Oligopeptides: Peptides composed of between two and twelve amino acids.Dipeptides: Peptides composed of two amino acid units.Glycylglycine: The simplest of all peptides. It functions as a gamma-glutamyl acceptor.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Cephalexin: A semisynthetic cephalosporin antibiotic with antimicrobial activity similar to that of CEPHALORIDINE or CEPHALOTHIN, but somewhat less potent. It is effective against both gram-positive and gram-negative organisms.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Membrane Transport Proteins: Membrane proteins whose primary function is to facilitate the transport of molecules across a biological membrane. Included in this broad category are proteins involved in active transport (BIOLOGICAL TRANSPORT, ACTIVE), facilitated transport and ION CHANNELS.Peptides: Members of the class of compounds composed of AMINO ACIDS joined together by peptide bonds between adjacent amino acids into linear, branched or cyclical structures. OLIGOPEPTIDES are composed of approximately 2-12 amino acids. Polypeptides are composed of approximately 13 or more amino acids. PROTEINS are linear polypeptides that are normally synthesized on RIBOSOMES.Chalones: Peptides that inhibit mitosis (ANTIMITOTICS). During the 1960's the term referred to crude extracts that inhibited cell proliferation; the activity was later attributed to PYROGLUTAMATE type oligopeptides.Substrate Specificity: A characteristic feature of enzyme activity in relation to the kind of substrate on which the enzyme or catalytic molecule reacts.Symporters: Membrane transporters that co-transport two or more dissimilar molecules in the same direction across a membrane. Usually the transport of one ion or molecule is against its electrochemical gradient and is "powered" by the movement of another ion or molecule with its electrochemical gradient.Lactococcus lactis: A non-pathogenic species of LACTOCOCCUS found in DAIRY PRODUCTS and responsible for the souring of MILK and the production of LACTIC ACID.Carrier Proteins: Transport proteins that carry specific substances in the blood or across cell membranes.Biological Transport: The movement of materials (including biochemical substances and drugs) through a biological system at the cellular level. The transport can be across cell membranes and epithelial layers. It also can occur within intracellular compartments and extracellular compartments.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Aminopeptidases: A subclass of EXOPEPTIDASES that act on the free N terminus end of a polypeptide liberating a single amino acid residue. EC 3.4.11.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Endopeptidases: A subclass of PEPTIDE HYDROLASES that catalyze the internal cleavage of PEPTIDES or PROTEINS.Amino Acids: Organic compounds that generally contain an amino (-NH2) and a carboxyl (-COOH) group. Twenty alpha-amino acids are the subunits which are polymerized to form proteins.Hydrolysis: The process of cleaving a chemical compound by the addition of a molecule of water.Structure-Activity Relationship: The relationship between the chemical structure of a compound and its biological or pharmacological activity. Compounds are often classed together because they have structural characteristics in common including shape, size, stereochemical arrangement, and distribution of functional groups.Cefadroxil: Long-acting, broad-spectrum, water-soluble, CEPHALEXIN derivative.Peptide Fragments: Partial proteins formed by partial hydrolysis of complete proteins or generated through PROTEIN ENGINEERING techniques.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Antibodies, Catalytic: Antibodies that can catalyze a wide variety of chemical reactions. They are characterized by high substrate specificity and share many mechanistic features with enzymes.Intestinal Absorption: Uptake of substances through the lining of the INTESTINES.Hydrogen-Ion Concentration: The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Protein Conformation: The characteristic 3-dimensional shape of a protein, including the secondary, supersecondary (motifs), tertiary (domains) and quaternary structure of the peptide chain. PROTEIN STRUCTURE, QUATERNARY describes the conformation assumed by multimeric proteins (aggregates of more than one polypeptide chain).Biological Transport, Active: The movement of materials across cell membranes and epithelial layers against an electrochemical gradient, requiring the expenditure of metabolic