A course of study offered by an educational institution.
The period of medical education in a medical school. In the United States it follows the baccalaureate degree and precedes the granting of the M.D.
Instructional use of examples or cases to teach using problem-solving skills and critical thinking.
Use for general articles concerning medical education.
The educational process of instructing.
Theoretical models which propose methods of learning or teaching as a basis or adjunct to changes in attitude or behavior. These educational interventions are usually applied in the fields of health and patient education but are not restricted to patient care.
Use for articles concerning dental education in general.
Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of medicine.
The assessing of academic or educational achievement. It includes all aspects of testing and test construction.
Individuals enrolled in a school of medicine or a formal educational program in medicine.
The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.
Educational programs designed to ensure that students attain prespecified levels of competence in a given field or training activity. Emphasis is on achievement or specified objectives.
Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of dentistry.
Programs of training in medicine and medical specialties offered by hospitals for graduates of medicine to meet the requirements established by accrediting authorities.
The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).
Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.
Formal instruction, learning, or training in the preparation, dispensing, and proper utilization of drugs in the field of medicine.
A self-learning technique, usually online, involving interaction of the student with programmed instructional materials.
Undergraduate education programs for second- , third- , and fourth-year students in health sciences in which the students receive clinical training and experience in teaching hospitals or affiliated health centers.
A branch of biology dealing with the structure of organisms.
Individuals enrolled a school of dentistry or a formal educational program in leading to a degree in dentistry.
Individuals enrolled in a school of pharmacy or a formal educational program leading to a degree in pharmacy.
Educational programs for medical graduates entering a specialty. They include formal specialty training as well as academic work in the clinical and basic medical sciences, and may lead to board certification or an advanced medical degree.
The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in an educational institution.
The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a medical school.
Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of pharmacy.
The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a dental school.
The capability to perform the duties of one's profession generally, or to perform a particular professional task, with skill of an acceptable quality.
The biological science concerned with the life-supporting properties, functions, and processes of living organisms or their parts.
Use for general articles concerning nursing education.
Instruction in which learners progress at their own rate using workbooks, textbooks, or electromechanical devices that provide information in discrete steps, test learning at each step, and provide immediate feedback about achievement. (ERIC, Thesaurus of ERIC Descriptors, 1996).
The study of NUTRITION PROCESSES as well as the components of food, their actions, interaction, and balance in relation to health and disease.
Relatively permanent change in behavior that is the result of past experience or practice. The concept includes the acquisition of knowledge.
A dental specialty concerned with the restoration and maintenance of oral function by the replacement of missing TEETH and related structures by artificial devices or DENTAL PROSTHESES.
A four-year program in nursing education in a college or university leading to a B.S.N. (Bachelor of Science in Nursing). Graduates are eligible for state examination for licensure as RN (Registered Nurse).
A branch of dentistry dealing with diseases of the oral and paraoral structures and the oral management of systemic diseases. (Hall, What is Oral Medicine, Anyway? Clinical Update: National Naval Dental Center, March 1991, p7-8)
Studies beyond the bachelor's degree at an institution having graduate programs for the purpose of preparing for entrance into a specific field, and obtaining a higher degree.
Individuals enrolled in a school of nursing or a formal educational program leading to a degree in nursing.
Formal education and training in preparation for the practice of a profession.
Systematic identification, development, organization, or utilization of educational resources and the management of these processes. It is occasionally used also in a more limited sense to describe the use of equipment-oriented techniques or audiovisual aids in educational settings. (Thesaurus of ERIC Descriptors, December 1993, p132)
Providing for the full range of dental health services for diagnosis, treatment, follow-up, and rehabilitation of patients.
Certification as complying with a standard set by non-governmental organizations, applied for by institutions, programs, and facilities on a voluntary basis.
A medical specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the internal organ systems of adults.
Practical experience in medical and health-related services that occurs as part of an educational program wherein the professionally-trained student works outside the academic environment under the supervision of an established professional in the particular field.
Persons trained in an accredited school or dental college and licensed by the state in which they reside to provide dental prophylaxis under the direction of a licensed dentist.
The study of the structure of various TISSUES of organisms on a microscopic level.
The psychological relations between the dentist and patient.
Use for general articles concerning veterinary medical education.
Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.
That phase of clinical dentistry concerned with the restoration of parts of existing teeth that are defective through disease, trauma, or abnormal development, to the state of normal function, health, and esthetics, including preventive, diagnostic, biological, mechanical, and therapeutic techniques, as well as material and instrument science and application. (Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 2d ed, p237)
Cultural and linguistic competence is a set of congruent behaviors, attitudes, and policies that come together in a system, agency, or among professionals that enables effective work in cross-cultural situations. Competence implies the capacity to function effectively as an individual and an organization within the context of the cultural beliefs, behaviors, and needs presented by consumers and their communities.
The field of dentistry involved in procedures for designing and constructing dental appliances. It includes also the application of any technology to the field of dentistry.
The branch of medicine concerned with the evaluation and initial treatment of urgent and emergent medical problems, such as those caused by accidents, trauma, sudden illness, poisoning, or disasters. Emergency medical care can be provided at the hospital or at sites outside the medical facility.
Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.
Education via communication media (correspondence, radio, television, computer networks) with little or no in-person face-to-face contact between students and teachers. (ERIC Thesaurus, 1997)
All of the divisions of the natural sciences dealing with the various aspects of the phenomena of life and vital processes. The concept includes anatomy and physiology, biochemistry and biophysics, and the biology of animals, plants, and microorganisms. It should be differentiated from BIOLOGY, one of its subdivisions, concerned specifically with the origin and life processes of living organisms.
Educational institutions providing facilities for teaching and research and authorized to grant academic degrees.
Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.
Those educational activities engaged in by holders of a bachelor's degree in nursing, which are primarily designed to prepare them for entrance into a specific field of nursing, and may lead to board certification or a more advanced degree.
The term "United States" in a medical context often refers to the country where a patient or study participant resides, and is not a medical term per se, but relevant for epidemiological studies, healthcare policies, and understanding differences in disease prevalence, treatment patterns, and health outcomes across various geographic locations.
Senior professionals who provide guidance, direction and support to those persons desirous of improvement in academic positions, administrative positions or other career development situations.
A dental specialty concerned with the histology, physiology, and pathology of the tissues that support, attach, and surround the teeth, and of the treatment and prevention of disease affecting these tissues.
A medical discipline that is based on the philosophy that all body systems are interrelated and dependent upon one another for good health. This philosophy, developed in 1874 by Dr. Andrew Taylor Still, recognizes the concept of "wellness" and the importance of treating illness within the context of the whole body. Special attention is placed on the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM.
Instructional materials used in teaching.
Educational programs structured in such a manner that the participating professionals, physicians, or students develop an increased awareness of their performance, usually on the basis of self-evaluation questionnaires.
The use of persons coached to feign symptoms or conditions of real diseases in a life-like manner in order to teach or evaluate medical personnel.
The branch of pharmacology that deals directly with the effectiveness and safety of drugs in humans.
Educational institutions.
The study of laws, theories, and hypotheses through a systematic examination of pertinent facts and their interpretation in the field of dentistry. (From Jablonski, Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982, p674)
Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).
Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program.
The principles of proper professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the dentist, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the dentist in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families. (From Stedman, 25th ed)
Educational programs for dental graduates entering a specialty. They include formal specialty training as well as academic work in the clinical and basic dental sciences, and may lead to board certification or an advanced dental degree.
Preventive health services provided for students. It excludes college or university students.
Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.
The grafting or inserting of a prosthetic device of alloplastic material into the oral tissue beneath the mucosal or periosteal layer or within the bone. Its purpose is to provide support and retention to a partial or complete denture.
The study of those aspects of energy and matter in terms of elementary principles and laws. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
Mental activity, not predominantly perceptual, by which one apprehends some aspect of an object or situation based on past learning and experience.
Acquisition of knowledge as a result of instruction in a formal course of study.
Professional society representing the field of dentistry.
One of the BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE DISCIPLINES concerned with the origin, structure, development, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of animals, plants, and microorganisms.
Stipends or grants-in-aid granted by foundations or institutions to individuals for study.
Requirements for the selection of students for admission to academic institutions.
The practice of dentistry concerned with preventive as well as diagnostic and treatment programs in a circumscribed population.
The process by which individuals internalize standards of right and wrong conduct.
The study of natural phenomena by observation, measurement, and experimentation.
An enduring, learned predisposition to behave in a consistent way toward a given class of objects, or a persistent mental and/or neural state of readiness to react to a certain class of objects, not as they are but as they are conceived to be.
Introduction of changes which are new to the organization and are created by management.
The field of information science concerned with the analysis and dissemination of medical data through the application of computers to various aspects of health care and medicine.
A dental specialty concerned with the maintenance of the dental pulp in a state of health and the treatment of the pulp cavity (pulp chamber and pulp canal).
An approach or process of practicing oral health care that requires the judicious integration of systematic assessments of clinical relevant scientific evidence, relating to the patient's oral and medical condition and history, with the dentist's clinical expertise and the patient's treatment needs and preferences. (from J Am Dent Assoc 134: 689, 2003)
Coexistence of numerous distinct ethnic, racial, religious, or cultural groups within one social unit, organization, or population. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 2d college ed., 1982, p955)
Educational programs for pharmacists who have a bachelor's degree or a Doctor of Pharmacy degree entering a specific field of pharmacy. They may lead to an advanced degree.
Societies whose membership is limited to pharmacists.
Medical specialty concerned with environmental factors that may impinge upon human disease, and development of methods for the detection, prevention, and control of environmentally related disease.
A branch of medicine concerned with the total health of the individual within the home environment and in the community, and with the application of comprehensive care to the prevention and treatment of illness in the entire community.
A dental specialty concerned with the prevention of disease and the maintenance of oral health through promoting organized dental health programs at a community, state, or federal level.
Investigations into the problems of integrating research findings into nursing curricula, developing problem solving skills, finding approaches to clinical teaching, determining the level of practice by graduates from different basic preparations, etc.
**I'm sorry for the confusion, but 'Nevada' is not a medical term.** It is a geographical location, specifically a state in the southwestern United States. If you have any medical terms or concepts you would like me to define or explain, please let me know!
Education and training in PUBLIC HEALTH for the practice of the profession.
A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.
The branch of science concerned with the means and consequences of transmission and generation of the components of biological inheritance. (Stedman, 26th ed)
A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.
Educational programs designed to inform dentists of recent advances in their fields.
While "Humanities" is a broad academic discipline that includes fields such as literature, philosophy, history, and language studies, it does not have a specific medical definition related to the practice of medicine or healthcare.
Transmission of live or pre-recorded audio or video content via connection or download from the INTERNET.
Facilities where dental care is provided to patients.
Programs of study which span the traditional boundaries of academic scholarship.
Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program in the health occupations.
Societies whose membership is limited to dentists.
Selection of a type of occupation or profession.
Professions or other business activities directed to the cure and prevention of disease. For occupations of medical personnel who are not physicians but who are working in the fields of medical technology, physical therapy, etc., ALLIED HEALTH OCCUPATIONS is available.
Schools which offer training in the area of health.
The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a nursing school.
The purposes, missions, and goals of an individual organization or its units, established through administrative processes. It includes an organization's long-range plans and administrative philosophy.
The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.
The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.
The practice of dentistry concerned with the dental problems of children, proper maintenance, and treatment. The dental care may include the services provided by dental specialists.
Educational programs designed to inform physicians of recent advances in their field.
The procedures through which a group approaches, attacks, and solves a common problem.
The principles of professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the physician, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the physician in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families.
An ethical system which emphasizes human values and the personal worth of each individual, as well as concern for the dignity and freedom of humankind.
Materials, frequently computer applications, that combine some or all of text, sound, graphics, animation, and video into integrated packages. (Thesaurus of ERIC Descriptors, 1994)
The reciprocal interaction of two or more professional individuals.
Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.
The process by which the employer promotes staff performance and efficiency consistent with management goals and objectives.
In the medical field, manikins are realistic, full-size models of human bodies used for teaching and practicing medical skills, such as CPR, intubation, or surgical procedures, as they provide a realistic and safe training environment without the use of actual patients.
The study of speech or language disorders and their diagnosis and correction.
Educational programs designed to inform individuals of recent advances in their particular field of interest. They do not lead to any formal advanced standing.
A system of medicine which aims at discovering the exact nature of the relationship between the emotions and bodily function, affirming the principle that the mind and body are one.
The exchange of students or professional personnel between countries done under the auspices of an organization for the purpose of further education.
An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)
Systematic identification of a population's needs or the assessment of individuals to determine the proper level of services needed.
The function of directing or controlling the actions or attitudes of an individual or group with more or less willing acquiescence of the followers.
An optical disk storage system for computers on which data can be read or from which data can be retrieved but not entered or modified. A CD-ROM unit is almost identical to the compact disk playback device for home use.
A specialty in which manual or operative procedures are used in the treatment of disease, injuries, or deformities.
The recognition of professional or technical competence through registration, certification, licensure, admission to association membership, the award of a diploma or degree, etc.
The interactions between representatives of institutional departments.
Nonspecialized dental practice which is concerned with providing primary and continuing dental care.
The granting of a license to practice dentistry.
A dental specialty concerned with pathology of the oral cavity.
Process of teaching a person to interact and communicate with a computer.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Indiana" is a U.S. state located in the Midwest and cannot be translated into a medical term or definition. If you have any questions about medical conditions, treatments, or terminology, I would be happy to help with those!
Compliance with a set of standards defined by non-governmental organizations. Certification is applied for by individuals on a voluntary basis and represents a professional status when achieved, e.g., certification for a medical specialty.
Books used in the study of a subject that contain a systematic presentation of the principles and vocabulary of a subject.
The scientific disciplines concerned with the embryology, anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, pharmacology, etc., of the nervous system.
A specialty concerned with the use of x-ray and other forms of radiant energy in the diagnosis and treatment of disease.
A learning situation involving more than one alternative from which a selection is made in order to attain a specific goal.
A mechanism of communication within a system in that the input signal generates an output response which returns to influence the continued activity or productivity of that system.
Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.
Appraisal of one's own personal qualities or traits.
On the job training programs for personnel carried out within an institution or agency. It includes orientation programs.
A method of data collection and a QUALITATIVE RESEARCH tool in which a small group of individuals are brought together and allowed to interact in a discussion of their opinions about topics, issues, or questions.
Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of public health.
The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)
Preparatory education meeting the requirements for admission to medical school.
Statement of the position requirements, qualifications for the position, wage range, and any special conditions expected of the employee.
The body of truths or facts accumulated in the course of time, the cumulated sum of information, its volume and nature, in any civilization, period, or country.
The study of the origin, nature, properties, and actions of drugs and their effects on living organisms.
The study of NUTRITION PROCESSES as well as the components of food, their actions, interaction, and balance in relation to health and disease of children, infants or adolescents.
Physicians who serve in a medical and administrative capacity as head of an organized medical staff and who also may serve as liaison for the medical staff with the administration and governing board.
Ending the TOBACCO habits of smoking, chewing, or snuff use.
Societies whose membership is limited to physicians.
The philosophy or code pertaining to what is ideal in human character and conduct. Also, the field of study dealing with the principles of morality.
Clusters of topics that fall within the domain of BIOETHICS, the field of study concerned with value questions that arise in biomedicine and health care delivery.
Total pharmaceutical services provided by qualified PHARMACISTS. In addition to the preparation and distribution of medical products, they may include consultative services provided to agencies and institutions which do not have a qualified pharmacist.
A medical specialty concerned with maintaining health and providing medical care to children from birth to adolescence.
Improving health status of an individual by adjusting the quantities, qualities, and methods of nutrient intake.
The obligations and accountability assumed in carrying out actions or ideas on behalf of others.
The expected function of a member of a particular profession.
Devices, usually alloplastic, surgically inserted into or onto the jawbone, which support a single prosthetic tooth and serve either as abutments or as cosmetic replacements for missing teeth.
## I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Ohio" is a U.S. state and not a term used in medical definitions.
Disciplines concerned with the study of human and animal behavior.
The end-result or objective, which may be specified or required in advance.
'Medical Libraries' are repositories or digital platforms that accumulate, organize, and provide access to a wide range of biomedical information resources including but not limited to books, journals, electronic databases, multimedia materials, and other evidence-based health data for the purpose of supporting and advancing clinical practice, education, research, and administration in healthcare.
Familiarity and comfort in using computers efficiently.
Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of nursing.
A branch of applied ethics that studies the value implications of practices and developments in life sciences, medicine, and health care.
The act or practice of literary composition, the occupation of writer, or producing or engaging in literary work as a profession.
The branch of medicine concerned with the physiological and pathological aspects of the aged, including the clinical problems of senescence and senility.
A denture replacing all natural teeth and associated structures in both the maxilla and mandible.
Removable prosthesis constructed over natural teeth or implanted studs.
The branch of dentistry concerned with the prevention of disease and the maintenance and promotion of oral health.
Systems where the input data enter the computer directly from the point of origin (usually a terminal or workstation) and/or in which output data are transmitted directly to that terminal point of origin. (Sippl, Computer Dictionary, 4th ed)
Individuals responsible for the development of policy and supervision of the execution of plans and functional operations.
A specialty concerned with the nature and cause of disease as expressed by changes in cellular or tissue structure and function caused by the disease process.
Persons trained to assist professional health personnel in communicating with residents in the community concerning needs and availability of health services.
A medical specialty concerned with the hypersensitivity of the individual to foreign substances and protection from the resultant infection or disorder.
The medical science that deals with the origin, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of mental disorders.
An iterative questionnaire designed to measure consensus among individual responses. In the classic Delphi approach, there is no interaction between responder and interviewer.
The principles of proper conduct concerning the rights and duties of the professional, relations with patients or consumers and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the professional and interpersonal relations with patient or consumer families. (From Stedman, 25th ed)
The adopting or performing the role of another significant individual in order to gain insight into the behavior of that person.
Success in bringing an effort to the desired end; the degree or level of success attained in some specified area (esp. scholastic) or in general.
A medical-surgical specialty concerned with the physiology and disorders primarily of the female genital tract, as well as female endocrinology and reproductive physiology.
The interactions between physician and patient.
Medical specialty concerned with the promotion and maintenance of the physical and mental health of employees in occupational settings.
The total of dental diagnostic, preventive, and restorative services provided to meet the needs of a patient (from Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982).
Writings having excellence of form or expression and expressing ideas of permanent or universal interest. The body of written works produced in a particular language, country, or age. (Webster, 3d ed)
The study of microorganisms such as fungi, bacteria, algae, archaea, and viruses.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Arizona" is a proper noun and refers to a state in the southwestern United States, not a medical term or condition. It would not have a medical definition.
A medical-surgical specialty concerned with management and care of women during pregnancy, parturition, and the puerperium.
The use of systematic methods of ethical examination, such as CASUISTRY or ETHICAL THEORY, in reasoning about moral problems.

