Salts and esters of cyclamic acid.
A family of alicyclic hydrocarbons containing an amine group with the general formula R-C6H10NH2.
Flavoring agent and non-nutritive sweetener.
Flavoring agent sweeter than sugar, metabolized as PHENYLALANINE and ASPARTIC ACID.
Substances that sweeten food, beverages, medications, etc., such as sugar, saccharine or other low-calorie synthetic products. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)
A segment of the LOWER GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT that includes the CECUM; the COLON; and the RECTUM.

Taste qualities of solutions preferred by hamsters. (1/25)

Molecules of diverse chemical structure are sweet to humans and several lines of evidence (genetic, physiological, behavioral) suggest that there may be distinct sweet perceptual qualities. To address how many perceptual categories these molecules elicit in hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus), we studied patterns of generalization of conditioned taste aversions for seven sweeteners: 100 mM sucrose, 320 mM maltose, 32 mM D-phenylalanine, 3.2 mM sodium saccharin, 16 mM calcium cyclamate, 10 mM dulcin and 32 mM sodium m-nitrobenzene sulfonate. Each stimulus was preferred versus water in two-bottle intake tests and stimulated the chorda tympani nerve. For each of seven experimental groups the conditional stimulus (CS) was a sweetener and for the control group the CS was water. Apomorphine.HCl was injected i.p. after a CS was sampled and, after recovery, test stimuli (TS) were presented for 1 h daily. The intake (ml) of each TS consumed by experimental animals was compared with mean TS intake by the control group. Learned aversions for 18/21 stimulus pairs cross-generalized, resulting in a single cluster of generalization patterns for the seven stimuli. Cross-generalization failures (maltose-cyclamate, maltose-sucrose, cyclamate-NaNBS) may be the consequence of particular stimulus features (e.g. salience, cation taste), rather than the absence of a 'sucrose-like' quality. The results are consistent with a single hamster perceptual quality for a diverse set of chemical structures that are sweet to humans.  (+info)

Long-term toxicity and carcinogenicity study of cyclamate in nonhuman primates. (2/25)

Twenty-one monkeys (cynomolgus, rhesus, African green) were fed cyclamate (100 mg/kg and 500 mg/kg) in the diet five times per week from a few days after birth and continuing for up to 24 years. Malignant tumors were diagnosed in three 24-year-old cyclamate monkeys; these were metastatic colon carcinoma (rhesus; 500 mg/kg), metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma (cynomolgus; 500 mg/kg), and a small, well differentiated adenocarcinoma of the prostate (cynomolgus; 100 mg/kg). Benign tumors were found at necropsy in three females; these were adenoma of the thyroid gland (rhesus; 100 mg/kg) and two cases of leiomyoma of the uterus (rhesus; 100 mg/kg and 500 mg/kg). No tumors were detected in an age-matched control group of 16 monkeys. Examination of the testes revealed complete testicular atrophy in one of the old cyclamate monkeys, and focal germ cell aplasia (Sertoli-only tubules) in two other cyclamate monkeys. Focal spermatogenic interruption (maturation arrest) at various germ cell levels mixed with normal spermatogenesis was observed in both the cyclamate-treated and the control monkeys, all of which were over 20 years old. Measurements of terminal cyclohexylamine concentrations showed that three of the males dosed with cyclamate at 500 mg/kg were high converters, with plasma concentrations comparable to the levels that produce testicular atrophy in rats. However, only one of the three high converters showed histologic evidence of irregular spermatogenesis. The overall conclusion is that the testicular abnormalities and the sporadic cases of different malignancies found after more than 20 years of dosing do not provide clear evidence of a toxic or carcinogenic effect of sodium cyclamate in monkeys.  (+info)

Pseudo-streaming potentials in Necturus gallbladder epithelium. I. Paracellular origin of the transepithelial voltage changes. (3/25)

