Cyanates: Organic salts of cyanic acid containing the -OCN radical.Carbon-Nitrogen Lyases: Enzymes that catalyze the cleavage of a carbon-nitrogen bond by means other than hydrolysis or oxidation. Subclasses are the AMMONIA-LYASES, the AMIDINE-LYASES, the amine-lyases, and other carbon-nitrogen lyases. EC 4.3.EstersThiocyanates: Organic derivatives of thiocyanic acid which contain the general formula R-SCN.AminohydrolasesCholesterol Esters: Fatty acid esters of cholesterol which constitute about two-thirds of the cholesterol in the plasma. The accumulation of cholesterol esters in the arterial intima is a characteristic feature of atherosclerosis.Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes: A species of gram-negative bacteria in the genus PSEUDOMONAS. All strains can utilize FRUCTOSE for energy. It is occasionally isolated from humans and some strains are pathogenic to WATERMELON.Carbamates: Derivatives of carbamic acid, H2NC(=O)OH. Included under this heading are N-substituted and O-substituted carbamic acids. In general carbamate esters are referred to as urethanes, and polymers that include repeating units of carbamate are referred to as POLYURETHANES. Note however that polyurethanes are derived from the polymerization of ISOCYANATES and the singular term URETHANE refers to the ethyl ester of carbamic acid.Citraconic Anhydrides: Methylmaleic anhydrides.IsocitratesPrintingInkWriting: The act or practice of literary composition, the occupation of writer, or producing or engaging in literary work as a profession.Polymers: Compounds formed by the joining of smaller, usually repeating, units linked by covalent bonds. These compounds often form large macromolecules (e.g., BIOPOLYMERS; PLASTICS).Water: A clear, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for most animal and plant life and is an excellent solvent for many substances. The chemical formula is hydrogen oxide (H2O). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Awards and PrizesResins, Plant: Flammable, amorphous, vegetable products of secretion or disintegration, usually formed in special cavities of plants. They are generally insoluble in water and soluble in alcohol, carbon tetrachloride, ether, or volatile oils. They are fusible and have a conchoidal fracture. They are the oxidation or polymerization products of the terpenes, and are mixtures of aromatic acids and esters. Most are soft and sticky, but harden after exposure to cold. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed & Dorland, 28th ed)Composite Resins: Synthetic resins, containing an inert filler, that are widely used in dentistry.Plant Transpiration: The loss of water vapor by plants to the atmosphere. It occurs mainly from the leaves through pores (stomata) whose primary function is gas exchange. The water is replaced by a continuous column of water moving upwards from the roots within the xylem vessels. (Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Shaw Potassium Channels: A shaker subfamily that is prominently expressed in NEURONS and are necessary for high-frequency, repetitive firing of ACTION POTENTIALS.Amyloidogenic Proteins: Proteins that form the core of amyloid fibrils. For example, the core of amyloid A is formed from amyloid A protein, also known as serum amyloid A protein or SAA protein.Solvents: Liquids that dissolve other substances (solutes), generally solids, without any change in chemical composition, as, water containing sugar. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Phenol: An antiseptic and disinfectant aromatic alcohol.Piperonyl Butoxide: An insecticide synergist, especially for pyrethroids and ROTENONE.Temperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.Cyclization: Changing an open-chain hydrocarbon to a closed ring. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed)Aminophenols: Phenols substituted in any position by an amino group.Cryogels: Macroporous hydrogels that are produced at subzero temperatures. Cryogels have pores that are produced by growing ice crystals and have been developed with a tissue-like elasticity that is suitable for cell immunization experiments.Patents as Topic: Exclusive legal rights or privileges applied to inventions, plants, etc.Calorimetry, Differential Scanning: Differential thermal analysis in which the sample compartment of the apparatus is a differential calorimeter, allowing an exact measure of the heat of transition independent of the specific heat, thermal conductivity, and other variables of the sample.Transition Temperature: The temperature at which a substance changes from one state or conformation of matter to another.Alloys: A mixture of metallic elements or compounds with other metallic or metalloid elements in varying proportions.Hot Temperature: Presence of warmth or heat or a temperature notably higher than an accustomed norm.Electronic Mail: Messages between computer users via COMPUTER COMMUNICATION NETWORKS. This feature duplicates most of the features of paper mail, such as forwarding, multiple copies, and attachments of images and other file types, but with a speed advantage. The term also refers to an individual message sent in this way.Polychlorinated Biphenyls: Industrial products consisting of a mixture of chlorinated biphenyl congeners and isomers. These compounds are highly lipophilic and tend to accumulate in fat stores of animals. Many of these compounds are considered toxic and potential environmental pollutants.Postal Service: The functions and activities carried out by the U.S. Postal Service, foreign postal services, and private postal services such as Federal Express.Candicidin: Mixture of antifungal heptaene macrolides from Streptomyces griseus or Actinomyces levoris used topically in candidiasis. The antibiotic complex is composed of candicidins A, B, C, and D, of which D is the major component.Fosfomycin: An antibiotic produced by Streptomyces fradiae.