Teaching pedestrian skills to retarded persons: generalization from the classroom to the natural environment. (1/3964)

Little attention has been given to teaching adaptive community skills to retarded persons. In this study, five retarded male students were taught basic pedestrian skills in a classroom- Training was conducted on a model built to simulate city traffic conditions. Each subject was taught five specific skills involved in street crossing in sequence, viz. intersection recognition, pedestrian-light skills, traffic-light skills, and skills for two different stop-sign conditions. Before, during, and after training, subjects were tested on generalization probes on model and under actual city traffic conditions. Results of a multiple-baseline design acorss both subjects and behaviors indicated that after receiving classroom training on the skills, each subject exhibited appropriate pedestrian skills under city traffic conditions. In addition, training in some skills appeared to facilitate performance in skills not yet trained.  (+info)

Do students' attitudes toward women change during medical school? (2/3964)

BACKGROUND: Medical school has historically reinforced traditional views of women. This cohort study follows implementation of a revitalized curriculum and examines students' attitudes toward women on entry into an Ontario medical school, and 3 years later. METHODS: Of the 75 students entering first year at Queen's University medical school 70 completed the initial survey in September 1994 and 54 were resurveyed in May 1997. First-year students at 2 other Ontario medical schools were also surveyed in 1994, and these 166 respondents formed a comparison group. Changes in responses to statements about sex-role stereotypes, willingness to control decision-making of female patients, and conceptualization of women as "other" or "abnormal" because they are women were examined. Responses from the comparison group were used to indicate whether the Queen's group was representative. RESULTS: Attitudinal differences between the primary group and the comparison group were not significant. After 3 years of medical education students were somewhat less accepting of sex-role stereotypes and less controlling in the doctor-patient encounter. They continued, however, to equate adults with men and to see women as "not adult" or "other." Female students began and remained somewhat more open-minded in all areas studied. INTERPRETATION: A predicted trend toward conservatism was not seen as students became older, more aware and closer to completion of medical training, although they continued to equate adults with male and to see women as "other." Findings may validate new curricular approaches and increased attention to gender issues in the academic environment.  (+info)

Back care instructions in physical therapy: a trend analysis of individualized back care programs. (3/3964)

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The treatment of people with low back pain often includes giving a variety of instructions about back care. The objective of our study was to explore the content and sequence of these instructions. SUBJECTS: Our database contained information on 1,151 therapy sessions for 132 patients who were treated by 21 therapists. METHODS: Hierarchical linear modeling was used to establish trends in instructions during the course of treatment. Instructions were measured by means of a registration form. RESULTS: Pain management instructions were given at the start of treatment and then decreased in later sessions. Instructions about taking care of the back in daily activities followed the same course. Exercise instructions were introduced after the start of treatment and were spread evenly across the visits. The number of recommendations about general fitness decreased during treatment. CONCLUSION AND DISCUSSION: The majority of back care instructions were spread evenly across therapy visits. Relatively little variation in instructions among patients was seen, which may indicate a lack of individualization of the back care programs.  (+info)

Food safety training for nutritionists. (4/3964)

A course on food safety for nutritionists has been developed in Indonesia through collaboration between government, industry, academia and international agencies. By teaching the basic principles of the subject it equips the participants to recommend foods that are safe as well as nutritious.  (+info)

The role of curriculum in influencing students to select generalist training: a 21-year longitudinal study. (5/3964)

To determine if specific curricula or backgrounds influence selection of generalist careers, the curricular choices of graduates of Mount Sinai School of Medicine between 1970 and 1990 were reviewed based on admission category. Students were divided into three groups: Group 1, those who started their first year of training at the School of Medicine; Group 2, those accepted with advanced standing into their third year of training from the Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education, a five-year program developed to select and produce students likely to enter primary care fields; and Group 3, those accepted with advanced standing into the third year who spent the first two years at a foreign medical school. All three groups took the identical last two years of clinical training at the School of Medicine. These were no significant differences with respect to initial choice of generalist training programs among all three groups, with 46% of the total cohort selecting generalist training. Of those students who chose generalist programs, 58% in Group 1, 51% in Group 2, and 41% in Group 3 remained in these fields rather than progressing to fellowship training. This difference was significant only with respect to Group 3. However, when an analysis was performed among those students providing only primary care as compared to only specialty care, there were no significant differences. Analysis by gender revealed women to be more likely to select generalist fields and remain in these fields without taking specialty training (P < .0001). Differentiating characteristics with respect to choosing generalist fields were not related to either Part I or Part II scores on National Board Examinations or selection to AOA. However, with respect to those specific specialties considered quite competitive (general surgery, obstetrics and gynecology, and ophthalmology), total test scores on Part I and Part II were significantly higher than those of all other students. The analysis indicated that, despite the diverse characteristics of students entering the third year at the School of Medicine, no one group produced a statistically greater proportion of generalists positions than any other, and academic performance while in medical school did not have a significant influence on whether a student entered a generalist field.  (+info)

Attracting and training more chemical pathologists in the United Kingdom. (6/3964)

I have attempted to define the function of the medical graduate in the clinical biochemistry laboratory and have examined data on recrutiment in the United Kingdom into clinical biochemistry. If trainee pathologists were encouraged to become proficient in both a branch of clinical medicine and in research techniques, the resulting chemical pathologists should be able to improve the consultative and investigative functions of the laboratory. To this end I have suggested some changes in the training regulations and in the role of the chemical pathologists.  (+info)

The adaptability of the health promoting schools concept: a case study from Australia. (7/3964)

The adoption of the concept of the health promoting school internationally indicates that it is a timely and flexible concept that can be utilized by different countries to accommodate their particular contexts. Political, economic and socio-cultural factors are powerful forces that shape the construction of health promoting schools globally. How some of these factors operate will be exemplified through a description of the health promoting school movement in Australia with commonalities and variations with activities in member countries of the European Network of Health Promoting Schools highlighted. The unique role globally of the Australian Health Promoting Schools Association, as a non-government organization specifically established to promote the concept of the health promoting school, is described. Its contribution is as a neutral body representing diverse interests that can advocate in different settings and at all levels of influence. Additionally it provides a mechanism for networking, awareness raising and information exchange. The structure of the health and education sectors in Australia has shaped the conceptualization of a health promoting school, one that accommodates the country's specific context. Barriers, facilitating factors and challenges that exist for future work in the area are described.  (+info)

Bridging the gap between managed care and academic medicine: an innovative fellowship. (8/3964)

Numerous challenges face academic medicine in the era of managed care. This environment is stimulating the development of innovative educational programs that can adapt to changes in the healthcare system. The U.S. Quality Algorithms Managed Care Fellowship at Jefferson Medical College is one response to these challenges. Two postresidency physicians are chosen as fellows each year. The 1-year curriculum is organized into four 3-month modules covering such subjects as biostatistics and epidemiology, medical informatics, the theory and practice of managed care, managed care finance, integrated healthcare systems, quality assessment and improvement, clinical parameters and guidelines, utilization management, and risk management. The fellowship may serve as a possible prototype for future post-graduate education.  (+info)

In the context of medical education, a curriculum refers to the planned and organized sequence of experiences and learning opportunities designed to achieve specific educational goals and objectives. It outlines the knowledge, skills, and attitudes that medical students or trainees are expected to acquire during their training program. The curriculum may include various components such as lectures, small group discussions, clinical rotations, simulations, and other experiential learning activities. It is typically developed and implemented by medical education experts and faculty members in consultation with stakeholders, including learners, practitioners, and patients.

Medical education, undergraduate, refers to the initial formal educational phase in which students learn the basic sciences and clinical skills required to become a physician. In the United States, this typically involves completing a four-year Bachelor's degree followed by four years of medical school. The first two years of medical school are primarily focused on classroom instruction in subjects such as anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, pharmacology, and pathology. The final two years involve clinical rotations, during which students work directly with patients under the supervision of licensed physicians. After completing medical school, graduates must then complete a residency program in their chosen specialty before they are eligible to practice medicine independently.

Problem-Based Learning (PBL) is not a medical term per se, but rather a teaching and learning approach that has been widely adopted in medical education. Here's a definition of PBL from the medical education perspective:

Problem-Based Learning is an educational method that utilizes clinical cases or real-world problems as a starting point for students to learn and apply concepts and principles from various disciplines. In this approach, students work in small groups to identify learning needs, gather relevant information, analyze and synthesize data, formulate hypotheses, develop solutions, and reflect on their learning process. The role of the instructor is that of a facilitator who guides the learners in their exploration of the problem and provides feedback on their performance. PBL aims to promote critical thinking, self-directed learning, collaborative skills, and clinical reasoning among medical students.

