A cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase subtype that is expressed in SMOOTH MUSCLE tissues and plays a role in regulation of smooth muscle contraction. Two isoforms, PKGIalpha and PKGIbeta, of the type I protein kinase exist due to alternative splicing of its mRNA.
A group of cyclic GMP-dependent enzymes that catalyze the phosphorylation of SERINE or THREONINE residues of proteins.
Guanosine cyclic 3',5'-(hydrogen phosphate). A guanine nucleotide containing one phosphate group which is esterified to the sugar moiety in both the 3'- and 5'-positions. It is a cellular regulatory agent and has been described as a second messenger. Its levels increase in response to a variety of hormones, including acetylcholine, insulin, and oxytocin and it has been found to activate specific protein kinases. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)
A cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase subtype primarily found in particulate subcellular fractions. They are tetrameric proteins that contain two catalytic subunits and two type II-specific regulatory subunits.
A cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase subtype that is expressed predominantly in INTESTINES, BRAIN, and KIDNEY. The protein is myristoylated on its N-terminus which may play a role its membrane localization.
A family of enzymes that catalyze the conversion of ATP and a protein to ADP and a phosphoprotein.
A cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase subtype primarily found in the CYTOPLASM. They are tetrameric proteins that contain two catalytic subunits and two type I-specific regulatory subunits.
A monomeric calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase subtype that is primarily expressed in neuronal tissues; T-LYMPHOCYTES and TESTIS. The activity of this enzyme is regulated by its phosphorylation by CALCIUM-CALMODULIN-DEPENDENT PROTEIN KINASE KINASE.
A group of enzymes that are dependent on CYCLIC AMP and catalyze the phosphorylation of SERINE or THREONINE residues on proteins. Included under this category are two cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase subtypes, each of which is defined by its subunit composition.
An adenine nucleotide containing one phosphate group which is esterified to both the 3'- and 5'-positions of the sugar moiety. It is a second messenger and a key intracellular regulator, functioning as a mediator of activity for a number of hormones, including epinephrine, glucagon, and ACTH.
An serine-threonine protein kinase that requires the presence of physiological concentrations of CALCIUM and membrane PHOSPHOLIPIDS. The additional presence of DIACYLGLYCEROLS markedly increases its sensitivity to both calcium and phospholipids. The sensitivity of the enzyme can also be increased by PHORBOL ESTERS and it is believed that protein kinase C is the receptor protein of tumor-promoting phorbol esters.
Structurally related forms of an enzyme. Each isoenzyme has the same mechanism and classification, but differs in its chemical, physical, or immunological characteristics.
A multifunctional calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase subtype that occurs as an oligomeric protein comprised of twelve subunits. It differs from other enzyme subtypes in that it lacks a phosphorylatable activation domain that can respond to CALCIUM-CALMODULIN-DEPENDENT PROTEIN KINASE KINASE.
A CALMODULIN-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the phosphorylation of proteins. This enzyme is also sometimes dependent on CALCIUM. A wide range of proteins can act as acceptor, including VIMENTIN; SYNAPSINS; GLYCOGEN SYNTHASE; MYOSIN LIGHT CHAINS; and the MICROTUBULE-ASSOCIATED PROTEINS. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992, p277)
The introduction of a phosphoryl group into a compound through the formation of an ester bond between the compound and a phosphorus moiety.
Conversion of an inactive form of an enzyme to one possessing metabolic activity. It includes 1, activation by ions (activators); 2, activation by cofactors (coenzymes); and 3, conversion of an enzyme precursor (proenzyme or zymogen) to an active enzyme.
A monomeric calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase subtype that is expressed in a broad variety of mammalian cell types. Its expression is regulated by the action of CALCIUM-CALMODULIN-DEPENDENT PROTEIN KINASE KINASE. Several isoforms of this enzyme subtype are encoded by distinct genes.
Toluenes in which one hydrogen of the methyl group is substituted by an amino group. Permitted are any substituents on the benzene ring or the amino group.
A type I cAMP-dependent protein kinase regulatory subunit that plays a role in confering CYCLIC AMP activation of protein kinase activity. It has a lower affinity for cAMP than the CYCLIC-AMP-DEPENDENT PROTEIN KINASE RIBETA SUBUNIT.
A group of enzymes that transfers a phosphate group onto an alcohol group acceptor. EC 2.7.1.
A basic element found in nearly all organized tissues. It is a member of the alkaline earth family of metals with the atomic symbol Ca, atomic number 20, and atomic weight 40. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and combines with phosphorus to form calcium phosphate in the bones and teeth. It is essential for the normal functioning of nerves and muscles and plays a role in blood coagulation (as factor IV) and in many enzymatic processes.
Agents that inhibit PROTEIN KINASES.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.
The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.
A group of enzymes that catalyzes the phosphorylation of serine or threonine residues in proteins, with ATP or other nucleotides as phosphate donors.
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.
N-(1-Oxobutyl)-cyclic 3',5'-(hydrogen phosphate)-2'-butanoate guanosine. A derivative of cyclic GMP. It has a higher resistance to extracellular and intracellular phosphodiesterase than cyclic GMP.
A heat-stable, low-molecular-weight activator protein found mainly in the brain and heart. The binding of calcium ions to this protein allows this protein to bind to cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases and to adenyl cyclase with subsequent activation. Thereby this protein modulates cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP levels.
A superfamily of PROTEIN-SERINE-THREONINE KINASES that are activated by diverse stimuli via protein kinase cascades. They are the final components of the cascades, activated by phosphorylation by MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE KINASES, which in turn are activated by mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinases (MAP KINASE KINASE KINASES).
Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.
A species of ciliate protozoa. It is used in biomedical research.
An intracellular signaling system involving the MAP kinase cascades (three-membered protein kinase cascades). Various upstream activators, which act in response to extracellular stimuli, trigger the cascades by activating the first member of a cascade, MAP KINASE KINASE KINASES; (MAPKKKs). Activated MAPKKKs phosphorylate MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE KINASES which in turn phosphorylate the MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASES; (MAPKs). The MAPKs then act on various downstream targets to affect gene expression. In mammals, there are several distinct MAP kinase pathways including the ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase) pathway, the SAPK/JNK (stress-activated protein kinase/c-jun kinase) pathway, and the p38 kinase pathway. There is some sharing of components among the pathways depending on which stimulus originates activation of the cascade.
A mitogen-activated protein kinase subfamily that regulates a variety of cellular processes including CELL GROWTH PROCESSES; CELL DIFFERENTIATION; APOPTOSIS; and cellular responses to INFLAMMATION. The P38 MAP kinases are regulated by CYTOKINE RECEPTORS and can be activated in response to bacterial pathogens.
Compounds or agents that combine with an enzyme in such a manner as to prevent the normal substrate-enzyme combination and the catalytic reaction.
Phosphotransferases that catalyzes the conversion of 1-phosphatidylinositol to 1-phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate. Many members of this enzyme class are involved in RECEPTOR MEDIATED SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION and regulation of vesicular transport with the cell. Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases have been classified both according to their substrate specificity and their mode of action within the cell.
Cyclic nucleotides are closed-chain molecules formed from nucleotides (ATP or GTP) through the action of enzymes called cyclases, functioning as second messengers in various cellular signaling pathways, with cAMP and cGMP being the most prominent members.
A dsRNA-activated cAMP-independent protein serine/threonine kinase that is induced by interferon. In the presence of dsRNA and ATP, the kinase autophosphorylates on several serine and threonine residues. The phosphorylated enzyme catalyzes the phosphorylation of the alpha subunit of EUKARYOTIC INITIATION FACTOR-2, leading to the inhibition of protein synthesis.
The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.
A cytoplasmic serine threonine kinase involved in regulating CELL DIFFERENTIATION and CELLULAR PROLIFERATION. Overexpression of this enzyme has been shown to promote PHOSPHORYLATION of BCL-2 PROTO-ONCOGENE PROTEINS and chemoresistance in human acute leukemia cells.
ATP:pyruvate 2-O-phosphotransferase. A phosphotransferase that catalyzes reversibly the phosphorylation of pyruvate to phosphoenolpyruvate in the presence of ATP. It has four isozymes (L, R, M1, and M2). Deficiency of the enzyme results in hemolytic anemia. EC 2.7.1.40.
A phorbol ester found in CROTON OIL with very effective tumor promoting activity. It stimulates the synthesis of both DNA and RNA.
A characteristic feature of enzyme activity in relation to the kind of substrate on which the enzyme or catalytic molecule reacts.
A proline-directed serine/threonine protein kinase which mediates signal transduction from the cell surface to the nucleus. Activation of the enzyme by phosphorylation leads to its translocation into the nucleus where it acts upon specific transcription factors. p40 MAPK and p41 MAPK are isoforms.
Specific enzyme subunits that form the active sites of the type I and type II cyclic-AMP protein kinases. Each molecule of enzyme contains two catalytic subunits.
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.
Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.
Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.
A serine-threonine protein kinase family whose members are components in protein kinase cascades activated by diverse stimuli. These MAPK kinases phosphorylate MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASES and are themselves phosphorylated by MAP KINASE KINASE KINASES. JNK kinases (also known as SAPK kinases) are a subfamily.
The uptake of naked or purified DNA by CELLS, usually meaning the process as it occurs in eukaryotic cells. It is analogous to bacterial transformation (TRANSFORMATION, BACTERIAL) and both are routinely employed in GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUES.
A 44-kDa extracellular signal-regulated MAP kinase that may play a role the initiation and regulation of MEIOSIS; MITOSIS; and postmitotic functions in differentiated cells. It phosphorylates a number of TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS; and MICROTUBULE-ASSOCIATED PROTEINS.
A ubiquitously expressed protein kinase that is involved in a variety of cellular SIGNAL PATHWAYS. Its activity is regulated by a variety of signaling protein tyrosine kinase.
Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.
A group of compounds with the heterocyclic ring structure of benzo(c)pyridine. The ring structure is characteristic of the group of opium alkaloids such as papaverine. (From Stedman, 25th ed)
Proteins to which calcium ions are bound. They can act as transport proteins, regulator proteins, or activator proteins. They typically contain EF HAND MOTIFS.
A subgroup of mitogen-activated protein kinases that activate TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR AP-1 via the phosphorylation of C-JUN PROTEINS. They are components of intracellular signaling pathways that regulate CELL PROLIFERATION; APOPTOSIS; and CELL DIFFERENTIATION.
N-(N-(N(2)-(N-(N-(N-(N-D-Alanyl L-seryl)-L-threonyl)-L-threonyl) L-threonyl)-L-asparaginyl)-L-tyrosyl) L-threonine. Octapeptide sharing sequence homology with HIV envelope protein gp120. It is potentially useful as antiviral agent in AIDS therapy. The core pentapeptide sequence, TTNYT, consisting of amino acids 4-8 in peptide T, is the HIV envelope sequence required for attachment to the CD4 receptor.
Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.
A group of enzymes removing the SERINE- or THREONINE-bound phosphate groups from a wide range of phosphoproteins, including a number of enzymes which have been phosphorylated under the action of a kinase. (Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992)
An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of GTP to 3',5'-cyclic GMP and pyrophosphate. It also acts on ITP and dGTP. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992) EC 4.6.1.2.
RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.
Intracellular signaling protein kinases that play a signaling role in the regulation of cellular energy metabolism. Their activity largely depends upon the concentration of cellular AMP which is increased under conditions of low energy or metabolic stress. AMP-activated protein kinases modify enzymes involved in LIPID METABOLISM, which in turn provide substrates needed to convert AMP into ATP.
An adenine nucleotide containing three phosphate groups esterified to the sugar moiety. In addition to its crucial roles in metabolism adenosine triphosphate is a neurotransmitter.
Phosphoproteins are proteins that have been post-translationally modified with the addition of a phosphate group, usually on serine, threonine or tyrosine residues, which can play a role in their regulation, function, interaction with other molecules, and localization within the cell.
A non-essential amino acid occurring in natural form as the L-isomer. It is synthesized from GLYCINE or THREONINE. It is involved in the biosynthesis of PURINES; PYRIMIDINES; and other amino acids.
A specific protein kinase C inhibitor, which inhibits superoxide release from human neutrophils (PMN) stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate or synthetic diacylglycerol.
The sum of the weight of all the atoms in a molecule.
A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.
A long-acting derivative of cyclic AMP. It is an activator of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase, but resistant to degradation by cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase.
An aspect of protein kinase (EC 2.7.1.37) in which serine residues in protamines and histones are phosphorylated in the presence of ATP.
The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.
A PROTEIN-TYROSINE KINASE family that was originally identified by homology to the Rous sarcoma virus ONCOGENE PROTEIN PP60(V-SRC). They interact with a variety of cell-surface receptors and participate in intracellular signal transduction pathways. Oncogenic forms of src-family kinases can occur through altered regulation or expression of the endogenous protein and by virally encoded src (v-src) genes.
A protein kinase C subtype that was originally characterized as a CALCIUM-independent, serine-threonine kinase that is activated by PHORBOL ESTERS and DIACYLGLYCEROLS. It is targeted to specific cellular compartments in response to extracellular signals that activate G-PROTEIN-COUPLED RECEPTORS; TYROSINE KINASE RECEPTORS; and intracellular protein tyrosine kinase.
'Purines' is a term used in medical biochemistry to refer to naturally occurring heterocyclic aromatic organic compounds, which include adenine and guanine (components of nucleotides and nucleic acids), and are formed in the body from purine bases through various metabolic processes.
PKC beta encodes two proteins (PKCB1 and PKCBII) generated by alternative splicing of C-terminal exons. It is widely distributed with wide-ranging roles in processes such as B-cell receptor regulation, oxidative stress-induced apoptosis, androgen receptor-dependent transcriptional regulation, insulin signaling, and endothelial cell proliferation.
The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.
Signal transduction mechanisms whereby calcium mobilization (from outside the cell or from intracellular storage pools) to the cytoplasm is triggered by external stimuli. Calcium signals are often seen to propagate as waves, oscillations, spikes, sparks, or puffs. The calcium acts as an intracellular messenger by activating calcium-responsive proteins.
Enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of cyclic GMP to yield guanosine-5'-phosphate.
An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of phosphatidylinositol (PHOSPHATIDYLINOSITOLS) to phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate, the first committed step in the biosynthesis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate.
Protein kinases that catalyze the PHOSPHORYLATION of TYROSINE residues in proteins with ATP or other nucleotides as phosphate donors.
Recombinant proteins produced by the GENETIC TRANSLATION of fused genes formed by the combination of NUCLEIC ACID REGULATORY SEQUENCES of one or more genes with the protein coding sequences of one or more genes.
Intracellular fluid from the cytoplasm after removal of ORGANELLES and other insoluble cytoplasmic components.
The level of protein structure in which combinations of secondary protein structures (alpha helices, beta sheets, loop regions, and motifs) pack together to form folded shapes called domains. Disulfide bridges between cysteines in two different parts of the polypeptide chain along with other interactions between the chains play a role in the formation and stabilization of tertiary structure. Small proteins usually consist of only one domain but larger proteins may contain a number of domains connected by segments of polypeptide chain which lack regular secondary structure.
Electrophoresis in which a polyacrylamide gel is used as the diffusion medium.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
A G-protein-coupled receptor kinase subtype that is primarily expressed in the TESTES and BRAIN. Variants of this subtype exist due to multiple alternative splicing of its mRNA.
The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.
Transport proteins that carry specific substances in the blood or across cell membranes.
The muscle tissue of the HEART. It is composed of striated, involuntary muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC) connected to form the contractile pump to generate blood flow.
A transferase that catalyzes formation of PHOSPHOCREATINE from ATP + CREATINE. The reaction stores ATP energy as phosphocreatine. Three cytoplasmic ISOENZYMES have been identified in human tissues: the MM type from SKELETAL MUSCLE, the MB type from myocardial tissue and the BB type from nervous tissue as well as a mitochondrial isoenzyme. Macro-creatine kinase refers to creatine kinase complexed with other serum proteins.
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
One of the mechanisms by which CELL DEATH occurs (compare with NECROSIS and AUTOPHAGOCYTOSIS). Apoptosis is the mechanism responsible for the physiological deletion of cells and appears to be intrinsically programmed. It is characterized by distinctive morphologic changes in the nucleus and cytoplasm, chromatin cleavage at regularly spaced sites, and the endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA; (DNA FRAGMENTATION); at internucleosomal sites. This mode of cell death serves as a balance to mitosis in regulating the size of animal tissues and in mediating pathologic processes associated with tumor growth.
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.
Phosphoprotein with protein kinase activity that functions in the G2/M phase transition of the CELL CYCLE. It is the catalytic subunit of the MATURATION-PROMOTING FACTOR and complexes with both CYCLIN A and CYCLIN B in mammalian cells. The maximal activity of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 is achieved when it is fully dephosphorylated.
Lipids containing one or more phosphate groups, particularly those derived from either glycerol (phosphoglycerides see GLYCEROPHOSPHOLIPIDS) or sphingosine (SPHINGOLIPIDS). They are polar lipids that are of great importance for the structure and function of cell membranes and are the most abundant of membrane lipids, although not stored in large amounts in the system.
The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in enzyme synthesis.
Potent activator of the adenylate cyclase system and the biosynthesis of cyclic AMP. From the plant COLEUS FORSKOHLII. Has antihypertensive, positive inotropic, platelet aggregation inhibitory, and smooth muscle relaxant activities; also lowers intraocular pressure and promotes release of hormones from the pituitary gland.
A free radical gas produced endogenously by a variety of mammalian cells, synthesized from ARGININE by NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE. Nitric oxide is one of the ENDOTHELIUM-DEPENDENT RELAXING FACTORS released by the vascular endothelium and mediates VASODILATION. It also inhibits platelet aggregation, induces disaggregation of aggregated platelets, and inhibits platelet adhesion to the vascular endothelium. Nitric oxide activates cytosolic GUANYLATE CYCLASE and thus elevates intracellular levels of CYCLIC GMP.
The fission of a CELL. It includes CYTOKINESIS, when the CYTOPLASM of a cell is divided, and CELL NUCLEUS DIVISION.
The nonstriated involuntary muscle tissue of blood vessels.
A ubiquitous casein kinase that is comprised of two distinct catalytic subunits and dimeric regulatory subunit. Casein kinase II has been shown to phosphorylate a large number of substrates, many of which are proteins involved in the regulation of gene expression.
Derivatives of phosphatidic acids in which the phosphoric acid is bound in ester linkage to a serine moiety. Complete hydrolysis yields 1 mole of glycerol, phosphoric acid and serine and 2 moles of fatty acids.
A group of compounds that contain the structure SO2NH2.
The biosynthesis of RNA carried out on a template of DNA. The biosynthesis of DNA from an RNA template is called REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION.
Linear POLYPEPTIDES that are synthesized on RIBOSOMES and may be further modified, crosslinked, cleaved, or assembled into complex proteins with several subunits. The specific sequence of AMINO ACIDS determines the shape the polypeptide will take, during PROTEIN FOLDING, and the function of the protein.
Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.
Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinases (MAPKKKs) are serine-threonine protein kinases that initiate protein kinase signaling cascades. They phosphorylate MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE KINASES; (MAPKKs) which in turn phosphorylate MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASES; (MAPKs).
The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.
Members of the class of compounds composed of AMINO ACIDS joined together by peptide bonds between adjacent amino acids into linear, branched or cyclical structures. OLIGOPEPTIDES are composed of approximately 2-12 amino acids. Polypeptides are composed of approximately 13 or more amino acids. PROTEINS are linear polypeptides that are normally synthesized on RIBOSOMES.
A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.
RNA consisting of two strands as opposed to the more prevalent single-stranded RNA. Most of the double-stranded segments are formed from transcription of DNA by intramolecular base-pairing of inverted complementary sequences separated by a single-stranded loop. Some double-stranded segments of RNA are normal in all organisms.
A compound consisting of dark green crystals or crystalline powder, having a bronze-like luster. Solutions in water or alcohol have a deep blue color. Methylene blue is used as a bacteriologic stain and as an indicator. It inhibits GUANYLATE CYCLASE, and has been used to treat cyanide poisoning and to lower levels of METHEMOGLOBIN.
The region of an enzyme that interacts with its substrate to cause the enzymatic reaction.
Proteins and peptides that are involved in SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION within the cell. Included here are peptides and proteins that regulate the activity of TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS and cellular processes in response to signals from CELL SURFACE RECEPTORS. Intracellular signaling peptide and proteins may be part of an enzymatic signaling cascade or act through binding to and modifying the action of other signaling factors.
Interferon secreted by leukocytes, fibroblasts, or lymphoblasts in response to viruses or interferon inducers other than mitogens, antigens, or allo-antigens. They include alpha- and beta-interferons (INTERFERON-ALPHA and INTERFERON-BETA).
A family of serine-threonine kinases that bind to and are activated by MONOMERIC GTP-BINDING PROTEINS such as RAC GTP-BINDING PROTEINS and CDC42 GTP-BINDING PROTEIN. They are intracellular signaling kinases that play a role the regulation of cytoskeletal organization.
Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.
A mitogen-activated protein kinase subfamily that is widely expressed and plays a role in regulation of MEIOSIS; MITOSIS; and post mitotic functions in differentiated cells. The extracellular signal regulated MAP kinases are regulated by a broad variety of CELL SURFACE RECEPTORS and can be activated by certain CARCINOGENS.
Within a eukaryotic cell, a membrane-limited body which contains chromosomes and one or more nucleoli (CELL NUCLEOLUS). The nuclear membrane consists of a double unit-type membrane which is perforated by a number of pores; the outermost membrane is continuous with the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM. A cell may contain more than one nucleus. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)
An abundant 43-kDa mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase subtype with specificity for MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE 1 and MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE 3.
The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.
A metallic element that has the atomic symbol Mg, atomic number 12, and atomic weight 24.31. It is important for the activity of many enzymes, especially those involved in OXIDATIVE PHOSPHORYLATION.
A protein-serine-threonine kinase that is activated by PHOSPHORYLATION in response to GROWTH FACTORS or INSULIN. It plays a major role in cell metabolism, growth, and survival as a core component of SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION. Three isoforms have been described in mammalian cells.
A potent cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase inhibitor; due to this action, the compound increases cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP in tissue and thereby activates CYCLIC NUCLEOTIDE-REGULATED PROTEIN KINASES
A powerful vasodilator used in emergencies to lower blood pressure or to improve cardiac function. It is also an indicator for free sulfhydryl groups in proteins.
Products of proto-oncogenes. Normally they do not have oncogenic or transforming properties, but are involved in the regulation or differentiation of cell growth. They often have protein kinase activity.
A homologous family of regulatory enzymes that are structurally related to the protein silent mating type information regulator 2 (Sir2) found in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Sirtuins contain a central catalytic core region which binds NAD. Several of the sirtuins utilize NAD to deacetylate proteins such as HISTONES and are categorized as GROUP III HISTONE DEACETYLASES. Several other sirtuin members utilize NAD to transfer ADP-RIBOSE to proteins and are categorized as MONO ADP-RIBOSE TRANSFERASES, while a third group of sirtuins appears to have both deacetylase and ADP ribose transferase activities.
Proteins found in plants (flowers, herbs, shrubs, trees, etc.). The concept does not include proteins found in vegetables for which VEGETABLE PROTEINS is available.
Cells grown in vitro from neoplastic tissue. If they can be established as a TUMOR CELL LINE, they can be propagated in cell culture indefinitely.
A family of protein serine/threonine kinases which act as intracellular signalling intermediates. Ribosomal protein S6 kinases are activated through phosphorylation in response to a variety of HORMONES and INTERCELLULAR SIGNALING PEPTIDES AND PROTEINS. Phosphorylation of RIBOSOMAL PROTEIN S6 by enzymes in this class results in increased expression of 5' top MRNAs. Although specific for RIBOSOMAL PROTEIN S6 members of this class of kinases can act on a number of substrates within the cell. The immunosuppressant SIROLIMUS inhibits the activation of ribosomal protein S6 kinases.
A phorbol ester found in CROTON OIL which, in addition to being a potent skin tumor promoter, is also an effective activator of calcium-activated, phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase C). Due to its activation of this enzyme, phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate profoundly affects many different biological systems.
Immunologic method used for detecting or quantifying immunoreactive substances. The substance is identified by first immobilizing it by blotting onto a membrane and then tagging it with labeled antibodies.
A protein that has been shown to function as a calcium-regulated transcription factor as well as a substrate for depolarization-activated CALCIUM-CALMODULIN-DEPENDENT PROTEIN KINASES. This protein functions to integrate both calcium and cAMP signals.
A chelating agent relatively more specific for calcium and less toxic than EDETIC ACID.
A sirtuin family member found primarily in the CELL NUCLEUS. It is an NAD-dependent deacetylase with specificity towards HISTONES and a variety of proteins involved in gene regulation.
The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.
A mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase with specificity for JNK MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASES; P38 MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASES and the RETINOID X RECEPTORS. It takes part in a SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION pathway that is activated in response to cellular stress.
Benzopyrroles with the nitrogen at the number one carbon adjacent to the benzyl portion, in contrast to ISOINDOLES which have the nitrogen away from the six-membered ring.
A group of protein-serine-threonine kinases that was originally identified as being responsible for the PHOSPHORYLATION of CASEINS. They are ubiquitous enzymes that have a preference for acidic proteins. Casein kinases play a role in SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION by phosphorylating a variety of regulatory cytoplasmic and regulatory nuclear proteins.
The most common form of fibrillar collagen. It is a major constituent of bone (BONE AND BONES) and SKIN and consists of a heterotrimer of two alpha1(I) and one alpha2(I) chains.
Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).
A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.
Diglycerides are a type of glyceride, specifically a form of lipid, that contains two fatty acid chains linked to a glycerol molecule by ester bonds.
Proteins which bind to DNA. The family includes proteins which bind to both double- and single-stranded DNA and also includes specific DNA binding proteins in serum which can be used as markers for malignant diseases.
Tumor-promoting compounds obtained from CROTON OIL (Croton tiglium). Some of these are used in cell biological experiments as activators of protein kinase C.
Protein kinases that control cell cycle progression in all eukaryotes and require physical association with CYCLINS to achieve full enzymatic activity. Cyclin-dependent kinases are regulated by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation events.
A potent natriuretic and vasodilatory peptide or mixture of different-sized low molecular weight PEPTIDES derived from a common precursor and secreted mainly by the HEART ATRIUM. All these peptides share a sequence of about 20 AMINO ACIDS.
An indolocarbazole that is a potent PROTEIN KINASE C inhibitor which enhances cAMP-mediated responses in human neuroblastoma cells. (Biochem Biophys Res Commun 1995;214(3):1114-20)
The process of moving proteins from one cellular compartment (including extracellular) to another by various sorting and transport mechanisms such as gated transport, protein translocation, and vesicular transport.
An adaptor protein complex found primarily on perinuclear compartments.
The first continuously cultured human malignant CELL LINE, derived from the cervical carcinoma of Henrietta Lacks. These cells are used for VIRUS CULTIVATION and antitumor drug screening assays.
Maleimides are a class of chemically reactive compounds containing a maleimide functional group, which can undergo addition reactions with nucleophiles such as thiols, making them useful for the formation of covalent bonds in various bioconjugation and material synthesis applications.
Connective tissue cells which secrete an extracellular matrix rich in collagen and other macromolecules.
Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.
Compounds which inhibit or antagonize the biosynthesis or actions of phosphodiesterases.
Inbred C57BL mice are a strain of laboratory mice that have been produced by many generations of brother-sister matings, resulting in a high degree of genetic uniformity and homozygosity, making them widely used for biomedical research, including studies on genetics, immunology, cancer, and neuroscience.
Partial proteins formed by partial hydrolysis of complete proteins or generated through PROTEIN ENGINEERING techniques.
Proteins that originate from plants species belonging to the genus ARABIDOPSIS. The most intensely studied species of Arabidopsis, Arabidopsis thaliana, is commonly used in laboratory experiments.
A glycogen synthase kinase that was originally described as a key enzyme involved in glycogen metabolism. It regulates a diverse array of functions such as CELL DIVISION, microtubule function and APOPTOSIS.
Benzo-indoles similar to CARBOLINES which are pyrido-indoles. In plants, carbazoles are derived from indole and form some of the INDOLE ALKALOIDS.
A serine-threonine protein kinase that, when activated by DNA, phosphorylates several DNA-binding protein substrates including the TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEIN P53 and a variety of TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS.
A 235-kDa cytoplasmic protein that is also found in platelets. It has been localized to regions of cell-substrate adhesion. It binds to INTEGRINS; VINCULIN; and ACTINS and appears to participate in generating a transmembrane connection between the extracellular matrix and the cytoskeleton.
A guanine nucleotide containing one phosphate group esterified to the sugar moiety and found widely in nature.
A group of phenyl benzopyrans named for having structures like FLAVONES.
A curved elevation of GRAY MATTER extending the entire length of the floor of the TEMPORAL HORN of the LATERAL VENTRICLE (see also TEMPORAL LOBE). The hippocampus proper, subiculum, and DENTATE GYRUS constitute the hippocampal formation. Sometimes authors include the ENTORHINAL CORTEX in the hippocampal formation.
A species of the genus SACCHAROMYCES, family Saccharomycetaceae, order Saccharomycetales, known as "baker's" or "brewer's" yeast. The dried form is used as a dietary supplement.
Compounds with a six membered aromatic ring containing NITROGEN. The saturated version is PIPERIDINES.