energy.Alanine: A non-essential amino acid that occurs in high levels in its free state in plasma. It is produced from pyruvate by transamination. It is involved in sugar and acid metabolism, increases IMMUNITY, and provides energy for muscle tissue, BRAIN, and the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Escherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.Caseins: A mixture of related phosphoproteins occurring in milk and cheese. The group is characterized as one of the most nutritive milk proteins, containing all of the common amino acids and rich in the essential ones.Cloning, Molecular: The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.Peptide Hydrolases: Hydrolases that specifically cleave the peptide bonds found in PROTEINS and PEPTIDES. Examples of sub-subclasses for this group include EXOPEPTIDASES and ENDOPEPTIDASES.Binding Sites: The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.Leucyl Aminopeptidase: A zinc containing enzyme of the hydrolase class that catalyzes the removal of the N-terminal amino acid from most L-peptides, particularly those with N-terminal leucine residues but not those with N-terminal lysine or arginine residues. This occurs in tissue cell cytosol, with high activity in the duodenum, liver, and kidney. The activity of this enzyme is commonly assayed using a leucine arylamide chromogenic substrate such as leucyl beta-naphthylamide.Streptococcus thermophilus: A species of thermophilic, gram-positive bacteria found in MILK and milk products.Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid: Liquid chromatographic techniques which feature high inlet pressures, high sensitivity, and high speed.Recombinant Proteins: Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.Molecular Weight: The sum of the weight of all the atoms in a molecule.Glycine: A non-essential amino acid. It is found primarily in gelatin and silk fibroin and used therapeutically as a nutrient. It is also a fast inhibitory neurotransmitter.Protein Binding: The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.Peptoids: Polymers of N-SUBSTITUTED GLYCINES containing chiral centers at the a-position of their side chains. These oligomers lack HYDROGEN BONDING donors, preventing formation of the usual intrachain hydrogen bonds but can form helices driven by the steric influence of chiral side chains.Circular Dichroism: A change from planar to elliptic polarization when an initially plane-polarized light wave traverses an optically active medium. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Lipoproteins: Lipid-protein complexes involved in the transportation and metabolism of lipids in the body. They are spherical particles consisting of a hydrophobic core of TRIGLYCERIDES and CHOLESTEROL ESTERS surrounded by a layer of hydrophilic free CHOLESTEROL; PHOSPHOLIPIDS; and APOLIPOPROTEINS. Lipoproteins are classified by their varying buoyant density and sizes.Sequence Homology, Amino Acid: The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.Protons: Stable elementary particles having the smallest known positive charge, found in the nuclei of all elements. The proton mass is less than that of a neutron. A proton is the nucleus of the light hydrogen atom, i.e., the hydrogen ion.Stereoisomerism: The phenomenon whereby compounds whose molecules have the same number and kind of atoms and the same atomic arrangement, but differ in their spatial relationships. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed)Administration, Mucosal: Delivery of a drug or other substance into the body through the epithelium lining of MUCOUS MEMBRANE involved with absorption and secretion.Metalloendopeptidases: ENDOPEPTIDASES which use a metal such as ZINC in the catalytic mechanism.Protease Inhibitors: Compounds which inhibit or antagonize biosynthesis or actions of proteases (ENDOPEPTIDASES).Carnosine: A naturally occurring dipeptide neuropeptide found in muscles.Microcystis: A form-genus of CYANOBACTERIA in the order Chroococcales. Many species are planktonic and possess gas vacuoles.Models, Molecular: Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.Peptide Termination Factors: Proteins that are involved in the peptide chain termination reaction (PEPTIDE CHAIN TERMINATION, TRANSLATIONAL) on RIBOSOMES. They include codon-specific class-I release factors, which recognize stop signals (TERMINATOR CODON) in the MESSENGER RNA; and codon-nonspecific class-II release factors.Epitopes: Sites on an antigen that interact with specific