Apparent streaming potentials were elicited across Necturus gallbladder epithelium by addition or removal of sucrose from the apical bathing solution. In NaCl Ringer's solution, the transepithelial voltage (Vms) change (reference, basolateral solution) was positive with sucrose addition and negative with sucrose removal. Bilateral Cl- removal (cyclamate replacement) had no effect on the polarity or magnitude of the Vms change elicited by addition of 100 mM sucrose. In contrast, bilateral Na+ removal (tetramethylammonium [TMA+] replacement) inverted the Vms change (from 2.7 +/- 0.3 to -3.2 +/- 0.2 mV). Replacement of Na+ and Cl- with TMA+ and cyclamate, respectively, abolished the change in Vms. Measurements of cell membrane voltages and relative resistances during osmotic challenges indicate that changes in cell membrane parameters do not explain the transepithelial voltage changes. The initial changes in Vms were slower than expected from concomitant estimates of the time course of sucrose concentration (and hence osmolality) at the membrane surface. Paired recordings of the time courses of paracellular bi-ionic potentials (partial substitution of apical Na+ with tetrabutylammonium [TBA+]) revealed much faster time courses than those produced by sucrose addition, although the diffusion coefficients of sucrose and TBACl are similar. Hyperosmotic and hypoosmotic challenges yielded initial Vms changes at the same rate; thereafter, the voltage increased with hypoosmotic solution and decreased with hyperosmotic solution. These late voltage changes appear to result from changes in width of the lateral intercellular spaces. The early time courses of the Vms changes produced by osmotic challenge are inconsistent with the expectations for water-ion flux coupling in the junctions. We propose that they are pseudo-streaming potentials, i.e., junctional diffusion potentials caused by salt concentration changes in the lateral intercellular spaces secondary to osmotic water flow.  (+info)

Different functional roles of T1R subunits in the heteromeric taste receptors. (4/25)

The T1R receptors, a family of taste-specific class C G protein-coupled receptors, mediate mammalian sweet and umami tastes. The structure-function relationships of T1R receptors remain largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate the different functional roles of T1R extracellular and transmembrane domains in ligand recognition and G protein coupling. Similar to other family C G protein-coupled receptors, the N-terminal Venus flytrap domain of T1R2 is required for recognizing sweeteners, such as aspartame and neotame. The G protein coupling requires the transmembrane domain of T1R2. Surprisingly, the C-terminal transmembrane domain of T1R3 is required for recognizing sweetener cyclamate and sweet taste inhibitor lactisole. Because T1R3 is the common subunit in the sweet taste receptor and the umami taste receptor, we tested the interaction of lactisole and cyclamate with the umami taste receptor. Lactisole inhibits the activity of the human T1R1/T1R3 receptor, and, as predicted, blocked the umami taste of l-glutamate in human taste tests. Cyclamate does not activate the T1R1/T1R3 receptor by itself, but potentiates the receptor's response to l-glutamate. Taken together, these findings demonstrate the different functional roles of T1R3 and T1R2 and the presence of multiple ligand binding sites on the sweet taste receptor.  (+info)

Artificial sweeteners--do they bear a carcinogenic risk? (5/25)

Artificial sweeteners are added to a wide variety of food, drinks, drugs and hygiene products. Since their introduction, the mass media have reported about potential cancer risks, which has contributed to undermine the public's sense of security. It can be assumed that every citizen of Western countries uses artificial sweeteners, knowingly or not. A cancer-inducing activity of one of these substances would mean a health risk to an entire population. We performed several PubMed searches of the National Library of Medicine for articles in English about artificial sweeteners. These articles included 'first generation' sweeteners such as saccharin, cyclamate and aspartame, as well as 'new generation' sweeteners such as acesulfame-K, sucralose, alitame and neotame. Epidemiological studies in humans did not find the bladder cancer-inducing effects of saccharin and cyclamate that had been reported from animal studies in rats. Despite some rather unscientific assumptions, there is no evidence that aspartame is carcinogenic. Case-control studies showed an elevated relative risk of 1.3 for heavy artificial sweetener use (no specific substances specified) of >1.7 g/day. For new generation sweeteners, it is too early to establish any epidemiological evidence about possible carcinogenic risks. As many artificial sweeteners are combined in today's products, the carcinogenic risk of a single substance is difficult to assess. However, according to the current literature, the possible risk of artificial sweeteners to induce cancer seems to be negligible.  (+info)