Nitric oxide regulation of gene transcription via soluble guanylate cyclase and type I cGMP-dependent protein kinase. (1/136)

Nitric oxide (NO) regulates the expression of multiple genes but in most cases its precise mechanism of action is unclear. We used baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells, which have very low soluble guanylate cyclase and cGMP-dependent protein kinase (G-kinase) activity, and CS-54 arterial smooth muscle cells, which express these two enzymes, to study NO regulation of the human fos promoter. The NO-releasing agent Deta-NONOate (ethanamine-2,2'-(hydroxynitrosohydrazone)bis-) had no effect on a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene under control of the fos promoter in BHK cells transfected with an empty vector or in cells transfected with a G-kinase Ibeta expression vector. In BHK cells transfected with expression vectors for guanylate cyclase, Deta-NONOate markedly increased the intracellular cGMP concentration and caused a small (2-fold) increase in CAT activity; the increased CAT activity appeared to be from cGMP activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. In BHK cells co-transfected with guanylate cyclase and G-kinase expression vectors, CAT activity was increased 5-fold in the absence of Deta-NONOate and 7-fold in the presence of Deta-NONOate. Stimulation of CAT activity in the absence of Deta-NONOate appeared to be largely from endogenous NO since we found that: (i) BHK cells produced high amounts of NO; (ii) CAT activity was partially inhibited by a NO synthase inhibitor; and (iii) the inhibition by the NO synthase inhibitor was reversed by exogenous NO. In CS-54 cells, we found that NO increased fos promoter activity and that the increase was prevented by a guanylate cyclase inhibitor. In summary, we found that NO activates the fos promoter by a guanylate cyclase- and G-kinase-dependent mechanism.  (+info)

Regulation of myosin phosphatase by a specific interaction with cGMP- dependent protein kinase Ialpha. (2/136)

Contraction and relaxation of smooth muscle are regulated by myosin light-chain kinase and myosin phosphatase through phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of myosin light chains. Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent protein kinase Ialpha (cGKIalpha) mediates physiologic relaxation of vascular smooth muscle in response to nitric oxide and cGMP. It is shown here that cGKIalpha is targeted to the smooth muscle cell contractile apparatus by a leucine zipper interaction with the myosin-binding subunit (MBS) of myosin phosphatase. Uncoupling of the cGKIalpha-MBS interaction prevents cGMP-dependent dephosphorylation of myosin light chain, demonstrating that this interaction is essential to the regulation of vascular smooth muscle cell tone.  (+info)

Nitric oxide and cGMP regulate gene expression in neuronal and glial cells by activating type II cGMP-dependent protein kinase. (3/136)

Nitric oxide (NO) and cGMP have been implicated in many neuronal functions, including regulation of gene expression, but little is known about the downstream targets of NO/cGMP in the nervous system. We found that type II cGMP-dependent protein kinase (G-kinase), which is widely expressed in the brain, mediated NO- and cGMP-induced activation of the fos promoter in cells of neuronal and glial origin; the enzyme was ineffective in regulating gene expression in fibroblast-like cells. The effect of G-kinase II on gene expression did not require calcium uptake but was synergistically enhanced by calcium. G-kinase II was membrane associated and did not translocate to the nucleus; however, a soluble G-kinase II mutant translocated to the nucleus and regulated gene expression in fibroblast-like cells. Soluble G-kinase I also regulates fos promoter activity, but membrane targeting of G-kinase I prevented the enzyme from translocating to the nucleus and regulating transcription in multiple cell types, including glioma cells; this suggests that cell type-specific factor(s) that mediate the transcriptional effects of extranuclear G-kinase II are not regulated by G-kinase I. Our results suggest that G-kinase I and II control gene expression by different mechanisms and that NO effects on neuronal plasticity may involve G-kinase II regulation of gene expression.-Gudi, T., Hong, G. K.-P., Vaandrager, A. B., Lohmann, S. M., Pilz, R. B. Nitric oxide and cGMP regulate gene expression in neuronal and glial cells by activating type II cGMP-dependent protein kinase.  (+info)

Identification of a conserved residue responsible for the autoinhibition of cGMP-dependent protein kinase Ialpha and beta. (4/136)

We isolated a constitutively active form of cGMP-dependent protein kinase Ialpha (cGK Ialpha) by PCR-driven random mutagenesis. The replacement of Ile-63 by Thr in the autoinhibitory domain results in the enhancement of autophosphorylation and the basal kinase activity in the absence of cGMP. The hydrophobicity at position 63 is essential for the inactive state of cGK Ialpha, and Ile-78 of cGK Ibeta is also required for the autoinhibitory property. Furthermore, cGK Ialpha (Ile-63-Thr) is constitutively active in vivo. These findings suggest that a conserved residue in the autoinhibitory domain was involved in the autoinhibition of both cGK Is.  (+info)

Binding and phosphorylation of a novel male germ cell-specific cGMP-dependent protein kinase-anchoring protein by cGMP-dependent protein kinase Ialpha. (5/136)

cGMP-dependent protein kinase (cGK) is a major cellular receptor of cGMP and plays important roles in cGMP-dependent signal transduction pathways. To isolate the components of the cGMP/cGK signaling pathway such as substrates and regulatory proteins of cGK, we employed the yeast two-hybrid system using cGK-Ialpha as a bait and isolated a novel male germ cell-specific 42-kDa protein, GKAP42 (42-kDa cGMP-dependent protein kinase anchoring protein). Although the N-terminal region (amino acids 1-66) of cGK-Ialpha is sufficient for the association with GKAP42, GKAP42 could not interact with cGK-Ibeta, cGK-II, or cAMP-dependent protein kinase. GKAP42 mRNA is specifically expressed in testis, where it is restricted to the spermatocytes and early round spermatids. Endogenous cGK-I is co-immunoprecipitated with anti-GKAP42 antibody from mouse testis tissue, suggesting that cGK-I physiologically interacts with GKAP42. Immunocytochemical observations revealed that GKAP42 is localized to the Golgi complex and that cGK-Ialpha is co-localized to the Golgi complex when coexpressed with GKAP42. Although both cGK-Ialpha and -Ibeta, but not cAMP-dependent protein kinase, phosphorylated GKAP42 in vitro, GKAP42 was a good substrate only for cGK-Ialpha in intact cells, suggesting that the association with kinase protein is required for the phosphorylation in vivo. Finally, we demonstrated that the kinase-deficient mutant of cGK-Ialpha stably associates with GKAP42 and that binding of cGMP to cGK-Ialpha facilitates their release from GKAP42. These findings suggest that GKAP42 functions as an anchoring protein for cGK-Ialpha and that cGK-Ialpha may participate in germ cell development through phosphorylation of Golgi-associated proteins such as GKAP42.  (+info)

Cysteine-rich protein 2, a novel substrate for cGMP kinase I in enteric neurons and intestinal smooth muscle. (6/136)

Nitric oxide/cGMP/cGMP kinase I (cGKI) signaling causes relaxation of intestinal smooth muscle. In the gastrointestinal tract substrates of cGKI have not been identified yet. In the present study a protein interacting with cGKIbeta has been isolated from a rat intestinal cDNA library using the yeast two-hybrid system. The protein was identified as cysteine-rich protein 2 (CRP2), recently cloned from rat brain (Okano, I., Yamamoto, T., Kaji, A., Kimura, T., Mizuno, K., and Nakamura, T. (1993) FEBS Lett. 333, 51-55). Recombinant CRP2 is specifically phosphorylated by cGKs but not by cAMP kinase in vitro. Co-transfection of CRP2 and cGKIbeta into COS cells confirmed the phosphorylation of CRP2 in vivo. Cyclic GMP kinase I phosphorylated CRP2 at Ser-104, because the mutation to Ala completely prevented the in vivo phosphorylation. Immunohistochemical analysis using confocal laser scan microscopy showed a co-localization of CRP2 and cGKI in the inner part of the circular muscle layer, in the muscularis mucosae, and in specific neurons of the myenteric and submucosal plexus. The co-localization together with the specific phosphorylation of CRP2 by cGKI in vitro and in vivo suggests that CRP2 is a novel substrate of cGKI in neurons and smooth muscle of the small intestine.  (+info)

Activation of cGMP-dependent protein kinase Ibeta inhibits interleukin 2 release and proliferation of T cell receptor-stimulated human peripheral T cells. (7/136)

Several major functions of type I cGMP-dependent protein kinase (cGK I) have been established in smooth muscle cells, platelets, endothelial cells, and cardiac myocytes. Here we demonstrate that cGK Ibeta is endogenously expressed in freshly purified human peripheral blood T lymphocytes and inhibits their proliferation and interleukin 2 release. Incubation of human T cells with the NO donor, sodium nitroprusside, or the membrane-permeant cGMP analogs PET-cGMP and 8-pCPT-cGMP, activated cGK I and produced (i) a distinct pattern of phosphorylation of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein, (ii) stimulation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases ERK1/2 and p38 kinase, and, upon anti-CD3 stimulation, (iii) inhibition of interleukin 2 release and (iv) inhibition of cell proliferation. cGK I was lost during in vitro culturing of primary T cells and was not detectable in transformed T cell lines. The proliferation of these cGK I-deficient cells was not inhibited by even high cGMP concentrations indicating that cGK I, but not cGMP-regulated phosphodiesterases or channels, cAMP-dependent protein kinase, or other potential cGMP mediators, was responsible for inhibition of T cell proliferation. Consistent with this, overexpression of cGK Ibeta, but not an inactive cGK Ibeta mutant, restored cGMP-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation of Jurkat cells. Thus, the NO/cGMP/cGK signaling system is a negative regulator of T cell activation and proliferation and of potential significance for counteracting inflammatory or lymphoproliferative processes.  (+info)

Gene transfer of cGMP-dependent protein kinase I enhances the antihypertrophic effects of nitric oxide in cardiomyocytes. (8/136)

NO acting through soluble guanylyl cyclase and cGMP formation is a negative regulator of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Downstream targets mediating the inhibitory effects of NO/cGMP on cardiomyocyte hypertrophy have not been elucidated. In addition to its antihypertrophic effects, NO promotes apoptosis in cardiomyocytes, presumably through cGMP-independent pathways. We investigated the role of cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) in the antihypertrophic and proapoptotic effects of NO. Incubation of neonatal rat cardiomyocytes with the NO donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D,L-penicillamine (SNAP) (250 micromol/L) or the PKG-selective cGMP analog 8-pCPT-cGMP (500 micromol/L) activated endogenous PKG type I, as shown by the site-specific phosphorylation of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein, a well-characterized PKG substrate. SNAP (250 micromol/L) and 8-pCPT-cGMP (500 micromol/L) modestly attenuated the hypertrophic response to alpha(1)-adrenergic stimulation with phenylephrine. Although a high concentration of SNAP (1000 micromol/L) promoted apoptosis in cardiomyocytes, as evidenced by the formation of histone-associated DNA fragments, antihypertrophic concentrations of SNAP (250 micromol/L) and 8-pCPT-cGMP (500 micromol/L) did not promote cell death. Because chronic activation downregulated endogenous PKG I, we explored whether gene transfer of PKG I would enhance the sensitivity of cardiomyocytes to the antihypertrophic effects of NO/cGMP. Indeed, after adenoviral overexpression of PKG Ibeta, SNAP (250 micromol/L) and 8-pCPT-cGMP (500 micromol/L) completely suppressed the hypertrophic response to alpha(1)-adrenergic stimulation. As observed in noninfected cells, SNAP (250 micromol/L) and 8-pCPT-cGMP (500 micromol/L) did not promote apoptosis in cardiomyocytes overexpressing PKG Ibeta. Moreover, overexpression of PKG Ibeta did not enhance the proapoptotic effects of 1000 micromol/L SNAP, implying PKG-independent effects of NO on apoptosis. Endogenous PKG I mediates antihypertrophic but not proapoptotic effects of NO in a cell culture model of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Adenoviral gene transfer of PKG I selectively enhances the antihypertrophic effects of NO without increasing the susceptibility to apoptosis.  (+info)

Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent protein kinase type I (PKG I) is a major enzyme responsible for mediating the effects of cGMP, which is a second messenger molecule involved in various cellular signaling pathways. PKG I is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is activated by binding to cGMP.

PKG I exists in two isoforms, alpha and beta, which are encoded by separate genes but share a similar structure and function. The enzyme consists of a regulatory domain, which contains the cGMP-binding sites, and a catalytic domain, which carries out the phosphorylation of target proteins.

PKG I plays a critical role in regulating various physiological processes, including smooth muscle relaxation, cardiac contractility, platelet aggregation, and neuronal signaling. It does so by phosphorylating specific protein targets that control these processes, such as ion channels, enzymes, and cytoskeletal proteins.

Defects in PKG I function have been implicated in several human diseases, including pulmonary hypertension, heart failure, and erectile dysfunction. Therefore, PKG I is an important therapeutic target for the development of drugs to treat these conditions.

Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent protein kinases (PKGs) are a type of enzyme that add phosphate groups to other proteins, thereby modifying their function. These kinases are activated by cGMP, which is a second messenger molecule that helps transmit signals within cells. PKGs play important roles in various cellular processes, including smooth muscle relaxation, platelet aggregation, and cardiac contractility. They have been implicated in the regulation of a number of physiological functions, such as blood flow, inflammation, and learning and memory. There are two main isoforms of cGMP-dependent protein kinases, PKG I and PKG II, which differ in their tissue distribution, regulatory properties, and substrate specificity.

Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is a important second messenger molecule that plays a crucial role in various biological processes within the human body. It is synthesized from guanosine triphosphate (GTP) by the enzyme guanylyl cyclase.

Cyclic GMP is involved in regulating diverse physiological functions, such as smooth muscle relaxation, cardiovascular function, and neurotransmission. It also plays a role in modulating immune responses and cellular growth and differentiation.

In the medical field, changes in cGMP levels or dysregulation of cGMP-dependent pathways have been implicated in various disease states, including pulmonary hypertension, heart failure, erectile dysfunction, and glaucoma. Therefore, pharmacological agents that target cGMP signaling are being developed as potential therapeutic options for these conditions.

Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase type II (PKA II) is a subtype of cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase, which is a crucial enzyme in many cellular processes. PKA II is composed of two regulatory subunits and two catalytic subunits. When cAMP levels are low, the regulatory subunits bind to and inhibit the catalytic subunits. However, when cAMP levels rise, cAMP molecules bind to the regulatory subunits, causing a conformational change that releases and activates the catalytic subunits.

The activated catalytic subunits then phosphorylate specific serine and threonine residues on target proteins, thereby modulating their activity, localization, or stability. PKA II is widely expressed in various tissues and plays a role in regulating diverse cellular functions such as metabolism, gene expression, cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis.

PKA II is distinct from the other subtype of cAMP-dependent protein kinase, PKA I, in its regulatory subunit composition and tissue distribution. While both PKA I and PKA II contain identical catalytic subunits, they differ in their regulatory subunits: PKA I contains the RIα, RIβ, or RIIβ regulatory subunits, while PKA II contains the RIIα regulatory subunit. Additionally, PKA II is predominantly expressed in tissues such as the brain, heart, and skeletal muscle, whereas PKA I is more widely distributed throughout the body.

Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent protein kinase type II (PKG II) is a subtype of cGMP-dependent protein kinases, which are enzymes that play a crucial role in the regulation of various cellular functions. PKG II is specifically expressed in certain tissues such as the smooth muscle and the brain.

The activation of PKG II occurs when cGMP binds to the regulatory subunit of the enzyme, leading to the release and activation of the catalytic subunit. Once activated, PKG II phosphorylates specific serine and threonine residues on target proteins, which in turn modulate their activity, localization, or stability.

PKG II has been implicated in several physiological processes, including smooth muscle relaxation, platelet aggregation, neuronal signaling, and cardiovascular function. Dysregulation of PKG II has been associated with various pathological conditions such as hypertension, pulmonary arterial hypertension, heart failure, and neurodegenerative disorders.

Protein kinases are a group of enzymes that play a crucial role in many cellular processes by adding phosphate groups to other proteins, a process known as phosphorylation. This modification can activate or deactivate the target protein's function, thereby regulating various signaling pathways within the cell. Protein kinases are essential for numerous biological functions, including metabolism, signal transduction, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis (programmed cell death). Abnormal regulation of protein kinases has been implicated in several diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase type I (PKA) is a key enzyme in intracellular signaling pathways that is activated by the second messenger cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). PKA is composed of two regulatory subunits and two catalytic subunits, which are held in an inactive state by binding to cAMP. When cAMP levels increase, it binds to the regulatory subunits, causing them to dissociate from the catalytic subunits and allowing the catalytic subunits to phosphorylate and activate target proteins.

PKA plays a critical role in many physiological processes, including metabolism, gene expression, cell growth and differentiation, and synaptic plasticity. Dysregulation of PKA signaling has been implicated in various diseases, such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, and neurological disorders. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms that regulate PKA activity is crucial for developing therapeutic strategies to target these conditions.

Calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type 4 (CAMK4) is a type of serine/threonine protein kinase that plays a crucial role in signal transduction pathways related to synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory. It is activated by the binding of calcium ions and calmodulin, a regulatory protein that binds calcium ions, to its calcium-calmodulin binding domain.

Once activated, CAMK4 phosphorylates various downstream target proteins, including transcription factors, ion channels, and other kinases, thereby modulating their activities. This enzyme is widely expressed in various tissues, but it is particularly abundant in the brain, where it has been implicated in long-term potentiation (LTP), a form of synaptic plasticity that underlies learning and memory.

Mutations or dysregulation of CAMK4 have been associated with several neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and epilepsy. Therefore, understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying CAMK4 activation and regulation is an important area of research in neuroscience and pharmacology.

Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinases, also known as protein kinase A (PKA), are a family of enzymes that play a crucial role in intracellular signaling pathways. These enzymes are responsible for the regulation of various cellular processes, including metabolism, gene expression, and cell growth and differentiation.

PKA is composed of two regulatory subunits and two catalytic subunits. When cAMP binds to the regulatory subunits, it causes a conformational change that leads to the dissociation of the catalytic subunits. The freed catalytic subunits then phosphorylate specific serine and threonine residues on target proteins, thereby modulating their activity.

The cAMP-dependent protein kinases are activated in response to a variety of extracellular signals, such as hormones and neurotransmitters, that bind to G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) or receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). These signals lead to the activation of adenylyl cyclase, which catalyzes the conversion of ATP to cAMP. The resulting increase in intracellular cAMP levels triggers the activation of PKA and the downstream phosphorylation of target proteins.

Overall, cAMP-dependent protein kinases are essential regulators of many fundamental cellular processes and play a critical role in maintaining normal physiology and homeostasis. Dysregulation of these enzymes has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is a key secondary messenger in many biological processes, including the regulation of metabolism, gene expression, and cellular excitability. It is synthesized from adenosine triphosphate (ATP) by the enzyme adenylyl cyclase and is degraded by the enzyme phosphodiesterase.

In the body, cAMP plays a crucial role in mediating the effects of hormones and neurotransmitters on target cells. For example, when a hormone binds to its receptor on the surface of a cell, it can activate a G protein, which in turn activates adenylyl cyclase to produce cAMP. The increased levels of cAMP then activate various effector proteins, such as protein kinases, which go on to regulate various cellular processes.

Overall, the regulation of cAMP levels is critical for maintaining proper cellular function and homeostasis, and abnormalities in cAMP signaling have been implicated in a variety of diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

Protein Kinase C (PKC) is a family of serine-threonine kinases that play crucial roles in various cellular signaling pathways. These enzymes are activated by second messengers such as diacylglycerol (DAG) and calcium ions (Ca2+), which result from the activation of cell surface receptors like G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs).

Once activated, PKC proteins phosphorylate downstream target proteins, thereby modulating their activities. This regulation is involved in numerous cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis, and membrane trafficking. There are at least 10 isoforms of PKC, classified into three subfamilies based on their second messenger requirements and structural features: conventional (cPKC; α, βI, βII, and γ), novel (nPKC; δ, ε, η, and θ), and atypical (aPKC; ζ and ι/λ). Dysregulation of PKC signaling has been implicated in several diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

Isoenzymes, also known as isoforms, are multiple forms of an enzyme that catalyze the same chemical reaction but differ in their amino acid sequence, structure, and/or kinetic properties. They are encoded by different genes or alternative splicing of the same gene. Isoenzymes can be found in various tissues and organs, and they play a crucial role in biological processes such as metabolism, detoxification, and cell signaling. Measurement of isoenzyme levels in body fluids (such as blood) can provide valuable diagnostic information for certain medical conditions, including tissue damage, inflammation, and various diseases.

Calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type 2 (CAMK2) is a type of serine/threonine protein kinase that plays a crucial role in signal transduction pathways related to synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory. It is composed of four subunits, each with a catalytic domain and a regulatory domain that contains an autoinhibitory region and a calmodulin-binding site.

The activation of CAMK2 requires the binding of calcium ions (Ca^2+^) to calmodulin, which then binds to the regulatory domain of CAMK2, relieving the autoinhibition and allowing the kinase to phosphorylate its substrates. Once activated, CAMK2 can also undergo a process called autophosphorylation, which results in a persistent activation state that can last for hours or even days.

CAMK2 has many downstream targets, including ion channels, transcription factors, and other protein kinases. Dysregulation of CAMK2 signaling has been implicated in various neurological disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and epilepsy.

Calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CAMKs) are a family of enzymes that play a crucial role in intracellular signaling pathways. They are activated by the binding of calcium ions and calmodulin, a ubiquitous calcium-binding protein, to their regulatory domain.

Once activated, CAMKs phosphorylate specific serine or threonine residues on target proteins, thereby modulating their activity, localization, or stability. This post-translational modification is essential for various cellular processes, including synaptic plasticity, gene expression, metabolism, and cell cycle regulation.

There are several subfamilies of CAMKs, including CaMKI, CaMKII, CaMKIII (also known as CaMKIV), and CaMK kinase (CaMKK). Each subfamily has distinct structural features, substrate specificity, and regulatory mechanisms. Dysregulation of CAMK signaling has been implicated in various pathological conditions, such as neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, and cardiovascular disorders.

Phosphorylation is the process of adding a phosphate group (a molecule consisting of one phosphorus atom and four oxygen atoms) to a protein or other organic molecule, which is usually done by enzymes called kinases. This post-translational modification can change the function, localization, or activity of the target molecule, playing a crucial role in various cellular processes such as signal transduction, metabolism, and regulation of gene expression. Phosphorylation is reversible, and the removal of the phosphate group is facilitated by enzymes called phosphatases.

Enzyme activation refers to the process by which an enzyme becomes biologically active and capable of carrying out its specific chemical or biological reaction. This is often achieved through various post-translational modifications, such as proteolytic cleavage, phosphorylation, or addition of cofactors or prosthetic groups to the enzyme molecule. These modifications can change the conformation or structure of the enzyme, exposing or creating a binding site for the substrate and allowing the enzymatic reaction to occur.

For example, in the case of proteolytic cleavage, an inactive precursor enzyme, known as a zymogen, is cleaved into its active form by a specific protease. This is seen in enzymes such as trypsin and chymotrypsin, which are initially produced in the pancreas as inactive precursors called trypsinogen and chymotrypsinogen, respectively. Once they reach the small intestine, they are activated by enteropeptidase, a protease that cleaves a specific peptide bond, releasing the active enzyme.

Phosphorylation is another common mechanism of enzyme activation, where a phosphate group is added to a specific serine, threonine, or tyrosine residue on the enzyme by a protein kinase. This modification can alter the conformation of the enzyme and create a binding site for the substrate, allowing the enzymatic reaction to occur.

Enzyme activation is a crucial process in many biological pathways, as it allows for precise control over when and where specific reactions take place. It also provides a mechanism for regulating enzyme activity in response to various signals and stimuli, such as hormones, neurotransmitters, or changes in the intracellular environment.

Calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type 1 (CAMK1) is a type of serine/threonine protein kinase that plays a crucial role in signal transduction pathways involved in various cellular processes, including synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory. It is activated by the binding of calcium ions (Ca2+) and calmodulin, a ubiquitous calcium-binding protein, to its regulatory domain.

Once activated, CAMK1 phosphorylates various downstream target proteins, leading to changes in their activity or function. In the brain, CAMK1 is primarily expressed in neurons and has been implicated in the regulation of synaptic strength and transmission, as well as in the modulation of gene expression and cell survival. Dysregulation of CAMK1 has been associated with several neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and epilepsy.

Benzylamines are a class of organic compounds that consist of a benzene ring attached to an amine group. The amine group (-NH2) can be primary, secondary, or tertiary, depending on the number of hydrogen atoms bonded to the nitrogen atom. Benzylamines are used in the synthesis of various pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and other organic compounds. They have a variety of biological activities and can act as central nervous system depressants, local anesthetics, and muscle relaxants. However, some benzylamines can also be toxic or carcinogenic, so they must be handled with care.

Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase RIα subunit, also known as PKA RIα or PRKAR1A, is a type of regulatory subunit of the cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA) enzyme. PKA is a key enzyme in many cellular signaling pathways and is composed of two regulatory subunits and two catalytic subunits. The RIα subunit is one of the four different regulatory subunits (RIα, RIβ, RIIα, and RIIβ) that regulate PKA activity by binding to cAMP, which leads to the release and activation of the catalytic subunits.

The RIα subunit is encoded by the PRKAR1A gene and is primarily expressed in many tissues, including the brain, heart, and adrenal glands. Mutations in the PRKAR1A gene have been associated with several genetic disorders, such as Carney Complex, a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by multiple tumors and endocrine overactivity. The RIα subunit plays an essential role in regulating various cellular processes, including metabolism, differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis.

Calcium is an essential mineral that is vital for various physiological processes in the human body. The medical definition of calcium is as follows:

Calcium (Ca2+) is a crucial cation and the most abundant mineral in the human body, with approximately 99% of it found in bones and teeth. It plays a vital role in maintaining structural integrity, nerve impulse transmission, muscle contraction, hormonal secretion, blood coagulation, and enzyme activation.

Calcium homeostasis is tightly regulated through the interplay of several hormones, including parathyroid hormone (PTH), calcitonin, and vitamin D. Dietary calcium intake, absorption, and excretion are also critical factors in maintaining optimal calcium levels in the body.

Hypocalcemia refers to low serum calcium levels, while hypercalcemia indicates high serum calcium levels. Both conditions can have detrimental effects on various organ systems and require medical intervention to correct.

Protein kinase inhibitors (PKIs) are a class of drugs that work by interfering with the function of protein kinases. Protein kinases are enzymes that play a crucial role in many cellular processes by adding a phosphate group to specific proteins, thereby modifying their activity, localization, or interaction with other molecules. This process of adding a phosphate group is known as phosphorylation and is a key mechanism for regulating various cellular functions, including signal transduction, metabolism, and cell division.

In some diseases, such as cancer, protein kinases can become overactive or mutated, leading to uncontrolled cell growth and division. Protein kinase inhibitors are designed to block the activity of these dysregulated kinases, thereby preventing or slowing down the progression of the disease. These drugs can be highly specific, targeting individual protein kinases or families of kinases, making them valuable tools for targeted therapy in cancer and other diseases.

Protein kinase inhibitors can work in various ways to block the activity of protein kinases. Some bind directly to the active site of the enzyme, preventing it from interacting with its substrates. Others bind to allosteric sites, changing the conformation of the enzyme and making it inactive. Still, others target upstream regulators of protein kinases or interfere with their ability to form functional complexes.

Examples of protein kinase inhibitors include imatinib (Gleevec), which targets the BCR-ABL kinase in chronic myeloid leukemia, and gefitinib (Iressa), which inhibits the EGFR kinase in non-small cell lung cancer. These drugs have shown significant clinical benefits in treating these diseases and have become important components of modern cancer therapy.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

In the context of medicine and pharmacology, "kinetics" refers to the study of how a drug moves throughout the body, including its absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (often abbreviated as ADME). This field is called "pharmacokinetics."

1. Absorption: This is the process of a drug moving from its site of administration into the bloodstream. Factors such as the route of administration (e.g., oral, intravenous, etc.), formulation, and individual physiological differences can affect absorption.

2. Distribution: Once a drug is in the bloodstream, it gets distributed throughout the body to various tissues and organs. This process is influenced by factors like blood flow, protein binding, and lipid solubility of the drug.

3. Metabolism: Drugs are often chemically modified in the body, typically in the liver, through processes known as metabolism. These changes can lead to the formation of active or inactive metabolites, which may then be further distributed, excreted, or undergo additional metabolic transformations.

4. Excretion: This is the process by which drugs and their metabolites are eliminated from the body, primarily through the kidneys (urine) and the liver (bile).

Understanding the kinetics of a drug is crucial for determining its optimal dosing regimen, potential interactions with other medications or foods, and any necessary adjustments for special populations like pediatric or geriatric patients, or those with impaired renal or hepatic function.

Signal transduction is the process by which a cell converts an extracellular signal, such as a hormone or neurotransmitter, into an intracellular response. This involves a series of molecular events that transmit the signal from the cell surface to the interior of the cell, ultimately resulting in changes in gene expression, protein activity, or metabolism.

The process typically begins with the binding of the extracellular signal to a receptor located on the cell membrane. This binding event activates the receptor, which then triggers a cascade of intracellular signaling molecules, such as second messengers, protein kinases, and ion channels. These molecules amplify and propagate the signal, ultimately leading to the activation or inhibition of specific cellular responses.

Signal transduction pathways are highly regulated and can be modulated by various factors, including other signaling molecules, post-translational modifications, and feedback mechanisms. Dysregulation of these pathways has been implicated in a variety of diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases (PSTKs) are a type of protein kinase that catalyzes the transfer of a phosphate group from ATP to the hydroxyl side chains of serine or threonine residues on target proteins. This phosphorylation process plays a crucial role in various cellular signaling pathways, including regulation of metabolism, gene expression, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis. PSTKs are involved in many physiological and pathological processes, and their dysregulation has been implicated in several diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative disorders.

An amino acid sequence is the specific order of amino acids in a protein or peptide molecule, formed by the linking of the amino group (-NH2) of one amino acid to the carboxyl group (-COOH) of another amino acid through a peptide bond. The sequence is determined by the genetic code and is unique to each type of protein or peptide. It plays a crucial role in determining the three-dimensional structure and function of proteins.

"Cells, cultured" is a medical term that refers to cells that have been removed from an organism and grown in controlled laboratory conditions outside of the body. This process is called cell culture and it allows scientists to study cells in a more controlled and accessible environment than they would have inside the body. Cultured cells can be derived from a variety of sources, including tissues, organs, or fluids from humans, animals, or cell lines that have been previously established in the laboratory.

Cell culture involves several steps, including isolation of the cells from the tissue, purification and characterization of the cells, and maintenance of the cells in appropriate growth conditions. The cells are typically grown in specialized media that contain nutrients, growth factors, and other components necessary for their survival and proliferation. Cultured cells can be used for a variety of purposes, including basic research, drug development and testing, and production of biological products such as vaccines and gene therapies.

It is important to note that cultured cells may behave differently than they do in the body, and results obtained from cell culture studies may not always translate directly to human physiology or disease. Therefore, it is essential to validate findings from cell culture experiments using additional models and ultimately in clinical trials involving human subjects.

Dibutyryl cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cAMP) is a chemically modified form of the second messenger molecule, cyclic GMP (guanosine monophosphate). The addition of butyryl groups to the cyclic GMP molecule makes it more lipid-soluble and allows for easier passage through cell membranes. This compound is often used in research to activate protein kinases and study the effects of increased intracellular levels of cyclic GMP, which plays a role in various cellular processes such as smooth muscle relaxation, regulation of ion channels, and inhibition of platelet aggregation.

Calmodulin is a small, ubiquitous calcium-binding protein that plays a critical role in various intracellular signaling pathways. It functions as a calcium sensor, binding to and regulating the activity of numerous target proteins upon calcium ion (Ca^2+^) binding. Calmodulin is expressed in all eukaryotic cells and participates in many cellular processes, including muscle contraction, neurotransmitter release, gene expression, metabolism, and cell cycle progression.

The protein contains four EF-hand motifs that can bind Ca^2+^ ions. Upon calcium binding, conformational changes occur in the calmodulin structure, exposing hydrophobic surfaces that facilitate its interaction with target proteins. Calmodulin's targets include enzymes (such as protein kinases and phosphatases), ion channels, transporters, and cytoskeletal components. By modulating the activity of these proteins, calmodulin helps regulate essential cellular functions in response to changes in intracellular Ca^2+^ concentrations.

Calmodulin's molecular weight is approximately 17 kDa, and it consists of a single polypeptide chain with 148-150 amino acid residues. The protein can be found in both the cytoplasm and the nucleus of cells. In addition to its role as a calcium sensor, calmodulin has been implicated in various pathological conditions, including cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and cardiovascular disorders.

Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases (MAPKs) are a family of serine/threonine protein kinases that play crucial roles in various cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation, transformation, and apoptosis, in response to diverse stimuli such as mitogens, growth factors, hormones, cytokines, and environmental stresses. They are highly conserved across eukaryotes and consist of a three-tiered kinase module composed of MAPK kinase kinases (MAP3Ks), MAPK kinases (MKKs or MAP2Ks), and MAPKs.

Activation of MAPKs occurs through a sequential phosphorylation and activation cascade, where MAP3Ks phosphorylate and activate MKKs, which in turn phosphorylate and activate MAPKs at specific residues (Thr-X-Tyr or Ser-Pro motifs). Once activated, MAPKs can further phosphorylate and regulate various downstream targets, including transcription factors and other protein kinases.

There are four major groups of MAPKs in mammals: extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2), c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK1/2/3), p38 MAPKs (p38α/β/γ/δ), and ERK5/BMK1. Each group of MAPKs has distinct upstream activators, downstream targets, and cellular functions, allowing for a high degree of specificity in signal transduction and cellular responses. Dysregulation of MAPK signaling pathways has been implicated in various human diseases, including cancer, diabetes, neurodegenerative disorders, and inflammatory diseases.

A cell line is a culture of cells that are grown in a laboratory for use in research. These cells are usually taken from a single cell or group of cells, and they are able to divide and grow continuously in the lab. Cell lines can come from many different sources, including animals, plants, and humans. They are often used in scientific research to study cellular processes, disease mechanisms, and to test new drugs or treatments. Some common types of human cell lines include HeLa cells (which come from a cancer patient named Henrietta Lacks), HEK293 cells (which come from embryonic kidney cells), and HUVEC cells (which come from umbilical vein endothelial cells). It is important to note that cell lines are not the same as primary cells, which are cells that are taken directly from a living organism and have not been grown in the lab.

I apologize for any confusion, but "Paramecium tetraurelia" is not a medical term. It is the scientific name of a species of ciliate protists, which are single-celled organisms commonly found in freshwater environments. These organisms are often studied in biology and microbiology as models for cellular and molecular processes. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or definitions, I would be happy to help with those instead.

Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling system is a crucial pathway for the transmission and regulation of various cellular responses in eukaryotic cells. It plays a significant role in several biological processes, including proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, inflammation, and stress response. The MAPK cascade consists of three main components: MAP kinase kinase kinase (MAP3K or MEKK), MAP kinase kinase (MAP2K or MEK), and MAP kinase (MAPK).

The signaling system is activated by various extracellular stimuli, such as growth factors, cytokines, hormones, and stress signals. These stimuli initiate a phosphorylation cascade that ultimately leads to the activation of MAPKs. The activated MAPKs then translocate into the nucleus and regulate gene expression by phosphorylating various transcription factors and other regulatory proteins.

There are four major MAPK families: extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2), c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK1/2/3), p38 MAPKs (p38α/β/γ/δ), and ERK5. Each family has distinct functions, substrates, and upstream activators. Dysregulation of the MAPK signaling system can lead to various diseases, including cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and neurological disorders. Therefore, understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying this pathway is crucial for developing novel therapeutic strategies.

p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases (p38 MAPKs) are a family of conserved serine-threonine protein kinases that play crucial roles in various cellular processes, including inflammation, immune response, differentiation, apoptosis, and stress responses. They are activated by diverse stimuli such as cytokines, ultraviolet radiation, heat shock, osmotic stress, and lipopolysaccharides (LPS).

Once activated, p38 MAPKs phosphorylate and regulate several downstream targets, including transcription factors and other protein kinases. This regulation leads to the expression of genes involved in inflammation, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis. Dysregulation of p38 MAPK signaling has been implicated in various diseases, such as cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and autoimmune diseases. Therefore, p38 MAPKs are considered promising targets for developing new therapeutic strategies to treat these conditions.

Enzyme inhibitors are substances that bind to an enzyme and decrease its activity, preventing it from catalyzing a chemical reaction in the body. They can work by several mechanisms, including blocking the active site where the substrate binds, or binding to another site on the enzyme to change its shape and prevent substrate binding. Enzyme inhibitors are often used as drugs to treat various medical conditions, such as high blood pressure, abnormal heart rhythms, and bacterial infections. They can also be found naturally in some foods and plants, and can be used in research to understand enzyme function and regulation.

Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases (PI3Ks) are a family of enzymes that play a crucial role in intracellular signal transduction. They phosphorylate the 3-hydroxyl group of the inositol ring in phosphatidylinositol and its derivatives, which results in the production of second messengers that regulate various cellular processes such as cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, motility, and survival.

PI3Ks are divided into three classes based on their structure and substrate specificity. Class I PI3Ks are further subdivided into two categories: class IA and class IB. Class IA PI3Ks are heterodimers consisting of a catalytic subunit (p110α, p110β, or p110δ) and a regulatory subunit (p85α, p85β, p55γ, or p50γ). They are primarily activated by receptor tyrosine kinases and G protein-coupled receptors. Class IB PI3Ks consist of a catalytic subunit (p110γ) and a regulatory subunit (p101 or p84/87). They are mainly activated by G protein-coupled receptors.

Dysregulation of PI3K signaling has been implicated in various human diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and autoimmune disorders. Therefore, PI3Ks have emerged as important targets for drug development in these areas.

Cyclic nucleotides are formed by the intramolecular phosphoester bond between the phosphate group and the hydroxyl group at the 3'-carbon atom of the ribose sugar in a nucleotide. This creates a cyclic structure, specifically a cyclic phosphate. The most common cyclic nucleotides are cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). These molecules function as second messengers in cells, playing crucial roles in various cellular signaling pathways related to metabolism, gene expression, and cell differentiation. The levels of cAMP and cGMP are tightly regulated by the activities of enzymes such as adenylate cyclase and guanylate cyclase for their synthesis, and phosphodiesterases for their degradation.

eIF-2 kinase is a type of protein kinase that phosphorylates the alpha subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor-2 (eIF-2) at serine 51. This phosphorylation event inhibits the guanine nucleotide exchange factor eIF-2B, thereby preventing the recycling of eIF-2 and reducing global protein synthesis.

There are four main subtypes of eIF-2 kinases:

1. HRI (heme-regulated inhibitor) - responds to heme deficiency and oxidative stress
2. PERK (PKR-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase) - activated by ER stress and misfolded proteins in the ER
3. GCN2 (general control non-derepressible 2) - responds to amino acid starvation
4. PKR (double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase) - activated by double-stranded RNA during viral infections

These eIF-2 kinases play crucial roles in regulating cellular responses to various stress conditions, such as the integrated stress response (ISR), which helps maintain cellular homeostasis and promote survival under adverse conditions.

Protein binding, in the context of medical and biological sciences, refers to the interaction between a protein and another molecule (known as the ligand) that results in a stable complex. This process is often reversible and can be influenced by various factors such as pH, temperature, and concentration of the involved molecules.

In clinical chemistry, protein binding is particularly important when it comes to drugs, as many of them bind to proteins (especially albumin) in the bloodstream. The degree of protein binding can affect a drug's distribution, metabolism, and excretion, which in turn influence its therapeutic effectiveness and potential side effects.

Protein-bound drugs may be less available for interaction with their target tissues, as only the unbound or "free" fraction of the drug is active. Therefore, understanding protein binding can help optimize dosing regimens and minimize adverse reactions.

Protein Kinase C-alpha (PKC-α) is a specific isoform of the Protein Kinase C (PKC) family, which are serine/threonine protein kinases that play crucial roles in various cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. PKC-α is activated by diacylglycerol (DAG) and calcium ions (Ca2+). It is involved in signal transduction pathways related to cell growth, differentiation, and oncogenic transformation. Mutations or dysregulation of PKC-alpha have been implicated in several diseases including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

Pyruvate kinase is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the final step of glycolysis, a process by which glucose is broken down to produce energy in the form of ATP (adenosine triphosphate). Specifically, pyruvate kinase catalyzes the transfer of a phosphate group from phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) to adenosine diphosphate (ADP), resulting in the formation of pyruvate and ATP.

There are several isoforms of pyruvate kinase found in different tissues, including the liver, muscle, and brain. The type found in red blood cells is known as PK-RBC or PK-M2. Deficiencies in pyruvate kinase can lead to a genetic disorder called pyruvate kinase deficiency, which can result in hemolytic anemia due to the premature destruction of red blood cells.

Tetradecanoylphorbol acetate (TPA) is defined as a pharmacological agent that is a derivative of the phorbol ester family. It is a potent tumor promoter and activator of protein kinase C (PKC), a group of enzymes that play a role in various cellular processes such as signal transduction, proliferation, and differentiation. TPA has been widely used in research to study PKC-mediated signaling pathways and its role in cancer development and progression. It is also used in topical treatments for skin conditions such as psoriasis.

Substrate specificity in the context of medical biochemistry and enzymology refers to the ability of an enzyme to selectively bind and catalyze a chemical reaction with a particular substrate (or a group of similar substrates) while discriminating against other molecules that are not substrates. This specificity arises from the three-dimensional structure of the enzyme, which has evolved to match the shape, charge distribution, and functional groups of its physiological substrate(s).

Substrate specificity is a fundamental property of enzymes that enables them to carry out highly selective chemical transformations in the complex cellular environment. The active site of an enzyme, where the catalysis takes place, has a unique conformation that complements the shape and charge distribution of its substrate(s). This ensures efficient recognition, binding, and conversion of the substrate into the desired product while minimizing unwanted side reactions with other molecules.

Substrate specificity can be categorized as:

1. Absolute specificity: An enzyme that can only act on a single substrate or a very narrow group of structurally related substrates, showing no activity towards any other molecule.
2. Group specificity: An enzyme that prefers to act on a particular functional group or class of compounds but can still accommodate minor structural variations within the substrate.
3. Broad or promiscuous specificity: An enzyme that can act on a wide range of structurally diverse substrates, albeit with varying catalytic efficiencies.

Understanding substrate specificity is crucial for elucidating enzymatic mechanisms, designing drugs that target specific enzymes or pathways, and developing biotechnological applications that rely on the controlled manipulation of enzyme activities.

Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 1 (MAPK1), also known as Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase 2 (ERK2), is a protein kinase that plays a crucial role in intracellular signal transduction pathways. It is a member of the MAPK family, which regulates various cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and stress response.

MAPK1 is activated by a cascade of phosphorylation events initiated by upstream activators like MAPKK (Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase) in response to various extracellular signals such as growth factors, hormones, and mitogens. Once activated, MAPK1 phosphorylates downstream targets, including transcription factors and other protein kinases, thereby modulating their activities and ultimately influencing gene expression and cellular responses.

MAPK1 is widely expressed in various tissues and cells, and its dysregulation has been implicated in several pathological conditions, including cancer, inflammation, and neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, understanding the regulation and function of MAPK1 signaling pathways has important implications for developing therapeutic strategies to treat these disorders.

Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunits, also known as protein kinase A (PKA) catalytic subunits, are key enzymes that play a crucial role in intracellular signaling pathways. These subunits are responsible for the regulation of various cellular processes, including metabolism, gene expression, and cell growth and differentiation.

The activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunits occurs through a cascade of events that begins with the binding of extracellular signals to G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) on the cell surface. This binding event activates adenylyl cyclase, an enzyme that converts ATP to cAMP. The increased levels of cAMP then bind to and activate regulatory subunits of cAMP-dependent protein kinase, leading to the release and activation of the catalytic subunits.

Once activated, the cAMP-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunits phosphorylate specific serine and threonine residues on target proteins, thereby modulating their activity and function. This process is reversible, as phosphatases can dephosphorylate these residues and inactivate the target proteins.

There are four different isoforms of cAMP-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunits (PKA-Cα, PKA-Cβ, PKA-Cγ, and PKA-Cδ) that are encoded by separate genes but share a high degree of sequence homology. These isoforms can form homodimers or heterodimers with each other, and their expression patterns and subcellular localization can vary depending on the cell type and physiological context.

Overall, cAMP-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunits are essential regulators of many fundamental cellular processes, and their dysregulation has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

A base sequence in the context of molecular biology refers to the specific order of nucleotides in a DNA or RNA molecule. In DNA, these nucleotides are adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T). In RNA, uracil (U) takes the place of thymine. The base sequence contains genetic information that is transcribed into RNA and ultimately translated into proteins. It is the exact order of these bases that determines the genetic code and thus the function of the DNA or RNA molecule.

In the context of medical and biological sciences, a "binding site" refers to a specific location on a protein, molecule, or cell where another molecule can attach or bind. This binding interaction can lead to various functional changes in the original protein or molecule. The other molecule that binds to the binding site is often referred to as a ligand, which can be a small molecule, ion, or even another protein.

The binding between a ligand and its target binding site can be specific and selective, meaning that only certain ligands can bind to particular binding sites with high affinity. This specificity plays a crucial role in various biological processes, such as signal transduction, enzyme catalysis, or drug action.

In the case of drug development, understanding the location and properties of binding sites on target proteins is essential for designing drugs that can selectively bind to these sites and modulate protein function. This knowledge can help create more effective and safer therapeutic options for various diseases.

A mutation is a permanent change in the DNA sequence of an organism's genome. Mutations can occur spontaneously or be caused by environmental factors such as exposure to radiation, chemicals, or viruses. They may have various effects on the organism, ranging from benign to harmful, depending on where they occur and whether they alter the function of essential proteins. In some cases, mutations can increase an individual's susceptibility to certain diseases or disorders, while in others, they may confer a survival advantage. Mutations are the driving force behind evolution, as they introduce new genetic variability into populations, which can then be acted upon by natural selection.

Western blotting is a laboratory technique used in molecular biology to detect and quantify specific proteins in a mixture of many different proteins. This technique is commonly used to confirm the expression of a protein of interest, determine its size, and investigate its post-translational modifications. The name "Western" blotting distinguishes this technique from Southern blotting (for DNA) and Northern blotting (for RNA).

The Western blotting procedure involves several steps:

1. Protein extraction: The sample containing the proteins of interest is first extracted, often by breaking open cells or tissues and using a buffer to extract the proteins.
2. Separation of proteins by electrophoresis: The extracted proteins are then separated based on their size by loading them onto a polyacrylamide gel and running an electric current through the gel (a process called sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis or SDS-PAGE). This separates the proteins according to their molecular weight, with smaller proteins migrating faster than larger ones.
3. Transfer of proteins to a membrane: After separation, the proteins are transferred from the gel onto a nitrocellulose or polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane using an electric current in a process called blotting. This creates a replica of the protein pattern on the gel but now immobilized on the membrane for further analysis.
4. Blocking: The membrane is then blocked with a blocking agent, such as non-fat dry milk or bovine serum albumin (BSA), to prevent non-specific binding of antibodies in subsequent steps.
5. Primary antibody incubation: A primary antibody that specifically recognizes the protein of interest is added and allowed to bind to its target protein on the membrane. This step may be performed at room temperature or 4°C overnight, depending on the antibody's properties.
6. Washing: The membrane is washed with a buffer to remove unbound primary antibodies.
7. Secondary antibody incubation: A secondary antibody that recognizes the primary antibody (often coupled to an enzyme or fluorophore) is added and allowed to bind to the primary antibody. This step may involve using a horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated or alkaline phosphatase (AP)-conjugated secondary antibody, depending on the detection method used later.
8. Washing: The membrane is washed again to remove unbound secondary antibodies.
9. Detection: A detection reagent is added to visualize the protein of interest by detecting the signal generated from the enzyme-conjugated or fluorophore-conjugated secondary antibody. This can be done using chemiluminescent, colorimetric, or fluorescent methods.
10. Analysis: The resulting image is analyzed to determine the presence and quantity of the protein of interest in the sample.

Western blotting is a powerful technique for identifying and quantifying specific proteins within complex mixtures. It can be used to study protein expression, post-translational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and more. However, it requires careful optimization and validation to ensure accurate and reproducible results.

Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinases (MAP2K or MEK) are a group of protein kinases that play a crucial role in intracellular signal transduction pathways. They are so named because they are activated by mitogens, which are substances that stimulate cell division, and other extracellular signals.

MAP2Ks are positioned upstream of the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases (MAPK) in a three-tiered kinase cascade. Once activated, MAP2Ks phosphorylate and activate MAPKs, which then go on to regulate various cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, survival, and apoptosis.

There are several subfamilies of MAP2Ks, including MEK1/2, MEK3/6 (also known as MKK3/6), MEK4/7 (also known as MKK4/7), and MEK5. Each MAP2K is specific to activating a particular MAPK, and they are activated by different MAP3Ks (MAP kinase kinase kinases) in response to various extracellular signals.

Dysregulation of the MAPK/MAP2K signaling pathways has been implicated in numerous diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and neurological disorders. Therefore, targeting these pathways with therapeutic agents has emerged as a promising strategy for treating various diseases.

Transfection is a term used in molecular biology that refers to the process of deliberately introducing foreign genetic material (DNA, RNA or artificial gene constructs) into cells. This is typically done using chemical or physical methods, such as lipofection or electroporation. Transfection is widely used in research and medical settings for various purposes, including studying gene function, producing proteins, developing gene therapies, and creating genetically modified organisms. It's important to note that transfection is different from transduction, which is the process of introducing genetic material into cells using viruses as vectors.

Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 3 (MAPK3), also known as extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 (ERK1), is a serine/threonine protein kinase that plays a crucial role in intracellular signal transduction pathways. It is involved in the regulation of various cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation, and survival, in response to extracellular stimuli such as growth factors, hormones, and stress.

MAPK3 is activated through a phosphorylation cascade that involves the activation of upstream MAPK kinases (MKK or MEK). Once activated, MAPK3 can phosphorylate and activate various downstream targets, including transcription factors, to regulate gene expression. Dysregulation of MAPK3 signaling has been implicated in several diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders.

Protein Kinase C-delta (PKC-δ) is a specific isoform of the Protein Kinase C (PKC) family, which are serine/threonine protein kinases that play crucial roles in various cellular signaling pathways. PKC-δ is involved in several cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and motility. It is activated by second messengers like diacylglycerol (DAG) and calcium ions (Ca2+), and its activation leads to the phosphorylation of specific target proteins, thereby modulating their functions. Aberrant regulation of PKC-δ has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer and neurodegenerative disorders.

"Cattle" is a term used in the agricultural and veterinary fields to refer to domesticated animals of the genus *Bos*, primarily *Bos taurus* (European cattle) and *Bos indicus* (Zebu). These animals are often raised for meat, milk, leather, and labor. They are also known as bovines or cows (for females), bulls (intact males), and steers/bullocks (castrated males). However, in a strict medical definition, "cattle" does not apply to humans or other animals.

Isoquinolines are not a medical term per se, but a chemical classification. They refer to a class of organic compounds that consist of a benzene ring fused to a piperidine ring. This structure is similar to that of quinoline, but with the nitrogen atom located at a different position in the ring.

Isoquinolines have various biological activities and can be found in some natural products, including certain alkaloids. Some isoquinoline derivatives have been developed as drugs for the treatment of various conditions, such as cardiovascular diseases, neurological disorders, and cancer. However, specific medical definitions related to isoquinolines typically refer to the use or effects of these specific drugs rather than the broader class of compounds.

Calcium-binding proteins (CaBPs) are a diverse group of proteins that have the ability to bind calcium ions (Ca^2+^) with high affinity and specificity. They play crucial roles in various cellular processes, including signal transduction, muscle contraction, neurotransmitter release, and protection against oxidative stress.

