Active cyclin/Cdk complexes phosphorylate and inactivate members of the retinoblastoma protein (Rb) family that are negative regulators of G 1 and S-phase progression, leading to induction of E2F-regulated gene expression and cell proliferation. (aacrjournals.org)
  • CKIs bind and inhibit the activity of cyclin/Cdk complexes and negatively regulate cell cycle progression (reviewed in Refs. (aacrjournals.org)
  • These three CKIs contain a conserved region of sequence at the NH 2 terminus that is required and sufficient for the inhibition of cyclin/Cdk complexes, whereas the COOH terminal regions are variable in length and function ( 12, 14 - 16 ). (aacrjournals.org)
  • They can bind and inhibit a broad range of cyclin/Cdk complexes, with a preference for those containing Cdk2 ( 17, 18 ). (aacrjournals.org)
  • Recent studies have suggested that dysregulation of at least 1 of the cyclin D genes ( CCND1, CCND2, and/or CCND3 ) is a common, unifying pathogenic event in multiple myeloma. (medscape.com)
  • This inhibition is a key regulatory step, because it allows the transcription factor Pho4, a substrate for the cyclin-CDK complex, to be unphosphorylated and thereby turn on expression of phosphate-responsive genes. (harvard.edu)
  • The methylation status of Cyclin D2 was correlated with the methylation of nine other tumor suppressor genes published previously from our laboratory on the same set of samples (R. Maruyama et al. (nih.gov)
  • We also compared methylation of cyclin D2 with methylation of nine tumor suppressor genes [published previously from our laboratory (R. Maruyama et al. (nih.gov)
  • [ 8 ] Increased levels of cyclin D1 as detected by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), whether secondary to a translocation or due to other abnormalities, also have been reported to be associated with a favorable prognosis. (medscape.com)
  • This arrest occurred in early G(1) with low levels of cyclin D1 protein. (duke.edu)
  • In different cellular contexts, different pathways assume a dominant role in regulating its expression, whereas their disregulation can contribute to overexpression of cyclin D1 in tumorigenesis. (portlandpress.com)
  • The crystal structure of the human cyclinA-cyclin-dependent kinase2 (CDK2)-ATP complex has been determined at 2.3 A resolution. (rcsb.org)
  • The A and B boxes each contain the cyclin-fold structural motif, with the LxCxE-binding site on the B-box cyclin fold being similar to a Cdk2-binding site of cyclin A and to a TBP-binding site of TFIIB. (embl-heidelberg.de)
  • The cyclin-dependent kinase Cdk2 associates with cyclins A, D, and E and has been implicated in the control of the G1 to S phase transition in mammals. (nih.gov)
  • CIP1 encodes a novel 21 kd protein that is found in cyclin A, cyclin D1, cyclin E, and Cdk2 immunoprecipitates. (nih.gov)
  • The cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4/6 inhibitors belong to a new class of drugs that interrupt proliferation of malignant cells by inhibiting progression through the cell cycle. (nih.gov)
  • Cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4/6 inhibitors have become standard of care in the treatment of hormone receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative metastatic breast cancer. (nih.gov)
  • The significance of cyclin D1 expression in plasma cell myeloma was examined by immunohistochemical analysis using a newly available rabbit monoclonal antibody with superior staining properties. (medscape.com)
  • We used a newly available rabbit monoclonal cyclin D1 antibody with superior staining properties [ 12 ] to study cyclin D1 protein expression in plasma cell myeloma. (medscape.com)
  • The following product was used in this experiment: Cyclin D1 Monoclonal Antibody (3D8) from Thermo Fisher Scientific, catalog # MA5-15650, RRID AB_10978307. (thermofisher.com)
  • Specificity: This antibody recognizes a protein of 55-62kDa, identified as cyclin B1. (scytek.com)
  • Scholars@Duke publication: Calcineurin regulates cyclin D1 accumulation in growth-stimulated fibroblasts. (duke.edu)
  • Although these pharmacological experiments suggested that calcineurin regulates cyclin D1 synthesis, we evaluated the effects of overexpression of activated calcineurin on cyclin D1 synthesis. (duke.edu)