Identification of the cyclamate interaction site within the transmembrane domain of the human sweet taste receptor subunit T1R3. (6/25)

The artificial sweetener cyclamate tastes sweet to humans, but not to mice. When expressed in vitro, the human sweet receptor (a heterodimer of two taste receptor subunits: hT1R2 + hT1R3) responds to cyclamate, but the mouse receptor (mT1R2 + mT1R3) does not. Using mixed-species pairings of human and mouse sweet receptor subunits, we determined that responsiveness to cyclamate requires the human form of T1R3. Using chimeras, we determined that it is the transmembrane domain of hT1R3 that is required for the sweet receptor to respond to cyclamate. Using directed mutagenesis, we identified several amino acid residues within the transmembrane domain of T1R3 that determine differential responsiveness to cyclamate of the human versus mouse sweet receptors. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis of residues predicted to line a transmembrane domain binding pocket in hT1R3 identified six residues specifically involved in responsiveness to cyclamate. Using molecular modeling, we docked cyclamate within the transmembrane domain of T1R3. Our model predicts substantial overlap in the hT1R3 binding pockets for the agonist cyclamate and the inverse agonist lactisole. The transmembrane domain of T1R3 is likely to play a critical role in the interconversion of the sweet receptor from the ground state to the active state.  (+info)

Electrophysiological effects of extracellular ATP on Necturus gallbladder epithelium. (7/25)

The effects of addition of ATP to the mucosal bathing solution on transepithelial, apical, and basolateral membrane voltages and resistances in Necturus gallbladder epithelium were determined. Mucosal ATP (100 microM) caused a rapid hyperpolarization of both apical (Vmc) and basolateral (Vcs) cell membrane voltages (delta Vm = 18 +/- 1 mV), a fall in transepithelial resistance (Rt) from 142 +/- 8 to 122 +/- 7 omega.cm2, and a decrease in fractional apical membrane resistance (fRa) from 0.93 +/- 0.02 to 0.83 +/- 0.03. The rapid initial hyperpolarization of Vmc and Vcs was followed by a slower depolarization of cell membrane voltages and a lumen-negative change in transepithelial voltage (Vms). This phase also included an additional decrease in fRa. Removal of the ATP caused a further depolarization of membrane voltages followed by a hyperpolarization and then a return to control values. fRa fell to a minimum after removal of ATP and then returned to control values as the cell membrane voltages repolarized. Similar responses could be elicited by ADP but not by adenosine. The results of two-point cable experiments revealed that ATP induced an initial increase in cell membrane conductance followed by a decrease. Transient elevations of mucosal solution [K+] induced a larger depolarization of Vmc and Vcs during exposure to ATP than under control conditions. Reduction of mucosal solution [Cl-] induced a slow hyperpolarization of Vmc and Vcs before exposure to ATP and a rapid depolarization during exposure to ATP. We conclude that ATP4- is the active agent and that it causes a concentration-dependent increase in apical and basolateral membrane K+ permeability. In addition, an apical membrane electrodiffusive Cl- permeability is activated by ATP4-.  (+info)

Potential carcinogenicity of food additives and contaminants. (8/25)

The potential role in carcinogenesis of food additives and contaminants presents a complex problem in terms of assessing the risk to the general public. Long-term testing in laboratory animals is still the most feasible method for determining potential carcinogenicity of various chemicals. The disadvantages encountered in the present methods of animal testing are discussed and a review is made of the current status of particular food additives and contaminants under scrutiny as possible carcinogens. It is suggested that, since it may not be possible to remove all carcinogenic materials from the environment, methods to mitigate or neutralize their harmful effects should be sought. Greater cooperation is called for among food technologists, toxicologists, laboratory researchers, and epidemiologists in the decision-making process regarding the role of possibly carcinogenic additives and contaminants.  (+info)

Cyclamates are a type of artificial sweetener that were widely used in food and beverages as a sugar substitute until they were banned by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1970. They are synthetic derivatives of cyclamic acid, which is a naturally occurring compound found in some plants.