The binding of calcium ions to these proteins induces conformational changes that can either activate or inhibit their functions. Some well-known CaBPs include calmodulin, troponin C, S100 proteins, and parvalbumins. These proteins are essential for maintaining calcium homeostasis within cells and for mediating the effects of calcium as a second messenger in various cellular signaling pathways.

JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase) Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases are a subgroup of the Ser/Thr protein kinases that are activated by stress stimuli and play important roles in various cellular processes, including inflammation, apoptosis, and differentiation. They are involved in the regulation of gene expression through phosphorylation of transcription factors such as c-Jun. JNKs are activated by a variety of upstream kinases, including MAP2Ks (MKK4/SEK1 and MKK7), which are in turn activated by MAP3Ks (such as ASK1, MEKK1, MLKs, and TAK1). JNK signaling pathways have been implicated in various diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and inflammatory diseases.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Peptide T" is not a widely recognized or established medical term. It appears that you might be referring to "T-20," which is also known as "Enfuvirtide." Enfuvirtide is a medication used in the treatment of HIV infection. It is a synthetic peptide that mimics a portion of the gp41 protein, which is a component of the viral envelope of HIV. By binding to this protein, enfuvirtide prevents the virus from infecting cells, providing an additional line of defense against the virus in combination therapy regimens.

If you meant something else by "Peptide T," please provide more context or clarify your question so I can give you a more accurate answer.

Recombinant proteins are artificially created proteins produced through the use of recombinant DNA technology. This process involves combining DNA molecules from different sources to create a new set of genes that encode for a specific protein. The resulting recombinant protein can then be expressed, purified, and used for various applications in research, medicine, and industry.

Recombinant proteins are widely used in biomedical research to study protein function, structure, and interactions. They are also used in the development of diagnostic tests, vaccines, and therapeutic drugs. For example, recombinant insulin is a common treatment for diabetes, while recombinant human growth hormone is used to treat growth disorders.

The production of recombinant proteins typically involves the use of host cells, such as bacteria, yeast, or mammalian cells, which are engineered to express the desired protein. The host cells are transformed with a plasmid vector containing the gene of interest, along with regulatory elements that control its expression. Once the host cells are cultured and the protein is expressed, it can be purified using various chromatography techniques.

Overall, recombinant proteins have revolutionized many areas of biology and medicine, enabling researchers to study and manipulate proteins in ways that were previously impossible.

Phosphoprotein phosphatases (PPPs) are a family of enzymes that play a crucial role in the regulation of various cellular processes by removing phosphate groups from serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues on proteins. Phosphorylation is a post-translational modification that regulates protein function, localization, and stability, and dephosphorylation by PPPs is essential for maintaining the balance of this regulation.

The PPP family includes several subfamilies, such as PP1, PP2A, PP2B (also known as calcineurin), PP4, PP5, and PP6. Each subfamily has distinct substrate specificities and regulatory mechanisms. For example, PP1 and PP2A are involved in the regulation of metabolism, signal transduction, and cell cycle progression, while PP2B is involved in immune response and calcium signaling.

Dysregulation of PPPs has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and cardiovascular disease. Therefore, understanding the function and regulation of PPPs is important for developing therapeutic strategies to target these diseases.

Guanylate cyclase is an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of guanosine triphosphate (GTP) to cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), which acts as a second messenger in various cellular signaling pathways. There are two main types of guanylate cyclases: soluble and membrane-bound. Soluble guanylate cyclase is activated by nitric oxide, while membrane-bound guanylate cyclase can be activated by natriuretic peptides. The increased levels of cGMP produced by guanylate cyclase can lead to a variety of cellular responses, including smooth muscle relaxation, neurotransmitter release, and regulation of ion channels. Dysregulation of guanylate cyclase activity has been implicated in several diseases, such as hypertension, heart failure, and cancer.

Messenger RNA (mRNA) is a type of RNA (ribonucleic acid) that carries genetic information copied from DNA in the form of a series of three-base code "words," each of which specifies a particular amino acid. This information is used by the cell's machinery to construct proteins, a process known as translation. After being transcribed from DNA, mRNA travels out of the nucleus to the ribosomes in the cytoplasm where protein synthesis occurs. Once the protein has been synthesized, the mRNA may be degraded and recycled. Post-transcriptional modifications can also occur to mRNA, such as alternative splicing and addition of a 5' cap and a poly(A) tail, which can affect its stability, localization, and translation efficiency.

AMP-activated protein kinases (AMPK) are a group of heterotrimeric enzymes that play a crucial role in cellular energy homeostasis. They are composed of a catalytic subunit (α) and two regulatory subunits (β and γ). AMPK is activated under conditions of low energy charge, such as ATP depletion, hypoxia, or exercise, through an increase in the AMP:ATP ratio.

Once activated, AMPK phosphorylates and regulates various downstream targets involved in metabolic pathways, including glycolysis, fatty acid oxidation, and protein synthesis. This results in the inhibition of energy-consuming processes and the promotion of energy-producing processes, ultimately helping to restore cellular energy balance.

AMPK has been implicated in a variety of physiological processes, including glucose and lipid metabolism, autophagy, mitochondrial biogenesis, and inflammation. Dysregulation of AMPK activity has been linked to several diseases, such as diabetes, obesity, cancer, and neurodegenerative disorders. Therefore, AMPK is an attractive target for therapeutic interventions in these conditions.

Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) is a high-energy molecule that stores and transports energy within cells. It is the main source of energy for most cellular processes, including muscle contraction, nerve impulse transmission, and protein synthesis. ATP is composed of a base (adenine), a sugar (ribose), and three phosphate groups. The bonds between these phosphate groups contain a significant amount of energy, which can be released when the bond between the second and third phosphate group is broken, resulting in the formation of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and inorganic phosphate. This process is known as hydrolysis and can be catalyzed by various enzymes to drive a wide range of cellular functions. ATP can also be regenerated from ADP through various metabolic pathways, such as oxidative phosphorylation or substrate-level phosphorylation, allowing for the continuous supply of energy to cells.

Phosphoproteins are proteins that have been post-translationally modified by the addition of a phosphate group (-PO3H2) onto specific amino acid residues, most commonly serine, threonine, or tyrosine. This process is known as phosphorylation and is mediated by enzymes called kinases. Phosphoproteins play crucial roles in various cellular processes such as signal transduction, cell cycle regulation, metabolism, and gene expression. The addition or removal of a phosphate group can activate or inhibit the function of a protein, thereby serving as a switch to control its activity. Phosphoproteins can be detected and quantified using techniques such as Western blotting, mass spectrometry, and immunofluorescence.

Serine is an amino acid, which is a building block of proteins. More specifically, it is a non-essential amino acid, meaning that the body can produce it from other compounds, and it does not need to be obtained through diet. Serine plays important roles in the body, such as contributing to the formation of the protective covering of nerve fibers (myelin sheath), helping to synthesize another amino acid called tryptophan, and taking part in the metabolism of fatty acids. It is also involved in the production of muscle tissues, the immune system, and the forming of cell structures. Serine can be found in various foods such as soy, eggs, cheese, meat, peanuts, lentils, and many others.

Molecular weight, also known as molecular mass, is the mass of a molecule. It is expressed in units of atomic mass units (amu) or daltons (Da). Molecular weight is calculated by adding up the atomic weights of each atom in a molecule. It is a useful property in chemistry and biology, as it can be used to determine the concentration of a substance in a solution, or to calculate the amount of a substance that will react with another in a chemical reaction.

Sprague-Dawley rats are a strain of albino laboratory rats that are widely used in scientific research. They were first developed by researchers H.H. Sprague and R.C. Dawley in the early 20th century, and have since become one of the most commonly used rat strains in biomedical research due to their relatively large size, ease of handling, and consistent genetic background.

Sprague-Dawley rats are outbred, which means that they are genetically diverse and do not suffer from the same limitations as inbred strains, which can have reduced fertility and increased susceptibility to certain diseases. They are also characterized by their docile nature and low levels of aggression, making them easier to handle and study than some other rat strains.

These rats are used in a wide variety of research areas, including toxicology, pharmacology, nutrition, cancer, and behavioral studies. Because they are genetically diverse, Sprague-Dawley rats can be used to model a range of human diseases and conditions, making them an important tool in the development of new drugs and therapies.

8-Bromo Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate (8-Br-cAMP) is a synthetic, cell-permeable analog of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). Cyclic AMP is an important second messenger in many signal transduction pathways, and 8-Br-cAMP is often used in research to mimic or study the effects of increased cAMP levels. The bromine atom at the 8-position makes 8-Br-cAMP more resistant to degradation by phosphodiesterases, allowing it to have a longer duration of action compared to cAMP. It is used in various biochemical and cellular studies as a tool compound to investigate the role of cAMP in different signaling pathways.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Protamine Kinase" is not a widely recognized or established term in medical or biological sciences. Protamines are small, arginine-rich proteins found in the sperm cells of many organisms, and they play a crucial role in the packaging and protection of DNA during spermatogenesis.

Kinases, on the other hand, are enzymes that catalyze the transfer of phosphate groups from ATP to specific amino acids in proteins, thereby modulating their function, localization, or stability.

A search of scientific literature reveals only a few instances where "protamine kinase" is mentioned, usually in the context of potential regulatory mechanisms during sperm maturation or fertilization. However, there is no widely accepted or well-characterized enzyme known as "protamine kinase." Therefore, it would be challenging to provide a concise and accurate medical definition for this term.

A dose-response relationship in the context of drugs refers to the changes in the effects or symptoms that occur as the dose of a drug is increased or decreased. Generally, as the dose of a drug is increased, the severity or intensity of its effects also increases. Conversely, as the dose is decreased, the effects of the drug become less severe or may disappear altogether.

The dose-response relationship is an important concept in pharmacology and toxicology because it helps to establish the safe and effective dosage range for a drug. By understanding how changes in the dose of a drug affect its therapeutic and adverse effects, healthcare providers can optimize treatment plans for their patients while minimizing the risk of harm.

The dose-response relationship is typically depicted as a curve that shows the relationship between the dose of a drug and its effect. The shape of the curve may vary depending on the drug and the specific effect being measured. Some drugs may have a steep dose-response curve, meaning that small changes in the dose can result in large differences in the effect. Other drugs may have a more gradual dose-response curve, where larger changes in the dose are needed to produce significant effects.

In addition to helping establish safe and effective dosages, the dose-response relationship is also used to evaluate the potential therapeutic benefits and risks of new drugs during clinical trials. By systematically testing different doses of a drug in controlled studies, researchers can identify the optimal dosage range for the drug and assess its safety and efficacy.

SRC-family kinases (SFKs) are a group of non-receptor tyrosine kinases that play important roles in various cellular processes, including cell proliferation, differentiation, survival, and migration. They are named after the founding member, SRC, which was first identified as an oncogene in Rous sarcoma virus.

SFKs share a common structure, consisting of an N-terminal unique domain, a SH3 domain, a SH2 domain, a catalytic kinase domain, and a C-terminal regulatory tail with a negative regulatory tyrosine residue (Y527 in human SRC). In their inactive state, SFKs are maintained in a closed conformation through intramolecular interactions between the SH3 domain, SH2 domain, and the phosphorylated C-terminal tyrosine.

Upon activation by various signals, such as growth factors, cytokines, or integrin engagement, SFKs are activated through a series of events that involve dephosphorylation of the regulatory tyrosine residue, recruitment to membrane receptors via their SH2 and SH3 domains, and trans-autophosphorylation of the activation loop in the kinase domain.

Once activated, SFKs can phosphorylate a wide range of downstream substrates, including other protein kinases, adaptor proteins, and cytoskeletal components, thereby regulating various signaling pathways that control cell behavior. Dysregulation of SFK activity has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer, inflammation, and neurological disorders.

Protein Kinase C-epsilon (PKCε) is a serine-threonine protein kinase that belongs to the family of Protein Kinase C (PKC) enzymes. These enzymes play crucial roles in various cellular processes, including signal transduction, cell survival, differentiation, and apoptosis.

PKCε is specifically involved in regulating several signaling pathways related to inflammation, proliferation, and carcinogenesis. It can be activated by different stimuli such as diacylglycerol (DAG) and phorbol esters, which lead to its translocation from the cytosol to the plasma membrane, where it phosphorylates and modulates the activity of various target proteins.

Abnormal regulation or expression of PKCε has been implicated in several diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and neurodegenerative disorders. Therefore, PKCε is considered a potential therapeutic target for these conditions, and inhibitors of this enzyme are being developed and tested in preclinical and clinical studies.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Purinones" is not a recognized term in medical terminology. It seems there might be a spelling mistake or a misunderstanding of the term. If you meant "purines," I can provide a definition for that. Purines are heterocyclic aromatic organic compounds that form the basis of several important biomolecules, such as nucleotides and their derivatives found in DNA and RNA. If you had something different in mind, please provide clarification so I can give you an accurate and helpful response.

Protein Kinase C beta (PKCβ) is a serine-threonine protein kinase that belongs to the family of Protein Kinase C (PKC) enzymes. It plays a crucial role in various cellular processes, including signal transduction, cell survival, differentiation, and apoptosis. PKCβ is activated by diacylglycerol (DAG) and calcium ions (Ca2+), which results in its translocation from the cytosol to the plasma membrane, where it phosphorylates downstream target proteins.

There are two isoforms of PKCβ, PKCβI and PKCβII, which differ in their regulatory domains but have similar catalytic domains. PKCβ has been implicated in several diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and inflammatory disorders, making it a potential therapeutic target for drug development.

I believe there may be some confusion in your question. "Rabbits" is a common name used to refer to the Lagomorpha species, particularly members of the family Leporidae. They are small mammals known for their long ears, strong legs, and quick reproduction.

However, if you're referring to "rabbits" in a medical context, there is a term called "rabbit syndrome," which is a rare movement disorder characterized by repetitive, involuntary movements of the fingers, resembling those of a rabbit chewing. It is also known as "finger-chewing chorea." This condition is usually associated with certain medications, particularly antipsychotics, and typically resolves when the medication is stopped or adjusted.

Calcium signaling is the process by which cells regulate various functions through changes in intracellular calcium ion concentrations. Calcium ions (Ca^2+^) are crucial second messengers that play a critical role in many cellular processes, including muscle contraction, neurotransmitter release, gene expression, and programmed cell death (apoptosis).

Intracellular calcium levels are tightly regulated by a complex network of channels, pumps, and exchangers located on the plasma membrane and intracellular organelles such as the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria. These proteins control the influx, efflux, and storage of calcium ions within the cell.

Calcium signaling is initiated when an external signal, such as a hormone or neurotransmitter, binds to a specific receptor on the plasma membrane. This interaction triggers the opening of ion channels, allowing extracellular Ca^2+^ to flow into the cytoplasm. In some cases, this influx of calcium ions is sufficient to activate downstream targets directly. However, in most instances, the increase in intracellular Ca^2+^ serves as a trigger for the release of additional calcium from internal stores, such as the ER.

The release of calcium from the ER is mediated by ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and inositol trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs), which are activated by specific second messengers generated in response to the initial external signal. The activation of these channels leads to a rapid increase in cytoplasmic Ca^2+^, creating a transient intracellular calcium signal known as a "calcium spark" or "calcium puff."

These localized increases in calcium concentration can then propagate throughout the cell as waves of elevated calcium, allowing for the spatial and temporal coordination of various cellular responses. The duration and amplitude of these calcium signals are finely tuned by the interplay between calcium-binding proteins, pumps, and exchangers, ensuring that appropriate responses are elicited in a controlled manner.

Dysregulation of intracellular calcium signaling has been implicated in numerous pathological conditions, including neurodegenerative diseases, cardiovascular disorders, and cancer. Therefore, understanding the molecular mechanisms governing calcium homeostasis and signaling is crucial for the development of novel therapeutic strategies targeting these diseases.

3',5'-Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) phosphodiesterases are a group of enzymes that play a role in regulating the levels of cGMP, an important intracellular signaling molecule involved in various biological processes. These enzymes catalyze the hydrolysis of cGMP to 5'-GMP, thereby terminating cGMP-mediated signals within cells.

There are several isoforms of cGMP phosphodiesterases, which differ in their regulatory properties, substrate specificity, and cellular distribution. These enzymes can be activated or inhibited by various factors, including drugs, hormones, and neurotransmitters, and play a crucial role in modulating the activity of cGMP-dependent signaling pathways in different tissues and organs.

Dysregulation of cGMP phosphodiesterase activity has been implicated in various diseases, including cardiovascular disorders, pulmonary hypertension, neurodegenerative diseases, and cancer. Therefore, these enzymes are considered important targets for the development of novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of these conditions.

1-Phosphatidylinositol 4-Kinase (PI4K) is a type of enzyme that belongs to the family of kinases, which are enzymes that transfer phosphate groups from high-energy donor molecules to specific target proteins or lipids in the cell. PI4K specifically phosphorylates the 4th position on the inositol ring of phosphatidylinositol (PI), a type of phospholipid found in the cell membrane, converting it to phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI4P).

PI4K has several isoforms, including PI4K alpha, beta, gamma, and delta, which are located in different cellular compartments and play distinct roles. For example, PI4K alpha and beta are primarily involved in vesicle trafficking and Golgi function, while PI4K gamma and delta are associated with the plasma membrane and regulate ion channels and other signaling pathways.

PI4P, the product of PI4K activity, is an important signaling molecule that regulates various cellular processes, including membrane trafficking, cytoskeleton organization, and protein sorting. Dysregulation of PI4K and its downstream pathways has been implicated in several human diseases, such as cancer, neurodegeneration, and viral infection.

Protein-Tyrosine Kinases (PTKs) are a type of enzyme that plays a crucial role in various cellular functions, including signal transduction, cell growth, differentiation, and metabolism. They catalyze the transfer of a phosphate group from ATP to the tyrosine residues of proteins, thereby modifying their activity, localization, or interaction with other molecules.

PTKs can be divided into two main categories: receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and non-receptor tyrosine kinases (NRTKs). RTKs are transmembrane proteins that become activated upon binding to specific ligands, such as growth factors or hormones. NRTKs, on the other hand, are intracellular enzymes that can be activated by various signals, including receptor-mediated signaling and intracellular messengers.

Dysregulation of PTK activity has been implicated in several diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, and inflammatory disorders. Therefore, PTKs are important targets for drug development and therapy.

Recombinant fusion proteins are artificially created biomolecules that combine the functional domains or properties of two or more different proteins into a single protein entity. They are generated through recombinant DNA technology, where the genes encoding the desired protein domains are linked together and expressed as a single, chimeric gene in a host organism, such as bacteria, yeast, or mammalian cells.

The resulting fusion protein retains the functional properties of its individual constituent proteins, allowing for novel applications in research, diagnostics, and therapeutics. For instance, recombinant fusion proteins can be designed to enhance protein stability, solubility, or immunogenicity, making them valuable tools for studying protein-protein interactions, developing targeted therapies, or generating vaccines against infectious diseases or cancer.

Examples of recombinant fusion proteins include:

1. Etaglunatide (ABT-523): A soluble Fc fusion protein that combines the heavy chain fragment crystallizable region (Fc) of an immunoglobulin with the extracellular domain of the human interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R). This fusion protein functions as a decoy receptor, neutralizing IL-6 and its downstream signaling pathways in rheumatoid arthritis.
2. Etanercept (Enbrel): A soluble TNF receptor p75 Fc fusion protein that binds to tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and inhibits its proinflammatory activity, making it a valuable therapeutic option for treating autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and psoriasis.
3. Abatacept (Orencia): A fusion protein consisting of the extracellular domain of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) linked to the Fc region of an immunoglobulin, which downregulates T-cell activation and proliferation in autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis.
4. Belimumab (Benlysta): A monoclonal antibody that targets B-lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) protein, preventing its interaction with the B-cell surface receptor and inhibiting B-cell activation in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).
5. Romiplostim (Nplate): A fusion protein consisting of a thrombopoietin receptor agonist peptide linked to an immunoglobulin Fc region, which stimulates platelet production in patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenia (ITP).
6. Darbepoetin alfa (Aranesp): A hyperglycosylated erythropoiesis-stimulating protein that functions as a longer-acting form of recombinant human erythropoietin, used to treat anemia in patients with chronic kidney disease or cancer.
7. Palivizumab (Synagis): A monoclonal antibody directed against the F protein of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), which prevents RSV infection and is administered prophylactically to high-risk infants during the RSV season.
8. Ranibizumab (Lucentis): A recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody fragment that binds and inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), used in the treatment of age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and other ocular disorders.
9. Cetuximab (Erbitux): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that binds to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), used in the treatment of colorectal cancer and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.
10. Adalimumab (Humira): A fully humanized monoclonal antibody that targets tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), used in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and Crohn's disease.
11. Bevacizumab (Avastin): A recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to VEGF-A, used in the treatment of various cancers, including colorectal, lung, breast, and kidney cancer.
12. Trastuzumab (Herceptin): A humanized monoclonal antibody that targets HER2/neu receptor, used in the treatment of breast cancer.
13. Rituximab (Rituxan): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that binds to CD20 antigen on B cells, used in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and rheumatoid arthritis.
14. Palivizumab (Synagis): A humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to the F protein of respiratory syncytial virus, used in the prevention of respiratory syncytial virus infection in high-risk infants.
15. Infliximab (Remicade): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases, including Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis.
16. Natalizumab (Tysabri): A humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to α4β1 integrin, used in the treatment of multiple sclerosis and Crohn's disease.
17. Adalimumab (Humira): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, Crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis.
18. Golimumab (Simponi): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and ulcerative colitis.
19. Certolizumab pegol (Cimzia): A PEGylated Fab' fragment of a humanized monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and Crohn's disease.
20. Ustekinumab (Stelara): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-12 and IL-23, used in the treatment of psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and Crohn's disease.
21. Secukinumab (Cosentyx): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-17A, used in the treatment of psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis.
22. Ixekizumab (Taltz): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-17A, used in the treatment of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.
23. Brodalumab (Siliq): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-17 receptor A, used in the treatment of psoriasis.
24. Sarilumab (Kevzara): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets the IL-6 receptor, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.
25. Tocilizumab (Actemra): A humanized monoclonal antibody that targets the IL-6 receptor, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis, polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis, giant cell arteritis, and chimeric antigen receptor T-cell-induced cytokine release syndrome.
26. Siltuximab (Sylvant): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that targets IL-6, used in the treatment of multicentric Castleman disease.
27. Satralizumab (Enspryng): A humanized monoclonal antibody that targets IL-6 receptor alpha, used in the treatment of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder.
28. Sirukumab (Plivensia): A human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-6, used in the treatment

Cytosol refers to the liquid portion of the cytoplasm found within a eukaryotic cell, excluding the organelles and structures suspended in it. It is the site of various metabolic activities and contains a variety of ions, small molecules, and enzymes. The cytosol is where many biochemical reactions take place, including glycolysis, protein synthesis, and the regulation of cellular pH. It is also where some organelles, such as ribosomes and vesicles, are located. In contrast to the cytosol, the term "cytoplasm" refers to the entire contents of a cell, including both the cytosol and the organelles suspended within it.

Tertiary protein structure refers to the three-dimensional arrangement of all the elements (polypeptide chains) of a single protein molecule. It is the highest level of structural organization and results from interactions between various side chains (R groups) of the amino acids that make up the protein. These interactions, which include hydrogen bonds, ionic bonds, van der Waals forces, and disulfide bridges, give the protein its unique shape and stability, which in turn determines its function. The tertiary structure of a protein can be stabilized by various factors such as temperature, pH, and the presence of certain ions. Any changes in these factors can lead to denaturation, where the protein loses its tertiary structure and thus its function.

Electrophoresis, polyacrylamide gel (EPG) is a laboratory technique used to separate and analyze complex mixtures of proteins or nucleic acids (DNA or RNA) based on their size and electrical charge. This technique utilizes a matrix made of cross-linked polyacrylamide, a type of gel, which provides a stable and uniform environment for the separation of molecules.

In this process:

1. The polyacrylamide gel is prepared by mixing acrylamide monomers with a cross-linking agent (bis-acrylamide) and a catalyst (ammonium persulfate) in the presence of a buffer solution.
2. The gel is then poured into a mold and allowed to polymerize, forming a solid matrix with uniform pore sizes that depend on the concentration of acrylamide used. Higher concentrations result in smaller pores, providing better resolution for separating smaller molecules.
3. Once the gel has set, it is placed in an electrophoresis apparatus containing a buffer solution. Samples containing the mixture of proteins or nucleic acids are loaded into wells on the top of the gel.
4. An electric field is applied across the gel, causing the negatively charged molecules to migrate towards the positive electrode (anode) while positively charged molecules move toward the negative electrode (cathode). The rate of migration depends on the size, charge, and shape of the molecules.
5. Smaller molecules move faster through the gel matrix and will migrate farther from the origin compared to larger molecules, resulting in separation based on size. Proteins and nucleic acids can be selectively stained after electrophoresis to visualize the separated bands.

EPG is widely used in various research fields, including molecular biology, genetics, proteomics, and forensic science, for applications such as protein characterization, DNA fragment analysis, cloning, mutation detection, and quality control of nucleic acid or protein samples.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 4 (GRK4) is a type of enzyme belonging to the family of GRKs, which play a crucial role in the regulation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). These receptors are involved in various cellular responses to hormones and neurotransmitters.

GRK4 specifically phosphorylates agonist-activated GPCRs, leading to their desensitization and internalization. This enzyme has four isoforms (GRK4A, GRK4B, GRK4C, and GRK4D) generated through alternative splicing, with different tissue distributions and functions.

GRK4 is most abundantly expressed in the heart, brain, adrenal glands, and testis. In the heart, it plays a significant role in regulating cardiac function, including modulating beta-adrenergic receptor signaling, which impacts heart rate and contractility. Dysregulation of GRK4 has been implicated in various pathological conditions such as heart failure, hypertension, and neurological disorders.

Sequence homology, amino acid, refers to the similarity in the order of amino acids in a protein or a portion of a protein between two or more species. This similarity can be used to infer evolutionary relationships and functional similarities between proteins. The higher the degree of sequence homology, the more likely it is that the proteins are related and have similar functions. Sequence homology can be determined through various methods such as pairwise alignment or multiple sequence alignment, which compare the sequences and calculate a score based on the number and type of matching amino acids.

Carrier proteins, also known as transport proteins, are a type of protein that facilitates the movement of molecules across cell membranes. They are responsible for the selective and active transport of ions, sugars, amino acids, and other molecules from one side of the membrane to the other, against their concentration gradient. This process requires energy, usually in the form of ATP (adenosine triphosphate).

Carrier proteins have a specific binding site for the molecule they transport, and undergo conformational changes upon binding, which allows them to move the molecule across the membrane. Once the molecule has been transported, the carrier protein returns to its original conformation, ready to bind and transport another molecule.

Carrier proteins play a crucial role in maintaining the balance of ions and other molecules inside and outside of cells, and are essential for many physiological processes, including nerve impulse transmission, muscle contraction, and nutrient uptake.

The myocardium is the middle layer of the heart wall, composed of specialized cardiac muscle cells that are responsible for pumping blood throughout the body. It forms the thickest part of the heart wall and is divided into two sections: the left ventricle, which pumps oxygenated blood to the rest of the body, and the right ventricle, which pumps deoxygenated blood to the lungs.