  • Therefore, calcineurin is a Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent target that regulates cyclin D1 accumulation in G(1). (duke.edu)
  • Tumor necrosis factor-alpha regulates cyclin-dependent kinase 5 activity during pain signaling through transcriptional activation of p35. (nih.gov)
  • The oscillations of the cyclins, namely fluctuations in cyclin gene expression and destruction by the ubiquitin mediated proteasome pathway, induce oscillations in Cdk activity to drive the cell cycle. (wikipedia.org)
  • Estrogen-occupied estrogen receptor represses cyclin G2 gene expression and recruits a repressor complex at the cyclin G2 promoter. (nih.gov)
  • Because cyclin D1 mRNA was induced normally in the cyclosporin A-treated cells, we analyzed the half-life of cyclin D1 in the presence of cyclosporin A and found no difference from control cells. (duke.edu)
  • Cyclin A1 mRNA expression in EOC and healthy tissues was quantified by microarray analysis and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). (biomedcentral.com)
  • Expression of cyclins detected immunocytochemically in individual cells in relation to cellular DNA content (cell cycle phase), or in relation to initiation and termination of DNA replication during S-phase, can be measured by flow cytometry. (wikipedia.org)
  • Different cyclins exhibit distinct expression and degradation patterns which contribute to the temporal coordination of each mitotic event. (thermofisher.com)
  • The Cyclin D1 protein has been shown to interact with tumor suppressor protein Rb and the expression of this gene is regulated positively by Rb. (thermofisher.com)
  • Cyclin D1 is a key regulator of cell proliferation and its expression is subject to both transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation. (portlandpress.com)
  • In contrast to the reduction of cyclin D1 with cyclosporin A, ectopic expression of calcium/calmodulin-independent calcineurin promoted synthesis of cyclin D1 during G(1) progression. (duke.edu)
  • We observed that cyclin A1 (CCNA1) protein expression was relatively higher in PCa metastatic lesions in lymph node, lung, and bone/bone marrow. (lu.se)
  • In both primary and metastatic tissues, cyclin A1 expression was also correlated with aromatase (CYP19A1), a key enzyme that directly regulates the local balance of androgens to estrogens. (lu.se)
  • Cyclin A1 expression has been reported in several epithelial malignancies, including testicular, endometrial, and epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). (biomedcentral.com)
  • We analyzed Cyclin A1 expression in EOC and its correlation with clinical features to evaluate Cyclin A1 as a T-cell target in EOC. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The mechanism behind the prolonged TTP in patients with high Cyclin A1 expression warrants further investigation. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The frequent, selectively high expression of Cyclin A1 in EOC makes it a promising target for T-cell therapies. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Transient expression of cyclin D1 is sufficient to promote hepatocyte replication and liver growth in vivo. (laboratorynotes.com)
  • High level expression of p27(kip1) and cyclin D1 in some human breast cancer cells: inverse correlation between the expression of p27(kip1) and degree of malignancy in human breast and colorectal cancers. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Detailed studies demonstrated a correlation between the high level expression of p27(kip1) and cyclin D1 in human breast cancer cells. (ox.ac.uk)
  • This study was conducted to assess patterns of expression and potential gene amplification of the G1 cyclins in 84 patients affected with extremity soft- tissue sarcomas. (mssm.edu)
  • Because estradiol represses expression of the cyclin G2 gene, which encodes a negative regulator of the cell cycle, our aim was to understand the mechanism by which cyclin G2 is repressed by estrogen. (nih.gov)
  • My results also reveal that PucA is the essential cyclin required for CdhA inactivation at the G1/S transition and that there are no other redundant mechanisms for CdhA inactivation in A. nidulans. (ku.edu)