Cyclamates are approximately 30-50 times sweeter than sugar, making them an attractive alternative for people looking to reduce their calorie intake. However, studies conducted in the 1960s suggested that cyclamates may be associated with an increased risk of bladder cancer in rats, leading to their ban in the United States and several other countries.

While some countries still allow the use of cyclamates in certain food products, they remain a controversial ingredient due to ongoing concerns about their safety. The European Union has classified cyclamates as a category IV sweetener, which means that they are considered safe for human consumption in limited quantities, but their use is restricted to specific applications and maximum levels have been established.

Cyclohexylamines are a class of organic compounds that consist of a cyclohexane ring (a six-carbon saturated ring) with an amine group (-NH2, -NHR, or -NR2) attached to it. The amine group can be primary (one alkyl group attached to the nitrogen atom), secondary (two alkyl groups attached to the nitrogen atom), or tertiary (three alkyl groups attached to the nitrogen atom).

Cyclohexylamines have a wide range of applications in the chemical industry, including as intermediates in the synthesis of pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and dyes. Some cyclohexylamines are also used as solvents or extractants. However, some cyclohexylamines can be toxic or have harmful effects on human health, so they must be handled with care.

Saccharin is not a medical term, but it is a chemical compound that is widely used as an artificial sweetener. Medically speaking, saccharin is classified as an intense sugar substitute, meaning it is many times sweeter than sucrose (table sugar) but contributes little to no calories when added to food or drink.

Saccharin is often used by people with diabetes or those who are trying to reduce their calorie intake. It has been in use for over a century and has undergone extensive safety testing. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has classified saccharin as generally recognized as safe (GRAS), although it once required a warning label due to concerns about bladder cancer. However, subsequent research has largely dismissed this risk for most people, and the warning label is no longer required.

It's important to note that while saccharin and other artificial sweeteners can be helpful for some individuals, they should not be used as a replacement for a balanced diet and regular exercise. Additionally, excessive consumption of these sugar substitutes may have negative health consequences, such as altering gut bacteria or contributing to metabolic disorders.

Aspartame is a synthetic, low-calorie sweetener that is commonly used as a sugar substitute in foods and beverages. It is composed of two amino acids, aspartic acid and phenylalanine, and a methanol molecule. Aspartame is approximately 200 times sweeter than sugar, so only a small amount is needed to provide the same level of sweetness.

In the body, aspartame is broken down into its component parts during digestion. The aspartic acid and phenylalanine are absorbed and used for normal bodily functions, while the methanol is converted into formaldehyde and then formic acid, which are eliminated from the body.

Aspartame is approved for use in foods and beverages by many health authorities, including the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). However, it has been the subject of some controversy, with some studies suggesting that it may be associated with health problems such as headaches, dizziness, and seizures. These claims have not been consistently supported by scientific research, and the FDA and EFSA consider aspartame to be safe for the general population when used in moderation.

It is important to note that people with a rare genetic disorder called phenylketonuria (PKU) must avoid aspartame because they are unable to metabolize phenylalanine, which can build up to toxic levels in their bodies. Foods and beverages containing aspartame must carry a warning label indicating its presence for this reason.

Sweetening agents are substances that are added to foods or drinks to give them a sweet taste. They can be natural, like sugar (sucrose), honey, and maple syrup, or artificial, like saccharin, aspartame, and sucralose. Artificial sweeteners are often used by people who want to reduce their calorie intake or control their blood sugar levels. However, it's important to note that some sweetening agents may have potential health concerns when consumed in large amounts.