The myocardium contains several types of cells, including cardiac muscle fibers, connective tissue, nerves, and blood vessels. The muscle fibers are arranged in a highly organized pattern that allows them to contract in a coordinated manner, generating the force necessary to pump blood through the heart and circulatory system.

Damage to the myocardium can occur due to various factors such as ischemia (reduced blood flow), infection, inflammation, or genetic disorders. This damage can lead to several cardiac conditions, including heart failure, arrhythmias, and cardiomyopathy.

Creatine kinase (CK) is a muscle enzyme that is normally present in small amounts in the blood. It is primarily found in tissues that require a lot of energy, such as the heart, brain, and skeletal muscles. When these tissues are damaged or injured, CK is released into the bloodstream, causing the levels to rise.

Creatine kinase exists in several forms, known as isoenzymes, which can be measured in the blood to help identify the location of tissue damage. The three main isoenzymes are:

1. CK-MM: Found primarily in skeletal muscle
2. CK-MB: Found primarily in heart muscle
3. CK-BB: Found primarily in the brain

Elevated levels of creatine kinase, particularly CK-MB, can indicate damage to the heart muscle, such as occurs with a heart attack. Similarly, elevated levels of CK-BB may suggest brain injury or disease. Overall, measuring creatine kinase levels is a useful diagnostic tool for assessing tissue damage and determining the severity of injuries or illnesses.

Biological models, also known as physiological models or organismal models, are simplified representations of biological systems, processes, or mechanisms that are used to understand and explain the underlying principles and relationships. These models can be theoretical (conceptual or mathematical) or physical (such as anatomical models, cell cultures, or animal models). They are widely used in biomedical research to study various phenomena, including disease pathophysiology, drug action, and therapeutic interventions.

Examples of biological models include:

1. Mathematical models: These use mathematical equations and formulas to describe complex biological systems or processes, such as population dynamics, metabolic pathways, or gene regulation networks. They can help predict the behavior of these systems under different conditions and test hypotheses about their underlying mechanisms.
2. Cell cultures: These are collections of cells grown in a controlled environment, typically in a laboratory dish or flask. They can be used to study cellular processes, such as signal transduction, gene expression, or metabolism, and to test the effects of drugs or other treatments on these processes.
3. Animal models: These are living organisms, usually vertebrates like mice, rats, or non-human primates, that are used to study various aspects of human biology and disease. They can provide valuable insights into the pathophysiology of diseases, the mechanisms of drug action, and the safety and efficacy of new therapies.
4. Anatomical models: These are physical representations of biological structures or systems, such as plastic models of organs or tissues, that can be used for educational purposes or to plan surgical procedures. They can also serve as a basis for developing more sophisticated models, such as computer simulations or 3D-printed replicas.

Overall, biological models play a crucial role in advancing our understanding of biology and medicine, helping to identify new targets for therapeutic intervention, develop novel drugs and treatments, and improve human health.

Apoptosis is a programmed and controlled cell death process that occurs in multicellular organisms. It is a natural process that helps maintain tissue homeostasis by eliminating damaged, infected, or unwanted cells. During apoptosis, the cell undergoes a series of morphological changes, including cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation, and fragmentation into membrane-bound vesicles called apoptotic bodies. These bodies are then recognized and engulfed by neighboring cells or phagocytic cells, preventing an inflammatory response. Apoptosis is regulated by a complex network of intracellular signaling pathways that involve proteins such as caspases, Bcl-2 family members, and inhibitors of apoptosis (IAPs).

'Gene expression regulation' refers to the processes that control whether, when, and where a particular gene is expressed, meaning the production of a specific protein or functional RNA encoded by that gene. This complex mechanism can be influenced by various factors such as transcription factors, chromatin remodeling, DNA methylation, non-coding RNAs, and post-transcriptional modifications, among others. Proper regulation of gene expression is crucial for normal cellular function, development, and maintaining homeostasis in living organisms. Dysregulation of gene expression can lead to various diseases, including cancer and genetic disorders.

CDC2 protein kinase, also known as cell division cycle 2 or CDK1, is a type of enzyme that plays a crucial role in the regulation of the cell cycle. The cell cycle is the series of events that cells undergo as they grow, replicate their DNA, and divide into two daughter cells.

CDC2 protein kinase is a member of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) family, which are serine/threonine protein kinases that are activated by binding to regulatory subunits called cyclins. CDC2 protein kinase is primarily associated with the regulation of the G2 phase and the entry into mitosis, the stage of the cell cycle where nuclear and cytoplasmic division occur.

CDC2 protein kinase functions by phosphorylating various target proteins, which alters their activity and contributes to the coordination of the different events that occur during the cell cycle. The activity of CDC2 protein kinase is tightly regulated through a variety of mechanisms, including phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, as well as the binding and destruction of cyclin subunits.

Dysregulation of CDC2 protein kinase has been implicated in various human diseases, including cancer, where uncontrolled cell division can lead to the formation of tumors. Therefore, understanding the regulation and function of CDC2 protein kinase is an important area of research in molecular biology and medicine.

Phospholipids are a major class of lipids that consist of a hydrophilic (water-attracting) head and two hydrophobic (water-repelling) tails. The head is composed of a phosphate group, which is often bound to an organic molecule such as choline, ethanolamine, serine or inositol. The tails are made up of two fatty acid chains.

Phospholipids are a key component of cell membranes and play a crucial role in maintaining the structural integrity and function of the cell. They form a lipid bilayer, with the hydrophilic heads facing outwards and the hydrophobic tails facing inwards, creating a barrier that separates the interior of the cell from the outside environment.

Phospholipids are also involved in various cellular processes such as signal transduction, intracellular trafficking, and protein function regulation. Additionally, they serve as emulsifiers in the digestive system, helping to break down fats in the diet.

A cell membrane, also known as the plasma membrane, is a thin semi-permeable phospholipid bilayer that surrounds all cells in animals, plants, and microorganisms. It functions as a barrier to control the movement of substances in and out of the cell, allowing necessary molecules such as nutrients, oxygen, and signaling molecules to enter while keeping out harmful substances and waste products. The cell membrane is composed mainly of phospholipids, which have hydrophilic (water-loving) heads and hydrophobic (water-fearing) tails. This unique structure allows the membrane to be flexible and fluid, yet selectively permeable. Additionally, various proteins are embedded in the membrane that serve as channels, pumps, receptors, and enzymes, contributing to the cell's overall functionality and communication with its environment.

Gene expression regulation, enzymologic refers to the biochemical processes and mechanisms that control the transcription and translation of specific genes into functional proteins or enzymes. This regulation is achieved through various enzymatic activities that can either activate or repress gene expression at different levels, such as chromatin remodeling, transcription factor activation, mRNA processing, and protein degradation.

Enzymologic regulation of gene expression involves the action of specific enzymes that catalyze chemical reactions involved in these processes. For example, histone-modifying enzymes can alter the structure of chromatin to make genes more or less accessible for transcription, while RNA polymerase and its associated factors are responsible for transcribing DNA into mRNA. Additionally, various enzymes are involved in post-transcriptional modifications of mRNA, such as splicing, capping, and tailing, which can affect the stability and translation of the transcript.

Overall, the enzymologic regulation of gene expression is a complex and dynamic process that allows cells to respond to changes in their environment and maintain proper physiological function.

Colforsin is a drug that belongs to a class of medications called phosphodiesterase inhibitors. It works by increasing the levels of a chemical called cyclic AMP (cyclic adenosine monophosphate) in the body, which helps to relax and widen blood vessels.

Colforsin is not approved for use in humans in many countries, including the United States. However, it has been used in research settings to study its potential effects on heart function and other physiological processes. In animals, colforsin has been shown to have positive inotropic (contractility-enhancing) and lusitropic (relaxation-enhancing) effects on the heart, making it a potential therapeutic option for heart failure and other cardiovascular conditions.

It is important to note that while colforsin has shown promise in preclinical studies, more research is needed to establish its safety and efficacy in humans. Therefore, it should only be used under the supervision of a qualified healthcare professional and in the context of a clinical trial or research study.

Nitric oxide (NO) is a molecule made up of one nitrogen atom and one oxygen atom. In the body, it is a crucial signaling molecule involved in various physiological processes such as vasodilation, immune response, neurotransmission, and inhibition of platelet aggregation. It is produced naturally by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS) from the amino acid L-arginine. Inhaled nitric oxide is used medically to treat pulmonary hypertension in newborns and adults, as it helps to relax and widen blood vessels, improving oxygenation and blood flow.

Cell division is the process by which a single eukaryotic cell (a cell with a true nucleus) divides into two identical daughter cells. This complex process involves several stages, including replication of DNA, separation of chromosomes, and division of the cytoplasm. There are two main types of cell division: mitosis and meiosis.

Mitosis is the type of cell division that results in two genetically identical daughter cells. It is a fundamental process for growth, development, and tissue repair in multicellular organisms. The stages of mitosis include prophase, prometaphase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase, followed by cytokinesis, which divides the cytoplasm.

Meiosis, on the other hand, is a type of cell division that occurs in the gonads (ovaries and testes) during the production of gametes (sex cells). Meiosis results in four genetically unique daughter cells, each with half the number of chromosomes as the parent cell. This process is essential for sexual reproduction and genetic diversity. The stages of meiosis include meiosis I and meiosis II, which are further divided into prophase, prometaphase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase.

In summary, cell division is the process by which a single cell divides into two daughter cells, either through mitosis or meiosis. This process is critical for growth, development, tissue repair, and sexual reproduction in multicellular organisms.

A smooth muscle within the vascular system refers to the involuntary, innervated muscle that is found in the walls of blood vessels. These muscles are responsible for controlling the diameter of the blood vessels, which in turn regulates blood flow and blood pressure. They are called "smooth" muscles because their individual muscle cells do not have the striations, or cross-striped patterns, that are observed in skeletal and cardiac muscle cells. Smooth muscle in the vascular system is controlled by the autonomic nervous system and by hormones, and can contract or relax slowly over a period of time.

Casein Kinase II (CK2) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is widely expressed in eukaryotic cells and is involved in the regulation of various cellular processes. It is a heterotetrameric enzyme, consisting of two catalytic subunits (alpha and alpha') and two regulatory subunits (beta).

CK2 phosphorylates a wide range of substrates, including transcription factors, signaling proteins, and other kinases. It is known to play roles in cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, DNA damage response, and protein stability, among others. CK2 activity is often found to be elevated in various types of cancer, making it a potential target for cancer therapy.

Phosphatidylserines are a type of phospholipids that are essential components of the cell membrane, particularly in the brain. They play a crucial role in maintaining the fluidity and permeability of the cell membrane, and are involved in various cellular processes such as signal transduction, protein anchorage, and apoptosis (programmed cell death). Phosphatidylserines contain a polar head group made up of serine amino acids and two non-polar fatty acid tails. They are abundant in the inner layer of the cell membrane but can be externalized to the outer layer during apoptosis, where they serve as signals for recognition and removal of dying cells by the immune system. Phosphatidylserines have been studied for their potential benefits in various medical conditions, including cognitive decline, Alzheimer's disease, and depression.

Sulfonamides are a group of synthetic antibacterial drugs that contain the sulfonamide group (SO2NH2) in their chemical structure. They are bacteriostatic agents, meaning they inhibit bacterial growth rather than killing them outright. Sulfonamides work by preventing the bacteria from synthesizing folic acid, which is essential for their survival.

The first sulfonamide drug was introduced in the 1930s and since then, many different sulfonamides have been developed with varying chemical structures and pharmacological properties. They are used to treat a wide range of bacterial infections, including urinary tract infections, respiratory tract infections, skin and soft tissue infections, and ear infections.

Some common sulfonamide drugs include sulfisoxazole, sulfamethoxazole, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (a combination of a sulfonamide and another antibiotic called trimethoprim). While sulfonamides are generally safe and effective when used as directed, they can cause side effects such as rash, nausea, and allergic reactions. It is important to follow the prescribing physician's instructions carefully and to report any unusual symptoms or side effects promptly.

Genetic transcription is the process by which the information in a strand of DNA is used to create a complementary RNA molecule. This process is the first step in gene expression, where the genetic code in DNA is converted into a form that can be used to produce proteins or functional RNAs.

During transcription, an enzyme called RNA polymerase binds to the DNA template strand and reads the sequence of nucleotide bases. As it moves along the template, it adds complementary RNA nucleotides to the growing RNA chain, creating a single-stranded RNA molecule that is complementary to the DNA template strand. Once transcription is complete, the RNA molecule may undergo further processing before it can be translated into protein or perform its functional role in the cell.

Transcription can be either "constitutive" or "regulated." Constitutive transcription occurs at a relatively constant rate and produces essential proteins that are required for basic cellular functions. Regulated transcription, on the other hand, is subject to control by various intracellular and extracellular signals, allowing cells to respond to changing environmental conditions or developmental cues.

Proteins are complex, large molecules that play critical roles in the body's functions. They are made up of amino acids, which are organic compounds that are the building blocks of proteins. Proteins are required for the structure, function, and regulation of the body's tissues and organs. They are essential for the growth, repair, and maintenance of body tissues, and they play a crucial role in many biological processes, including metabolism, immune response, and cellular signaling. Proteins can be classified into different types based on their structure and function, such as enzymes, hormones, antibodies, and structural proteins. They are found in various foods, especially animal-derived products like meat, dairy, and eggs, as well as plant-based sources like beans, nuts, and grains.

Membrane proteins are a type of protein that are embedded in the lipid bilayer of biological membranes, such as the plasma membrane of cells or the inner membrane of mitochondria. These proteins play crucial roles in various cellular processes, including:

1. Cell-cell recognition and signaling
2. Transport of molecules across the membrane (selective permeability)
3. Enzymatic reactions at the membrane surface
4. Energy transduction and conversion
5. Mechanosensation and signal transduction

Membrane proteins can be classified into two main categories: integral membrane proteins, which are permanently associated with the lipid bilayer, and peripheral membrane proteins, which are temporarily or loosely attached to the membrane surface. Integral membrane proteins can further be divided into three subcategories based on their topology:

1. Transmembrane proteins, which span the entire width of the lipid bilayer with one or more alpha-helices or beta-barrels.
2. Lipid-anchored proteins, which are covalently attached to lipids in the membrane via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor or other lipid modifications.
3. Monotopic proteins, which are partially embedded in the membrane and have one or more domains exposed to either side of the bilayer.

Membrane proteins are essential for maintaining cellular homeostasis and are targets for various therapeutic interventions, including drug development and gene therapy. However, their structural complexity and hydrophobicity make them challenging to study using traditional biochemical methods, requiring specialized techniques such as X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM).

MAP (Mitogen-Activated Protein) Kinase Kinase Kinases (MAP3K or MAPKKK) are a group of protein kinases that play a crucial role in intracellular signal transduction pathways, which regulate various cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, survival, and apoptosis. They are called "kinases" because they catalyze the transfer of a phosphate group from ATP to specific serine or threonine residues on their target proteins.

MAP3Ks function upstream of MAP Kinase Kinases (MKKs or MAP2K) and MAP Kinases (MPKs or MAPK) in the MAP kinase cascade. Upon activation by various extracellular signals, such as growth factors, cytokines, stress, and hormones, MAP3Ks phosphorylate and activate MKKs, which subsequently phosphorylate and activate MPKs. Activated MPKs then regulate the activity of downstream transcription factors and other target proteins to elicit appropriate cellular responses.

There are several subfamilies of MAP3Ks, including ASK, DLK, TAK, MEKK, MLK, and ZAK, among others. Each subfamily has distinct structural features and functions in different signaling pathways. Dysregulation of MAP kinase cascades, including MAP3Ks, has been implicated in various human diseases, such as cancer, inflammation, and neurodegenerative disorders.

Molecular cloning is a laboratory technique used to create multiple copies of a specific DNA sequence. This process involves several steps:

1. Isolation: The first step in molecular cloning is to isolate the DNA sequence of interest from the rest of the genomic DNA. This can be done using various methods such as PCR (polymerase chain reaction), restriction enzymes, or hybridization.
2. Vector construction: Once the DNA sequence of interest has been isolated, it must be inserted into a vector, which is a small circular DNA molecule that can replicate independently in a host cell. Common vectors used in molecular cloning include plasmids and phages.
3. Transformation: The constructed vector is then introduced into a host cell, usually a bacterial or yeast cell, through a process called transformation. This can be done using various methods such as electroporation or chemical transformation.
4. Selection: After transformation, the host cells are grown in selective media that allow only those cells containing the vector to grow. This ensures that the DNA sequence of interest has been successfully cloned into the vector.
5. Amplification: Once the host cells have been selected, they can be grown in large quantities to amplify the number of copies of the cloned DNA sequence.

Molecular cloning is a powerful tool in molecular biology and has numerous applications, including the production of recombinant proteins, gene therapy, functional analysis of genes, and genetic engineering.

Peptides are short chains of amino acid residues linked by covalent bonds, known as peptide bonds. They are formed when two or more amino acids are joined together through a condensation reaction, which results in the elimination of a water molecule and the formation of an amide bond between the carboxyl group of one amino acid and the amino group of another.

Peptides can vary in length from two to about fifty amino acids, and they are often classified based on their size. For example, dipeptides contain two amino acids, tripeptides contain three, and so on. Oligopeptides typically contain up to ten amino acids, while polypeptides can contain dozens or even hundreds of amino acids.

Peptides play many important roles in the body, including serving as hormones, neurotransmitters, enzymes, and antibiotics. They are also used in medical research and therapeutic applications, such as drug delivery and tissue engineering.

"Wistar rats" are a strain of albino rats that are widely used in laboratory research. They were developed at the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia, USA, and were first introduced in 1906. Wistar rats are outbred, which means that they are genetically diverse and do not have a fixed set of genetic characteristics like inbred strains.

Wistar rats are commonly used as animal models in biomedical research because of their size, ease of handling, and relatively low cost. They are used in a wide range of research areas, including toxicology, pharmacology, nutrition, cancer, cardiovascular disease, and behavioral studies. Wistar rats are also used in safety testing of drugs, medical devices, and other products.

Wistar rats are typically larger than many other rat strains, with males weighing between 500-700 grams and females weighing between 250-350 grams. They have a lifespan of approximately 2-3 years. Wistar rats are also known for their docile and friendly nature, making them easy to handle and work with in the laboratory setting.

I'm happy to help! However, it seems there might be a slight misunderstanding in your question. RNA, or ribonucleic acid, is typically single-stranded. Unlike DNA, which is double-stranded and forms a double helix, RNA usually exists as a single strand of nucleotides.

There are exceptions to this rule, such as certain types of RNA molecules that can form double-stranded structures in specific contexts. For example:

1. Double-Stranded RNA (dsRNA) viruses: These viruses have genomes made entirely of RNA, which is double-stranded throughout or partially double-stranded. The dsRNA viruses include important pathogens such as rotaviruses and reoviruses.
2. Hairpin loops in RNA structures: Some single-stranded RNA molecules can fold back on themselves to form short double-stranded regions, called hairpin loops, within their overall structure. These are often found in ribosomal RNA (rRNA), transfer RNA (tRNA), and messenger RNA (mRNA) molecules.

So, while 'double-stranded RNA' is not a standard medical definition for RNA itself, there are specific instances where RNA can form double-stranded structures as described above.

Methylene Blue is a heterocyclic aromatic organic compound with the molecular formula C16H18ClN3S. It is primarily used as a medication, but can also be used as a dye or as a chemical reagent. As a medication, it is used in the treatment of methemoglobinemia (a condition where an abnormal amount of methemoglobin is present in the blood), as well as in some forms of poisoning and infections. It works by acting as a reducing agent, converting methemoglobin back to hemoglobin, which is the form of the protein that is responsible for carrying oxygen in the blood. Methylene Blue has also been used off-label for other conditions, such as vasculitis and Alzheimer's disease, although its effectiveness for these uses is not well established.

It is important to note that Methylene Blue should be used with caution, as it can cause serious side effects in some people, particularly those with kidney or liver problems, or those who are taking certain medications. It is also important to follow the instructions of a healthcare provider when using this medication, as improper use can lead to toxicity.

A catalytic domain is a portion or region within a protein that contains the active site, where the chemical reactions necessary for the protein's function are carried out. This domain is responsible for the catalysis of biological reactions, hence the name "catalytic domain." The catalytic domain is often composed of specific amino acid residues that come together to form the active site, creating a unique three-dimensional structure that enables the protein to perform its specific function.

In enzymes, for example, the catalytic domain contains the residues that bind and convert substrates into products through chemical reactions. In receptors, the catalytic domain may be involved in signal transduction or other regulatory functions. Understanding the structure and function of catalytic domains is crucial to understanding the mechanisms of protein function and can provide valuable insights for drug design and therapeutic interventions.

Intracellular signaling peptides and proteins are molecules that play a crucial role in transmitting signals within cells, which ultimately lead to changes in cell behavior or function. These signals can originate from outside the cell (extracellular) or within the cell itself. Intracellular signaling molecules include various types of peptides and proteins, such as:

1. G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs): These are seven-transmembrane domain receptors that bind to extracellular signaling molecules like hormones, neurotransmitters, or chemokines. Upon activation, they initiate a cascade of intracellular signals through G proteins and secondary messengers.
2. Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs): These are transmembrane receptors that bind to growth factors, cytokines, or hormones. Activation of RTKs leads to autophosphorylation of specific tyrosine residues, creating binding sites for intracellular signaling proteins such as adapter proteins, phosphatases, and enzymes like Ras, PI3K, and Src family kinases.
3. Second messenger systems: Intracellular second messengers are small molecules that amplify and propagate signals within the cell. Examples include cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), diacylglycerol (DAG), inositol triphosphate (IP3), calcium ions (Ca2+), and nitric oxide (NO). These second messengers activate or inhibit various downstream effectors, leading to changes in cellular responses.
4. Signal transduction cascades: Intracellular signaling proteins often form complex networks of interacting molecules that relay signals from the plasma membrane to the nucleus. These cascades involve kinases (protein kinases A, B, C, etc.), phosphatases, and adapter proteins, which ultimately regulate gene expression, cell cycle progression, metabolism, and other cellular processes.
5. Ubiquitination and proteasome degradation: Intracellular signaling pathways can also control protein stability by modulating ubiquitin-proteasome degradation. E3 ubiquitin ligases recognize specific substrates and conjugate them with ubiquitin molecules, targeting them for proteasomal degradation. This process regulates the abundance of key signaling proteins and contributes to signal termination or amplification.

In summary, intracellular signaling pathways involve a complex network of interacting proteins that relay signals from the plasma membrane to various cellular compartments, ultimately regulating gene expression, metabolism, and other cellular processes. Dysregulation of these pathways can contribute to disease development and progression, making them attractive targets for therapeutic intervention.

Interferon type I is a class of signaling proteins, also known as cytokines, that are produced and released by cells in response to the presence of pathogens such as viruses, bacteria, and parasites. These interferons play a crucial role in the body's innate immune system and help to establish an antiviral state in surrounding cells to prevent the spread of infection.

Interferon type I includes several subtypes, such as interferon-alpha (IFN-α), interferon-beta (IFN-β), and interferon-omega (IFN-ω). When produced, these interferons bind to specific receptors on the surface of nearby cells, triggering a cascade of intracellular signaling events that lead to the activation of genes involved in the antiviral response.

The activation of these genes results in the production of enzymes that inhibit viral replication and promote the destruction of infected cells. Interferon type I also enhances the adaptive immune response by promoting the activation and proliferation of immune cells such as T-cells and natural killer (NK) cells, which can directly target and eliminate infected cells.

Overall, interferon type I plays a critical role in the body's defense against viral infections and is an important component of the immune response to many different types of pathogens.

P21-activated kinases (PAKs) are a family of serine/threonine protein kinases that play crucial roles in various cellular processes, including cytoskeletal reorganization, cell motility, and gene transcription. They are activated by binding to small GTPases of the Rho family, such as Cdc42 and Rac, which become active upon stimulation of various extracellular signals. Once activated, PAKs phosphorylate a range of downstream targets, leading to changes in cell behavior and function. Aberrant regulation of PAKs has been implicated in several human diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders.

A "knockout" mouse is a genetically engineered mouse in which one or more genes have been deleted or "knocked out" using molecular biology techniques. This allows researchers to study the function of specific genes and their role in various biological processes, as well as potential associations with human diseases. The mice are generated by introducing targeted DNA modifications into embryonic stem cells, which are then used to create a live animal. Knockout mice have been widely used in biomedical research to investigate gene function, disease mechanisms, and potential therapeutic targets.

Extracellular signal-regulated mitogen-activated protein kinases (ERKs or Extracellular signal-regulated kinases) are a subfamily of the MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) family, which are serine/threonine protein kinases that regulate various cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, migration, and survival in response to extracellular signals.

ERKs are activated by a cascade of phosphorylation events initiated by the binding of growth factors, hormones, or other extracellular molecules to their respective receptors. This activation results in the formation of a complex signaling pathway that involves the sequential activation of several protein kinases, including Ras, Raf, MEK (MAPK/ERK kinase), and ERK.

Once activated, ERKs translocate to the nucleus where they phosphorylate and activate various transcription factors, leading to changes in gene expression that ultimately result in the appropriate cellular response. Dysregulation of the ERK signaling pathway has been implicated in a variety of diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

The cell nucleus is a membrane-bound organelle found in the eukaryotic cells (cells with a true nucleus). It contains most of the cell's genetic material, organized as DNA molecules in complex with proteins, RNA molecules, and histones to form chromosomes.

The primary function of the cell nucleus is to regulate and control the activities of the cell, including growth, metabolism, protein synthesis, and reproduction. It also plays a crucial role in the process of mitosis (cell division) by separating and protecting the genetic material during this process. The nuclear membrane, or nuclear envelope, surrounding the nucleus is composed of two lipid bilayers with numerous pores that allow for the selective transport of molecules between the nucleoplasm (nucleus interior) and the cytoplasm (cell exterior).

The cell nucleus is a vital structure in eukaryotic cells, and its dysfunction can lead to various diseases, including cancer and genetic disorders.

MAPKKK1 or Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase 1 is a serine/threonine protein kinase that belongs to the MAP3K family. It plays a crucial role in intracellular signal transduction pathways, particularly in the MAPK/ERK cascade, which is involved in various cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, and survival.

MAPKKK1 activates MAPKKs (Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinases) through phosphorylation of specific serine and threonine residues. In turn, activated MAPKKs phosphorylate and activate MAPKs (Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases), which then regulate the activity of various transcription factors and other downstream targets to elicit appropriate cellular responses.

Mutations in MAPKKK1 have been implicated in several human diseases, including cancer and developmental disorders. Therefore, understanding its function and regulation is essential for developing novel therapeutic strategies to treat these conditions.