  • Inactivation of cyclin D2 gene in prostate cancers by aberrant promoter methylation. (nih.gov)
  • During a replicative cycle, CRK5 stably interacts with a single Plasmodium -specific cyclin (SOC2), although we obtained no evidence of SOC2 cycling by transcription, translation or degradation. (elifesciences.org)
  • Cyclins can be divided into four classes based on their behaviour in the cell cycle of vertebrate somatic cells and yeast cells: G1 cyclins, G1/S cyclins, S cyclins, and M cyclins. (wikipedia.org)
  • This finding resolves a longstanding question about how cells communicate information about phosphate availability to a cyclin-CDK complex that is a central player in the phosphate-responsive signaling pathway. (harvard.edu)
  • In response to starvation for phosphate, cells increase IP7 levels and IP7 binds to the cyclin-CDK-CDK inhibitor complex and inactivates its kinase activity. (harvard.edu)
  • Cyclin A1 and P450 aromatase promote metastatic homing and growth of stem-like prostate cancer cells in the bone marrow. (lu.se)
  • Cyclin A1 overexpression in the stem-like ALDHhigh subpopulation of PC3M cells, one model of PCa, enabled bone marrow integration and metastatic growth. (lu.se)
  • In the bone marrow, Cyclin A1 and aromatase enhanced local bone marrow-releasing factors, including androgen receptor, estrogen and matrix metalloproteinase MMP9 and promoted hte metastatic growth of PCa cells. (lu.se)
  • In glioma ( 28 ) and in vascular smooth muscle cells ( 29 ), p21 facilitates active cyclin-Cdk complex formation and induces cell proliferation. (aacrjournals.org)
  • As cyclins reach a threshold level, they are thought to drive cells into G2 phase and thus to mitosis. (ntu.edu.sg)
  • The resulting buildup of cyclin D2 in cells triggers them to continue dividing when they otherwise would not have, leading to abnormal cell proliferation. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Tsunekawa Y, Kikkawa T, Osumi N. Asymmetric inheritance of Cyclin D2 maintains proliferative neural stem/progenitor cells: a critical event in brain development and evolution. (medlineplus.gov)
  • We show that cyclin G2 is a primary ER target gene in MCF-7 breast cancer cells that is rapidly and robustly down-regulated by estrogen. (nih.gov)
  • Following estradiol treatment of cells, chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses reveal recruitment of ER to the cyclin G2 regulatory region, dismissal of RNA polymerase II, and recruitment of a complex containing N-CoR and histone deacetylases, leading to a hypoacetylated chromatin state. (nih.gov)
  • Here, we discuss the ability of the NF-κB (nuclear factor κB)/IKK [IκB (inhibitor of NF-κB) kinase] pathways to regulate cyclin D1 gene transcription and also consider the newly discovered role of the SNARP (SNIP1/SkIP-associated RNA processing) complex as a co-transcriptional regulator of cyclin D1 RNA stability. (portlandpress.com)
  • Cyclin D2 helps to regulate a step in the cycle called the G1-S transition, in which the cell moves from the G1 phase, when cell growth occurs, to the S phase, when the cell's DNA is copied (replicated) in preparation for cell division. (medlineplus.gov)
  • In a second set of 44 cases of newly diagnosed plasma cell myeloma in which patients were enrolled in a phase 2 study of melphalan, prednisone, and rituximab, we examined the association of cyclin D1 immunohistochemical staining patterns with other clinicopathologic findings at diagnosis and with progression-free and overall survival. (medscape.com)
  • Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV) encodes a D-type cyclin (ORF72) that binds CDK6 and is likely to contribute to KSHV-related cancers. (wikipedia.org)
  • S cyclins bind to Cdk and the complex directly induces DNA replication. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cyclin A triggers Mitosis either via the Greatwall kinase pathway or Cyclin B. (bvsalud.org)
  • In humans, the CCND1 gene encoding cyclin D1 is present on chromosome 11. (thermofisher.com)