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Office Automation: Use of computers or computer systems for doing routine clerical work, e.g., billing, records pertaining to the administration of the office, etc.ImidesPolyphenols: A large class of organic compounds having more than one PHENOL group.Anhydrides: Chemical compounds derived from acids by the elimination of a molecule of water.Dicarboxylic AcidsPhthalic Anhydrides: Phthalic acid anhydrides. Can be substituted on any carbon atom. Used extensively in industry and as a reagent in the acylation of amino- and hydroxyl groups.Phenols: Benzene derivatives that include one or more hydroxyl groups attached to the ring structure.Maleic Anhydrides: Used in copolymerization reactions, in the Diels-Alder(diene)synthesis, in the preparation of resins, pharmaceuticals and agricultural chemicals. It is a powerful irritant and causes burns.Gene Library: A large collection of DNA fragments cloned (CLONING, MOLECULAR) from a given organism, tissue, organ, or cell type. It may contain complete genomic sequences (GENOMIC LIBRARY) or complementary DNA sequences, the latter being formed from messenger RNA and lacking intron sequences.United StatesLibraries, MedicalLibraries: Collections of systematically acquired and organized information resources, and usually providing assistance to users. (ERIC Thesaurus, http://www.eric.ed.gov/ accessed 2/1/2008)Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Journal Impact Factor: A quantitative measure of the frequency on average with which articles in a journal have been cited in a given period of time.
  • The second portion of the thesis focused on cyanate ester or polycyanurate networks generated from dicyanate monomers. (vt.edu)
  • Nitrate esters , such as nitroglycerin , are known for their explosive properties, while polyesters are important plastics , with monomers linked by ester moieties . (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, if the acid is acetic acid , the ester is called an acetate. (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • The name ester is derived from the German Es sig-Ä ther , an old name for acetic acid ethyl ester ( ethyl acetate ). (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • Esters derived from the simplest carboxylic acids are commonly named according to the more traditional, so-called " trivial names " e.g. as formate, acetate, propionate, and butyrate, as opposed to the IUPAC nomenclature methanoate, ethanoate, propanoate and butanoate. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, by introducing an aryl ether bond, para or meta, to the cyanate group, wide highly desirable processing windows were demonstrated. (vt.edu)
  • For esters derived from the simplest carboxylic acids, the traditional names are recommended by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC), . (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • This property makes them very useful in organic analytical chemistry: unknown organic acids with low volatility can often be esterified into a volatile ester, which can then be analyzed using gas chromatography, gas liquid chromatography, or mass spectrometry . (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • I want to get the latest chemistry news from C&EN in my inbox every week. (acs.org)
  • 2,4,5-Trichlorophenoxy)-acetic acid 2-butoxyethyl ester (CAS 2545-59-7) Market Research Report 2019 aims at providing comprehensive data on (2,4,5-trichlorophenoxy)-acetic acid 2-butoxyethyl ester market globally and regionally (Europe, Asia, North America, Latin America etc. (marketpublishers.com)
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  • relating to acetyl, the ester of acetic acid. (absp.org.uk)
  • It was demonstrated that electron withdrawing characteristics, such as carbonyl, sulfone, or phenylphosphine oxide increased the reactivity of the cyanate group above the melting point of the monomer. (vt.edu)
  • Ester names are derived from the parent alcohol and the parent acid, where the latter may be organic or inorganic. (wikipedia.org)
  • Use of this fact is made in cyanide decontamination processes where oxidants such as permanganate and hydrogen peroxide are used to convert toxic cyanide to safer cyanate. (wikipedia.org)
  • The protective effect of melatonin has been documented also against other toxic substances that elicit increased oxidative potential, such as ammonia (Lena & Subramanian, 2003), cyanate (Melchiori et al. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The cyanate ion is an ambidentate ligand, forming complexes with a metal ion in which either the nitrogen or oxygen atom may be the electron-pair donor. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cyanate is an ambidentate ligand which can donate the pair of electrons on the nitrogen atom or the oxygen atom, or both. (wikipedia.org)