Medical education is a systematic process of acquiring knowledge, skills, and values necessary for becoming a healthcare professional, such as a doctor, nurse, or allied health professional. It involves a combination of theoretical instruction, practical training, and experiential learning in clinical settings. The goal of medical education is to produce competent, compassionate, and ethical practitioners who can provide high-quality care to patients and contribute to the advancement of medicine. Medical education typically includes undergraduate (pre-medical) studies, graduate (medical) school, residency training, and continuing medical education throughout a healthcare professional's career.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "teaching" is a general term that refers to the act of imparting knowledge or skills to others and is not a medical term. However, in the context of medical education, teaching refers to the instruction and training of medical students, residents, fellows, and other healthcare professionals to develop their knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for providing high-quality patient care. This can take place in various settings such as classrooms, clinical wards, simulation centers, or online platforms, and can involve a range of teaching methods including lectures, small group discussions, bedside teaching, case-based learning, and hands-on training.

Educational models, in the context of medicine and healthcare, are simplified representations or simulations of a real-world concept, process, or system. They are used as teaching tools to facilitate learning and understanding of complex medical concepts. These models can be physical (e.g., anatomical models, simulated patients), digital (e.g., computer-based simulations), or theoretical (e.g., conceptual frameworks). By providing a tangible or visual representation, educational models help students grasp abstract ideas, develop problem-solving skills, and rehearse procedures in a controlled and safe environment.

Dental education refers to the process of teaching, training, and learning in the field of dentistry. It involves a curriculum of academic and clinical instruction that prepares students to become licensed dental professionals, such as dentists, dental hygienists, and dental assistants. Dental education typically takes place in accredited dental schools or programs and includes classroom study, laboratory work, and supervised clinical experience. The goal of dental education is to provide students with the knowledge, skills, and values necessary to deliver high-quality oral health care to patients and promote overall health and wellness.

"Medical Schools" is a term that refers to educational institutions specifically designed to train and educate future medical professionals. These schools offer comprehensive programs leading to a professional degree in medicine, such as the Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) or Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (D.O.) degree. The curriculum typically includes both classroom instruction and clinical training, covering topics like anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, pathology, medical ethics, and patient care. Medical schools aim to equip students with the necessary knowledge, skills, and attitudes to become competent, compassionate, and ethical healthcare providers. Admission to medical schools usually requires a bachelor's degree and completion of specific prerequisite courses, as well as a strong performance on the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT).

Educational measurement is a field of study concerned with the development, administration, and interpretation of tests, questionnaires, and other assessments for the purpose of measuring learning outcomes, abilities, knowledge, skills, and attitudes in an educational context. The goal of educational measurement is to provide valid, reliable, and fair measures of student achievement and growth that can inform instructional decisions, guide curriculum development, and support accountability efforts.

Educational measurement involves a variety of statistical and psychometric methods for analyzing assessment data, including classical test theory, item response theory, and generalizability theory. These methods are used to establish the reliability and validity of assessments, as well as to score and interpret student performance. Additionally, educational measurement is concerned with issues related to test fairness, accessibility, and bias, and seeks to ensure that assessments are equitable and inclusive for all students.

Overall, educational measurement plays a critical role in ensuring the quality and effectiveness of educational programs and policies, and helps to promote student learning and achievement.

I'm assuming you are asking for a definition of "medical students." Here it is:

Medical students are individuals who are enrolled in a program of study to become medical doctors. They typically complete four years of undergraduate education before entering a medical school, where they spend another four years studying basic sciences and clinical medicine. After completing medical school, they become physicians (M.D.) and continue their training through residency programs in their chosen specialties. Some medical students may choose to pursue a research career and complete a Ph.D. during or after medical school.

Clinical competence is the ability of a healthcare professional to provide safe and effective patient care, demonstrating the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for the job. It involves the integration of theoretical knowledge with practical skills, judgment, and decision-making abilities in real-world clinical situations. Clinical competence is typically evaluated through various methods such as direct observation, case studies, simulations, and feedback from peers and supervisors.

A clinically competent healthcare professional should be able to:

1. Demonstrate a solid understanding of the relevant medical knowledge and its application in clinical practice.
2. Perform essential clinical skills proficiently and safely.
3. Communicate effectively with patients, families, and other healthcare professionals.
4. Make informed decisions based on critical thinking and problem-solving abilities.
5. Exhibit professionalism, ethical behavior, and cultural sensitivity in patient care.
6. Continuously evaluate and improve their performance through self-reflection and ongoing learning.

Maintaining clinical competence is essential for healthcare professionals to ensure the best possible outcomes for their patients and stay current with advances in medical science and technology.

Competency-based education (CBE) is a teaching and learning approach that focuses on measuring and demonstrating specific skills, abilities, or knowledge competencies rather than solely on the amount of time spent in class or completing coursework. In this model, students progress through their education by mastering a series of clearly defined competencies at their own pace.

In medical education, CBE aims to ensure that healthcare professionals possess the necessary skills and knowledge to provide safe and effective patient care. Competency-based medical education often involves the use of direct assessments, such as objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs), standardized patients, and workplace-based assessments, to evaluate students' competencies in various domains, including medical knowledge, communication, professionalism, and clinical skills.

The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) has identified six core competencies that residents must achieve during their training: patient care, medical knowledge, practice-based learning and improvement, interpersonal and communication skills, professionalism, and systems-based practice. Competency-based medical education helps to ensure that these competencies are systematically assessed and developed throughout a trainee's educational journey.

"Schools, Dental" is not a recognized medical term or concept. It seems that there might be some confusion in the terminology used. If you are referring to "Dental Schools," they are educational institutions that offer professional training programs in dentistry, leading to a degree in dental surgery (DDS) or dental medicine (DMD).

If you meant something else, please clarify the term or concept, and I would be happy to provide more information.

Internship: In medical terms, an internship is a supervised program of hospital-based training for physicians and surgeons who have recently graduated from medical school. The duration of an internship typically ranges from one to three years, during which the intern engages in a variety of clinical rotations in different departments such as internal medicine, surgery, pediatrics, obstetrics and gynecology, psychiatry, and neurology. The primary aim of an internship is to provide newly graduated doctors with hands-on experience in patient care, diagnosis, treatment planning, and communication skills under the close supervision of experienced physicians.

Residency: A residency is a structured and intensive postgraduate medical training program that typically lasts between three and seven years, depending on the specialty. Residents are licensed physicians who have completed their internship and are now receiving advanced training in a specific area of medicine or surgery. During this period, residents work closely with experienced attending physicians to gain comprehensive knowledge and skills in their chosen field. They are responsible for managing patient care, performing surgical procedures, interpreting diagnostic tests, conducting research, teaching medical students, and participating in continuing education activities. Residency programs aim to prepare physicians for independent practice and board certification in their specialty.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Program Development" is not a medical term. It is a general term that refers to the process of creating, planning, and implementing a new program or project, typically in a business, education, or community setting. In a healthcare context, it might refer to the development of a new healthcare service, treatment program, or educational initiative.

If you have any questions related to medical terminology or concepts, I'd be happy to try and help!

Program Evaluation is a systematic and objective assessment of a healthcare program's design, implementation, and outcomes. It is a medical term used to describe the process of determining the relevance, effectiveness, and efficiency of a program in achieving its goals and objectives. Program evaluation involves collecting and analyzing data related to various aspects of the program, such as its reach, impact, cost-effectiveness, and quality. The results of program evaluation can be used to improve the design and implementation of existing programs or to inform the development of new ones. It is a critical tool for ensuring that healthcare programs are meeting the needs of their intended audiences and delivering high-quality care in an efficient and effective manner.

Pharmacy education refers to the formal learning process and academic program designed to prepare individuals to become licensed pharmacists. The curriculum typically includes courses in biology, chemistry, physics, mathematics, and specialized subjects such as pharmaceutical chemistry, pharmacology, pharmacotherapy, and clinical practice. Pharmacy education also covers topics related to the ethical and legal aspects of pharmacy practice, communication skills, and management of pharmacy operations.

The duration and format of pharmacy education vary by country and region. In the United States, for example, pharmacy education typically involves completing a Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) degree, which takes six years of full-time study beyond high school. This includes two years of pre-professional studies and four years of professional studies in a college or school of pharmacy.

After completing their pharmacy education, graduates must pass licensure exams to practice as a pharmacist. The specific requirements for licensure vary by jurisdiction but typically include passing both a written and practical examination. Continuing education is also required to maintain licensure and stay up-to-date with advances in the field of pharmacy.

Computer-Assisted Instruction (CAI) is a type of educational technology that involves the use of computers to deliver, support, and enhance learning experiences. In a medical context, CAI can be used to teach a variety of topics, including anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, and clinical skills.

CAI typically involves interactive multimedia presentations, simulations, quizzes, and other activities that engage learners and provide feedback on their performance. It may also include adaptive learning systems that adjust the content and pace of instruction based on the learner's abilities and progress.

CAI has been shown to be effective in improving knowledge retention, critical thinking skills, and learner satisfaction in medical education. It can be used as a standalone teaching method or in combination with traditional classroom instruction or clinical experiences.

A clinical clerkship is a phase of medical education where medical students participate in supervised direct patient care in a clinical setting as part of their training. It typically occurs during the third or fourth year of medical school and serves to provide students with practical experience in diagnosing and treating patients under the guidance of experienced physicians.

During a clinical clerkship, students work directly with patients in hospitals, clinics, or other healthcare facilities, taking medical histories, performing physical examinations, ordering and interpreting diagnostic tests, formulating treatment plans, and communicating with patients and their families. They may also participate in patient rounds, conferences, and other educational activities.

Clinical clerkships are designed to help students develop clinical skills, build confidence, and gain exposure to different medical specialties. They provide an opportunity for students to apply the knowledge and skills they have learned in the classroom to real-world situations, helping them to become competent and compassionate healthcare providers.

Anatomy is the branch of biology that deals with the study of the structure of organisms and their parts. In medicine, anatomy is the detailed study of the structures of the human body and its organs. It can be divided into several subfields, including:

1. Gross anatomy: Also known as macroscopic anatomy, this is the study of the larger structures of the body, such as the organs and organ systems, using techniques such as dissection and observation.
2. Histology: This is the study of tissues at the microscopic level, including their structure, composition, and function.
3. Embryology: This is the study of the development of the embryo and fetus from conception to birth.
4. Neuroanatomy: This is the study of the structure and organization of the nervous system, including the brain and spinal cord.
5. Comparative anatomy: This is the study of the structures of different species and how they have evolved over time.

Anatomy is a fundamental subject in medical education, as it provides the basis for understanding the function of the human body and the underlying causes of disease.

I'm happy to help! However, I believe there may be a slight misunderstanding in your question. "Students, Dental" is not a medical term or definition. Instead, it likely refers to individuals who are studying to become dental professionals, such as dentists, dental hygienists, or dental assistants.

If you're looking for information about dental education or the field of dentistry, I would be happy to provide some resources or answer any questions you may have!

I'm happy to help! However, I believe there may be a slight misunderstanding in your question. "Students, Pharmacy" is not a medical term or concept. Instead, it likely refers to individuals who are studying to become pharmacists or are taking courses related to pharmacy as part of their education.

Pharmacy students are typically enrolled in a professional degree program, such as a Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) program, which prepares them to become licensed pharmacists. These programs typically include coursework in topics such as pharmaceutical chemistry, pharmacology, and clinical practice, as well as supervised clinical experiences in various healthcare settings.

Therefore, the term "Students, Pharmacy" generally refers to individuals who are pursuing a degree or certification in the field of pharmacy.

Medical education, graduate refers to the post-baccalaureate programs of study leading to a doctoral degree in medicine (MD) or osteopathic medicine (DO). These programs typically include rigorous coursework in the basic medical sciences, clinical training, and research experiences. The goal of medical education at this level is to prepare students to become competent, caring physicians who are able to provide high-quality medical care to patients, conduct research to advance medical knowledge, and contribute to the improvement of health care systems.

Graduate medical education (GME) typically includes residency programs, which are postgraduate training programs that provide specialized clinical training in a particular field of medicine. Residency programs typically last three to seven years, depending on the specialty, and provide hands-on experience in diagnosing and treating patients under the supervision of experienced physicians.

Medical education at the graduate level is designed to build upon the foundational knowledge and skills acquired during undergraduate medical education (UME) and to prepare students for licensure and certification as practicing physicians. Graduates of GME programs are eligible to take licensing exams and apply for certification in their chosen specialty through professional organizations such as the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS).

In a medical context, "faculty" most commonly refers to the inherent abilities or powers of a normal functioning part of the body or mind. For example, one might speak of the "faculties of perception" to describe the senses of sight, hearing, touch, taste, and smell. It can also refer to the teaching staff or body of instructors at a medical school or other educational institution. Additionally, it can be used more generally to mean a capability or skill, as in "the faculty of quick thinking."

The term "Faculty, Medical" generally refers to the faculty members who are involved in medical education and training within a medical school or academic institution. These individuals are responsible for teaching and instructing medical students, residents, and fellows in various areas of medical knowledge and clinical skills. They may hold positions such as professor, associate professor, assistant professor, or instructor, and they may specialize in a particular area of medicine such as internal medicine, surgery, pediatrics, or psychiatry. Medical faculty members may also be involved in research, patient care, and administrative duties within the institution.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Schools, Pharmacy" is not a recognized medical term or concept. A "pharmacy school" refers to an educational institution that provides training and degrees in the field of pharmacy. If you have any questions about pharmacy education or the pharmacy profession, I'd be happy to try to help answer those!