The large intestine, also known as the colon, is the lower part of the gastrointestinal tract that extends from the cecum, where it joins the small intestine, to the anus. It is called "large" because it has a larger diameter compared to the small intestine and is responsible for several important functions in the digestive process.

The large intestine measures about 1.5 meters (5 feet) long in adults and consists of four main regions: the ascending colon, transverse colon, descending colon, and sigmoid colon. The primary function of the large intestine is to absorb water and electrolytes from undigested food materials, compact the remaining waste into feces, and store it until it is eliminated through defecation.

The large intestine also contains a diverse population of bacteria that aid in digestion by breaking down complex carbohydrates, producing vitamins like vitamin K and some B vitamins, and competing with harmful microorganisms to maintain a healthy balance within the gut. Additionally, the large intestine plays a role in immune function and helps protect the body from pathogens through the production of mucus, antimicrobial substances, and the activation of immune cells.

Cyclamates and its salts (such as calcium cyclamate, sodium cyclamate, magnesium cyclamate, and potassium cyclamate) are ... FAP 2A3672 Cyclamate (cyclamic acid, calcium cyclamate, and sodium cyclamate) Weihrauch MR, Diehl V (2004). "Artificial ... Cyclamate is approved as a sweetener in at least 130 countries. In the late 1960s, cyclamate was banned in the United Kingdom; ... As cyclamate is stable to heat, it was and is marketed as suitable for use in cooking and baking.[citation needed] In 1966, a ...
Other names in common use include cyclamate sulfamatase, cyclamate sulfamidase, and cyclohexylsulfamate sulfamidase. This ... In enzymology, a cyclamate sulfohydrolase (EC 3.10.1.2) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction cyclohexylsulfamate ... Nimura T, Tokieda T, Yamaha T (February 1974). "Partial purification and some properties of cyclamate sulfamatase". J. Biochem ...
Nevertheless, cyclamate remains banned in the US. Recently, two other sweeteners have been used with increasing frequency: ... In 1970, the Food and Drug Administration banned cyclamates in the United States based on the results of a study which found ... Per the Delaney amendment, the FDA immediately announced a ban on cyclamate in food and drink products, to take effect in 1970 ... All of the above products were originally sweetened with cyclamates and saccharin, which soon proved disastrous. In 1969, an ...
According to The Tennessean, he also did "pioneering research into the harmful effects of cyclamates on animals which were ... He researched cholesterol, oral contraceptives and cyclamates. He is the namesake of John Mallette Drive in Nashville, ...
Cyclamate is prohibited from being used as a sweetener within the United States, but is allowed in other parts of the world. ... In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration banned the sale of cyclamate in 1969 after lab tests in rats involving a ... "Worldwide status of cyclamate". Calorie Control Council. Archived from the original on 21 April 2021. Retrieved 10 January 2018 ... In Canada, cyclamate is used. Stein, Anne (11 May 2011). "Artificial sweeteners. What's the difference?". Chicago Tribune. ...
Kaufman, Leslie (August 21, 1999). "Michael Sveda, the Inventor Of Cyclamates, Dies at 87". Nobel The New York Times. Retrieved ...
At certain times it was sweetened with cyclamates and saccharin. At one point the directions instructed children to add sugar ...
The mix was sweetened with calcium cyclamate. Cyclamates and their salts (including calcium cyclamate and sodium cyclamate) ... Carlos Vincent Domingues; Alex Leybelman; Julie M. Fagan (2014). FDA's Persistent Ban on the Artificial Sweetener Cyclamate ( ... were banned in the United States in 1970; Calcium cyclamate was briefly replaced by saccharin, which proved unpopular, after ...