antibodies.Recombinant Fusion Proteins: Recombinant proteins produced by the GENETIC TRANSLATION of fused genes formed by the combination of NUCLEIC ACID REGULATORY SEQUENCES of one or more genes with the protein coding sequences of one or more genes.Dipeptidyl-Peptidases and Tripeptidyl-Peptidases: A subclass of exopeptidases that includes enzymes which cleave either two or three AMINO ACIDS from the end of a peptide chain.Proline: A non-essential amino acid that is synthesized from GLUTAMIC ACID. It is an essential component of COLLAGEN and is important for proper functioning of joints and tendons.Serine Endopeptidases: Any member of the group of ENDOPEPTIDASES containing at the active site a serine residue involved in catalysis.Enkephalin, Leucine-2-Alanine: A delta-selective opioid (ANALGESICS, OPIOID). It can cause transient depression of mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Apiaceae: A large plant family in the order Apiales, also known as Umbelliferae. Most are aromatic herbs with alternate, feather-divided leaves that are sheathed at the base. The flowers often form a conspicuous flat-topped umbel. Each small individual flower is usually bisexual, with five sepals, five petals, and an enlarged disk at the base of the style. The fruits are ridged and are composed of two parts that split open at maturity.Xenorhabdus: A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic rod-shaped cells which are motile by peritrichous flagella. Late in the growth cycle, spheroplasts or coccoid bodies occur, resulting from disintegration of the cell wall. The natural habitat is the intestinal lumen of certain nematodes. (From Bergey's Manual of Determinative Bacteriology, 9th ed)Viral Proteins: Proteins found in any species of virus.Mycoplasma hominis: A common inhabitant of the vagina and cervix and a potential human pathogen, causing infections of the male and female reproductive tracts. It has also been associated with respiratory disease and pharyngitis. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Netropsin: A basic polypeptide isolated from Streptomyces netropsis. It is cytotoxic and its strong, specific binding to A-T areas of DNA is useful to genetics research.Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial: Any of the processes by which cytoplasmic or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in bacteria.Repetitive Sequences, Amino Acid: A sequential pattern of amino acids occurring more than once in the same protein sequence.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Protein Structure, Secondary: The level of protein structure in which regular hydrogen-bond interactions within contiguous stretches of polypeptide chain give rise to alpha helices, beta strands (which align to form beta sheets) or other types of coils. This is the first folding level of protein conformation.Operon: In bacteria, a group of metabolically related genes, with a common promoter, whose transcription into a single polycistronic MESSENGER RNA is under the control of an OPERATOR REGION.Caco-2 Cells: Human colonic ADENOCARCINOMA cells that are able to express differentiation features characteristic of mature intestinal cells, such as ENTEROCYTES. These cells are valuable in vitro tools for studies related to intestinal cell function and differentiation.Lysine: An essential amino acid. It is often added to animal feed.Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel: Electrophoresis in which a polyacrylamide gel is used as the diffusion medium.Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Spectroscopic method of measuring the magnetic moment of elementary particles such as atomic nuclei, protons or electrons. It is employed in clinical applications such as NMR Tomography (MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING).Microvilli: Minute projections of cell membranes which greatly increase the surface area of the cell.Mass Spectrometry: An analytical method used in determining the identity of a chemical based on its mass using mass analyzers/mass spectrometers.Temperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Pheromones: Chemical substances, excreted by an organism into the environment, that elicit behavioral or physiological responses from other organisms of the same species. Perception of these chemical signals may be olfactory or by contact.Plasmids: Extrachromosomal, usually CIRCULAR DNA molecules that are self-replicating and transferable from one organism to another. They are found in a variety of bacterial, archaeal, fungal, algal, and plant species. They are used in GENETIC ENGINEERING as CLONING VECTORS.