The Faculty of Dental Surgery (FDS) is a division or department within a medical or dental school that focuses on the study, research, and practice of dental surgery. The faculty may be responsible for providing undergraduate and postgraduate education and training in dental surgery, as well as conducting research in this field.

Dental surgery encompasses various procedures related to the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of diseases and disorders that affect the teeth, gums, and other structures of the mouth and jaw. This may include procedures such as tooth extractions, root canals, dental implants, and oral cancer surgery, among others.

The Faculty of Dental Surgery is typically composed of a group of dental surgeons who are experts in their field and have a commitment to advancing the practice of dental surgery through education, research, and clinical excellence. Members of the faculty may include professors, researchers, clinicians, and other professionals who are involved in the delivery of dental care.

Professional competence, in the context of medicine, refers to the possession of the necessary skills, knowledge, and behaviors required for the provision of high-quality healthcare services. It involves the ability to apply medical knowledge and clinical skills effectively in practice, make informed and evidence-based decisions, communicate clearly and effectively with patients and colleagues, demonstrate professionalism and ethical behavior, and engage in continuous learning and improvement.

Professional competence is evaluated through various means, including assessments of clinical skills, knowledge tests, patient feedback, and peer reviews. It is an ongoing process that requires healthcare professionals to continually update their knowledge and skills, adapt to changes in medical practice, and strive for excellence in patient care. Maintaining professional competence is essential for ensuring the safety and quality of healthcare services and is a key component of medical regulation and licensure.

Physiology is the scientific study of the normal functions and mechanisms of living organisms, including all of their biological systems, organs, cells, and biomolecules. It focuses on how various bodily functions are regulated, coordinated, and integrated to maintain a healthy state in an organism. This field encompasses a wide range of areas such as cellular physiology, neurophysiology, cardiovascular physiology, respiratory physiology, renal physiology, endocrine physiology, reproductive physiology, and exercise physiology, among others. Physiologists use a combination of experimental and theoretical approaches to understand the principles underlying normal biological function and to investigate how these functions are altered in various disease states.

"Nursing Education" refers to the process of teaching and learning the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for nursing practice. This can occur in a variety of settings, including academic institutions and clinical environments. The goal of nursing education is to prepare nurses to provide safe, effective, and compassionate care to patients across the lifespan and in a variety of healthcare settings.

Nursing education programs may lead to various levels of qualification, such as a diploma, associate's degree, bachelor's degree, master's degree, or doctoral degree in nursing. The length and content of these programs vary, but all include coursework in topics such as anatomy and physiology, microbiology, pharmacology, health assessment, pathophysiology, and nursing theory. In addition to classroom instruction, nursing education also includes clinical experiences, where students apply their knowledge and skills in a supervised healthcare setting.

Nursing education is essential for ensuring that nurses are prepared to meet the challenges of an increasingly complex healthcare system. It provides the foundation for nursing practice and enables nurses to provide high-quality care to patients and families.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Programmed Instruction" is not a medical term or concept. It is a educational theory and teaching strategy that was developed in the mid-20th century. Programmed instruction involves presenting information to learners in small, manageable chunks or "frames," with each frame building upon the previous one. Learners are often asked to respond to questions or prompts after each frame, which allows them to immediately apply what they have learned and receive feedback. This approach is designed to help learners progress at their own pace and take an active role in their learning process. It has been used in various settings, including medical education, to teach a wide range of topics.

Nutritional Sciences is a field of study that deals with the scientific examination and understanding of nutrients in food, how the body uses them, and the relationship between diet, health, and disease. It encompasses various disciplines including biochemistry, physiology, molecular biology, epidemiology, and clinical nutrition.

The field covers several key areas such as:

1. Nutrient metabolism: This involves studying how nutrients are digested, absorbed, transported, stored, and utilized in the body for energy production, growth, maintenance, and reproduction.
2. Diet and disease prevention: Nutritional sciences investigate the role of diet in preventing or managing various health conditions like obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer.
3. Functional foods and nutraceuticals: This area focuses on studying the potential health benefits of specific foods or food components beyond their basic nutritional value, including functional foods (foods that have demonstrated health benefits) and nutraceuticals (nutrient-rich supplements derived from food sources).
4. Public health nutrition: Nutritional sciences also address population-wide nutrition issues, such as malnutrition, food insecurity, and the development of public policies related to food and health.
5. Clinical nutrition: This subfield applies nutritional principles and research findings to patient care, focusing on developing individualized dietary plans for patients with various medical conditions.

Overall, Nutritional Sciences aims to provide a solid scientific foundation for making informed dietary choices and promoting optimal health outcomes across populations and individuals.

In the context of medicine and healthcare, learning is often discussed in relation to learning abilities or disabilities that may impact an individual's capacity to acquire, process, retain, and apply new information or skills. Learning can be defined as the process of acquiring knowledge, understanding, behaviors, and skills through experience, instruction, or observation.

Learning disorders, also known as learning disabilities, are a type of neurodevelopmental disorder that affects an individual's ability to learn and process information in one or more areas, such as reading, writing, mathematics, or reasoning. These disorders are not related to intelligence or motivation but rather result from differences in the way the brain processes information.

It is important to note that learning can also be influenced by various factors, including age, cognitive abilities, physical and mental health status, cultural background, and educational experiences. Therefore, a comprehensive assessment of an individual's learning abilities and needs should take into account these various factors to provide appropriate support and interventions.

Prosthodontics is a specialized branch of dentistry that focuses on the diagnosis, restoration, and replacement of missing or damaged teeth. A prosthodontist is a dental professional who has completed additional training beyond dental school in this field, learning advanced techniques for creating and placing various types of dental prostheses, such as:

1. Dental crowns: Artificial restorations that cover damaged or weakened teeth to restore their function and appearance.
2. Dental bridges: Fixed or removable appliances used to replace one or more missing teeth by connecting artificial teeth to adjacent natural teeth or implants.
3. Complete dentures: Removable appliances that replace all the teeth in an arch, resting on the gums and supported by the underlying bone structure.
4. Partial dentures: Removable appliances that replace some missing teeth, typically attached to remaining natural teeth with clasps or precision attachments.
5. Dental implants: Titanium screws that are surgically placed into the jawbone to serve as anchors for crowns, bridges, or dentures, providing a more secure and stable solution for tooth replacement.
6. Maxillofacial prosthetics: Custom-made devices used to restore or improve the function and appearance of facial structures affected by congenital defects, trauma, or surgical removal of tumors.

Prosthodontists work closely with other dental specialists, such as oral surgeons, periodontists, and orthodontists, to develop comprehensive treatment plans for their patients, ensuring optimal functional and aesthetic outcomes.

"Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate" refers to a program of study that leads to a Bachelor's degree in the field of nursing. The curriculum typically includes coursework in topics such as anatomy and physiology, microbiology, chemistry, psychology, and social sciences, as well as clinical experiences in various healthcare settings.

The baccalaureate nursing program prepares graduates to provide safe, quality care to patients across the lifespan in a variety of settings. Graduates are eligible to take the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX-RN) and become licensed as registered nurses (RNs).

Baccalaureate nursing education provides a strong foundation for graduate study in nursing, including advanced practice nursing, nursing education, and nursing leadership roles. It also promotes the development of critical thinking, leadership, communication, and evidence-based practice skills that are essential for success in the nursing profession.

Oral medicine is a specialized branch of dentistry that focuses on the diagnosis, management, and treatment of oral diseases and disorders. These may include conditions that affect the oral mucosa (the lining of the mouth), salivary glands, jaw joints, and other oral structures. Oral medicine also deals with the oral manifestations of systemic diseases, such as diabetes or HIV/AIDS, and the oral side effects of medications. Practitioners of oral medicine often work closely with other healthcare professionals, including medical doctors, dentists, and pharmacists, to provide comprehensive care for their patients.

Graduate education typically refers to educational programs beyond the undergraduate level that lead to an advanced degree, such as a master's, doctoral, or professional degree. These programs usually require completion of a Bachelor's degree as a prerequisite and involve more specialized and in-depth study in a particular field. Graduate education may include coursework, research, examinations, and the completion of a thesis or dissertation. The specific requirements for graduate education vary depending on the field of study and the institution offering the degree program.

I'm happy to help! However, it seems there might be a slight confusion in your request. "Students, Nursing" is not a medical term or concept but rather refers to individuals studying to become nurses. Nonetheless, I can certainly provide you with some information about nursing education and the types of students involved.

Nursing students are individuals who pursue formal education to acquire knowledge, skills, and competencies required to become registered nurses (RNs) or advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs). There are several educational paths for nursing students:

1. **Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN):** A two-year program that prepares students to provide direct patient care as a registered nurse. ADN programs typically cover fundamental nursing concepts and clinical practice.
2. **Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN):** A four-year undergraduate degree program that combines general education courses with nursing theory, research, leadership, and practice. BSN-prepared nurses often have better career advancement opportunities compared to ADN graduates.
3. **Direct Entry Master's Degree in Nursing (DEM):** A graduate-level program designed for individuals who hold a bachelor's degree in a non-nursing field and wish to transition into nursing. DEM programs typically take 18-24 months to complete and prepare students to become registered nurses.
4. **Master of Science in Nursing (MSN):** A graduate-level program for RNs who want to specialize or advance their careers as nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, nurse educators, or nurse administrators. MSN programs usually take 2-3 years to complete and require a BSN degree for admission.
5. **Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP):** A terminal professional degree that prepares advanced practice registered nurses for the highest level of clinical practice, leadership, and healthcare policy. DNP programs typically take 3-4 years to complete and require an MSN degree for admission.

In summary, nursing students are individuals who enroll in various educational programs to become qualified nursing professionals, ranging from associate to doctoral degrees.

Professional education refers to the educational programs and training that prepare individuals to enter a recognized profession. This type of education is typically focused on providing students with the specific knowledge, skills, and abilities required to practice in a particular field, such as medicine, law, engineering, or teaching. Professional education often includes a combination of classroom instruction, practical experience, and examination or assessment to ensure that students have met the necessary standards to enter the profession. It is designed to develop the competencies required for safe and effective practice, and may include ongoing education and training throughout a professional's career to maintain and enhance their skills and knowledge.

Educational technology is a field concerned with the application of educational theories, instructional design principles, and technological tools to facilitate learning, improve performance, and enhance access to education. It involves the use of various technologies, such as computers, mobile devices, learning management systems, digital content, and online collaboration tools, to support teaching and learning processes.

The goal of educational technology is to create engaging, interactive, and personalized learning experiences that cater to diverse learning styles, needs, and preferences. It encompasses a wide range of practices, including multimedia presentations, simulations, virtual labs, serious games, adaptive assessments, and social media-based collaboration.

Educational technology also includes the study of how people learn with technology, the design and development of educational technologies, and the evaluation of their effectiveness in achieving learning outcomes. It is an interdisciplinary field that draws on insights from education, psychology, computer science, engineering, and other related disciplines.

Comprehensive dental care is a broad term that refers to a dental approach that involves the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of a wide range of oral health issues. It aims to provide patients with complete and optimal oral health care, including:

1. Oral examination and assessment: This includes a thorough examination of the patient's oral cavity, head, and neck to identify any existing dental problems or potential issues that may arise in the future.
2. Preventive care: Comprehensive dental care emphasizes preventive measures such as regular dental cleanings, fluoride treatments, and sealants to help protect against tooth decay and gum disease.
3. Restorative dentistry: If dental problems are identified, comprehensive dental care includes restorative treatments like fillings, crowns, bridges, or implants to restore the function and appearance of damaged teeth.
4. Periodontal (gum) treatment: Comprehensive dental care also addresses periodontal health through deep cleanings, scaling and root planing, and other therapies to manage gum disease.
5. Oral surgery: In some cases, comprehensive dental care may involve oral surgery procedures like tooth extractions or jaw realignment.
6. Endodontic (root canal) treatment: If the pulp of a tooth becomes infected or inflamed, endodontic treatment may be necessary to save the tooth and alleviate pain.
7. Prosthodontics: This includes the replacement of missing teeth with dentures, bridges, or implants.
8. Orthodontic care: Comprehensive dental care can also involve orthodontic treatments like braces or aligners to straighten misaligned teeth and improve bite.
9. Oral cancer screening: Regular oral cancer screenings are an essential part of comprehensive dental care, as early detection significantly increases the chances of successful treatment.
10. Patient education: Comprehensive dental care also focuses on educating patients about proper oral hygiene practices, nutrition, and lifestyle choices that can impact their oral health. This helps empower patients to take an active role in maintaining their oral health between appointments.

In summary, comprehensive dental care is a holistic approach to dental care that aims to provide complete and personalized oral health solutions for each patient, addressing all aspects of their oral health and promoting long-term wellbeing.

Accreditation is a process in which a healthcare organization, facility, or program is evaluated and certified as meeting certain standards and criteria established by a recognized accrediting body. The purpose of accreditation is to ensure that the organization, facility, or program provides safe, high-quality care and services to its patients or clients.

Accreditation typically involves a thorough review of an organization's policies, procedures, practices, and outcomes, as well as an on-site survey by a team of experts from the accrediting body. The evaluation focuses on various aspects of the organization's operations, such as leadership and management, patient safety, infection control, clinical services, quality improvement, and staff competence.

Accreditation is voluntary, but many healthcare organizations seek it as a way to demonstrate their commitment to excellence and continuous improvement. Accreditation can also be a requirement for licensure, reimbursement, or participation in certain programs or initiatives.

Examples of accrediting bodies in the healthcare field include The Joint Commission, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF), and the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA).

Internal Medicine is a medical specialty that deals with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of internal diseases affecting adults. It encompasses a wide range of medical conditions, including those related to the cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, hematological, endocrine, infectious, and immune systems. Internists, or general internists, are trained to provide comprehensive care for adult patients, managing both simple and complex diseases, and often serving as primary care physicians. They may also subspecialize in various fields such as cardiology, gastroenterology, nephrology, or infectious disease, among others.