Chewable tablets: cyclamate, vanillin, fersip, aromatica, excip. pro compr. Drops: conserv.: E217, E219; sucrose, vanillin, ...
The original formula was sweetened with cyclamate and saccharin. After cyclamate was banned in 1969, it was removed from the ...
However, by that time some animal studies had shown that very high doses of cyclamates, at levels of humans ingesting 350 cans ... In October 1970, a year after Ley left, the FDA banned cyclamate completely from all food and drug products in the United ... Ley met tremendous opposition from Upjohn.: 17-19 The highest profile issue that Ley had to confront was sodium cyclamate. An ... By 1969 annual sales of cyclamate had reached $1 billion. ... in connection with the banning of cyclamates because he did ...
... was originally sweetened with cyclamates which were banned by the FDA in 1969. They were replaced with saccharin and in ...
Benzoate and cyclamate were commonly used as food additives in Indonesia. Other substances found in the samples, such as borax ... Other food contaminants found by Depok Health agency in elementary schools in 2006 were sodium benzoate, cyclamate and borax ...
It was initially sweetened with a mixture of cyclamate and saccharin. After the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a ban ... Studies on laboratory rats during the early 1970s linked high volumes of cyclamate and saccharin with the development of ... on cyclamate in 1969, sodium saccharin was used as the beverage's primary sweetener. ...
In Canada, yellow packets are also associated with SugarTwin's cyclamate sweetener. Merck Index, 11th Edition, 8854. Anonymous ...
This, coupled with the Food and Drug Administration's ban of cyclamate sweeteners from all U.S. food and drug products in ... Initially it came only in ginger ale, sweetened with sodium cyclamate. Later, root beer and black cherry were added, the latter ...
Reaction with cyclohexylamine followed by addition of NaOH gives C6H11NHSO3Na, sodium cyclamate. Related compounds are also ...
... as cyclamate was found being used. As the dried plum using candyleaf was developed in 1981 by such confectionaries as Uema ...
Saccharin, cyclamate, aspartame, acesulfame potassium, sucralose, alitame, and neotame are commonly used.[citation needed] A ...
... sodium cyclamate, polydextrose, maltitol and lactitol. It is the exclusive South African agent of Nutrasweet's aspartame and ...
A 10:1 cyclamate-saccharin blend is common in countries where both these sweeteners are legal; in this blend, each sweetener ... Aspartame Neotame Saccharose Sodium cyclamate Steviol glycoside Sugar substitute Sucralose Xylitol Phthalimide "Saccharin". ...
... where it contains cyclamate instead). When introduced in 1958 in the United States, Sweet'n Low was cyclamate-based, but it was ... Health Canada does not allow food manufacturers to sell foods or beverages that contain cyclamate. "The Bittersweet History of ... "Comparing Sugar Substitutes", HealthLink BC website, 2023-01-18, archived from the original on 2023-03-21, Cyclamate (Sucaryl, ... markets cyclamate-based Sweet 'n Low as a sugar substitute. "Our Products", Sweet'n Low website, archived from the original on ...
"Quantitative hydrolysis of sodium cyclamate and calcium cyclamate to cyclohexylamine, followed by colorimetric analysis". ... The sodium and calcium salts of cyclamic acid are used as artificial sweeteners under the name cyclamate. Johnson, Darryl E; ...
Cyclamate a man-made chemical used instead of sugar in low calorie foods and drinks. Banned in the US (due to concerns about ...
After cyclamate was declared safe for consumption in the mid-1950s, the Hermes Company announced their new product, Assugrin, ... Cyclamate sugar substitute was discovered in 1937 by two American chemists and tested over the subsequent twenty years. ... Assugrin is a brand name for a sugar substitute that is a blend of cyclamate and saccharin. Produced in Switzerland by MCM ... More than a decade later, in 1965, Hermes company came up with a mixture of saccharin and cyclamate. It was later introduced to ...