  • The levels of S cyclins remain high, not only throughout S phase, but through G2 and early mitosis as well to promote early events in mitosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • M cyclin concentrations rise as the cell begins to enter mitosis and the concentrations peak at metaphase. (wikipedia.org)
  • The destruction of M cyclins during metaphase and anaphase, after the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint is satisfied, causes the exit of mitosis and cytokinesis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Two mitotic cyclin types, cyclin A and B, exist in higher eukaryotes , but their specialised functions in mitosis are incompletely understood. (bvsalud.org)
  • There are several different cyclins that are active in different parts of the cell cycle and that cause the Cdk to phosphorylate different substrates. (wikipedia.org)
  • The final barrier to mitotic establishment corresponds to nuclear envelope breakdown, which requires a decisive shift in the balance of cyclin-dependent kinase Cdk1 and PP2AB55 activity. (bvsalud.org)
  • Cyclin D1 represses gluconeogenesis via inhibition of the transcriptional coactivator PGC1α. (laboratorynotes.com)
  • Here we show that motoneuron progenitors in the embryonic spinal cord persistently express Cyclin D1 during the initial phase of differentiation, while down-regulating Cyclin D2. (ca.gov)
  • These data identify a cell cycle-independent function for Cyclin D1 in promoting neuronal differentiation, along with a potential genetic pathway through which this function is exerted. (ca.gov)
  • The Cdk- G1/S cyclin complex begins to induce the initial processes of DNA replication, primarily by arresting systems that prevent S phase Cdk activity in G1. (wikipedia.org)
  • The findings showed that immunohistochemical analysis can identify 2 cyclin D1+ subsets of myeloma that display distinct clinicopathologic features but share a favorable prognosis. (medscape.com)
  • Cyclins were originally discovered by R. Timothy Hunt in 1982 while studying the cell cycle of sea urchins. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cyclins were originally named because their concentration varies in a cyclical fashion during the cell cycle. (wikipedia.org)
  • Note that the cyclins are now classified according to their conserved cyclin box structure, and not all these cyclins alter in level through the cell cycle. (wikipedia.org)
  • The cyclins also promote other activities to progress the cell cycle, such as centrosome duplication in vertebrates or spindle pole body in yeast. (wikipedia.org)
  • G1 cyclins do not behave like the other cyclins, in that the concentrations increase gradually (with no oscillation), throughout the cell cycle based on cell growth and the external growth-regulatory signals. (wikipedia.org)
  • The presence of G cyclins coordinate cell growth with the entry to a new cell cycle. (wikipedia.org)
  • The cyclin box fold: protein recognition in cell-cycle and transcription control. (embl-heidelberg.de)
  • The Cyclin D1 protein belongs to the highly conserved cyclin family, whose members are characterized by a dramatic periodicity in protein abundance throughout the cell cycle. (thermofisher.com)
  • Cyclin D1 has been successfully employed and is a promising tool for further studies in both cell cycle biology and cancer associated abnormalities. (thermofisher.com)
  • Cyclin D1 promotes neurogenesis in the developing spinal cord in a cell cycle-independent manner. (ca.gov)
  • Interestingly, we found that Cyclin D1, a well-known key positive regulator of the cell cycle, unexpectedly regulates neuronal specification. (ca.gov)
  • Such role of Cyclin D1 in neuronal specification is not shared by other Cyclin Ds and is independent on its action on the cell cycle. (ca.gov)
  • Loss-of-function and gain-of-function experiments indicate that Cyclin D1 (but not D2) promotes neurogenesis in vivo, a role that can be dissociated from its cell cycle function. (ca.gov)
  • 2015)]. Experiments in our lab with the cold-sensitive γ-tubulin mutant mipAD159 in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans revealed that γ-tubulin has a role in inactivating the anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) resulting in continuous destruction of cyclin B and failure of nuclei to progress through the cell cycle (Nayak et al. (ku.edu)