Preceptorship is a period of structured guidance and support provided to a novice or trainee healthcare professional, usually following the completion of their initial training, to help them develop the necessary skills and knowledge to practice safely and effectively in their chosen field. The preceptee works under the supervision of an experienced practitioner, known as a preceptor, who provides direct oversight, assessment, and feedback on their performance. Preceptorship aims to promote the integration and application of theoretical knowledge into clinical practice, enhance confidence, and promote the development of competence in the areas of communication, critical thinking, professionalism, and patient safety.

A dental hygienist is a licensed healthcare professional who works as part of the dental team, providing educational, clinical, and therapeutic services to prevent and control oral diseases. They are trained and authorized to perform various duties such as:

1. Cleaning and polishing teeth (prophylaxis) to remove plaque, calculus, and stains.
2. Applying fluoride and sealants to protect tooth surfaces from decay.
3. Taking dental radiographs (x-rays) to help diagnose dental issues.
4. Providing oral health education, including proper brushing, flossing techniques, and nutrition counseling.
5. Performing screenings for oral cancer and other diseases.
6. Documenting patient care and treatment plans in medical records.
7. Collaborating with dentists to develop individualized treatment plans for patients.
8. Managing infection control protocols and maintaining a safe, clean dental environment.
9. Providing supportive services, such as applying anesthetics or administering nitrous oxide, under the direct supervision of a dentist (depending on state regulations).

Dental hygienists typically work in private dental offices but can also be found in hospitals, clinics, public health settings, educational institutions, and research facilities. They must complete an accredited dental hygiene program and pass written and clinical exams to obtain licensure in their state of practice. Continuing education is required to maintain licensure and stay current with advancements in the field.

Histology is the study of the microscopic structure of tissues. It involves the examination of tissues at the level of individual cells and their organization into functional units. This field uses various staining techniques to visualize different cellular components, allowing for the identification and analysis of specific cell types, tissue architecture, and pathological changes. Histology is a fundamental discipline in anatomy, physiology, and pathology, providing essential information for understanding normal tissue function and disease processes.

Dentist-patient relations refer to the professional relationship between a licensed dentist and their patient. This relationship is based on trust, communication, and ethical obligations. The dentist is responsible for providing competent and appropriate dental care while considering the patient's needs, preferences, and values. The patient, on the other hand, should be honest with their dentist regarding their medical history, oral health habits, and any concerns they may have. Effective dentist-patient relations are crucial in ensuring positive dental experiences, treatment compliance, and overall satisfaction with dental care.

Veterinary education is a postsecondary educational process and training that prepares students to become licensed veterinarians. The curriculum typically includes courses in biochemistry, anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, pathology, microbiology, immunology, toxicology, animal nutrition, parasitology, and veterinary clinical practice.

In addition to classroom instruction, veterinary education also involves hands-on training through clinical rotations in veterinary hospitals, clinics, and research laboratories. Students learn how to diagnose and treat diseases and injuries in a variety of animals, including domestic pets, livestock, and wildlife.

Veterinary education typically takes four years to complete and is offered by colleges or schools of veterinary medicine that are accredited by the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) Council on Education. After completing their education, graduates must pass a licensing exam in order to practice veterinary medicine. Continuing education is also required throughout their careers to maintain their license and stay up-to-date with advances in the field.

The "attitude of health personnel" refers to the overall disposition, behavior, and approach that healthcare professionals exhibit towards their patients or clients. This encompasses various aspects such as:

1. Interpersonal skills: The ability to communicate effectively, listen actively, and build rapport with patients.
2. Professionalism: Adherence to ethical principles, confidentiality, and maintaining a non-judgmental attitude.
3. Compassion and empathy: Showing genuine concern for the patient's well-being and understanding their feelings and experiences.
4. Cultural sensitivity: Respecting and acknowledging the cultural backgrounds, beliefs, and values of patients.
5. Competence: Demonstrating knowledge, skills, and expertise in providing healthcare services.
6. Collaboration: Working together with other healthcare professionals to ensure comprehensive care for the patient.
7. Patient-centeredness: Focusing on the individual needs, preferences, and goals of the patient in the decision-making process.
8. Commitment to continuous learning and improvement: Staying updated with the latest developments in the field and seeking opportunities to enhance one's skills and knowledge.

A positive attitude of health personnel contributes significantly to patient satisfaction, adherence to treatment plans, and overall healthcare outcomes.

Operative dentistry is a branch of dental medicine that involves the diagnosis, treatment, and management of teeth with structural or functional damage due to decay, trauma, or other causes. It primarily focuses on restoring the function, form, and health of damaged teeth through various operative procedures such as fillings, crowns, inlays, onlays, and root canal treatments. The goal is to preserve natural tooth structure, alleviate pain, prevent further decay or damage, and restore the patient's oral health and aesthetics.

Here are some of the key aspects and procedures involved in operative dentistry:

1. Diagnosis: Operative dentists use various diagnostic tools and techniques to identify and assess tooth damage, including visual examination, dental X-rays, and special tests like pulp vitality testing. This helps them determine the most appropriate treatment approach for each case.
2. Preparation: Before performing any operative procedure, the dentist must prepare the tooth by removing decayed or damaged tissue, as well as any existing restorations that may be compromised or failing. This process is called tooth preparation and involves using specialized dental instruments like burs and excavators to shape the tooth and create a stable foundation for the new restoration.
3. Restoration: Operative dentistry encompasses various techniques and materials used to restore damaged teeth, including:
a. Fillings: Direct fillings are placed directly into the prepared cavity using materials like amalgam (silver), composite resin (tooth-colored), glass ionomer, or gold foil. The choice of filling material depends on factors such as the location and extent of the damage, patient's preferences, and cost considerations.
b. Indirect restorations: These are fabricated outside the mouth, usually in a dental laboratory, and then cemented or bonded to the prepared tooth. Examples include inlays, onlays, and crowns, which can be made from materials like gold, porcelain, ceramic, or resin composites.
c. Endodontic treatments: Operative dentistry also includes root canal therapy, which involves removing infected or inflamed pulp tissue from within the tooth's root canals, cleaning and shaping the canals, and then filling and sealing them to prevent reinfection.
d. Veneers: These are thin layers of porcelain or composite resin that are bonded to the front surfaces of teeth to improve their appearance, shape, or alignment.
4. Follow-up care: After placing a restoration, patients should maintain good oral hygiene practices and have regular dental checkups to ensure the long-term success of the treatment. In some cases, additional adjustments or repairs may be necessary over time due to wear, fracture, or secondary decay.

Cultural competency is a term used in the medical and healthcare fields to describe the ability of healthcare providers and systems to understand, respect, and effectively communicate with patients from diverse cultural backgrounds. It involves an awareness of and appreciation for the differences in customs, values, beliefs, languages, and practices that exist among various cultural groups.

A culturally competent healthcare provider is one who:

* Has knowledge of the patient's culture and how it may impact their health beliefs, behaviors, and communication styles
* Is sensitive to and respectful of the patient's cultural values and traditions
* Uses this understanding to inform their clinical decision-making and provide care that is tailored to the individual needs and preferences of the patient

Cultural competency also involves an awareness of one's own cultural background and biases, as well as a commitment to ongoing learning and self-reflection in order to continually improve cultural humility and sensitivity.

A culturally competent healthcare system is one that:

* Has policies and procedures in place to ensure equitable access to care for all patients, regardless of their cultural background
* Provides interpreter services and other language accommodations as needed
* Engages in ongoing training and education to promote cultural awareness and sensitivity among staff members
* Collects and analyzes data on patient outcomes and satisfaction to identify and address disparities in care.

Dental technology refers to the application of science and engineering in dentistry to prevent, diagnose, and treat dental diseases and conditions. It involves the use of various equipment, materials, and techniques to improve oral health and enhance the delivery of dental care. Some examples of dental technology include:

1. Digital radiography: This technology uses digital sensors instead of traditional X-ray films to produce images of the teeth and supporting structures. It provides higher quality images, reduces radiation exposure, and allows for easier storage and sharing of images.
2. CAD/CAM dentistry: Computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology is used to design and fabricate dental restorations such as crowns, bridges, and veneers in a single appointment. This technology allows for more precise and efficient production of dental restorations.
3. Dental implants: These are artificial tooth roots that are placed into the jawbone to replace missing teeth. They provide a stable foundation for dental restorations such as crowns, bridges, and dentures.
4. Intraoral cameras: These are small cameras that can be inserted into the mouth to capture detailed images of the teeth and gums. These images can be used for diagnosis, treatment planning, and patient education.
5. Laser dentistry: Dental lasers are used to perform a variety of procedures such as cavity preparation, gum contouring, and tooth whitening. They provide more precise and less invasive treatments compared to traditional dental tools.
6. 3D printing: This technology is used to create dental models, surgical guides, and custom-made dental restorations. It allows for more accurate and efficient production of dental products.

Overall, dental technology plays a crucial role in modern dentistry by improving the accuracy, efficiency, and quality of dental care.

Emergency medicine is a medical specialty that focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of acute illnesses or injuries that require immediate medical attention. This can include conditions such as severe trauma, cardiac arrest, stroke, respiratory distress, and other life-threatening situations. Emergency medicine physicians, also known as emergency doctors or ER doctors, are trained to provide rapid assessment, diagnosis, and treatment in a fast-paced and often unpredictable environment. They work closely with other healthcare professionals, such as nurses, paramedics, and specialists, to ensure that patients receive the best possible care in a timely manner. Emergency medicine is a critical component of the healthcare system, providing essential services for patients who require immediate medical attention, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

A questionnaire in the medical context is a standardized, systematic, and structured tool used to gather information from individuals regarding their symptoms, medical history, lifestyle, or other health-related factors. It typically consists of a series of written questions that can be either self-administered or administered by an interviewer. Questionnaires are widely used in various areas of healthcare, including clinical research, epidemiological studies, patient care, and health services evaluation to collect data that can inform diagnosis, treatment planning, and population health management. They provide a consistent and organized method for obtaining information from large groups or individual patients, helping to ensure accurate and comprehensive data collection while minimizing bias and variability in the information gathered.

Distance education, also known as distance learning, is a type of education in which students receive instruction and complete coursework remotely, typically through online or correspondence courses. This allows learners to access educational opportunities from anywhere, without the need to physically attend classes on a college campus or other physical location. Distance education may involve a variety of multimedia resources, such as video lectures, interactive simulations, discussion forums, and email communication with instructors and classmates.

Distance learning has become increasingly popular in recent years, due in part to advances in technology that make it easier to deliver high-quality educational content over the internet. It is often used by working professionals who need flexibility in their schedules, as well as by students who live in remote areas or have other reasons that prevent them from attending traditional classes.

While distance education offers many benefits, it also has some unique challenges, such as ensuring adequate student-teacher interaction and maintaining academic integrity. As a result, institutions offering distance learning programs must carefully design their courses and support systems to ensure that students receive a quality education that meets their needs and expectations.

Biological science disciplines are fields of study that deal with the principles and mechanisms of living organisms and their interactions with the environment. These disciplines employ scientific, analytical, and experimental approaches to understand various biological phenomena at different levels of organization, ranging from molecules and cells to ecosystems. Some of the major biological science disciplines include:

1. Molecular Biology: This field focuses on understanding the structure, function, and interactions of molecules that are essential for life, such as DNA, RNA, proteins, and lipids. It includes sub-disciplines like genetics, biochemistry, and structural biology.
2. Cellular Biology: This discipline investigates the properties, structures, and functions of individual cells, which are the basic units of life. Topics covered include cell division, signaling, metabolism, transport, and organization.
3. Physiology: Physiologists study the functioning of living organisms and their organs, tissues, and cells. They investigate how biological systems maintain homeostasis, respond to stimuli, and adapt to changing environments.
4. Genetics: This field deals with the study of genes, heredity, and variation in organisms. It includes classical genetics, molecular genetics, population genetics, quantitative genetics, and genetic engineering.
5. Evolutionary Biology: This discipline focuses on understanding the processes that drive the origin, diversification, and extinction of species over time. Topics include natural selection, adaptation, speciation, phylogeny, and molecular evolution.
6. Ecology: Ecologists study the interactions between organisms and their environment, including the distribution, abundance, and behavior of populations, communities, and ecosystems.
7. Biotechnology: This field applies biological principles and techniques to develop products, tools, and processes that improve human health, agriculture, and industry. It includes genetic engineering, bioprocessing, bioremediation, and synthetic biology.
8. Neuroscience: Neuroscientists investigate the structure, function, development, and disorders of the nervous system, including the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nerves.
9. Biophysics: This discipline combines principles from physics and biology to understand living systems' properties and behaviors at various scales, from molecules to organisms.
10. Systems Biology: Systems biologists study complex biological systems as integrated networks of genes, proteins, and metabolites, using computational models and high-throughput data analysis.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "universities" is a term that refers to institutions of higher education and research, and it is not a medical term. A university typically offers undergraduate and postgraduate programs leading to the award of degrees such as bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees.

If you have any questions related to medicine or healthcare, I would be happy to try to help answer them for you.

Health education is the process of providing information and strategies to individuals and communities about how to improve their health and prevent disease. It involves teaching and learning activities that aim to empower people to make informed decisions and take responsible actions regarding their health. Health education covers a wide range of topics, including nutrition, physical activity, sexual and reproductive health, mental health, substance abuse prevention, and environmental health. The ultimate goal of health education is to promote healthy behaviors and lifestyles that can lead to improved health outcomes and quality of life.