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Selectins: Transmembrane proteins consisting of a lectin-like domain, an epidermal growth factor-like domain, and a variable number of domains that are homologous to complement regulatory proteins. They are important cell adhesion molecules which help LEUKOCYTES attach to VASCULAR ENDOTHELIUM.DNA: A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).Proteins: Linear POLYPEPTIDES that are synthesized on RIBOSOMES and may be further modified, crosslinked, cleaved, or assembled into complex proteins with several subunits. The specific sequence of AMINO ACIDS determines the shape the polypeptide will take, during PROTEIN FOLDING, and the function of the protein.Receptors, Formyl Peptide: A family of G-protein-coupled receptors that was originally identified by its ability to bind N-formyl peptides such as N-FORMYLMETHIONINE LEUCYL-PHENYLALANINE. Since N-formyl peptides are found in MITOCHONDRIA and BACTERIA, this class of receptors is believed to play a role in mediating cellular responses to cellular damage and bacterial invasion. However, non-formylated peptide ligands have also been found for this receptor class.Binding, Competitive: The interaction of two or more substrates or ligands with the same binding site. The displacement of one by the other is used in quantitative and selective affinity measurements.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Sequence Alignment: The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters: A family of MEMBRANE TRANSPORT PROTEINS that require ATP hydrolysis for the transport of substrates across membranes. The protein family derives its name from the ATP-binding domain found on the protein.Milk: The white liquid secreted by the mammary glands. It contains proteins, sugar, lipids, vitamins, and minerals.Antigens, Viral: Substances elaborated by viruses that have antigenic activity.Genetic Complementation Test: A test used to determine whether or not complementation (compensation in the form of dominance) will occur in a cell with a given mutant phenotype when another mutant genome, encoding the same mutant phenotype, is introduced into that cell.Genes, Bacterial: The functional hereditary units of BACTERIA.Fungal Proteins: Proteins found in any species of fungus.Antibodies, Viral: Immunoglobulins produced in response to VIRAL ANTIGENS.Intestines: The section of the alimentary canal from the STOMACH to the ANAL CANAL. It includes the LARGE INTESTINE and SMALL INTESTINE.Bacillus subtilis: A species of gram-positive bacteria that is a common soil and water saprophyte.Gene Deletion: A genetic rearrangement through loss of segments of DNA or RNA, bringing sequences which are normally separated into close proximity. This deletion may be detected using cytogenetic techniques and can also be inferred from the phenotype, indicating a deletion at one specific locus.Prions: Small proteinaceous infectious particles which resist inactivation by procedures that modify NUCLEIC ACIDS and contain an abnormal isoform of a cellular protein which is a major and necessary component. The abnormal (scrapie) isoform is PrPSc (PRPSC PROTEINS) and the cellular isoform PrPC (PRPC PROTEINS). The primary amino acid sequence of the two isoforms is identical. Human diseases caused by prions include CREUTZFELDT-JAKOB SYNDROME; GERSTMANN-STRAUSSLER SYNDROME; and INSOMNIA, FATAL FAMILIAL.Salmonella typhimurium: A serotype of Salmonella enterica that is a frequent agent of Salmonella gastroenteritis in humans. It also causes PARATYPHOID FEVER.Valine: A branched-chain essential amino acid that has stimulant activity. It promotes muscle growth and tissue repair. It is a precursor in the penicillin biosynthetic pathway.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Histidine: An essential amino acid that is required for the production of HISTAMINE.
Examples of oligopeptides include: Amanitins - Cyclic peptides taken from carpophores of several different mushroom species. ... An oligopeptide, often just called peptide (oligo-, "a few"), consists of two to twenty amino acids and can include dipeptides ... Antipain - An oligopeptide produced by various bacteria which acts as a protease inhibitor. Ceruletide - A specific decapeptide ... Pepstatins - N-acylated oligopeptides isolated from culture filtrates of Actinomycetes, which act specifically to inhibit acid ...