... Blue contains 14 grams of lactose and artificial sweeteners (cyclamate, acesulfame K) instead of refined sugar. This ...
When cyclamate was banned, Sweet* 10 and Funny Face were eliminated, resulting in a $4.5 million loss. Both products were re- ... In the 1960s, Pillsbury added Sweet* 10 made with cyclamate, which became the most popular artificial sweetener. In 1964, ...
Bars All Cyclamates After Sept. 1", Pittsburgh Press, August 14, 1970, p1 "Cyclamates: House Report Charges Administrative ... Puerto Rico had enacted a no-fault plan in 1969 All diet foods and drinks with sodium cyclamate as an artificial sweetener were ... Bottles and cans of Cyclamate-sweeted diet soft drinks had been banned since January 1, but the sweeteners were still used in ... The United States Food and Drug Administration gave retailers 18 days to sell or remove their remaining stock of the cyclamate- ...
Other sweeteners were substituted in 1970, when the federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA) banned cyclamate as a potential ... the researchers added lemon juice and cyclamate to the original formula of water, salt, sodium citrate, fructose and ...
... cyclamate and saccharin reach their maximum sweetness at 11.6 SE%, 11.3 SE% and 9 SE%, respectively. Neotame is a high-potency ...
Cyclamates and its salts (such as calcium cyclamate, sodium cyclamate, magnesium cyclamate, and potassium cyclamate) are ... FAP 2A3672 Cyclamate (cyclamic acid, calcium cyclamate, and sodium cyclamate) Weihrauch MR, Diehl V (2004). "Artificial ... Cyclamate is approved as a sweetener in at least 130 countries. In the late 1960s, cyclamate was banned in the United Kingdom; ... As cyclamate is stable to heat, it was and is marketed as suitable for use in cooking and baking.[citation needed] In 1966, a ...
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Cyclamate ByFRANCES HUNT. , BARBARA A. BOPP. , PAUL PRICE. Abstract chapter 8. ,. 16 pages. Neohesperidin Dihydrochalcone By ...
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Artificial sweeteners: aspartame, cyclamates, sucralose, acesulfame potassium, saccharin, etc.. Natural sugar substitutes, such ...
E.01.001 - PART E - Cyclamate Sweeteners * E.01.002 - Sale *E.01.003 - Advertising ...
E.01.001 - PART E - Cyclamate Sweeteners * E.01.002 - Sale *E.01.003 - Advertising ...
Update 01/18/05 sighmoan notes that the artificial sweetener used was cyclamate, not saccharine. Cyclamate was banned in the U. ... The drinks popularity further waned upon news that cyclamate was possibly carcinogenic, at least in lab rats. Tab is still ... Tab became a hit among dieters, although not everyone liked the aftertaste from the artificial sweetener (cyclamate) used. ...
Artificial sweeteners, such as aspartame, saccharin, sodium cyclamate, and sucralose. *Benzoic acid in fruit juices ...
cyclamate. any of a number of very sweet substances derived from petrochemicals.. ...
Calcium cyclamate artificial sweetener (952). Acesulfame potassium artificial sweetener (950). Possibly/probably additive-laden ...
E.01.001 - PART E - Cyclamate Sweeteners * E.01.002 - Sale *E.01.003 - Advertising ...
Cyclamate caused chromosomal breaks in sperm of rats and bladder tumors, also in rats. But there is one exception: the plant- ... acesulfame-k, artificial sweeteners, aspartame, breast cancer, cancer, cancer risk, cyclamate, monk fruit, stevia, sucralose ... No increase of cancer risk with the use of sucralose, cyclamates, saccharin, steviol glycosides (stevia), and salt of aspartame ... These other sweeteners were: Advantame, Cyclamate, Neotame (brand name Newtame), Saccharin (SweetN Low or Sweet Twin) and ...
Butylated-hydroxyanisol (25013165), butylated-hydroxytoluene (128370), D(+)tryptophan (153946), sodium-cyclamate (139059) and ...
... cyclamate, aspartame, and sucralose. Sweet Stuff discusses sweeteners in the context of diet, science and technology, business ...