"Education, Nursing, Graduate" typically refers to a level of academic achievement in the field of nursing. It indicates that an individual has completed a program of study beyond the bachelor's degree level, specifically in the field of nursing. This may include degrees such as a Master of Science in Nursing (MSN), Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP), or PhD in Nursing.

The specific curriculum and focus of these programs can vary, but they generally build on the foundational knowledge and skills gained in a bachelor's degree program in nursing. Graduate nursing programs may focus on advanced clinical practice, leadership and management, research, or education, among other areas.

Individuals who complete a graduate nursing program may be eligible for more advanced roles in nursing, such as nurse practitioner, clinical nurse specialist, nurse educator, or nurse administrator, depending on the specific degree and area of focus. They may also be prepared to conduct research or teach in nursing programs.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "United States" is a geopolitical entity, specifically the name of the country consisting of 50 states, and it is not a medical term or concept. Therefore, I can't provide a medical definition for it. If you have any questions related to health, medicine, or biology, I would be happy to try to help answer those!

I believe you may have made a typo in your question. The term you're asking about should be "mentor" instead of "mentors." A mentor is not a medical term per se, but I can certainly provide a general definition.

A mentor is a experienced and trusted advisor or guide who provides support, shares knowledge, and helps in the personal and professional development of an individual, often in a specific field or industry. In a medical context, a mentor could be a senior physician or researcher who guides and supports a medical student, resident, or fellow in their learning and career progression.

Periodontics is a specialty of dentistry that focuses on the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases affecting the supporting structures of the teeth, including the gums, periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone. It deals with the maintenance of the health, function, and esthetics of these structures and the teeth themselves. Common periodontal treatments include scaling and root planing (deep cleanings), pocket reduction procedures, regenerative treatments, and dental implant placement. Periodontists are dentists who have completed additional training in this specialized field.

Osteopathic medicine is a system of medical care that focuses on the unity of the mind, body, and spirit in the diagnosis and treatment of illness. It was founded in the United States in 1874 by Andrew Taylor Still, MD, who developed a philosophy of medicine based on principles of preventive medicine, holistic patient care, and the interrelationship of all body systems.

Osteopathic physicians (DOs), also known as osteopaths, are trained to diagnose and treat medical conditions using a variety of treatment modalities, including manual manipulation of the musculoskeletal system. They receive the same basic medical education as MDs, but also complete additional training in osteopathic principles and practices.

Osteopathic medicine emphasizes the importance of preventive care, lifestyle modifications, and patient education in maintaining health and preventing illness. DOs are trained to use their hands to diagnose and treat structural and functional problems in the body, with a focus on the musculoskeletal system. They believe that the body has an inherent ability to heal itself, and that manipulation of the bones, muscles, and other tissues can help promote this natural healing process.

DOs are licensed to practice medicine and surgery in all 50 states and are recognized as fully qualified physicians. They may choose to specialize in any area of medicine, including family practice, internal medicine, pediatrics, surgery, psychiatry, and neurology, among others.

I apologize for any confusion, but "Teaching Materials" is not a medical term or concept. It generally refers to resources and tools used by educators to facilitate learning, which can include textbooks, multimedia presentations, handouts, and other materials used in educational settings. If you have a specific term related to medicine or healthcare in mind, please let me know so I can provide a more accurate definition.

I couldn't find a specific medical definition for "Self-Evaluation Programs." However, in the context of healthcare and medical education, self-evaluation programs generally refer to activities or interventions designed to help healthcare professionals assess their own knowledge, skills, and performance. These programs often include tools such as:

1. Knowledge-based tests and quizzes
2. Reflective practice exercises
3. Case discussions and simulations
4. Feedback from peers or supervisors
5. Performance metrics and benchmarking

The primary goal of self-evaluation programs is to promote continuous professional development, identify areas for improvement, and enhance the quality of care provided to patients. They may be used as part of continuing medical education (CME), maintenance of certification (MOC) processes, or quality improvement initiatives.

Patient simulation is the creation of a situation or scenario that represents a patient's medical condition or illness, using a mannequin or computer-based program. It allows healthcare professionals and students to practice their skills and decision-making abilities in a controlled and safe environment. The simulated patient can respond to treatments and interventions, providing a realistic representation of the patient's condition. This type of simulation is used for training, assessment, and research purposes in medical education and healthcare fields.

Clinical pharmacology is a branch of medicine that deals with the study of drugs and their interactions with living organisms. It involves understanding how drugs are absorbed, distributed, metabolized, and excreted by the body, as well as their therapeutic effects, side effects, and toxicity. Clinical pharmacology also encompasses the design and conduct of clinical trials to evaluate the safety and efficacy of new drugs in human subjects. The ultimate goal of clinical pharmacology is to optimize drug therapy for individual patients by considering factors such as age, sex, genetics, lifestyle, and comorbidities. In summary, clinical pharmacology is the application of pharmacological principles to the practice of medicine for the benefit of patients.

I believe there may be some confusion in your question. "Schools" is not a medical term. It generally refers to educational institutions where children or adults receive instruction in various subjects. If you are asking about a medical condition that might be associated with the word "school," it's possible you could mean "psychological disorders that first present or become evident during the school-aged period (approximately 5-18 years of age)." These disorders can include, but are not limited to, ADHD, learning disabilities, anxiety disorders, and mood disorders. However, without more context, it's difficult for me to provide a more specific answer.

Dental research is a scientific discipline that focuses on the study of teeth, oral health, and related diseases. It involves various aspects of dental sciences such as oral biology, microbiology, biochemistry, genetics, epidemiology, biomaterials, and biotechnology. The main aim of dental research is to improve oral health care, develop new diagnostic tools, prevent dental diseases, and create better treatment options for various dental conditions. Dental researchers may study topics such as tooth development, oral cancer, periodontal disease, dental caries (cavities), saliva composition, and the effects of nutrition on oral health. The findings from dental research can help improve dental care practices, inform public health policies, and advance our understanding of overall human health.

"Health Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices" (HKAP) is a term used in public health to refer to the knowledge, beliefs, assumptions, and behaviors that individuals possess or engage in that are related to health. Here's a brief definition of each component:

1. Health Knowledge: Refers to the factual information and understanding that individuals have about various health-related topics, such as anatomy, physiology, disease processes, and healthy behaviors.
2. Attitudes: Represent the positive or negative evaluations, feelings, or dispositions that people hold towards certain health issues, practices, or services. These attitudes can influence their willingness to adopt and maintain healthy behaviors.
3. Practices: Encompass the specific actions or habits that individuals engage in related to their health, such as dietary choices, exercise routines, hygiene practices, and use of healthcare services.

HKAP is a multidimensional concept that helps public health professionals understand and address various factors influencing individual and community health outcomes. By assessing and addressing knowledge gaps, negative attitudes, or unhealthy practices, interventions can be designed to promote positive behavior change and improve overall health status.

I apologize for any confusion, but "students" is not a medical term. It refers to individuals who are engaged in studying or learning at an educational institution, such as a school, college, or university. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or concepts, I would be happy to help clarify those for you.

Dental ethics refers to the principles and rules that guide the conduct of dental professionals in their interactions with patients, colleagues, and society. These ethical standards are designed to promote trust, respect, and fairness in dental care, and they are often based on fundamental ethical principles such as autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence, and justice.

Autonomy refers to the patient's right to make informed decisions about their own health care, free from coercion or manipulation. Dental professionals have an obligation to provide patients with accurate information about their dental conditions and treatment options, so that they can make informed choices about their care.

Beneficence means acting in the best interests of the patient, and doing what is medically necessary and appropriate to promote their health and well-being. Dental professionals have a duty to provide high-quality care that meets accepted standards of practice, and to use evidence-based treatments that are likely to be effective.

Non-maleficence means avoiding harm to the patient. Dental professionals must take reasonable precautions to prevent injuries or complications during treatment, and they should avoid providing unnecessary or harmful treatments.

Justice refers to fairness and equity in the distribution of dental resources and services. Dental professionals have an obligation to provide care that is accessible, affordable, and culturally sensitive, and to advocate for policies and practices that promote health equity and social justice.

Dental ethics also encompasses issues related to patient confidentiality, informed consent, research integrity, professional competence, and boundary violations. Dental professionals are expected to adhere to ethical guidelines established by their professional organizations, such as the American Dental Association (ADA) or the British Dental Association (BDA), and to comply with relevant laws and regulations governing dental practice.

"Dental, Graduate Education" refers to the post-baccalaureate programs of study and training that lead to an advanced degree in the field of dentistry. These programs are designed to prepare students for specialized dental practice, research, or teaching careers. Examples of graduate dental degrees include:

1. Doctor of Dental Surgery (DDS): A professional doctoral degree that qualifies the graduate to practice general dentistry.
2. Doctor of Medical Dentistry (DMD): A professional doctoral degree equivalent to the DDS; awarded by some universities in the United States and several other countries.
3. Master of Science (MS) in Dentistry: An academic master's degree focused on research, teaching, or advanced clinical practice in a specific dental discipline.
4. Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in Dental Sciences: A research-oriented doctoral degree that prepares students for careers in academia, research institutions, or the dental industry.
5. Specialty Training Programs: Postgraduate residency programs that provide advanced training in one of the nine recognized dental specialties, such as orthodontics, oral and maxillofacial surgery, or pediatric dentistry. These programs typically lead to a certificate or a master's degree in the respective specialty area.

Graduate dental education usually involves a combination of classroom instruction, laboratory work, clinical experience, and research. Admission to these programs typically requires a DDS or DMD degree from an accredited dental school and satisfactory scores on the Dental Admission Test (DAT).

School health services refer to the health programs and services provided within schools by qualified healthcare professionals or specialists. These services aim to improve the overall well-being, academic success, and development of students by addressing both their physical and mental health needs. Examples of school health services include:

1. Health screenings: Routine vision, hearing, dental, and other health screenings to identify any potential issues early on.
2. Immunizations: Ensuring students are up-to-date with required immunizations and providing education about the importance of vaccinations.
3. Chronic disease management: Helping students manage chronic conditions such as asthma, diabetes, or epilepsy through individualized care plans and coordination with healthcare providers.
4. Mental health services: Providing counseling, therapy, and support for students dealing with emotional or behavioral challenges, including anxiety, depression, or trauma.
5. Health education: Teaching students about various health topics, such as nutrition, hygiene, sexual health, substance abuse prevention, and safety practices.
6. Case management: Coordinating care and providing resources for students with complex medical needs or social determinants of health challenges.
7. First aid and emergency care: Providing immediate medical attention in case of injuries or illnesses that occur during school hours.
8. Referrals to community resources: Connecting students and families with local healthcare providers, support services, and other resources as needed.

The goal of school health services is to create a safe, healthy, and supportive learning environment that promotes the overall well-being of all students.

Data collection in the medical context refers to the systematic gathering of information relevant to a specific research question or clinical situation. This process involves identifying and recording data elements, such as demographic characteristics, medical history, physical examination findings, laboratory results, and imaging studies, from various sources including patient interviews, medical records, and diagnostic tests. The data collected is used to support clinical decision-making, inform research hypotheses, and evaluate the effectiveness of treatments or interventions. It is essential that data collection is performed in a standardized and unbiased manner to ensure the validity and reliability of the results.

Dental implantation is a surgical procedure in which a titanium post or frame is inserted into the jawbone beneath the gum line to replace the root of a missing tooth. Once the implant has integrated with the bone, a replacement tooth (crown) is attached to the top of the implant, providing a stable and durable restoration that looks, feels, and functions like a natural tooth. Dental implants can also be used to support dental bridges or dentures, providing added stability and comfort for patients who are missing multiple teeth.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "physics" is not a term that has a medical definition. Physics is a branch of science that deals with the study of matter, energy, and their interactions. It may be studied in the context of medical physics, which involves the application of physical principles to medicine, such as in the use of radiation therapy for cancer treatment or imaging techniques like MRI and CT scans. However, "physics" itself is not a medical term with a specific definition within the field of medicine.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "thinking" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. It is a cognitive process, which is a general term used to describe various mental activities related to perception, reasoning, memory, attention, language use, learning, and problem-solving. These processes are studied across many fields, including psychology, neuroscience, philosophy, and linguistics.

If you're looking for medical definitions of cognitive processes or conditions that affect cognition, I'd be happy to help! Please provide more details.

I am not a medical professional, but I can provide you with some general information about the concept of "education" in the context of health and medicine.

In this context, education generally refers to the process of acquiring knowledge, skills, values, and attitudes related to maintaining and improving one's health and well-being, as well as preventing and managing diseases and injuries. Health education can take place in various settings, such as schools, healthcare facilities, workplaces, and communities.

Health education aims to empower individuals and populations to make informed decisions about their health and promote healthy behaviors and lifestyle choices. It covers a wide range of topics, including:

1. Anatomy and physiology
2. Nutrition and diet
3. Exercise and physical activity
4. Mental health and well-being
5. Substance use and abuse
6. Sexual and reproductive health
7. Personal hygiene and infection control
8. Chronic disease management
9. Injury prevention and safety
10. Environmental health

Health education is often delivered by healthcare professionals, educators, and community leaders, using various methods such as lectures, workshops, demonstrations, simulations, and digital media. The ultimate goal of health education is to improve overall health outcomes and reduce health disparities in populations.

The American Dental Association (ADA) is not a medical condition or diagnosis. It is the largest professional organization of dentists in the United States, with the mission to serve and advance the dental profession, promote oral health, and protect the public. The ADA develops and publishes guidelines and standards for the practice of dentistry, provides continuing education opportunities for dentists, advocates for oral health legislation and policies, and engages in scientific research and evidence-based dentistry.