The present invention provides an oligopeptide which is represented by the formula (I): X1-X2-X3-X4-X5-X6-X7, or the like ... The object of the present invention is to provide an oligopeptide having hair growth promoting activity. ... Production of Cyclic Oligopeptides. Cyclic oligopeptides shown in the following amino acid sequences were chemically ... 7. The cyclic oligopeptide of claim 1. wherein the cyclic oligopeptide promotes hair growth. ...
Oligopeptides Alternative Parents. *Cyclic peptides *Arginine and derivatives *Proline and derivatives *N-acyl-alpha amino ... Alpha-oligopeptide. *Cyclic alpha peptide. *Arginine or derivatives. *N-acyl-alpha amino acid or derivatives ... belongs to the class of organic compounds known as oligopeptides. These are organic compounds containing a sequence of between ...
Oligopeptides Alternative Parents. *Cyclic peptides *Proline and derivatives *Macrolactams *N-acyl-alpha amino acids and ... Alpha-oligopeptide. *Cyclic alpha peptide. *Proline or derivatives. *Macrolactam. *N-acyl-alpha amino acid or derivatives ... Vasopressin, also known as pitressin or ADH, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as oligopeptides. These are ... belongs to the class of organic compounds known as oligopeptides. These are organic compounds containing a sequence of between ...
Oligopeptides Alternative Parents. *Cyclic peptides *Leucine and derivatives *Proline and derivatives *Macrolactams ... Alpha-oligopeptide. *Cyclic alpha peptide. *Leucine or derivatives. *Proline or derivatives. *Macrolactam ... belongs to the class of organic compounds known as oligopeptides. These are organic compounds containing a sequence of between ...
Examples of oligopeptides include: Amanitins - Cyclic peptides taken from carpophores of several different mushroom species. ... An oligopeptide, often just called peptide (oligo-, "a few"), consists of two to twenty amino acids and can include dipeptides ... Antipain - An oligopeptide produced by various bacteria which acts as a protease inhibitor. Ceruletide - A specific decapeptide ... Pepstatins - N-acylated oligopeptides isolated from culture filtrates of Actinomycetes, which act specifically to inhibit acid ...
... an oligopeptide, without any presumptions as to the conformation of the underlying primary or secondary structure. The method ... Other constrained, cyclic structures are also possible by linking other substituents so as to form cyclic structures. ... 8A is a Balaji plot of a representative oligopeptide showing the use of a wedge for each residue to represent the φ, ψ values, ... Short peptide chains, e.g., having less than ten amino acid units, are sometimes referred to as "oligopeptides", where the ...
... an oligopeptide, without any presumptions as to the conformation of the underlying primary or secondary structure. The method ... Other constrained, cyclic structures are also possible by linking other substituents so as to form cyclic structures. ... 8A is a Balaji plot of a representative oligopeptide showing the use of a wedge for each residue to represent the φ, ψ values, ... Short peptide chains, e.g., having less than ten amino acid units, are sometimes referred to as "oligopeptides", where the ...
Pm represents a family of antimicrobial cyclic oligopeptides synthesized by the Gram-positive organism Bacillus polymyxa. The ... is thought to hinder charge interactions between phosphate groups within LPS and amino groups within the cyclic Pm oligopeptide ...
Beside microcystins, various other linear and cyclic oligopeptides such as aeruginosins, anabaenopeptilides, cyanopeptolins, ... Fig.1A1A and B; Table ​Table2)2) (27). Microcystins are the most abundant oligopeptides in the unialgal strain HUB 5-2-4, while ... Fig.4).4). In all but 2 of 111 M. aeruginosa colonies, microcystins were the chief oligopeptides detected (Fig. ​(Fig.2B,2B, ... Oligopeptides identified by MALDI-TOF MS. Positive-ion mass spectra were recorded from the Microcystis strains, from 258 ...
... oligopeptide explanation free. What is oligopeptide? Meaning of oligopeptide medical term. What does oligopeptide mean? ... Looking for online definition of oligopeptide in the Medical Dictionary? ... and cooking does not destroy the two types of cyclic oligopeptide toxins, the amatoxin and the phallotoxins.. Management of ... Putative antimicrobial oligopeptides in grape Vitis vinifera. Other launches from the brand are a 24K Gold Pure Luxury Lift & ...