  • Thus, A. nidulans is a much better model than these yeasts for studying cyclin function and cell cycle regulation in filamentous fungi. (ku.edu)
  • My phylogenetic analyses reveal there are three A. nidulans cyclins that likely carry out cell cycle-related functions (NimECyclin B, PucA, and ClbA). (ku.edu)
  • The neurogenic function of Cyclin D1 appears to be mediated, directly or indirectly, by Hes6, a proneurogenic basic helic-loop-helix transcription factor. (ca.gov)
  • The first of which is the conserved cyclin box, outside of which cyclins are divergent. (wikipedia.org)
  • Your search for reliable Cyclin E1 antibodies ends here. (antibodies-online.com)
  • Utilize our Cyclin E1 antibodies in your research endeavors for dependable Cyclin E1 detection. (antibodies-online.com)
  • Find Cyclin E1 Antibodies for a variety of species such as anti-Human Cyclin E1, anti-Mouse Cyclin E1, anti-Rat Cyclin E1. (antibodies-online.com)
  • Find Cyclin E1 Antibodies validated for a specific application such as WB, IHC, FACS, ELISA. (antibodies-online.com)
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  • Find available monoclonal or polyclonal Cyclin E1 Antibodies. (antibodies-online.com)
  • Find Cyclin E1 Antibodies with a specific conjugate such as Biotin, FITC, Alexa Fluor 488. (antibodies-online.com)
  • Immunohistochemical analyses were conducted using antibodies to cyclins D1, E, and A. Southern blot analysis was performed on DNA available from 53 of 84 patients with a cyclin D1-specific probe. (mssm.edu)
  • Cyclin D2's role in the cell division cycle makes it a key controller of the rate of cell growth and division (proliferation) in the body. (medlineplus.gov)
  • It is less clear how a buildup of cyclin D2 contributes to polydactyly, although the extra digits are probably related to abnormal cell proliferation in the developing hands and feet. (medlineplus.gov)
  • They demonstrated that IP7 regulates the activity of a cyclin-CDK-CDK inhibitor complex involved in relaying information about availability of the nutrient inorganic phosphate. (harvard.edu)
  • This work demonstrates a new mechanism for regulating cyclin-CDK activity, and also provides a glimpse of the complex metabolic network that underlies phosphate sensing and signaling. (harvard.edu)
  • 2010). Deletion of the APC/C co-activator CdhA (the A. nidulans Cdh1 homolog) restores cyclin B accumulation and these and other data demonstrate that γ-tubulin plays an important role in inactivating APC/C-CdhA at the G1/S boundary. (ku.edu)
  • Cyclin D1 is a putative proto-oncogene overexpressed in a wide variety of human neoplasms including mantle cell lymphomas (MCL). (thermofisher.com)
  • Coimmunoprecipitation experiments with GlCDKs and the nine putative G. lamblia cyclins (Glcyclins) identified Glcyclins 3977/14488/17505 and 22394/6584 as cognate partners of GlCDK1 and GlCDK2, respectively. (gene-tools.com)
  • Loss of cyclin A in G2-phase prevents mitotic entry. (bvsalud.org)
  • On multivariate analysis, neither cyclin E nor cyclin A were significant predictors of outcome. (mssm.edu)
  • This is significant as the complement of cyclins found in model yeasts (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Candida albicans) differs considerably from one another and from the great majority of filamentous ascomycetes. (ku.edu)
  • The cyclin D2 protein is regulated by a chemical signaling pathway called the PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway. (medlineplus.gov)
  • [ 3 , 4 ] The most common of these is t(11;14)(q13;q32) involving the cyclin D1 gene ( CCND1 ) and IGH, which is present in approximately 15% to 20% of cases. (medscape.com)
  • For example, cyclin F is an orphan cyclin that is essential for G2/M transition. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cyclin D2 promoter methylation was analyzed in 101 prostate cancer samples by methylation-specific PCR. (nih.gov)
  • We investigated the epigenetic silencing of Cyclin D2 gene in prostate cancers and correlated the data with clinicopathological features. (nih.gov)
  • Our results indicate that methylation of Cyclin D2 in prostate cancers correlates with clinicopathological features of poor prognosis. (nih.gov)