Biology is the scientific study of living organisms and their vital processes. It deals with the characteristics, classification, and behaviors of plants, animals, and microorganisms, as well as how they interact with each other and the environment. Biology covers a wide range of topics, including genetics, cell biology, evolution, ecology, and physiology. The goal of biological research is to understand the fundamental principles that govern the functioning of living systems and to apply this knowledge to improve human health, agriculture, and the environment.

Fellowships and scholarships in the medical context are awards given to individuals to support their education, training, or research in a specific medical field. Here are the definitions for each:

1. Fellowship: A fellowship is a competitive award given to a highly qualified individual, usually a physician or researcher, to pursue advanced training, education, or research in a specialized area of medicine. Fellowships can last from one to several years and often involve working in an academic medical center or research institution. They may include a stipend, tuition support, and other benefits.
2. Scholarship: A scholarship is a financial award given to an individual to support their education, typically for undergraduate or graduate studies. In the medical context, scholarships are often granted to students who demonstrate academic excellence, leadership potential, and a commitment to a career in medicine. Scholarships can cover tuition, fees, books, and living expenses and may be awarded by universities, professional organizations, or other entities.

Both fellowships and scholarships can provide valuable opportunities for individuals to advance their knowledge, skills, and careers in the medical field. They are often highly competitive, with selection based on a variety of factors including academic achievement, research experience, leadership potential, and personal qualities.

"School Admission Criteria" is not a medical term. However, I can provide you with a general definition:

School admission criteria are the set of standards and qualifications that a student must meet in order to be considered for acceptance into a particular school or educational program. These criteria may include academic achievements, standardized test scores, behavioral records, extracurricular activities, interviews, and other factors that the school deems relevant to assess a student's potential for success in their learning environment.

While not medical, these criteria can impact a child's educational experience and overall well-being, which may have indirect effects on their health.

Community dentistry, also known as public health dentistry, is a branch of dental science that focuses on the prevention and control of oral diseases and promoting oral health within communities and populations. It involves the application of epidemiological, social, behavioral, and administrative sciences to improve the oral health of populations. The goal of community dentistry is to reduce oral health disparities by providing accessible, affordable, and culturally competent dental care to all members of a community, particularly those who are underserved or vulnerable.

Community dentistry programs may include school-based dental sealant programs, fluoridation initiatives, oral health education campaigns, and policy advocacy efforts to improve access to dental care. Dental public health professionals work in a variety of settings, including public health departments, community health centers, academic institutions, and non-profit organizations. They collaborate with other healthcare providers, policymakers, and community stakeholders to promote oral health and prevent oral diseases.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Moral Development" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. It is a concept that primarily belongs to the fields of psychology and philosophy.

Moral development refers to the process by which individuals acquire, construct, and systematize moral knowledge and make moral judgments. This concept was popularized by psychologist Lawrence Kohlberg through his stages of moral development theory, which posits that individuals go through distinct stages in their understanding and interpretation of moral dilemmas. These stages range from a focus on avoiding punishment (pre-conventional morality) to considering the rights and welfare of others (post-conventional morality).

While medical professionals may take into account a patient's moral development when providing care or counseling, it is not a term that has a specific medical definition.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Science" is a broad field that refers to a systematic and logical process used to discover how things in the universe work. It's not typically used as a medical term. However, within the context of medicine, "science" often refers to evidence-based practices, which are treatments and preventions that have been scientifically researched and proven to be effective. This could include areas like pharmacology (the study of drugs), pathophysiology (the study of changes in the body due to disease), or clinical trials (studies used to test new treatments). If you're looking for a specific medical term, could you please provide more context?

In the context of medical terminology, "attitude" generally refers to the position or posture of a patient's body or a part of it. It can also refer to the mental set or disposition that a person has towards their health, illness, or healthcare providers. However, it is not a term that has a specific medical definition like other medical terminologies do.

For example, in orthopedics, "attitude" may be used to describe the position of a limb or joint during an examination or surgical procedure. In psychology, "attitude" may refer to a person's feelings, beliefs, and behaviors towards a particular object, issue, or idea related to their health.

Therefore, the meaning of "attitude" in medical terminology can vary depending on the context in which it is used.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "organizational innovation" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. It is a concept that is more commonly used in the fields of business and management, where it refers to the introduction of new methods, ideas, or products within an organization. This can include things like new processes, structures, or technologies that are designed to improve efficiency, effectiveness, or competitive advantage.

In healthcare organizations, for example, organizational innovation might involve the implementation of new electronic health records systems, the creation of multidisciplinary care teams, or the adoption of novel approaches to patient engagement and empowerment. These types of innovations can help to improve patient outcomes, reduce costs, and enhance the overall quality of care.

Medical Informatics, also known as Healthcare Informatics, is the scientific discipline that deals with the systematic processing and analysis of data, information, and knowledge in healthcare and biomedicine. It involves the development and application of theories, methods, and tools to create, acquire, store, retrieve, share, use, and reuse health-related data and knowledge for clinical, educational, research, and administrative purposes. Medical Informatics encompasses various areas such as bioinformatics, clinical informatics, consumer health informatics, public health informatics, and translational bioinformatics. It aims to improve healthcare delivery, patient outcomes, and biomedical research through the effective use of information technology and data management strategies.

Endodontics is a branch of dentistry that deals with the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of diseases or injuries of the dental pulp (the soft tissue inside the tooth that contains nerves, blood vessels, and connective tissue) and the tissues surrounding the root of the tooth. The most common endodontic procedure is root canal therapy, which involves removing infected or inflamed pulp tissue from within the tooth, cleaning and shaping the root canals, and filling and sealing the space to prevent reinfection. Endodontists are dental specialists who have undergone additional training in this field beyond dental school.

Evidence-Based Dentistry (EBD) is a systematic approach to professional dental practice that incorporates the best available scientific evidence from research, along with clinical expertise and patient values and preferences. The goal of EBD is to provide dental care that is safe, effective, efficient, and equitable. It involves the integration of three key components:

1. Clinical Judgment and Experience: The dentist's knowledge, training, and experience play a critical role in the application of evidence-based dentistry. Clinical expertise helps to identify patient needs, determine the most appropriate treatment options, and tailor care to meet individual patient preferences and values.
2. Patient Values and Preferences: EBD recognizes that patients have unique perspectives, values, and preferences that must be taken into account when making treatment decisions. Dentists should engage in shared decision-making with their patients, providing them with information about the benefits and risks of various treatment options and involving them in the decision-making process.
3. Best Available Scientific Evidence: EBD relies on high-quality scientific evidence from well-designed clinical studies to inform dental practice. This evidence is systematically reviewed, critically appraised, and applied to clinical decision-making. The strength of the evidence is evaluated based on factors such as study design, sample size, and statistical analysis.

In summary, Evidence-Based Dentistry is a method of practicing dentistry that combines clinical expertise, patient values and preferences, and the best available scientific evidence to provide high-quality, individualized care to dental patients.

Cultural diversity, in the context of healthcare and medicine, refers to the existence, recognition, and respect of the different cultural backgrounds, beliefs, values, traditions, languages, and practices of individuals or groups. This concept is important in providing culturally competent care, which aims to improve health outcomes by addressing the unique needs and preferences of patients from diverse backgrounds. Cultural diversity in healthcare recognizes that there are variations in how people perceive and experience health and illness, communicate about symptoms and treatments, seek help, and follow medical advice. By understanding and incorporating cultural diversity into healthcare practices, providers can build trust, reduce disparities, and enhance patient satisfaction and adherence to treatment plans.

"Education, Pharmacy, Graduate" generally refers to the completion of a graduate-level program of study in the field of pharmacy. This type of education is typically pursued by individuals who already hold an undergraduate degree and wish to specialize in the preparation, dispensing, and proper use of medications.

In order to become a licensed pharmacist in the United States, for example, an individual must typically complete a Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) program, which is a post-baccalaureate degree that typically takes four years to complete. During this time, students learn about various aspects of pharmacy practice, including drug therapy management, patient care, and communication skills. They also gain hands-on experience through internships and other experiential learning opportunities.

Graduates of pharmacy programs may go on to work in a variety of settings, including community pharmacies, hospitals, clinics, and long-term care facilities. They may also choose to pursue research or academic careers, working as professors or researchers in universities or research institutions.

A pharmaceutical society is a professional organization that represents and serves the interests of pharmacists and the pharmaceutical industry in a given society or country. The primary objective of these societies is to promote the advancement of the profession of pharmacy, including education, research, and practice. They also work to ensure the safe and effective use of medications, advocate for evidence-based policies and practices, and provide resources and support to their members.

Pharmaceutical societies may engage in various activities, such as:

1. Developing guidelines and standards for pharmacy education and practice.
2. Providing continuing education programs for pharmacists.
3. Conducting research and disseminating knowledge related to pharmacy and medication use.
4. Advocating for policies that promote the safe and effective use of medications.
5. Collaborating with other healthcare professionals, regulatory bodies, and industry partners to improve patient outcomes.
6. Providing resources and support to members, including career development opportunities and networking events.

Examples of pharmaceutical societies include the American Pharmacists Association (APhA), the Royal Pharmaceutical Society (RPS) in the UK, and the International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP).

Environmental medicine is a branch of medicine that focuses on the study of how various environmental factors, including physical, chemical, and biological agents, can impact human health. It involves understanding and addressing the causes and effects of environmental exposures on individual health and disease. This may include assessing and managing exposure to pollutants, allergens, infectious agents, and other environmental stressors in order to prevent or treat related health issues. Additionally, environmental medicine also considers how individual susceptibility, such as genetic factors or pre-existing health conditions, can influence the impact of environmental exposures on health.

Community medicine, also known as social medicine or public health medicine, is a branch of medical science that deals with the health of populations and communities rather than individual patients. It focuses on preventing diseases and promoting health through organized community efforts, including education, advocacy, and policy development. Community medicine aims to improve the overall health status of a population by addressing the social determinants of health, such as poverty, housing, education, and access to healthcare services. It involves collaboration between various stakeholders, including healthcare professionals, community members, policical leaders, and organizations, to identify and address the health needs of the community.

Public Health Dentistry is defined as the science and art of preventing and controlling dental diseases and promoting oral health through organized community efforts. It involves the planning, organization, implementation, and evaluation of services designed to improve the oral health of populations, rather than individuals. This field of dentistry focuses on the importance of addressing social determinants of health, advocating for policies that benefit oral health, and conducting research to inform public health practice and policy. Public Health Dentists work in a variety of settings including public health departments, community health centers, dental schools, and non-profit organizations to promote oral health and reduce oral health disparities.

Nursing Education Research (NER) is a specific field of research that focuses on the development, implementation, evaluation, and dissemination of theories, practices, and outcomes of nursing education. The primary goal of NER is to improve the quality and effectiveness of nursing education programs, teaching strategies, and learning environments to enhance the knowledge, skills, and attitudes of student nurses, as well as their preparedness for professional practice.

NER addresses various topics, including curriculum development and evaluation, instructional design and technology, faculty development, simulation and clinical education, interprofessional education, diversity and inclusivity, and educational outcomes assessment. The ultimate aim of NER is to advance the science of nursing education, inform evidence-based practices, and promote continuous quality improvement in nursing education to ultimately benefit patient care and health outcomes.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Nevada" is not a medical term. It is the name of a state in the western United States. If you have any medical questions or terms you would like defined, please let me know and I would be happy to help.

A public health professional is a trained and educated individual who works to improve the health and well-being of communities and populations through education, research, policy development, and advocacy. A public health professional in the field of education may work in various settings such as universities, colleges, public health departments, non-profit organizations, or government agencies.

Their responsibilities typically include:

1. Developing and implementing educational programs to promote healthy behaviors and prevent disease and injury.
2. Conducting research to identify the health needs and concerns of communities and developing strategies to address them.
3. Advocating for policies and practices that support public health and promote health equity.
4. Collaborating with other professionals, such as healthcare providers, community leaders, and policymakers, to develop and implement effective public health interventions.
5. Evaluating the impact of public health programs and using data to inform decision-making and improve outcomes.

To become a public health professional in education, one typically needs to have at least a master's degree in public health or a related field, such as health education, health promotion, or health services administration. Some positions may require a doctoral degree or additional certifications. Relevant work experience, such as internships or volunteer work, is also valuable for gaining practical skills and making professional connections.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Internet" is a term that pertains to the global network of interconnected computers and servers that enable the transmission and reception of data via the internet protocol (IP). It is not a medical term and does not have a specific medical definition. If you have any questions related to medicine or health, I'd be happy to try to help answer them for you!

Genetics is the scientific study of genes, heredity, and variation in living organisms. It involves the analysis of how traits are passed from parents to offspring, the function of genes, and the way genetic information is transmitted and expressed within an organism's biological system. Genetics encompasses various subfields, including molecular genetics, population genetics, quantitative genetics, and genomics, which investigate gene structure, function, distribution, and evolution in different organisms. The knowledge gained from genetics research has significant implications for understanding human health and disease, as well as for developing medical treatments and interventions based on genetic information.

Family practice, also known as family medicine, is a medical specialty that provides comprehensive and continuous care to patients of all ages, genders, and stages of life. Family physicians are trained to provide a wide range of services, including preventive care, diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic illnesses, management of complex medical conditions, and providing health education and counseling.

Family practice emphasizes the importance of building long-term relationships with patients and their families, and takes into account the physical, emotional, social, and psychological factors that influence a person's health. Family physicians often serve as the primary point of contact for patients within the healthcare system, coordinating care with other specialists and healthcare providers as needed.

Family practice is a broad and diverse field, encompassing various areas such as pediatrics, internal medicine, obstetrics and gynecology, geriatrics, and behavioral health. The goal of family practice is to provide high-quality, patient-centered care that meets the unique needs and preferences of each individual patient and their family.