Aryl and arylalkyl R1, Ra, and Rc groups can be linear or cyclic. Aryl and arylalkyl R1, Ra, and Rc having less than 5 carbon ... X is selected from the group consisting of a direct bond, an oligopeptide, a substantially linear alkyl chain from 2 to about ... The chain is typically linear or substantially linear, although branched chains (including oligopeptides) and linkers ... Aryl and arylalkyl R2 and R3 groups can be linear or cyclic. Aryl and arylalkyl R2 and R3 having less than 5 carbon atoms in a ...
... which enables massive screening of cyclic oligopeptides with potential pharmacological action against neurodegenerative ... further in silico screening of the oligopeptide repertoires using PepSimili may, on one hand, dramatically reduce the number of ... The oligopeptides mimicking the prioritized protein products can be easily retrieved through the Galaxy interface for further ... The two samples of cultured cells were separately used for the biopanning with a combinatorial library of cyclic 7mers on phage ...
Sample SJ, Hao Z, Wilson AP, Muir P. Role of calcitonin gene-related peptide in bone repair after cyclic fatigue loading. PLoS ... Kim YJ, Park YJ, Lee YM, Rhyu IC, Ku Y. The biological effects of fibrin-binding synthetic oligopeptides derived from ... The terms protein, polypeptide, oligopeptide and peptide are rather ambiguous and overlapping in their meaning [25]. Proteins ... Drissi H, Hott M, Marie PJ, Lasmoles F. Expression of the CT/CGRP gene and its regulation by dibutyryl cyclic adenosine ...
Oligopeptides. Alternative Parents. Cyclic peptides / Proline and derivatives / Macrolactams / N-acyl-alpha amino acids and ... Alpha-oligopeptide / Cyclic alpha peptide / N-acyl-alpha amino acid or derivatives / Proline or derivatives / Macrolactam / ... This compound belongs to the class of organic compounds known as oligopeptides. These are organic compounds containing a ...
Oligopeptides Engineering & Materials Science * Phosphorylation Engineering & Materials Science * Cyclic AMP-Dependent Protein ... A fluorescent-labeled oligopeptide (DACM-CLRRASLK-fluorescein), containing a consensus amino acid sequence (RRXSL) of cyclic ... A fluorescent-labeled oligopeptide for monitoring PKA-mediated phosphorylation. / Ohuchi, Y.; Katayama, Y.; Maeda, M. ... Ohuchi Y, Katayama Y, Maeda M. A fluorescent-labeled oligopeptide for monitoring PKA-mediated phosphorylation. Analyst. 2000 ...
A fluorescent-labeled oligopeptide for monitoring PKA-mediated phosphorylation. Ohuchi, Y., Katayama, Y. & Maeda, M., 1 1 2000 ...
OligoPeptide Synthesis , DiPeptide Synthesis , Tri-Peptide Synthesis. Selleck has been producing synthetic oligo peptides for ... Our experience in oligopeptide synthesis manufacturing allows us to produce the highest quality, large-scale oligopeptides with ... The following list provides details on oligopeptides we have recently synthesized.. Dipeptide. Tri-peptide. Oligopeptide. ... We have delivered more than 20,000 oligopeptides (including dipeptide, tri-peptide) to our customers. Our manufacturing ...
An oligopeptide contains a few molecules; a polypeptide contains many. Peptides generally contain fewer than 30 amino acid ... Shorter strings of amino acids may be referred to as peptides, or, less commonly, oligopeptides. ... Nonribosomal peptides often have highly complex cyclic structures, although linear nonribosomal peptides are also common. ...