The brain is the central organ of the nervous system, responsible for receiving and processing sensory information, regulating vital functions, and controlling behavior, movement, and cognition. It is divided into several distinct regions, each with specific functions:

1. Cerebrum: The largest part of the brain, responsible for higher cognitive functions such as thinking, learning, memory, language, and perception. It is divided into two hemispheres, each controlling the opposite side of the body.
2. Cerebellum: Located at the back of the brain, it is responsible for coordinating muscle movements, maintaining balance, and fine-tuning motor skills.
3. Brainstem: Connects the cerebrum and cerebellum to the spinal cord, controlling vital functions such as breathing, heart rate, and blood pressure. It also serves as a relay center for sensory information and motor commands between the brain and the rest of the body.
4. Diencephalon: A region that includes the thalamus (a major sensory relay station) and hypothalamus (regulates hormones, temperature, hunger, thirst, and sleep).
5. Limbic system: A group of structures involved in emotional processing, memory formation, and motivation, including the hippocampus, amygdala, and cingulate gyrus.

The brain is composed of billions of interconnected neurons that communicate through electrical and chemical signals. It is protected by the skull and surrounded by three layers of membranes called meninges, as well as cerebrospinal fluid that provides cushioning and nutrients.

Magnesium is an essential mineral that plays a crucial role in various biological processes in the human body. It is the fourth most abundant cation in the body and is involved in over 300 enzymatic reactions, including protein synthesis, muscle and nerve function, blood glucose control, and blood pressure regulation. Magnesium also contributes to the structural development of bones and teeth.

In medical terms, magnesium deficiency can lead to several health issues, such as muscle cramps, weakness, heart arrhythmias, and seizures. On the other hand, excessive magnesium levels can cause symptoms like diarrhea, nausea, and muscle weakness. Magnesium supplements or magnesium-rich foods are often recommended to maintain optimal magnesium levels in the body.

Some common dietary sources of magnesium include leafy green vegetables, nuts, seeds, legumes, whole grains, and dairy products. Magnesium is also available in various forms as a dietary supplement, including magnesium oxide, magnesium citrate, magnesium chloride, and magnesium glycinate.

Protein-kinase B, also known as AKT, is a group of intracellular proteins that play a crucial role in various cellular processes such as glucose metabolism, apoptosis, cell proliferation, transcription, and cell migration. The AKT family includes three isoforms: AKT1, AKT2, and AKT3, which are encoded by the genes PKBalpha, PKBbeta, and PKBgamma, respectively.

Proto-oncogene proteins c-AKT refer to the normal, non-mutated forms of these proteins that are involved in the regulation of cell growth and survival under physiological conditions. However, when these genes are mutated or overexpressed, they can become oncogenes, leading to uncontrolled cell growth and cancer development.

Activation of c-AKT occurs through a signaling cascade that begins with the binding of extracellular ligands such as insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) or epidermal growth factor (EGF) to their respective receptors on the cell surface. This triggers a series of phosphorylation events that ultimately lead to the activation of c-AKT, which then phosphorylates downstream targets involved in various cellular processes.

In summary, proto-oncogene proteins c-AKT are normal intracellular proteins that play essential roles in regulating cell growth and survival under physiological conditions. However, their dysregulation can contribute to cancer development and progression.

1-Methyl-3-isobutylxanthine is a chemical compound that belongs to the class of xanthines. It is a methylated derivative of xanthine and is commonly found in some types of tea, coffee, and chocolate. This compound acts as a non-selective phosphodiesterase inhibitor, which means it can increase the levels of intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) by preventing its breakdown.

In medical terms, 1-Methyl-3-isobutylxanthine is often used as a bronchodilator and a stimulant of central nervous system. It is also known to have diuretic properties. This compound is sometimes used in the treatment of asthma, COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), and other respiratory disorders.

It's important to note that 1-Methyl-3-isobutylxanthine can have side effects, including increased heart rate, blood pressure, and anxiety. It should be used under the supervision of a medical professional and its use should be carefully monitored to avoid potential adverse reactions.

nitroprusside (ni-troe-rus-ide)

A rapid-acting vasodilator used in the management of severe hypertension, acute heart failure, and to reduce afterload in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. It is a potent arterial and venous dilator that decreases preload and afterload, thereby reducing myocardial oxygen demand. Nitroprusside is metabolized to cyanide, which must be monitored closely during therapy to prevent toxicity.

Pharmacologic class: Peripheral vasodilators

Therapeutic class: Antihypertensives, Vasodilators

Medical Categories: Cardiovascular Drugs, Hypertension Agents

Proto-oncogene proteins are normal cellular proteins that play crucial roles in various cellular processes, such as signal transduction, cell cycle regulation, and apoptosis (programmed cell death). They are involved in the regulation of cell growth, differentiation, and survival under physiological conditions.

When proto-oncogene proteins undergo mutations or aberrations in their expression levels, they can transform into oncogenic forms, leading to uncontrolled cell growth and division. These altered proteins are then referred to as oncogene products or oncoproteins. Oncogenic mutations can occur due to various factors, including genetic predisposition, environmental exposures, and aging.

Examples of proto-oncogene proteins include:

1. Ras proteins: Involved in signal transduction pathways that regulate cell growth and differentiation. Activating mutations in Ras genes are found in various human cancers.
2. Myc proteins: Regulate gene expression related to cell cycle progression, apoptosis, and metabolism. Overexpression of Myc proteins is associated with several types of cancer.
3. EGFR (Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor): A transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase that regulates cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation. Mutations or overexpression of EGFR are linked to various malignancies, such as lung cancer and glioblastoma.
4. Src family kinases: Intracellular tyrosine kinases that regulate signal transduction pathways involved in cell proliferation, survival, and migration. Dysregulation of Src family kinases is implicated in several types of cancer.
5. Abl kinases: Cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases that regulate various cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, and stress responses. Aberrant activation of Abl kinases, as seen in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), leads to uncontrolled cell proliferation.

Understanding the roles of proto-oncogene proteins and their dysregulation in cancer development is essential for developing targeted cancer therapies that aim to inhibit or modulate these aberrant signaling pathways.

Sirtuins are a family of proteins that possess NAD+-dependent deacetylase or ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. They play crucial roles in regulating various cellular processes, such as aging, transcription, apoptosis, inflammation, and stress resistance. In humans, there are seven known sirtuins (SIRT1-7), each with distinct subcellular localizations and functions. SIRT1, the most well-studied sirtuin, is a nuclear protein involved in chromatin remodeling, DNA repair, and metabolic regulation. Other sirtuins are found in various cellular compartments, including the nucleus, cytoplasm, and mitochondria, where they modulate specific targets to maintain cellular homeostasis. Dysregulation of sirtuins has been implicated in several diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative disorders.

"Plant proteins" refer to the proteins that are derived from plant sources. These can include proteins from legumes such as beans, lentils, and peas, as well as proteins from grains like wheat, rice, and corn. Other sources of plant proteins include nuts, seeds, and vegetables.

Plant proteins are made up of individual amino acids, which are the building blocks of protein. While animal-based proteins typically contain all of the essential amino acids that the body needs to function properly, many plant-based proteins may be lacking in one or more of these essential amino acids. However, by consuming a variety of plant-based foods throughout the day, it is possible to get all of the essential amino acids that the body needs from plant sources alone.

Plant proteins are often lower in calories and saturated fat than animal proteins, making them a popular choice for those following a vegetarian or vegan diet, as well as those looking to maintain a healthy weight or reduce their risk of chronic diseases such as heart disease and cancer. Additionally, plant proteins have been shown to have a number of health benefits, including improving gut health, reducing inflammation, and supporting muscle growth and repair.

'Tumor cells, cultured' refers to the process of removing cancerous cells from a tumor and growing them in controlled laboratory conditions. This is typically done by isolating the tumor cells from a patient's tissue sample, then placing them in a nutrient-rich environment that promotes their growth and multiplication.

The resulting cultured tumor cells can be used for various research purposes, including the study of cancer biology, drug development, and toxicity testing. They provide a valuable tool for researchers to better understand the behavior and characteristics of cancer cells outside of the human body, which can lead to the development of more effective cancer treatments.

It is important to note that cultured tumor cells may not always behave exactly the same way as they do in the human body, so findings from cell culture studies must be validated through further research, such as animal models or clinical trials.

Ribosomal Protein S6 Kinases (RSKs) are a family of serine/threonine protein kinases that play a crucial role in the regulation of cell growth, proliferation, and survival. They are so named because they phosphorylate and regulate the function of the ribosomal protein S6, which is a component of the 40S ribosomal subunit involved in protein synthesis.

RSKs are activated by various signals, including growth factors, hormones, and mitogens, through a cascade of phosphorylation events involving several upstream kinases such as MAPK/ERK kinase (MEK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Once activated, RSKs phosphorylate a wide range of downstream targets, including transcription factors, regulators of translation, and cytoskeletal proteins, thereby modulating their activities and functions.

There are four isoforms of RSKs in humans, namely RSK1, RSK2, RSK3, and RSK4, which share a common structural organization and functional domains, including an N-terminal kinase domain, a C-terminal kinase domain, and a linker region that contains several regulatory motifs. Dysregulation of RSKs has been implicated in various pathological conditions, including cancer, cardiovascular diseases, neurological disorders, and diabetes, making them attractive targets for therapeutic intervention.

Phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDB) is not a medical term per se, but a chemical compound used in scientific research. It's a type of phorbol ester, which are tumor promoters and active components of croton oil. PDB is often used as a biochemical tool to study cell signaling pathways, particularly those involving protein kinase C (PKC) activation.

Medically, it may be mentioned in research or clinical studies related to cellular processes, cancer, or inflammation. However, it is not something that a patient would typically encounter in a medical setting.

Immunoblotting, also known as western blotting, is a laboratory technique used in molecular biology and immunogenetics to detect and quantify specific proteins in a complex mixture. This technique combines the electrophoretic separation of proteins by gel electrophoresis with their detection using antibodies that recognize specific epitopes (protein fragments) on the target protein.

The process involves several steps: first, the protein sample is separated based on size through sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Next, the separated proteins are transferred onto a nitrocellulose or polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane using an electric field. The membrane is then blocked with a blocking agent to prevent non-specific binding of antibodies.

After blocking, the membrane is incubated with a primary antibody that specifically recognizes the target protein. Following this, the membrane is washed to remove unbound primary antibodies and then incubated with a secondary antibody conjugated to an enzyme such as horseradish peroxidase (HRP) or alkaline phosphatase (AP). The enzyme catalyzes a colorimetric or chemiluminescent reaction that allows for the detection of the target protein.

Immunoblotting is widely used in research and clinical settings to study protein expression, post-translational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and disease biomarkers. It provides high specificity and sensitivity, making it a valuable tool for identifying and quantifying proteins in various biological samples.

CREB (Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding Protein) is a transcription factor that plays a crucial role in regulating gene expression in response to various cellular signals. CREB binds to the cAMP response element (CRE) sequence in the promoter region of target genes and regulates their transcription.

When activated, CREB undergoes phosphorylation at a specific serine residue (Ser-133), which leads to its binding to the coactivator protein CBP/p300 and recruitment of additional transcriptional machinery to the promoter region. This results in the activation of target gene transcription.

CREB is involved in various cellular processes, including metabolism, differentiation, survival, and memory formation. Dysregulation of CREB has been implicated in several diseases, such as cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and mood disorders.

I apologize, but I am not able to provide a medical definition for "Egtazic Acid" because it is not a term that is recognized in the field of medicine or pharmacology. It is possible that you may have meant "Egтарic Acid," which also does not have a specific medical meaning, or "Ethylene Glycol Tetraacetic Acid (EGTA)," which is a chemical compound used in research and medicine for its ability to bind calcium ions. If you have any other questions, I would be happy to try to help answer them.

Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) is a NAD+-dependent deacetylase enzyme that plays a crucial role in regulating several cellular processes, including metabolism, aging, stress resistance, inflammation, and DNA repair. It is primarily located in the nucleus but can also be found in the cytoplasm. SIRT1 regulates gene expression by removing acetyl groups from histones and transcription factors, thereby modulating their activity and function.

SIRT1 has been shown to have protective effects against various age-related diseases, such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, neurodegenerative disorders, and cancer. Its activation has been suggested to promote longevity and improve overall health by enhancing cellular stress resistance and metabolic efficiency. However, further research is needed to fully understand the therapeutic potential of SIRT1 modulation in various diseases.

Neurons, also known as nerve cells or neurocytes, are specialized cells that constitute the basic unit of the nervous system. They are responsible for receiving, processing, and transmitting information and signals within the body. Neurons have three main parts: the dendrites, the cell body (soma), and the axon. The dendrites receive signals from other neurons or sensory receptors, while the axon transmits these signals to other neurons, muscles, or glands. The junction between two neurons is called a synapse, where neurotransmitters are released to transmit the signal across the gap (synaptic cleft) to the next neuron. Neurons vary in size, shape, and structure depending on their function and location within the nervous system.

MAP Kinase Kinase 4 (MAP2K4 or MKK4) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that plays a crucial role in intracellular signal transduction pathways, particularly the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades. These cascades are involved in various cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, survival, and apoptosis in response to extracellular stimuli like cytokines, growth factors, and stress signals.

MAP2K4 specifically activates the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway by phosphorylating and activating JNK proteins. The activation of JNK leads to the phosphorylation and regulation of various transcription factors, ultimately influencing gene expression and cellular responses. Dysregulation of MAP2K4 has been implicated in several diseases, including cancer and inflammatory disorders.

Indole is not strictly a medical term, but it is a chemical compound that can be found in the human body and has relevance to medical and biological research. Indoles are organic compounds that contain a bicyclic structure consisting of a six-membered benzene ring fused to a five-membered pyrrole ring.

In the context of medicine, indoles are particularly relevant due to their presence in certain hormones and other biologically active molecules. For example, the neurotransmitter serotonin contains an indole ring, as does the hormone melatonin. Indoles can also be found in various plant-based foods, such as cruciferous vegetables (e.g., broccoli, kale), and have been studied for their potential health benefits.

Some indoles, like indole-3-carbinol and diindolylmethane, are found in these vegetables and can have anti-cancer properties by modulating estrogen metabolism, reducing inflammation, and promoting cell death (apoptosis) in cancer cells. However, it is essential to note that further research is needed to fully understand the potential health benefits and risks associated with indoles.

Casein kinases are a family of protein kinases that play important roles in various cellular processes, including signal transduction, cell cycle regulation, and DNA damage repair. These enzymes phosphorylate serine and threonine residues on their target proteins by transferring a phosphate group from ATP to the hydroxyl side chain of these amino acids.

There are several isoforms of casein kinases, including Casein Kinase 1 (CK1) and Casein Kinase 2 (CK2), which differ in their structure, substrate specificity, and cellular functions. CK1 is involved in various signaling pathways, such as the Wnt signaling pathway, and regulates processes such as gene transcription, DNA repair, and circadian rhythm. CK2, on the other hand, is a highly conserved serine/threonine protein kinase that plays a role in many cellular processes, including cell division, apoptosis, and transcriptional regulation.

Dysregulation of casein kinases has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and cardiovascular disease. Therefore, these enzymes are considered important targets for the development of new therapeutic strategies.

Collagen Type I is the most abundant form of collagen in the human body, found in various connective tissues such as tendons, ligaments, skin, and bones. It is a structural protein that provides strength and integrity to these tissues. Collagen Type I is composed of three alpha chains, two alpha-1(I) chains, and one alpha-2(I) chain, arranged in a triple helix structure. This type of collagen is often used in medical research and clinical applications, such as tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, due to its excellent mechanical properties and biocompatibility.

"Swine" is a common term used to refer to even-toed ungulates of the family Suidae, including domestic pigs and wild boars. However, in a medical context, "swine" often appears in the phrase "swine flu," which is a strain of influenza virus that typically infects pigs but can also cause illness in humans. The 2009 H1N1 pandemic was caused by a new strain of swine-origin influenza A virus, which was commonly referred to as "swine flu." It's important to note that this virus is not transmitted through eating cooked pork products; it spreads from person to person, mainly through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes.

A cell line that is derived from tumor cells and has been adapted to grow in culture. These cell lines are often used in research to study the characteristics of cancer cells, including their growth patterns, genetic changes, and responses to various treatments. They can be established from many different types of tumors, such as carcinomas, sarcomas, and leukemias. Once established, these cell lines can be grown and maintained indefinitely in the laboratory, allowing researchers to conduct experiments and studies that would not be feasible using primary tumor cells. It is important to note that tumor cell lines may not always accurately represent the behavior of the original tumor, as they can undergo genetic changes during their time in culture.

Diacylglycerols (also known as diglycerides) are a type of glyceride, which is a compound that consists of glycerol and one or more fatty acids. Diacylglycerols contain two fatty acid chains bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. They are important intermediates in the metabolism of lipids and can be found in many types of food, including vegetable oils and dairy products. In the body, diacylglycerols can serve as a source of energy and can also play roles in cell signaling processes.

DNA-binding proteins are a type of protein that have the ability to bind to DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid), the genetic material of organisms. These proteins play crucial roles in various biological processes, such as regulation of gene expression, DNA replication, repair and recombination.

The binding of DNA-binding proteins to specific DNA sequences is mediated by non-covalent interactions, including electrostatic, hydrogen bonding, and van der Waals forces. The specificity of binding is determined by the recognition of particular nucleotide sequences or structural features of the DNA molecule.

DNA-binding proteins can be classified into several categories based on their structure and function, such as transcription factors, histones, and restriction enzymes. Transcription factors are a major class of DNA-binding proteins that regulate gene expression by binding to specific DNA sequences in the promoter region of genes and recruiting other proteins to modulate transcription. Histones are DNA-binding proteins that package DNA into nucleosomes, the basic unit of chromatin structure. Restriction enzymes are DNA-binding proteins that recognize and cleave specific DNA sequences, and are widely used in molecular biology research and biotechnology applications.

Phorbol esters are a type of chemical compound that is derived from the seeds of croton plants. They are known for their ability to activate certain proteins in cells, specifically the protein kinase C (PKC) enzymes. This activation can lead to a variety of cellular responses, including changes in gene expression and cell growth.

Phorbol esters are often used in laboratory research as tools to study cell signaling pathways and have been shown to have tumor-promoting properties. They are also found in some types of skin irritants and have been used in traditional medicine in some cultures. However, due to their potential toxicity and carcinogenicity, they are not used medically in humans.

Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are a family of serine/threonine protein kinases that play crucial roles in regulating the cell cycle, transcription, and other cellular processes. They are activated by binding to cyclin proteins, which accumulate and degrade at specific stages of the cell cycle. The activation of CDKs leads to phosphorylation of various downstream target proteins, resulting in the promotion or inhibition of different cell cycle events. Dysregulation of CDKs has been implicated in several human diseases, including cancer, and they are considered important targets for drug development.

Atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), also known as atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), is a hormone that is primarily produced and secreted by the atria of the heart in response to stretching of the cardiac muscle cells due to increased blood volume. ANF plays a crucial role in regulating body fluid homeostasis, blood pressure, and cardiovascular function.

The main physiological action of ANF is to promote sodium and water excretion by the kidneys, which helps lower blood volume and reduce blood pressure. ANF also relaxes vascular smooth muscle, dilates blood vessels, and inhibits the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), further contributing to its blood pressure-lowering effects.

Defects in ANF production or action have been implicated in several cardiovascular disorders, including heart failure, hypertension, and kidney disease. Therefore, ANF and its analogs are being investigated as potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of these conditions.

Staurosporine is an alkaloid compound that is derived from the bacterium Streptomyces staurosporeus. It is a potent and broad-spectrum protein kinase inhibitor, which means it can bind to and inhibit various types of protein kinases, including protein kinase C (PKC), cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), and tyrosine kinases.

Protein kinases are enzymes that play a crucial role in cell signaling by adding phosphate groups to other proteins, thereby modulating their activity. The inhibition of protein kinases by staurosporine can disrupt these signaling pathways and lead to various biological effects, such as the induction of apoptosis (programmed cell death) and the inhibition of cell proliferation.

Staurosporine has been widely used in research as a tool to study the roles of protein kinases in various cellular processes and diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and inflammation. However, its use as a therapeutic agent is limited due to its lack of specificity and high toxicity.

Protein transport, in the context of cellular biology, refers to the process by which proteins are actively moved from one location to another within or between cells. This is a crucial mechanism for maintaining proper cell function and regulation.

Intracellular protein transport involves the movement of proteins within a single cell. Proteins can be transported across membranes (such as the nuclear envelope, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, or plasma membrane) via specialized transport systems like vesicles and transport channels.

Intercellular protein transport refers to the movement of proteins from one cell to another, often facilitated by exocytosis (release of proteins in vesicles) and endocytosis (uptake of extracellular substances via membrane-bound vesicles). This is essential for communication between cells, immune response, and other physiological processes.

It's important to note that any disruption in protein transport can lead to various diseases, including neurological disorders, cancer, and metabolic conditions.

Adaptor Protein Complex 3 (APC3), also known as AP-3, is a type of adaptor protein complex that plays a crucial role in the sorting and trafficking of proteins within cells. It is composed of four subunits: delta, beta3A, mu3, and sigma3A. APC3 is primarily involved in the transport of proteins from the early endosomes to the lysosomes or to the plasma membrane. It also plays a role in the biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles such as melanosomes and platelet-dense granules. Mutations in the genes encoding for APC3 subunits have been associated with several genetic disorders, including Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome and Chediak-Higashi syndrome.

HeLa cells are a type of immortalized cell line used in scientific research. They are derived from a cancer that developed in the cervical tissue of Henrietta Lacks, an African-American woman, in 1951. After her death, cells taken from her tumor were found to be capable of continuous division and growth in a laboratory setting, making them an invaluable resource for medical research.

HeLa cells have been used in a wide range of scientific studies, including research on cancer, viruses, genetics, and drug development. They were the first human cell line to be successfully cloned and are able to grow rapidly in culture, doubling their population every 20-24 hours. This has made them an essential tool for many areas of biomedical research.

It is important to note that while HeLa cells have been instrumental in numerous scientific breakthroughs, the story of their origin raises ethical questions about informed consent and the use of human tissue in research.

Maleimides are a class of chemical compounds that contain a maleimide functional group, which is characterized by a five-membered ring containing two carbon atoms and three nitrogen atoms. The double bond in the maleimide ring makes it highly reactive towards nucleophiles, particularly thiol groups found in cysteine residues of proteins.

In medical and biological contexts, maleimides are often used as cross-linking agents to modify or label proteins, peptides, and other biomolecules. For example, maleimide-functionalized probes such as fluorescent dyes, biotin, or radioisotopes can be covalently attached to thiol groups in proteins for various applications, including protein detection, purification, and imaging.

However, it is important to note that maleimides can also react with other nucleophiles such as amines, although at a slower rate. Therefore, careful control of reaction conditions is necessary to ensure specificity towards thiol groups.

Fibroblasts are specialized cells that play a critical role in the body's immune response and wound healing process. They are responsible for producing and maintaining the extracellular matrix (ECM), which is the non-cellular component present within all tissues and organs, providing structural support and biochemical signals for surrounding cells.

Fibroblasts produce various ECM proteins such as collagens, elastin, fibronectin, and laminins, forming a complex network of fibers that give tissues their strength and flexibility. They also help in the regulation of tissue homeostasis by controlling the turnover of ECM components through the process of remodeling.

In response to injury or infection, fibroblasts become activated and start to proliferate rapidly, migrating towards the site of damage. Here, they participate in the inflammatory response, releasing cytokines and chemokines that attract immune cells to the area. Additionally, they deposit new ECM components to help repair the damaged tissue and restore its functionality.

Dysregulation of fibroblast activity has been implicated in several pathological conditions, including fibrosis (excessive scarring), cancer (where they can contribute to tumor growth and progression), and autoimmune diseases (such as rheumatoid arthritis).

Transcription factors are proteins that play a crucial role in regulating gene expression by controlling the transcription of DNA to messenger RNA (mRNA). They function by binding to specific DNA sequences, known as response elements, located in the promoter region or enhancer regions of target genes. This binding can either activate or repress the initiation of transcription, depending on the properties and interactions of the particular transcription factor. Transcription factors often act as part of a complex network of regulatory proteins that determine the precise spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression during development, differentiation, and homeostasis in an organism.

Phosphodiesterase inhibitors (PDE inhibitors) are a class of drugs that work by blocking the action of phosphodiesterase enzymes, which are responsible for breaking down cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), two crucial intracellular signaling molecules.

By inhibiting these enzymes, PDE inhibitors increase the concentration of cAMP and cGMP in the cells, leading to a variety of effects depending on the specific type of PDE enzyme that is inhibited. These drugs have been used in the treatment of various medical conditions such as erectile dysfunction, pulmonary arterial hypertension, and heart failure.

Examples of PDE inhibitors include sildenafil (Viagra), tadalafil (Cialis), vardenafil (Levitra) for erectile dysfunction, and iloprost, treprostinil, and sildenafil for pulmonary arterial hypertension. It's important to note that different PDE inhibitors have varying levels of selectivity for specific PDE isoforms, which can result in different therapeutic effects and side effect profiles.

C57BL/6 (C57 Black 6) is an inbred strain of laboratory mouse that is widely used in biomedical research. The term "inbred" refers to a strain of animals where matings have been carried out between siblings or other closely related individuals for many generations, resulting in a population that is highly homozygous at most genetic loci.

The C57BL/6 strain was established in 1920 by crossing a female mouse from the dilute brown (DBA) strain with a male mouse from the black strain. The resulting offspring were then interbred for many generations to create the inbred C57BL/6 strain.

C57BL/6 mice are known for their robust health, longevity, and ease of handling, making them a popular choice for researchers. They have been used in a wide range of biomedical research areas, including studies of cancer, immunology, neuroscience, cardiovascular disease, and metabolism.

One of the most notable features of the C57BL/6 strain is its sensitivity to certain genetic modifications, such as the introduction of mutations that lead to obesity or impaired glucose tolerance. This has made it a valuable tool for studying the genetic basis of complex diseases and traits.

Overall, the C57BL/6 inbred mouse strain is an important model organism in biomedical research, providing a valuable resource for understanding the genetic and molecular mechanisms underlying human health and disease.

A peptide fragment is a short chain of amino acids that is derived from a larger peptide or protein through various biological or chemical processes. These fragments can result from the natural breakdown of proteins in the body during regular physiological processes, such as digestion, or they can be produced experimentally in a laboratory setting for research or therapeutic purposes.

Peptide fragments are often used in research to map the structure and function of larger peptides and proteins, as well as to study their interactions with other molecules. In some cases, peptide fragments may also have biological activity of their own and can be developed into drugs or diagnostic tools. For example, certain peptide fragments derived from hormones or neurotransmitters may bind to receptors in the body and mimic or block the effects of the full-length molecule.

Arabidopsis proteins refer to the proteins that are encoded by the genes in the Arabidopsis thaliana plant, which is a model organism commonly used in plant biology research. This small flowering plant has a compact genome and a short life cycle, making it an ideal subject for studying various biological processes in plants.

Arabidopsis proteins play crucial roles in many cellular functions, such as metabolism, signaling, regulation of gene expression, response to environmental stresses, and developmental processes. Research on Arabidopsis proteins has contributed significantly to our understanding of plant biology and has provided valuable insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying various agronomic traits.

Some examples of Arabidopsis proteins include transcription factors, kinases, phosphatases, receptors, enzymes, and structural proteins. These proteins can be studied using a variety of techniques, such as biochemical assays, protein-protein interaction studies, and genetic approaches, to understand their functions and regulatory mechanisms in plants.

Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 (GSK-3) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that plays a crucial role in the regulation of several cellular processes, including glycogen metabolism, cell signaling, gene transcription, and apoptosis. It was initially discovered as a key enzyme involved in glycogen metabolism due to its ability to phosphorylate and inhibit glycogen synthase, an enzyme responsible for the synthesis of glycogen from glucose.

GSK-3 exists in two isoforms, GSK-3α and GSK-3β, which share a high degree of sequence similarity and are widely expressed in various tissues. Both isoforms are constitutively active under normal conditions and are regulated through inhibitory phosphorylation by several upstream signaling pathways, such as insulin, Wnt, and Hedgehog signaling.

Dysregulation of GSK-3 has been implicated in the pathogenesis of various diseases, including diabetes, neurodegenerative disorders, and cancer. In recent years, GSK-3 has emerged as an attractive therapeutic target for the development of novel drugs to treat these conditions.

Carbazoles are aromatic organic compounds that consist of a tricyclic structure with two benzene rings fused to a five-membered ring containing two nitrogen atoms. The chemical formula for carbazole is C12H9N. Carbazoles are found in various natural sources, including coal tar and certain plants. They also have various industrial applications, such as in the production of dyes, pigments, and pharmaceuticals. In a medical context, carbazoles are not typically referred to as a single entity but rather as a class of compounds with potential therapeutic activity. Some carbazole derivatives have been studied for their anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, and anti-microbial properties.

DNA-activated protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a type of serine/threonine protein kinase that plays a crucial role in the DNA damage response and repair processes in cells. It is composed of a catalytic subunit, DNA-PKcs, and a regulatory subunit, Ku, which binds to double-stranded DNA breaks and recruits DNA-PKcs to the site of damage.

Once activated by DNA damage, DNA-PK phosphorylates various downstream targets involved in DNA repair, including proteins involved in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). NHEJ is a major pathway for the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks, while HR is a more accurate but slower process that requires a template for repair.

Dysregulation of DNA-PK has been implicated in various human diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders. Inhibitors of DNA-PK are being investigated as potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of cancer, particularly in combination with other DNA damage response inhibitors or radiation therapy.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Talin" is not a medical term that I am aware of. Talin is actually a protein involved in cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesion, acting as a crucial component in connecting the intracellular cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix. It might be used in scientific or biology research contexts, but it's not a term typically found in medical textbooks or patient-related medical definitions. If you have any questions about medical conditions or terms, I would be happy to help with those!

Guanosine monophosphate (GMP) is a nucleotide that is a fundamental unit of genetic material in DNA and RNA. It consists of a guanine base, a pentose sugar (ribose in the case of RNA, deoxyribose in DNA), and one phosphate group. GMP plays crucial roles in various biochemical reactions within cells, including energy transfer and signal transduction pathways. Additionally, it is involved in the synthesis of important molecules like nucleic acids, neurotransmitters, and hormones.

Flavonoids are a type of plant compounds with antioxidant properties that are beneficial to health. They are found in various fruits, vegetables, grains, and wine. Flavonoids have been studied for their potential to prevent chronic diseases such as heart disease and cancer due to their ability to reduce inflammation and oxidative stress.

There are several subclasses of flavonoids, including:

1. Flavanols: Found in tea, chocolate, grapes, and berries. They have been shown to improve blood flow and lower blood pressure.
2. Flavones: Found in parsley, celery, and citrus fruits. They have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties.
3. Flavanonols: Found in citrus fruits, onions, and tea. They have been shown to improve blood flow and reduce inflammation.
4. Isoflavones: Found in soybeans and legumes. They have estrogen-like effects and may help prevent hormone-related cancers.
5. Anthocyanidins: Found in berries, grapes, and other fruits. They have antioxidant properties and may help improve vision and memory.

It is important to note that while flavonoids have potential health benefits, they should not be used as a substitute for medical treatment or a healthy lifestyle. It is always best to consult with a healthcare professional before starting any new supplement regimen.

The hippocampus is a complex, curved formation in the brain that resembles a seahorse (hence its name, from the Greek word "hippos" meaning horse and "kampos" meaning sea monster). It's part of the limbic system and plays crucial roles in the formation of memories, particularly long-term ones.

This region is involved in spatial navigation and cognitive maps, allowing us to recognize locations and remember how to get to them. Additionally, it's one of the first areas affected by Alzheimer's disease, which often results in memory loss as an early symptom.

Anatomically, it consists of two main parts: the Ammon's horn (or cornu ammonis) and the dentate gyrus. These structures are made up of distinct types of neurons that contribute to different aspects of learning and memory.

"Saccharomyces cerevisiae" is not typically considered a medical term, but it is a scientific name used in the field of microbiology. It refers to a species of yeast that is commonly used in various industrial processes, such as baking and brewing. It's also widely used in scientific research due to its genetic tractability and eukaryotic cellular organization.

However, it does have some relevance to medical fields like medicine and nutrition. For example, certain strains of S. cerevisiae are used as probiotics, which can provide health benefits when consumed. They may help support gut health, enhance the immune system, and even assist in the digestion of certain nutrients.

In summary, "Saccharomyces cerevisiae" is a species of yeast with various industrial and potential medical applications.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Pyridines" is not a medical term. It is a chemical term that refers to a class of organic compounds with the chemical structure of a six-membered ring containing one nitrogen atom and five carbon atoms (heterocyclic aromatic compound).

In a biological or medical context, pyridine derivatives can be found in various natural and synthetic substances. For example, some medications contain pyridine rings as part of their chemical structure. However, "Pyridines" itself is not a medical term or condition.