... cyclamates) 076 nutra sweet/saccharin 076 saccharin/nutrasweet 077 low-cal salad dressing 077 salad dressing, low-cal 078 ... cyclamates) 023 artificially sweetened drinks diet colas 002 bacon 034 baked foods 150 balanced diet 082 barbecue foods 112 ...
Sodium Cyclamate is the sodium salt of cyclamic acid and it is an artificial sweetener that is 30-50 times sweeter than sucrose ...
E.01.001 - PART E - Cyclamate Sweeteners * E.01.002 - Sale *E.01.003 - Advertising ...
result sql = Cyclamate. Cyclamate 9. char = s;code = 115. char = a;code = 97. char = c;code = 99. char = c;code = 99. char = h; ...
Cyclamates. MANNITOL/SORBITOL. The present invention provides a sweetener composition and methods for improving the taste of a ... cyclamate, sucralose, saccharin or Acesulfame-K, with polyols such as maltitol, sorbitol, mannitol, erythritol, xylitol, ...
Cyclamates. *Essences. *FD&C Blue No. 1. *FD&C Blue No. 2 ...
Sodium Cyclamate. Stearic Acid. Taurin. Titanium Dioxide FG. TEA-Triethanolamine. Vanillin. Vaseline. White Oil Grade A. Xantan ...
  • the mixture of 10 parts cyclamate to 1 part saccharin is common and masks the off-tastes of both sweeteners. (wikipedia.org)
  • Further research resulted in a 1969 study that found the common 10:1 cyclamate-saccharin mixture increased the incidence of bladder cancer in rats. (wikipedia.org)
  • The released study was showing that eight out of 240 rats fed a mixture of saccharin and cyclamates, at levels equivalent to humans ingesting 550 cans of diet soda per day, developed bladder tumors. (wikipedia.org)
  • These other sweeteners were: Advantame, Cyclamate, Neotame (brand name Newtame), Saccharin (Sweet'N Low or Sweet Twin) and Sucralose (Splenda). (nethealthbook.com)
  • Butylated-hydroxyanisol (25013165), butylated-hydroxytoluene (128370), D(+)tryptophan (153946), sodium-cyclamate (139059) and sodium-saccharin (128449) produced weak responses. (cdc.gov)
  • Saccharose, artificial sweeteners: sodium cyclamate, acesulfame K. (bevandeistantanee.it)
  • Sodium cyclamate and sodum saccharinate based sweetener.Ristora sweeteners are available in a range of packagings to meet consumers' needs. (bevandeistantanee.it)
  • Cyclamate is an artificial sweetener. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cyclamate was marketed in tablet form for use by diabetics as an alternative tabletop sweetener, as well as in a liquid form. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cyclamate is approved as a sweetener in at least 130 countries. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] In 1966, a study reported that some intestinal bacteria could desulfonate cyclamate to produce cyclohexylamine, a compound suspected to have some chronic toxicity in animals. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1996). For example, chlorophenol red selectively reacts with chlorine dioxide at pH 7 with a detection limit of 0.12 mg/L. The interferences from chlorine may be reduced by the addition of oxalic acid, sodium cyclamate, or thioacetamide (Sweetin et al. (cdc.gov)
  • Although the FDA has stated that a review of all available evidence does not implicate cyclamate as a carcinogen in mice or rats, cyclamate remains banned from food products in the United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cyclamate caused chromosomal breaks in sperm of rats and bladder tumors, also in rats. (nethealthbook.com)
  • Prior to 1973, Abbott Laboratories produced sodium cyclamate (Sucaryl) by a mixture of ingredients including the addition of pure sodium (flakes or rods suspended in solvent) with cyclohexylamine, chilled and filtered through a high speed centrifugal separator, dried, granulated and micro-pulverised for powder or tablet usage. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sales continued to expand, and in 1969, annual sales of cyclamate had reached $1 billion, which increased pressure from public safety watchdogs to restrict the usage of cyclamate. (wikipedia.org)
  • Structures of artificial sweeteners--cyclamic acid and sodium cyclamate with other cyclamates. (nih.gov)
  • Contains no aspartame, saccharine or cyclamates. (solal.co.za)