Oligopeptide chemotypes of the toxic freshwater cyanobacterium Planktothrix can form sub-populations with dissimilar ecological ... Only 4 of the 24 isolated strains from East Africa were found to produce microcystins, while oligopeptides belonging to the ... The bloom forming cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa is known to produce cyclic heptatoxins (microcystins) which can be ... On the effect of abiotic environmental factors on production of bioactive oligopeptides in field populations of Planktothrix ...
0092] Methods used for the synthesis of oligopeptides or oligopeptide microarrays are designed in repeating cycles, comprising ... Examples of cyclic amino groups include, but are not limited to, aziridino, azetidino, pyrrolidino, piperidino, piperazino, ... oligopeptide features/cm2, at least 100,000 oligopeptide features/cm2, at least 200,000 oligopeptide features/cm2, at least ... oligopeptide features/cm2, at least 500,000 oligopeptide features/cm2, or at least 1,000,000 oligopeptide features/cm2. Further ...
An oligopeptide is a small number of amino acids (but still more than 3) bonded together. ... In sensitive individuals, gliadin is broken down into oligopeptides but no further (source). This is due to its low surface ... As it turns out, prolines cyclic structure contorts gliadin enough that special enzymes are required to degrade it (source) . ... And so, these gliadin oligopeptides - resistant to further enzymatic degradation - may damage the gut by blunting villi and ...
E. Wang and Y. Liu, "Cyclic voltammetry and chronopotentiometry with cyclic linear current scanning of terramycin at the water/ ... M. D. Scanlon, G. Herzog, and D. W. M. Arrigan, "Electrochemical detection of oligopeptides at silicon-fabricated micro-liquid/ ... a theoretical equation for the polarographic current potential profiles corresponding to the transfer of an oligopeptide or an ... Figure 1: Cyclic voltammograms for the transfer of TEA+. Quiescent solutions (black line) and aqueous phase agitated at 600 rpm ...
... targeting the oligopeptide transporter on rabbit retin were found in PRIME PubMed. Download Prime PubMed App to iPhone or iPad. ... AgentsBiological TransportCarrier ProteinsChoroidDipeptidesDrug Delivery SystemsGanciclovirIn Vitro TechniquesMaleOligopeptides ... of a novel intraocular drug-delivery system using crystalline lipid antiviral prodrugs of ganciclovir and cyclic cidofovir. ... TY - JOUR T1 - Dipeptide monoester ganciclovir prodrugs for transscleral drug delivery: targeting the oligopeptide transporter ...
We reveal a new N-iodoamide that is capable of a direct and efficient C-H bond iodination of various cyclic and acyclic alkanes ... This one-pot protocol utilizes an oligopeptide multicatalyst, m-CPBA as the oxidant, and N,N′-diisopropylcarbodiimide as the ... Lipophilic oligopeptides for chemo- and enantioselective acyl transfer onto alcohols. Christian E. Müller, Daniela Zell, Radim ... Herein, we report on the design and use of a structurally demanding cyclic peroxide (spiro[bicyclo[2.2.1]heptane-2,4′-[1,2] ...
Useful linker moieties include both natural and non-natural amino acids, oligopeptides, for example, linear or cyclic ... oligopeptide, or alternatively, two substantially similar fluorophores can be covalently linked to the oligopeptide, at ... The term "aryl" also includes polycyclic ring systems having two or more cyclic rings in which two or more carbons are common ... The enzymatically cleavable oligopeptide is cleavable by at least one enzyme selected from hydrolases, elastases, cathepsins, ...
  • A fluorescent-labeled oligopeptide (DACM-CLRRASLK-fluorescein), containing a consensus amino acid sequence (RRXSL) of cyclic AMP (cAMP) dependent protein kinase A (PKA) substrate-proteins, was designed. (elsevier.com)
  • Dipeptides, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, and a beta-lactum antibiotic strongly inhibited the transport of glycylsarcosine indicating the functional presence of oligopeptide transport (OPT) system on the RPE. (unboundmedicine.com)