"Localization of the human gene for the type I cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase to chromosome 10". Cytogenetics and Cell ... of a novel male germ cell-specific cGMP-dependent protein kinase-anchoring protein by cGMP-dependent protein kinase Ialpha". ... 5-trisphosphate receptor by cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase". The Journal of Biological Chemistry. 269 (12): 8701-7. doi: ... "Characterization of the human gene encoding the type I alpha and type I beta cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PRKG1)". Genomics. ...
5-trisphosphate receptor by cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase". The Journal of Biological Chemistry. 269 (12): 8701-7. doi: ... "Carbonic anhydrase-related protein is a novel binding protein for inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor type 1". The ... Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor type 1 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the ITPR1 gene. ITPR1 has been shown to ... Joseph SK, Lin C, Pierson S, Thomas AP, Maranto AR (Oct 1995). "Heteroligomers of type-I and type-III inositol trisphosphate ...
EC 2.7.11.12 Cyclic GMP-Dependent Protein Kinases and the Cardiovascular System cGMP-Dependent+Protein+Kinases at the U.S. ... Two PKG genes, coding for PKG type I (PKG-I) and type II (PKG-II), have been identified in mammals. The N-terminus of PKG-I is ... cGMP-dependent protein kinase or protein kinase G (PKG) is a serine/threonine-specific protein kinase that is activated by cGMP ... "A crystal structure of the cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase I{beta} dimerization/docking domain reveals molecular details of ...
July 2000). "Cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase signaling pathway inhibits RhoA-induced Ca2+ sensitization of contraction in ... L-type calcium channel expression increases in spastic vascular smooth muscle cells, which could result in excessive calcium ... Vrolix M, Raeymaekers L, Wuytack F, Hofmann F, Casteels R (November 1988). "Cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase stimulates the ... Nicorandil stimulates guanylate cyclase to increase formation of cyclic GMP (cGMP). cGMP activates protein kinase G (PKG), ...
... inducing a signaling cascade that results in the activation of cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) and an ultimate decrease in ... In addition to this, it has already been shown that NO stimulates increased cyclic GMP (cGMP) levels in the smooth muscle cells ... Various cell types play a role in HR, including astrocytes, smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells of blood vessels, and ... When these proteins are active, they turn on SREBP2 which inhibits LRP-1. LRP-1 helps the brain remove amyloid beta. Therefore ...
... where it stimulates a protein kinase called cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. By phosphorylating proteins, cyclic AMP- ... G proteins). The two most well-studied cyclic nucleotides are cyclic AMP (cAMP) and cyclic GMP (cGMP), while cyclic CMP (cCMP) ... Cyclic nucleotides can be found in many different types of eukaryotic cells, including photo-receptor rods and cones, smooth ... Eckly-Michel A, Martin V, Lugnier C (September 1997). "Involvement of cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinases in cyclic AMP ...
The molecular mechanism of smooth muscle relaxation involves the enzyme CGMP-dependent protein kinase, also known as PKG. This ... June 1996). "Sildenafil: an orally active type 5 cyclic GMP-specific phosphodiesterase inhibitor for the treatment of penile ... Francis SH, Busch JL, Corbin JD, Sibley D (September 2010). "cGMP-dependent protein kinases and cGMP phosphodiesterases in ... Sildenafil protects cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) from degradation by cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) in ...
"Cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase regulates vascular smooth muscle cell phenotype". Journal of Vascular Research. 34 (4): 245 ... Hydrogen sulfide is also involved in the disease process of type 1 diabetes. The beta cells of the pancreas in type 1 diabetes ... Lincoln, T. M.; Cornwell, Taylor (March 1990). "cGMP-dependent protein kinase mediates the reduction of Ca2+ by cAMP in ... increased cGMP triggers an increase in protein kinase G (PKG) activity. PKG reduces intracellular Ca2+ in vascular smooth ...
In vivo phosphorylation of thromboxane by cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences ... phosphorylate messengers via protein kinase A (PKA). These signaling elements include thromboxane A2, receptor type α, ... Nitric oxide (NO) stimulates cGMP production and therefore the activation cGMP-dependent protein kinase (G kinase). This kinase ... Siess, Wolfgang; Eduardo, Lapetina (1990). "Functional relationship between cyclic AMP-dependent protein phosphorylation and ...
... which is a heterodimeric enzyme with subsequent formation of cyclic-GMP. Cyclic-GMP activates protein kinase G, which causes ... "Hydrogen sulfide and nitric oxide are mutually dependent in the regulation of angiogenesis and endothelium-dependent ... It is a known bioproduct in almost all types of organisms, ranging from bacteria to plants, fungi, and animal cells. NO is ... mitogen-activated protein kinase, PPAR gamma, HIF1A, NRF2, ion channels, cystathionine beta synthase, and numerous other ...
CNG channel activity is controlled by the interaction between cGMP-dependent protein kinase and G1 protein because of cGMP's ... "Induction by cyclic GMP of cationic conductance in plasma membrane of retinal rod outer segment". Nature. 313 (6000): 310-3. ... However, a receptor-type GC in mammalian sperm has yet to be identified. Mouse sperm express other channels such as CatSper1. ... Cyclic nucleotide gated channel alpha-subunits include Cyclic nucleotide-gated channel alpha 1 Cyclic nucleotide-gated channel ...
Cyclic GMP binds to the cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG1) which phosphorylates several proteins that results in decreased ... "Phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitor use in type 2 diabetes is associated with a reduction in all-cause mortality". Heart. 102 ( ... cGMP binding proteins and protein kinase G (PKG). The effect on PKG reduces levels of calcium leading to relaxation of smooth ... Their function is to degrade intracellular second messengers such as cyclic adenine monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine ...
... which contributes to the contraction of myocytes by phosphorylation through cAMP dependent protein kinase A (PKA) and Ca2+ ... and cyclic GMP (cGMP) levels fall in vascular smooth muscle. This impairs relaxation in the vasculature and is a part of the ... this kinase improves the Ca2+ inward current through the L-type Ca2+ channels, which leads to calcium-induced calcium release ... a special type of smooth ER) and decreasing the calcium available for contraction. In myocytes, the increase of cAMP ...
... cyclic gmp-dependent protein kinases MeSH D12.644.360.200.575 - protamine kinase MeSH D12.644.360.250 - cyclin-dependent ... c-type MeSH D12.644.548.587 - pancreatic polypeptide MeSH D12.644.548.588 - parathyroid hormone-related protein MeSH D12.644. ... map kinase kinase kinase 1 MeSH D12.644.360.400.200 - map kinase kinase kinase 2 MeSH D12.644.360.400.300 - map kinase kinase ... cyclic nucleotide-regulated protein kinases MeSH D12.644.360.200.125 - cyclic amp-dependent protein kinases MeSH D12.644. ...
... through cyclic GMP-dependent mechanisms. NO prolongs the ability of human dendritic cells to internalize antigens at sites of ... protein kinase A (PKA) and the exchange proteins directly activated by cAMP (Epac-1 and -2). Epac-1 and PKA are both important ... The alveolar macrophage is the third cell type in the alveolus; the others are the type I and type II pneumocytes. Alveolar ... The lungs are especially sensitive and prone to damage, thus to avoid collateral damage to type I and type II pneumocytes, ...
"Direct phosphorylation of brain tyrosine hydroxylase by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase: mechanism of enzyme activation". ... Roskoski R, Roskoski LM (Jan 1987). "Activation of tyrosine hydroxylase in PC12 cells by the cyclic GMP and cyclic AMP second ... Tyrosine hydroxylase is also an autoantigen in Autoimmune Polyendocrine Syndrome (APS) type I. A consistent abnormality in ... that are phosphorylated by a variety of protein kinases. Ser40 is phosphorylated by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Ser19 ( ...
... beta-adrenergic-receptor kinase MeSH D08.811.913.696.620.682.700.150.150 - cyclic gmp-dependent protein kinases MeSH D08.811. ... bone morphogenetic protein receptors, type ii MeSH D08.811.913.696.620.682.700.125 - ca(2+)-calmodulin dependent protein kinase ... cyclic nucleotide-regulated protein kinases MeSH D08.811.913.696.620.682.700.150.125 - cyclic amp-dependent protein kinases ... map kinase kinase kinase 1 MeSH D08.811.913.696.620.682.700.559.200 - map kinase kinase kinase 2 MeSH D08.811.913.696.620.682. ...
Upon binding DNA, the protein cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase (cGAS) triggers reaction of GTP and ATP to form cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP). ... Ishikawa H, Ma Z, Barber GN (October 2009). "STING regulates intracellular DNA-mediated, type I interferon-dependent innate ... STING is also thought to activate the NF-κB transcription factor through the activity of the IκB kinase (IKK), though the ... Cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP) is a cyclic dinucleotide (CDN) and the first to be found in metazoans. Other CDNs (c-di-GMP and c-di-AMP ...
... cyclic-GMP phosphodiesterase EC 3.1.4.36: Now with EC 3.1.4.43 EC 3.1.4.37: 2′,3′-cyclic-nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase EC 3.1 ... ADP-dependent medium-chain-acyl-CoA hydrolase EC 3.1.2.20: acyl-CoA hydrolase EC 3.1.2.21: dodecanoyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) ... type I site-specific deoxyribonuclease EC 3.1.21.4: type II site-specific deoxyribonuclease EC 3.1.21.5: type III site-specific ... protein-tyrosine-phosphatase EC 3.1.3.49: [pyruvate kinase]-phosphatase EC 3.1.3.50: sorbitol-6-phosphatase EC 3.1.3.51: ...
This in turn leads to increased cAMP-dependent protein kinase or PKA (protein kinase A) activity, ultimately promoting ... Nitric oxide and cyclic GMP in cell signaling and drug development". The New England Journal of Medicine. 355 (19): 2003-11. ... Phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5), which is abundant in the pulmonary tissue, hydrolyzes the cyclic bond of cGMP. Consequently, ... The cGMP then activates cGMP-dependent kinase or PKG (protein kinase G). Activated PKG promotes vasorelaxation (via a reduction ...
CEF scientists showed that GABARAP proteins are not only involved in autophagy but also in the ubiquitin-dependent degradation ... or for the manipulation of cyclic GMP. Several CEF groups joined forces not only to unravel the photocycle of ChR2 at different ... They further discovered that reticulon-type proteins act as ER-specific autophagy receptors and simulated their effect on the ... "The leukemogenic AF4-MLL fusion protein causes P-TEFb kinase activation and altered epigenetic signatures". Leukemia. 25 (1): ...
Cyclic-GMP activates protein kinase G, which causes reuptake of Ca2+ and the opening of calcium-activated potassium channels. ... The elevation of intracellular cGMP results in relaxation by the activation of cGMP-dependent protein kinase, which ... "Threshold Effects of Nitric Oxide-Induced Toxicity and Cellular Responses in Wild-Type and p53-Null Human Lymphoblastoid Cells ... Krawutschke, Christian; Koesling, Doris; Russwurm, Michael (September 2015). "Cyclic GMP in Vascular Relaxation: Export Is of ...
"A Cyclic GMP-Dependent K + Channel in the Blastocladiomycete Fungus Blastocladiella emersonii". Eukaryotic Cell. 14 (9): 958- ... whereas animals use type 2 opsins. Type 2 opsins belong to Class A family of G-protein coupled receptors. Both types are seven- ... Histidine kinases in fungi are hybrid histidine kinases due to the fusion of histidine kinase/histidine kinase-like ATPase ... However, in S. punctatus type 1 opsins do not exist, but a putative type 2 opsin. It shares with other G-protein-coupled ...
Yeast tRNA kinase then phosphorylates the 5'-hydroxyl group using adenosine triphosphate. Yeast tRNA cyclic phosphodiesterase ... Fu XD, Ares M (October 2014). "Context-dependent control of alternative splicing by RNA-binding proteins". Nature Reviews. ... This type of splicing is termed canonical splicing or termed the lariat pathway, which accounts for more than 99% of splicing. ... GMP, GDP, GTP) attacks phosphate at the 5' splice site. 3'OH of the 5' exon becomes a nucleophile and the second ...
Kagan's studies of the cGAS-STING pathway revealed mutant cGAS proteins that signal from within mitochondria to induce Type I ... "Species-specific self-DNA detection mechanisms by mammalian cyclic GMP-AMP synthases". Science Immunology. 8 (79): eabp9765. ... was proposed to exist from analysis of recombinant death domains derived from the protein MyD88 and the IRAK family kinases in ... dependent pyroptosis and release of IL-1α. The BCL-2 family members MCL-1 and BCL-xL were identified as the pyroptosis-inducing ...
"Cyclic AMP/GMP-dependent modulation of Ca2+ channels sets the polarity of nerve growth-cone turning". Nature. 423 (6943): 990-5 ... Overall, these studies show that regulating effects of netrin is dependent on the type of vascular tissue. Recently, netrin has ... DCC and UNC-5 proteins mediate netrin-1 responses. The UNC-5 protein is mainly involved in signaling repulsion. DCC, which is ... In the first pathway, the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is bound to DCC and both undergo tyrosine phosphorylation upon netrin-1 ...
Cyclic GMP possibly opens cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) K+-selective channels, thereby causing hyperpolarization of the ... cAMP and protein kinase A as well as soluble guanylyl cyclase, cGMP, inositol trisphosphate receptor and store-operated Ca2+ ... This gradient-dependent sperm accumulation was observed over a wide temperature range (29-41 °C). Since temperature affects ... They include the chemokine CCL20, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), specific odorants, natriuretic peptide type C (NPPC), and ...
This structural change causes an increased affinity for the regulatory protein called transducin (a type of G protein). Upon ... Second, it serves as an adaptor protein to aid the receptor to the clathrin-dependent endocytosis machinery (to induce receptor ... As rhodopsin is phosphorylated by rhodopsin kinase (a member of the GPCR kinases(GRKs)), it binds with high affinity to the ... GMP. Reduction in cGMP allows the ion channels to close, preventing the influx of positive ions, hyperpolarizing the cell, and ...
Then, it converts adenosine triphosphate into cyclic AMP, which activates Protein kinase A. PKA leads to protein tyrosine ... "Cyclic GMP signaling is involved in the luteinizing hormone-dependent meiotic maturation of mouse oocytes". Biology of ... Therefore, there are four main transmembrane receptor types: G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), tyrosine kinase receptors ( ... These proteins activate protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) that phosphorylates various proteins important for capacitation and ...
... through a protein kinase C-dependent mechanism". Biochem J. 466 (2): 379-90. doi:10.1042/bj20140881. PMID 25422863. Milo, Ron; ... Pugh, E. N. Jr.; Lamb, T. D. (1990). "Cyclic GMP and calcium: The internal messengers of excitation and adaptation in ... This type of dysfunction can be seen in cardiovascular diseases, hypertension, and diabetes. Calcium coordination plays an ... An example a protein with calcium coordination is von Willebrand factor (vWF) which has an essential role in blood clot ...
"Localization of the human gene for the type I cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase to chromosome 10". Cytogenetics and Cell ... of a novel male germ cell-specific cGMP-dependent protein kinase-anchoring protein by cGMP-dependent protein kinase Ialpha". ... 5-trisphosphate receptor by cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase". The Journal of Biological Chemistry. 269 (12): 8701-7. doi: ... "Characterization of the human gene encoding the type I alpha and type I beta cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PRKG1)". Genomics. ...
... revealing that context-dependent engagement of distinct intracellular signaling pathways within a single sensory neuron type is ... The cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase EGL-4 regulates olfactory adaptation in C. elegans. Neuron. 2002;36:1079-89. pmid: ... Context-dependent reversal of odorant preference is driven by inversion of the response in a single sensory neuron type. * ... 2022) Context-dependent reversal of odorant preference is driven by inversion of the response in a single sensory neuron type. ...
... cyclic guanosine-monophosphate; GMP, guanosine-monophosphate; PKA, protein kinase A; INF-1, interferon type 1; JAK, janus ... Zinc-dependent suppression of TNF-alpha production is mediated by protein kinase A-induced inhibition of Raf-1, I kappa B ... cyclic nucleotide cGMP (cyclic guanosine monophosphate) is elevated, leading to the activation of PKA (protein kinase A), and ... RNA-activated protein kinase; ACE-2, angiotensin-converting enzyme 2; RdRp, RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. ...
C-type natriuretic peptide) and it, in turn, activates other proteins including PRGK2 (cyclic GMP dependent protein kinase 2). ... The NPR2 gene encodes the natriuretic peptide receptor B (NPR-B) protein, also called guanylate cyclase B (GC-B). NPR-B is ... Acromesomelic dysplasia, Maroteaux type (AMDM) is an autosomal recessive skeletal disorder that affects skeletal growth. ... Studying the consequences of AMDM at the cellular, biophysical, and protein levels may help in furthering the development of ...
Cyclic GMP-Dependent Protein Kinases 87% * Calcium-Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Type 2 83% ...
human PRKG1 protein Medicine & Life Sciences 100% * Cyclic GMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Type I Medicine & Life Sciences 53% ... The type I cGMP-dependent protein kinase (cGK) is one of the major pathways for the cGMP cascade and has been demonstrated to ... N2 - The type I cGMP-dependent protein kinase (cGK) is one of the major pathways for the cGMP cascade and has been demonstrated ... AB - The type I cGMP-dependent protein kinase (cGK) is one of the major pathways for the cGMP cascade and has been demonstrated ...
Experiments aimed at mapping UBCv1 inhibitory activity indicated that this viral protein acts upstream or at the level step of ... Additionally, A549 stably transduced for UBCv1 showed a significant decrease in the levels of NF-ĸB dependent genes. ... a mutant disabled for ubiquitylation activity retained similar immunomodulatory activity as the wild-type enzyme, suggesting ... In this work, we have revealed that early viral protein UBCv1, the only known conjugating enzyme encoded by a virus, modulates ...
Molecular characterization of a type II cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase expressed in the rat brain. There are currently ... Simply sign the form and return it to Flex-Plan Services with the accompanying documentation showing the date, type, and cost ... All mantle secretomes surveyed to date include novel genes encoding lineage-restricted proteins and unique combinations of co- ... Type the address of a blocked website into the text box near the top of the page. The present study also provides insights into ...
Discovery and Characterization of a Causative Mutation for Bovine Dwarfism in Cyclic GMP-dependant, Type II, Protein Kinase ( ... Using Mathematical Tools to Gain Insight into Binding Specificity in Protein-Protein and Protein-DNA Interactions , Julie ... Protein-ligand Interfaces Are Polarized and Favor Hydrogen Bond Donors on the Protein Side, Auditorium. Mar. 5 Presentation by ... Mining the Protein Data Bank and TargetDB with a Structural Genomics Focus , Ryan Bannen , Biochemistry. Modeling Gene ...
... the protein kinase RNA-activated (PKR), oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS), latent endoribonuclease (RnaseL), cyclic GMP-AMP ( ... a dose-dependent survival was seen with partial neutrophil depletion in this type of lethal infection. Comparing viral ... abelson kinase 1 (ABI1); diacylglycerol kinase epsilon (DGKE); cyclin-dependent kinase 5 regulator (CDK5R2); protein kinase C ι ... the double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR); cyclin-dependent kinase 6 (CDK6) and most MAPKs with the exception of ...
... paralleled by higher cGMP-dependent protein kinase type I (cGKI) protein levels PMID: 26254181 ... Thus BNP, which increases cyclic GMP independently of NO, is an important approach to prevent growth in the diabetic myocardium ... Distinct roles of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways in GATA-4 transcription factor-mediated regulation of B-type ... Load-induced activation of BNP gene expression is independent of calcineurin, protein kinase C anad protein phosphatase 2A. ...
MeSH headings : Animals; Cyclic GMP / biosynthesis; Cyclic GMP-Dependent Protein Kinases; Epithelial Cells / cytology; ... Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II; Nitric Oxide Synthase Type III; Nitrogen / metabolism; Oxidative Stress / physiology; Reactive ... Protein Kinase C / antagonists & inhibitors; Protein Kinases / metabolism; Signal Transduction; Trachea / cytology; Trachea / ... Tumor necrosis factor-alpha stimulates mucin secretion and cyclic GMP production by guinea pig tracheal epithelial cells in ...
... a cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) inhibitor, 10(-6)M). We also determined PKG expression levels and kinase activity. ... M 8-bromo-cyclic GMP (cGMP), 10(-8), 10(-7)M C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), or 10(-6), 10(-5)M S-nitroso-N-acetyl- ... Increased HIF-1 alpha protects the functional effects of cyclic GMP thorough maintenance of cyclic GMP protein kinase activity ... cyclic GMP protein kinase inhibitor, 10(-6)M). Kinase activity was measured via a protein phosphorylation assay. Under control ...
... in vivo phosphorylation of thromboxane receptor by cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase. Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 95, 4888-4893 ... Functional significance of the kunitz-type inhibitory domains of lipoprotein-associated coagulation inhibitor. Nature 338, 518- ... Protein kinase B/Akt activates c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase by increasing NO production in response to shear stress. J. Appl. ... Vinals, F., Chambard, J. C. & Pouyssegur, J. p70 S6 kinase-mediated protein synthesis is a critical step for vascular ...
A dose-dependent antiproliferative effect was evident and after 5 days with an IC50 value of 108 μM. Cyclic GMP was able to ... Francis, S.H., Busch, J.L., Corbin, J.D. and Sibley, D. (2010) cGMP-Dependent Protein Kinases and cGMP Phosphodiesterases in ... Chou, T.C. (1976) Derivation and Properties of Michaelis-Menten Type and Hill Type Equations for Reference Ligands. Journal of ... Schultz, C., Vaskinn, S., Kildalsen, H. and Sager, G. (1998) Cyclic AMP Stimulates the Cyclic GMP Egression Pump in Human ...
We used the carboxyl-terminal cyclic nucleotide binding domain of Plasmodium falciparum cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) ... based biosensors for intracellular detection of cyclic nucleotides have been designed in the past decade. However, few such ... We used the carboxyl-terminal cyclic nucleotide binding domain of Plasmodium falciparum cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) ... Type. Journal article. Journal. Commun Biol. Publication Date. 29/10/2019. Volume. 2 ...
We used the carboxyl-terminal cyclic nucleotide binding domain of Plasmodium falciparum cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) ... based biosensors for intracellular detection of cyclic nucleotides have been designed in the past decade. However, few such ... We used the carboxyl-terminal cyclic nucleotide binding domain of Plasmodium falciparum cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) ... Type. Journal article. Journal. Commun Biol. Publication Date. 29/10/2019. Volume. 2 ...
Cyclic GMP can directly stimulate If but it is ∼10-fold less potent than the physiological If-gating nucleotide, cAMP. In ... Aim: To elucidate the role of PDE3, PKA and PKG in mediating the NO-If-dependent increase in HR. Methods and Results: In ... the present findings provide an important link between the activation of GC with NO donors and the NO-dependent mobilization of ... ventricular myocytes, NO can increase cAMP levels through a cGMP-dependent inhibition of PDE3. ...
Cyclic GMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Type I. Proteína Quinase Dependente de GMP Cíclico Tipo I. Proteína Quinasa Dependiente de ... Cyclic GMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Type I. Proteína Quinase Dependente de GMP Cíclico Tipo I. Proteína Quinasa Dependiente de ... Cyclic GMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Type II. Proteína Quinase Dependente de GMP Cíclico Tipo II. Proteína Quinasa Dependiente ... Cyclic GMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Type II. Proteína Quinase Dependente de GMP Cíclico Tipo II. Proteína Quinasa Dependiente ...
Cyclic GMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Type I. Proteína Quinase Dependente de GMP Cíclico Tipo I. Proteína Quinasa Dependiente de ... Cyclic GMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Type I. Proteína Quinase Dependente de GMP Cíclico Tipo I. Proteína Quinasa Dependiente de ... Cyclic GMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Type II. Proteína Quinase Dependente de GMP Cíclico Tipo II. Proteína Quinasa Dependiente ... Cyclic GMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Type II. Proteína Quinase Dependente de GMP Cíclico Tipo II. Proteína Quinasa Dependiente ...
Cyclic GMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Type I. Proteína Quinase Dependente de GMP Cíclico Tipo I. Proteína Quinasa Dependiente de ... Cyclic GMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Type I. Proteína Quinase Dependente de GMP Cíclico Tipo I. Proteína Quinasa Dependiente de ... Cyclic GMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Type II. Proteína Quinase Dependente de GMP Cíclico Tipo II. Proteína Quinasa Dependiente ... Cyclic GMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Type II. Proteína Quinase Dependente de GMP Cíclico Tipo II. Proteína Quinasa Dependiente ...
Cyclic GMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Type I. Proteína Quinase Dependente de GMP Cíclico Tipo I. Proteína Quinasa Dependiente de ... Cyclic GMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Type I. Proteína Quinase Dependente de GMP Cíclico Tipo I. Proteína Quinasa Dependiente de ... Cyclic GMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Type II. Proteína Quinase Dependente de GMP Cíclico Tipo II. Proteína Quinasa Dependiente ... Cyclic GMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Type II. Proteína Quinase Dependente de GMP Cíclico Tipo II. Proteína Quinasa Dependiente ...
Cyclic GMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Type I. Proteína Quinase Dependente de GMP Cíclico Tipo I. Proteína Quinasa Dependiente de ... Cyclic GMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Type I. Proteína Quinase Dependente de GMP Cíclico Tipo I. Proteína Quinasa Dependiente de ... Cyclic GMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Type II. Proteína Quinase Dependente de GMP Cíclico Tipo II. Proteína Quinasa Dependiente ... Cyclic GMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Type II. Proteína Quinase Dependente de GMP Cíclico Tipo II. Proteína Quinasa Dependiente ...
Cyclic GMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Type I. Proteína Quinase Dependente de GMP Cíclico Tipo I. Proteína Quinasa Dependiente de ... Cyclic GMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Type I. Proteína Quinase Dependente de GMP Cíclico Tipo I. Proteína Quinasa Dependiente de ... Cyclic GMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Type II. Proteína Quinase Dependente de GMP Cíclico Tipo II. Proteína Quinasa Dependiente ... Cyclic GMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Type II. Proteína Quinase Dependente de GMP Cíclico Tipo II. Proteína Quinasa Dependiente ...
Cyclic GMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Type I. Proteína Quinase Dependente de GMP Cíclico Tipo I. Proteína Quinasa Dependiente de ... Cyclic GMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Type I. Proteína Quinase Dependente de GMP Cíclico Tipo I. Proteína Quinasa Dependiente de ... Cyclic GMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Type II. Proteína Quinase Dependente de GMP Cíclico Tipo II. Proteína Quinasa Dependiente ... Cyclic GMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Type II. Proteína Quinase Dependente de GMP Cíclico Tipo II. Proteína Quinasa Dependiente ...
Many effects of NO are mediated through its canonical receptor, the soluble guanylyl cyclase, and the second messenger cyclic ... The classical targets of cGMP are cGMP-dependent protein kinases (cGKs), cyclic nucleotide hydrolysing phosphodiesterases, and ... Cyclic GMP / pharmacology * Cyclic GMP / physiology* * Humans * Neuronal Plasticity / drug effects * Neuronal Plasticity / ... Publication types * Research Support, Non-U.S. Govt * Review MeSH terms * Animals ...
Cyclic GMP-Dependent Protein Kinases 20% * Behov, bistånd, budget. Elmersjö, M., Hultqvist, S. & Johansson, S., 2023, Socialt ... Epidemiology and Pathogenesis of Type 1 Diabetes. Stene, L. C. & Lernmark, A., 2023, Transplantation of the Pancreas. Gruessner ... A Potential Neuroprotective Role for Pyruvate Kinase 2 in Retinal Degeneration. Zhou, J., Rasmussen, M. & Ekström, P., 2023, ... Combined with Crosslinking Mass Spectrometry for Identification and Structural Modeling of Host-Pathogen Protein-Protein ...
Ca(2+)-Calmodulin Dependent Protein Kinase. Calcium-Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinases. Cholesterol Esterase. Sterol Esterase ... Cyclic-GMP Phosphodiesterase. 3,5-Cyclic-GMP Phosphodiesterases. 3,5-Cyclic-Nucleotide Phosphodiesterase. 3,5-Cyclic-AMP ... SHP1 Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase. Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase, Non-Receptor Type 6. Thioredoxin Reductase (NADPH). ... Unpublished Works [Publication Type]. Unpublished Works. V03 - Study Characteristics. Case Reports [Publication Type]. Case ...
Ca(2+)-Calmodulin Dependent Protein Kinase. Calcium-Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinases. Cholesterol Esterase. Sterol Esterase ... Cyclic-GMP Phosphodiesterase. 3,5-Cyclic-GMP Phosphodiesterases. 3,5-Cyclic-Nucleotide Phosphodiesterase. 3,5-Cyclic-AMP ... SHP1 Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase. Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase, Non-Receptor Type 6. Thioredoxin Reductase (NADPH). ... Unpublished Works [Publication Type]. Unpublished Works. V03 - Study Characteristics. Case Reports [Publication Type]. Case ...
Ca(2+)-Calmodulin Dependent Protein Kinase. Calcium-Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinases. Cholesterol Esterase. Sterol Esterase ... Cyclic-GMP Phosphodiesterase. 3,5-Cyclic-GMP Phosphodiesterases. 3,5-Cyclic-Nucleotide Phosphodiesterase. 3,5-Cyclic-AMP ... SHP1 Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase. Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase, Non-Receptor Type 6. Thioredoxin Reductase (NADPH). ... Unpublished Works [Publication Type]. Unpublished Works. V03 - Study Characteristics. Case Reports [Publication Type]. Case ...
  • The classical targets of cGMP are cGMP-dependent protein kinases (cGKs), cyclic nucleotide hydrolysing phosphodiesterases, and cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) cation channels. (nih.gov)
  • Our results indicate that context-dependent recruitment of alternative intracellular signaling pathways within a single sensory neuron type conveys opposite hedonic valences, thereby providing a robust mechanism for odorant encoding and discrimination at the periphery. (plos.org)
  • Several FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer)-based biosensors for intracellular detection of cyclic nucleotides have been designed in the past decade. (ox.ac.uk)
  • We examined the role of cGMP-dependent signaling pathways and intracellular Ca(2+)stores in mediating the positive chronotropic effect of NO donors. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Stimulator of interferon genes (STING, also named MITA, MYPS, or ERIS) is an intracellular DNA sensor that induces type I interferon through its interaction with TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1). (umassmed.edu)
  • This demonstrates the intersection of two key pathways of innate immune regulation, NLR and STING, to fine tune host response to intracellular DNA, DNA virus, and c-di-GMP. (umassmed.edu)
  • Fertel and Weiss, 1976) therefore preventing the inactivation of the intracellular second messengers cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) by the respective PDE subtype(s). (biomedjournal.com)
  • Cyclic GMP is the intracellular trigger for penile erection. (trochetadalafil.com)
  • These protein kinase interactions result in reduced intracellular calcium levels and a consequent relaxation of arterial and trabecular smooth muscle, leading to arterial dilatation, venous constriction, and the rigidity of penile erection. (trochetadalafil.com)
  • FGFR3 is a receptor tyrosine kinase that comprises an extracellular ligand-binding domain, a transmembrane domain, and 2 intracellular tyrosine kinase domains [ 8 ]. (e-apem.org)
  • Hence, ANP, via its guanylyl cyclase-A (GC-A) receptor and intracellular cyclic GMP as second messenger, stimulates endothelial albumin permeability. (uni-wuerzburg.de)
  • Many of these proteins take part in pathways that stimulate calcium mineral release (for instance, calcium-calmodulin G proteins signaling) and the forming of intracellular junctions, resulting in arousal of contractions. (researchensemble.com)
  • Garg, U.C. and Hassid, A. (1989) Nitric Oxide-Generating Vasodilators and 8-Bromo-cyclic Guanosine Monophosphate Inhibit Mitogenesis and Proliferation of Cultured Rat Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells. (scirp.org)
  • Many effects of NO are mediated through its canonical receptor, the soluble guanylyl cyclase, and the second messenger cyclic guanosine-3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP). (nih.gov)
  • The first is by activation of guanylate cyclase, which promotes the conversion of guanosine triphosphate (GTP) to cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). (trochetadalafil.com)
  • In primates, including humans, the L -arginine-nitric oxide-guanylyl cyclase-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) pathway is the key mechanism of penile erection (Figure 1). (trochetadalafil.com)
  • The interaction of NO with guanylyl cyclase causes a conformational change in this enzyme, which results in the catalytic production of 3′-5′-cyclic guanosine monophosphate from guanosine 5′-triphosphate. (trochetadalafil.com)
  • MNU was dissolved im- (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) mediately before use in glacial acetic acid and water (pH into their intermediate inactive 50 derivatives and 5- 4.5-5). (sagepub.com)
  • Chen, Z.S., Lee, K. and Kruh, G.D. (2001) Transport of Cyclic Nucleotides and Estradiol 17-Beta-d-glucuronide by Multidrug Resistance Protein 4. (scirp.org)
  • Nitric oxide (NO) donors increase heart rate (HR) through a guanylyl cyclase-dependent stimulation of the pacemaker current I(f), without affecting basal I(Ca-L). The activity of I(f)is known to be enhanced by cyclic nucleotides and by an increase in cytosolic Ca(2+). (ox.ac.uk)
  • Nitric oxide mediates the indole acetic acid induction activation of a mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade involved in adventitious root development. (bio-protocol.org)
  • Binding of various FGFs to FGFR3 induces receptor dimerization and transphosphorylation of tyrosine residues [ 9 ], leading to activation of several downstream signaling pathways, including mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades ( Fig. 1 ) [ 10 , 11 ]. (e-apem.org)
  • The interaction with the non-selective PDE (cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase) inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) was tested after three days. (scirp.org)
  • Conversely, either NO or cGMP analogs paired with one-train tetanization produced late-phase potentiation, and the cGMP-induced potentiation was blocked by inhibitors of protein or RNA synthesis and an inhibitor of PKG, but not by an inhibitor of PKA. (jneurosci.org)
  • 4. Chen X, Wang N, Liu Y, Liu Y, Zhang T, Zhu L, Wang Y, Wu C, Yang J. (2014) Yonkenafil: a novel phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor induces neuronal network potentiation by a cGMP-dependent Nogo-R axis in acute experimental stroke. (guidetopharmacology.org)
  • A specific inhibitor of cyclic GMP dependent protein kinase, Rp-8pCPT-cGMPS, partially inhibited the effect of dinitrosyl-iron-thiosulfate on neurogenic vasoconstriction, but not on [ 3 H]noradrenaline release. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Tadalafil is a known phosphodiesterase-5 Distinct metastasis and resistance development by self- (PDE-5) inhibitor, which have anti-cancer effects in vari- renewing nascent cancer cells in response with the ous types of cancer [2]. (sagepub.com)
  • Calcium and calcium-dependent protein kinases are involved in nitric oxide- and auxin-induced adventitious root formation in cucumber. (bio-protocol.org)
  • Nitric oxide and cyclic GMP are messengers in the indole acetic acid-induced adventitious rooting process. (bio-protocol.org)
  • details] Increase in nitric oxide and cyclic GMP of rat cerebellum by radio frequency burst-type electromagnetic field radiation [med. (emf-portal.org)
  • The JNK protein kinase is a member of the MAP kinase group that is activated in response to dual phosphorylation on threonine and tyrosine. (umassmed.edu)
  • These results suggest that NO contributes to L-LTP by stimulating guanylyl cyclase and cGMP-dependent protein kinase, which acts in parallel with PKA to increase phosphorylation of the transcription factor CREB. (jneurosci.org)
  • NO-induced activation of cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) increases the open probability of large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels (BK channels) by direct phosphorylation. (reactome.org)
  • Furthermore, this increase in cGMP degradation is paralleled by the phosphorylation of phosphodiesterase type 5 at Ser-92. (rupress.org)
  • Thus, our data suggest that NO-induced desensitization of the cGMP response is caused by the phosphorylation and subsequent activity increase of phosphodiesterase type 5. (rupress.org)
  • In healthy individuals, nicotine improves memory impairment caused by sleep deprivation by enhancing the phosphorylation of calmodulin‑dependent protein kinase II, an essential regulator of cell proliferation and synaptic plasticity. (spandidos-publications.com)
  • Even muscle contraction is certainly inhibited with the phosphorylation of myosin light-chain kinase with the cAMP-dependent proteins kinase. (researchensemble.com)
  • NPR-B is activated by a small protein called CNP (C-type natriuretic peptide) and it, in turn, activates other proteins including PRGK2 (cyclic GMP dependent protein kinase 2). (childrenshospital.org)
  • Acts by specifically binding and stimulating NPR1 to produce cGMP, which in turn activates effector proteins that drive various biological responses. (cusabio.com)
  • Cyclic GMP activates cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG), which in turn phosphorylates several proteins. (trochetadalafil.com)
  • Here we found that the nucleotide-binding, leucine-rich-repeat-containing protein, NLRC3, reduced STING-dependent innate immune activation in response to cytosolic DNA, cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP), and DNA viruses. (umassmed.edu)
  • The increasing cGMP binds to regulatory binding sites for protein kinase G thereby activating the catalytic units that enable protein kinase G to reduce cytosolic Ca2+ levels needed for smooth muscle contraction within blood vessels.1,2 In addition, NO is also known to cause direct activation of Ca2+-dependent K+ channels resulting in a hyperpolarization and relaxation of vascular smooth muscle cells that allow for increased blood flow. (trochetadalafil.com)
  • The major sensor of cytosolic double stranded (ds)DNA is the enzyme cGAS (cyclic GMP-AMP synthase). (monash.edu)
  • cGMP-dependent protein kinase 1, alpha isozyme is an enzyme that in humans is encoded by the PRKG1 gene. (wikipedia.org)
  • This CpG web-site is connected with the PRKG1 gene, which encodes cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase 1 and is involved with understanding, memory, and circadian rhythm regulation (Langmesser et al. (trpv1inhibitor.com)
  • Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) hydrolyze the phosphodiester bond of cAMP and cGMP to form the inactive 5′-AMP and 5′-GMP. (biomedjournal.com)
  • We used the carboxyl-terminal cyclic nucleotide binding domain of Plasmodium falciparum cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) flanked by different FRET pairs to generate two cGMP biosensors (Yellow PfPKG and Red PfPKG). (ox.ac.uk)
  • 3 hr, and is reduced by inhibitors of PKA and of protein or RNA synthesis. (jneurosci.org)
  • Three-train L-LTP was also blocked by inhibitors of guanylyl cyclase or cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG). (jneurosci.org)
  • Selective phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors improve the formation of hippocampus-dependent memories in several rodent models of cognition. (springer.com)
  • stitute of 11 distinct gene families, which initiate the Carcinogenesis was induced by single tail vein injection of st sequential lcleavage of cyclic adenosine monophosphate MNU on day 1 in each animal. (sagepub.com)
  • Taken together, we demonstrate that for the conditions tested PilG and PilH have inverse regulatory effects on flagellum-dependent and pili-dependent motility in Xcc and that this regulatory impact depends on these proteins influences on genes/proteins involved in flagellar biosynthesis and pilus assembly. (biomedcentral.com)
  • In ventricular myocytes, NO can increase cAMP levels through a cGMP-dependent inhibition of PDE3. (ox.ac.uk)
  • However, studies evaluating the effects of PDE inhibition on prefrontal cortex-dependent cognition and in monkeys are rare. (springer.com)
  • Altogether, we are the first to demonstrate that NETs inhibition with Cl-amidine ameliorated neuroinflammation, neuronal apoptosis, and neurological deficits via STING-dependent IRE1α/ASK1/JNK signaling pathway after TBI. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The NPR2 gene encodes the natriuretic peptide receptor B (NPR-B) protein, also called guanylate cyclase B (GC-B). NPR-B is expressed in many tissues, including cells in the growth plates of growing bones. (childrenshospital.org)
  • There are two subtypes of the type I cGK, cGKIα and cGKIβ. (elsevierpure.com)
  • In the present study, we isolated the full-length human cGKIα cDNA (-36 to +2177: the translation start site: +1) encoding the 671-amino acid protein. (elsevierpure.com)
  • My results indicate that KCNK3 internalizes in response to Protein Kinase C (PKC) activation, using a novel pathway that requires the phosphoserine binding protein, 14-3-3β, and demonstrates for the first time regulated KCNK3 channel trafficking in neurons. (umassmed.edu)
  • MNU 47 mg/kg, i.v.) and group IV (Tada- activate protein kinase G and map kinase pathway of lafil 4 mg/kg, p.o. (sagepub.com)
  • Figure 2: Postulated G-protein-mediated signal transduction process in normal and regenerating endothelial cells. (nature.com)
  • In this work, we have revealed that early viral protein UBCv1, the only known conjugating enzyme encoded by a virus, modulates innate immune and inflammatory signaling. (mdpi.com)
  • Angiotensin II (10 -8 mol/L), transforming growth factor-β (4 x 10 -11 mol/L), and tumor necrosis factor-α (6 x 10 -6 mol/L) also exhibited an inhibitory effect on type I cGK gene expression. (elsevierpure.com)
  • Pilz, R.B. and Broderick, K.E. (2005) Role of Cyclic GMP in Gene Regulation. (scirp.org)
  • The chemotaxis proteins of Pseudomonas aeruginosa are encoded in two clusters, which are located at different regions of the chromosome: che I and che V. These gene clusters are known to control chemotaxis via swimming, or flagellar-based, motility. (uwm.edu)
  • Maternal control of male-gamete delivery in Arabidopsis involves a putative GPI-anchored protein encoded by the LORELEI gene. (bio-protocol.org)
  • Using lately developed useful mapping equipment (HOPACH (hierarchical purchased partitioning and collapsing cross types) and GenMAPP 2.0), we've identified new potential transcriptional regulatory gene systems mediating the changeover from quiescence to term activation. (researchensemble.com)
  • Cluster formation of the chemotaxis histidine kinase CheA was reduced by 50% in the absence of either Par-like protein, thus demonstrating a potential mechanism behind the reduced swimming motility. (uwm.edu)
  • Presynaptic mechanisms of NO/cGMP/cGK signalling will be discussed with recently identified potential downstream components such as CaMKII, the vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein, and regulators of G protein signalling. (nih.gov)
  • Here we present evidence demonstrating the role of two single domain response regulators PilG and PilH in the antagonistic control of flagellum-dependent (swimming) and pili-dependent (swarming) motility. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Conclusions These outcomes implicate CA-074 Methyl Ester novel inhibtior the myometrium as an important regulator of endocrine hormone (cortisol and progesterone synthesis) and signaling pathways (cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP arousal) that immediate quiescence via the transcripitional upregulation of both book and previously linked regulators. (researchensemble.com)
  • While types distinctions in labor legislation have been noticed, a few common signaling elements and pathways have already been implicated as essential regulators across species. (researchensemble.com)
  • Several these regulators induce cyclic AMP (cAMP)- and cGMP-mediated signaling pathways. (researchensemble.com)
  • Both Par-like proteins are needed for wild type swimming motility, yet ParP appears to have a more important role as its loss results in a greater swimming defect. (uwm.edu)
  • Endocytic trafficking dynamically regulates neuronal plasma membrane protein presentation and activity, and plays a central role in excitability and plasticity. (umassmed.edu)
  • Over the course of my dissertation research I investigated endocytic mechanisms regulating two neuronal membrane proteins: the anesthetic-activated potassium leak channel, KCNK3, as well as the psychostimulant-sensitive dopamine transporter (DAT). (umassmed.edu)
  • Taken together, these results demonstrate that novel, non-classical endocytic mechanisms dynamically control the plasma membrane presentation of these two important neuronal proteins. (umassmed.edu)
  • In terms of its mechanism of action, nicotine slows the progression of PD by inhibiting Sirtuin 6, a stress‑responsive protein deacetylase, thereby decreasing neuronal apoptosis and improving neuronal survival. (spandidos-publications.com)
  • However, when intact platelets were incubated with NO and then lysed, enhanced activity of phosphodiesterase type 5 was detected in the cytosol. (rupress.org)
  • This controlled movement is possible due to the chemotaxis system, which is typically made up of several proteins that collectively sense the stimuli and transduce the signal within the cell to mediate a motility response. (uwm.edu)
  • Although mechanisms operating at the level of single sensory neuron types or sensilla in the periphery have also been implicated in this process [ 14 - 21 ], the contributions of sensory neurons to mediating odorant discrimination and olfactory behavioral plasticity are not fully understood. (plos.org)
  • The valence of individual chemicals is largely determined by the responding sensory neuron type, such that distinct subsets of chemosensory neurons drive either attraction or avoidance to different chemicals [ 25 , 26 ]. (plos.org)
  • FRET-based cyclic GMP biosensors measure low cGMP concentrations in cardiomyocytes and neurons. (ox.ac.uk)
  • NLRC3 associated with both STING and TBK1 and impeded STING-TBK1 interaction and downstream type I interferon production. (umassmed.edu)
  • To test a possible downstream target of PKG, we examined changes in phospho-CRE-binding protein (phospho-CREB) immunofluorescence in the CA1 cell body area and obtained results similar to those of the electrophysiology experiments. (jneurosci.org)
  • We discovered that IKKe works redundantly along with TBK1, the major effector kinase downstream of STING. (monash.edu)
  • Since PKA is known to stimulate SR Ca2+ release by phosphorylating ryanodine receptors, the present findings provide an important link between the activation of GC with NO donors and the NO-dependent mobilization of SR Ca2+ in SA node which we reported previously. (ox.ac.uk)
  • This activation was blocked by expression of the MAP kinase phosphatase MKP-1. (umassmed.edu)
  • Elements previously from the legislation of myometrial activation are the oxytocin receptor, difference junction proteins connexin-43, voltage-gated calcium mineral stations, prostaglandin receptor subtypes, estrogen, transcription and cortisol elements c-Jun and c-Fos. (researchensemble.com)
  • These findings suggest a pathophysiological implication of the type I cGK in cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension and atherosclerosis. (elsevierpure.com)
  • Neonatal exposure to a Type-I pyrethroid (bioallethrin) induces dose-response changes in brain muscarinic receptors and behaviour in neonatal and adult mice. (cdc.gov)
  • 2001). The substrate specificities include the enzymes which are specific for cAMP hydrolysis, those for cyclic GMP hydrolysis (Mehats et al. (biomedjournal.com)
  • There are very low levels of free zinc in plasma, since it is mostly bound to proteins such as albumin, alpha-2-macroglobulin (A2M), and transferrin. (frontiersin.org)
  • Zinc helps to enhance the interferon type 1 response to the virus and participates in many regulatory pathways. (frontiersin.org)
  • Co-immunoprecipitation, bacterial two-hybrid and pull-down analyses showed that PilH and PilG were able to interact with district subsets of proteins that potentially account for their regulatory impact. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Data show that approximately 60% of natriuretic peptide precursor type B (Nppb)-/- females developed mesenteric polyarteritis-nodosa (PAN)-like vasculitis in their life span, some as early as 4 months of age. (cusabio.com)
  • The protein kinase activity of these JNK isoforms was measured using the transcription factors ATF2, Elk-1 and members of the Jun family as substrates. (umassmed.edu)
  • Comparison of the binding activity of the JNK isoforms demonstrated that the JNK proteins differ in their interaction with ATF2, Elk-1 and Jun transcription factors. (umassmed.edu)
  • For instance, most labile zinc in the body is absorbed by intestinal epithelial cells via SLC39a4 protein, and excessive zinc is excreted through the kidneys, and the intestine via SLC39a5 ( 12 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • This recombinant protein was biotinylated in vivo by AviTag-BirA technology, which method is BriA catalyzes amide linkage between the biotin and the specific lysine of the AviTag. (cusabio.com)
  • Bacterial two-hybrid results showed that the Par-like proteins interact with each other and the chemotaxis system, and that ParP interacts with DipA, a phosphodiesterase which degrades cyclic-di-GMP and is important for biofilm dispersion and chemotaxis. (uwm.edu)
  • The hyperpermeability effect was prevented in mice with conditional, endothelial deletion of GC-A (EC GC-A KO) or with deleted caveolin-1 (cav-1), the caveolae scaffold protein. (uni-wuerzburg.de)
  • Like most bacteria, Xcc uses a variety of extracellular protein structures to interact with their surrounding environment and drives cellular movement. (biomedcentral.com)
  • These extracellular protein structures called flagella and pili contribute cellular movement in the form of 'swimming' and 'swarming', respectively. (biomedcentral.com)
  • In cytoplasm, zinc mostly binds zinc-chelating proteins called metallothioneins (MTs). (frontiersin.org)
  • Inverse to the reported increase in sensitivity caused by NO shortage, concentrating NO attenuated the cGMP response in a concentration-dependent manner. (rupress.org)
  • DNIC-thiosulfate (1-10 μM), in a concentration dependent manner, enhanced the electrical field stimulated [ 3 H] noradrenaline release. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Upon binding of dsDNA, cGAS produces a cyclic di-nucleotide molecule, cGAMP. (monash.edu)
  • Data suggest an overall depressed immunity in long-term type 1 DM. (indexindex.com)