Continuing dental education (CDE) refers to the ongoing education and training that dentists and other oral health professionals engage in after completing their initial professional degrees. The purpose of CDE is to help these professionals stay current with advances in dental technology, research, and patient care so they can continue to provide the highest quality of care to their patients.

CDE programs may cover a wide range of topics, including new techniques for treating oral diseases, advances in dental materials and equipment, ethical issues in dental practice, and strategies for managing a successful dental practice. These programs may take many forms, such as lectures, workshops, seminars, online courses, or hands-on training sessions.

In most states, dentists are required to complete a certain number of CDE credits each year in order to maintain their licensure. This helps ensure that all dental professionals are up-to-date on the latest research and best practices in their field, which ultimately benefits patients by promoting better oral health outcomes.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "humanities" is not typically used in a medical context as it relates to fields such as literature, philosophy, arts, and languages. The humanities are academic disciplines that study human culture, including language, history, philosophy, and the creation of art. They provide valuable insights into human nature, behavior, and experience, which can certainly have applications in various fields, including healthcare. However, a specific medical definition of "humanities" would not be applicable.

A medical webcast is a digital broadcast of a live or recorded medical education event, seminar, or conference transmitted via the internet. It may include lectures, presentations, discussions, and question-and-answer sessions delivered by medical professionals, researchers, or experts in various fields of medicine. Medical webcasts serve as a valuable resource for continuing medical education (CME) and professional development, allowing healthcare providers to stay current with the latest advances, treatments, and guidelines in their respective fields. They may also provide opportunities for remote participation and interaction with presenters and other attendees through live chats, polls, or Q&A sessions.

A dental clinic is a healthcare facility that is primarily focused on providing oral health services to patients. These services may include preventative care, such as dental cleanings and exams, as well as restorative treatments like fillings, crowns, and bridges. Dental clinics may also offer specialized services, such as orthodontics, periodontics, or endodontics.

In a dental clinic, patients are typically seen by licensed dentists who have completed dental school and received additional training in their chosen area of specialty. Dental hygienists, dental assistants, and other support staff may also work in the clinic to provide care and assistance to patients.

Dental clinics can be found in a variety of settings, including hospitals, community health centers, private practices, and educational institutions. Some dental clinics may specialize in treating certain populations, such as children, elderly individuals, or low-income patients. Others may offer specialized services, such as oral surgery or cosmetic dentistry.

Overall, dental clinics play an important role in promoting oral health and preventing dental diseases and conditions. By providing access to high-quality dental care, dental clinics can help patients maintain healthy teeth and gums, prevent tooth decay and gum disease, and improve their overall quality of life.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Interdisciplinary Studies" is not a medical term. It is a term used in education and research to describe the approach that involves two or more academic disciplines in order to broaden understanding, improve problem-solving, and enhance innovation. This approach is used in various fields including social sciences, humanities, natural sciences, and engineering.

In a medical context, interdisciplinary studies might refer to a collaborative approach to patient care that involves healthcare professionals from different disciplines (such as doctors, nurses, pharmacists, social workers, etc.) working together to provide comprehensive and coordinated care for patients with complex medical conditions. This type of collaboration can lead to improved patient outcomes, increased patient satisfaction, and more efficient use of healthcare resources.

I'm happy to help! However, I believe there might be a slight confusion in your question. "Students, Health Occupations" is not a medical term or definition per se, but rather a general description of individuals who are studying to become healthcare professionals.

Healthcare occupations encompass a wide range of professions, including (but not limited to) physicians, nurses, pharmacists, dentists, mental health professionals, allied health professionals (such as physical therapists, respiratory therapists, and diagnostic medical sonographers), and public health professionals.

Students in health occupations are individuals who are pursuing education and training to enter these professions. They may be enrolled in various types of educational programs, such as undergraduate or graduate degree programs, vocational schools, certificate programs, or on-the-job training. The specific requirements for becoming a healthcare professional vary depending on the profession and the location, but typically involve a combination of education, clinical training, licensure, and certification.

A dental society is a professional organization composed of dentists who have come together to promote and advance the practice of dentistry. These societies can be local, regional, national or international in scope and may include general dentists as well as specialists in various fields of dentistry. The members of dental societies often engage in continuing education, advocacy, research, and community service activities to improve oral health and the delivery of dental care. Additionally, dental societies may establish guidelines for ethical practice and provide resources and support for their members.

A career choice refers to the decision or selection of a job or profession that an individual makes, typically based on their interests, skills, values, and personal goals. It involves considering various factors such as education and training requirements, job outlook, salary potential, and work-life balance. A well-informed career choice can lead to long-term job satisfaction, success, and fulfillment. It is essential to note that career choices can change over time due to various reasons, including personal growth, industry trends, or changes in life circumstances.

"Health occupations" is a broad term that refers to careers or professions involved in the delivery, management, and improvement of health services. These occupations encompass a wide range of roles, including but not limited to:

1. Healthcare providers: This group includes medical doctors (MDs), doctors of osteopathic medicine (DOs), nurses, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, dentists, dental hygienists, optometrists, pharmacists, and other professionals who provide direct patient care.
2. Allied health professionals: These are healthcare workers who provide diagnostic, technical, therapeutic, and support services. Examples include respiratory therapists, radiologic technologists, dietitians, occupational therapists, physical therapists, speech-language pathologists, and medical laboratory scientists.
3. Public health professionals: This group focuses on preventing diseases and promoting community health. They work in various settings, such as government agencies, non-profit organizations, and academic institutions, addressing public health issues like infectious disease control, environmental health, health education, and policy development.
4. Health administrators and managers: These professionals oversee the operations of healthcare facilities, including hospitals, clinics, nursing homes, and managed care organizations. They ensure that resources are used efficiently, that services meet quality standards, and that regulatory requirements are met.
5. Health educators: These individuals work in various settings to promote health awareness and teach individuals and communities about healthy behaviors and practices.
6. Health information specialists: Professionals in this field manage and analyze health data, maintain medical records, and ensure the security and privacy of patient information.

Overall, health occupations play a crucial role in maintaining, promoting, and restoring the health and well-being of individuals and communities.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Schools, Health Occupations" is not a medical term or concept. It may refer to educational programs or institutions that focus on training individuals for various health care occupations, such as nursing, dental hygiene, or medical assisting. However, it does not have a specific medical definition. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or concepts, I'd be happy to help!

The faculty of nursing refers to the academic staff and administration who are responsible for teaching, research, and administration in a school or department of nursing within a college or university. They may include professors, associate professors, assistant professors, instructors, clinical specialists, and other professional staff. The faculty members may teach various nursing subjects, supervise student clinical practice, conduct research, publish scholarly works, and provide service to the profession and community.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Organizational Objectives" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. It is a general management and business concept. Organizational objectives are the goals or targets that an organization aims to achieve through its operations and functions. These can include financial objectives like profitability and growth, as well as non-financial objectives related to areas like quality, innovation, social responsibility, and employee satisfaction.

In a healthcare setting, organizational objectives might include improving patient outcomes, increasing patient satisfaction, reducing costs, implementing new treatments or technologies, enhancing community health, and maintaining ethical standards.

I apologize, but "Canada" is not a medical term or concept. It is a country located in North America, known for its vast wilderness, multicultural cities, and significant natural resources. If you have any questions related to healthcare or medical terms, I would be happy to help answer those!

In the medical context, communication refers to the process of exchanging information, ideas, or feelings between two or more individuals in order to facilitate understanding, cooperation, and decision-making. Effective communication is critical in healthcare settings to ensure that patients receive accurate diagnoses, treatment plans, and follow-up care. It involves not only verbal and written communication but also nonverbal cues such as body language and facial expressions.

Healthcare providers must communicate clearly and empathetically with their patients to build trust, address concerns, and ensure that they understand their medical condition and treatment options. Similarly, healthcare teams must communicate effectively with each other to coordinate care, avoid errors, and provide the best possible outcomes for their patients. Communication skills are essential for all healthcare professionals, including physicians, nurses, therapists, and social workers.

Pediatric Dentistry is a specialty of dentistry that focuses on the oral health of children from infancy through adolescence. It involves comprehensive dental care that includes prevention, early detection and treatment of dental diseases, and counseling to promote healthy oral habits and behaviors. Pediatric dentists are trained to understand and meet the unique needs of children, including those with special healthcare needs. They provide services such as routine check-ups, cleanings, fluoride treatments, sealants, fillings, crowns, extractions, and interceptive orthodontics. The goal of pediatric dentistry is to ensure that children maintain good oral health throughout their lives.

Continuing medical education (CME) refers to the process of ongoing learning and professional development that healthcare professionals engage in throughout their careers. The goal of CME is to enhance knowledge, skills, and performance in order to provide better patient care and improve health outcomes.

CME activities may include a variety of formats such as conferences, seminars, workshops, online courses, journal clubs, and self-study programs. These activities are designed to address specific learning needs and objectives related to clinical practice, research, or healthcare management.

Healthcare professionals are required to complete a certain number of CME credits on a regular basis in order to maintain their licensure, certification, or membership in professional organizations. The content and quality of CME activities are typically overseen by accreditation bodies such as the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) in the United States.

Overall, continuing medical education is an essential component of maintaining competence and staying up-to-date with the latest developments in healthcare.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Group Processes" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. It is a term that is commonly used in the fields of psychology, social work, and group therapy to refer to the interactions and dynamics that occur within a group of people. This can include things like communication patterns, decision-making processes, power dynamics, and conflict resolution strategies.

In a medical or healthcare context, the term "group process" might be used to describe the way that a team of healthcare providers works together to make decisions about a patient's care, for example. However, it is not a term with a specific clinical diagnosis or medical definition.

Medical ethics is a branch of ethics that deals with moral issues in medical care, research, and practice. It provides a framework for addressing questions related to patient autonomy, informed consent, confidentiality, distributive justice, beneficentia (doing good), and non-maleficence (not doing harm). Medical ethics also involves the application of ethical principles such as respect for persons, beneficence, non-maleficence, and justice to specific medical cases and situations. It is a crucial component of medical education and practice, helping healthcare professionals make informed decisions that promote patient well-being while respecting their rights and dignity.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Humanism" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. It is a philosophical and ethical stance that emphasizes the value and agency of human beings, their capacities and responsibilities, and concerns for their survival, dignity, and well-being.

However, in a broader context, Humanism in healthcare often refers to a approach that focuses on treating patients with respect, dignity, and compassion, recognizing their individual needs and preferences, and promoting patient autonomy and informed decision-making. This approach is consistent with the principles of patient-centered care and shared decision-making, which are widely recognized as important components of high-quality healthcare.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "multimedia" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. Multimedia generally refers to the use of multiple forms of media, such as text, audio, video, graphics, and animation, in a single interactive presentation or platform. It is often used in various fields including education, entertainment, marketing, and some areas of healthcare for purposes like training, patient education, and therapy. However, it does not have a specific medical meaning itself.

Interprofessional relations, in the context of healthcare, refers to the interactions and collaborative practices between different healthcare professionals (such as physicians, nurses, pharmacists, therapists, social workers, etc.) when providing care for patients. It involves developing and maintaining positive and effective communication, respect, trust, and collaboration among various healthcare disciplines to ensure coordinated, safe, and high-quality patient care. The goal of interprofessional relations is to enhance collaborative practice, improve patient outcomes, and promote a supportive work environment.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "pilot projects" is not a medical term per se. Instead, it is a general term used in various fields, including healthcare and medicine, to describe a small-scale initiative that is implemented on a temporary basis to evaluate its feasibility, effectiveness, or impact before deciding whether to expand or continue it.

In the context of healthcare, pilot projects might involve testing new treatment protocols, implementing innovative care models, or introducing technology solutions in a limited setting to assess their potential benefits and drawbacks. The results of these projects can help inform decisions about broader implementation and provide valuable insights for improving the quality and efficiency of healthcare services.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "staff development" is not a medical term per se. It is a general human resources term that refers to the process of improving and increasing the knowledge, skills, and abilities of an organization's workforce. In a healthcare setting, staff development might involve training programs, workshops, or continuing education opportunities for medical professionals to enhance their clinical skills, patient communication, leadership abilities, and other competencies necessary for providing high-quality care and ensuring positive patient outcomes.

A manikin is commonly referred to as a full-size model of the human body used for training in various medical and healthcare fields. Medical manikins are often made from materials that simulate human skin and tissues, allowing for realistic practice in procedures such as physical examinations, resuscitation, and surgical techniques.

These manikins can be highly advanced, with built-in mechanisms to simulate physiological responses, such as breathing, heartbeats, and pupil dilation. They may also have interchangeable parts, allowing for the simulation of various medical conditions and scenarios. Medical manikins are essential tools in healthcare education, enabling learners to develop their skills and confidence in a controlled, safe environment before working with real patients.

Speech-Language Pathology is a branch of healthcare that deals with the evaluation, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of communication disorders, speech difficulties, and swallowing problems. Speech-language pathologists (SLPs), also known as speech therapists, are professionals trained to assess and help manage these issues. They work with individuals of all ages, from young children who may be delayed in their speech and language development, to adults who have communication or swallowing difficulties due to stroke, brain injury, neurological disorders, or other conditions. Treatment may involve various techniques and technologies to improve communication and swallowing abilities, and may also include counseling and education for patients and their families.

Continuing education (CE) in the medical field refers to the ongoing process of learning and professional development that healthcare professionals engage in throughout their careers. The goal of CE is to maintain, develop, and increase knowledge, skills, and competence in order to provide safe, effective, and high-quality care to patients.

Continuing education activities can take many forms, including conferences, seminars, workshops, online courses, and self-study programs. These activities may cover a wide range of topics, such as new research findings, advances in clinical practice, changes in regulations or guidelines, and ethical issues.

Healthcare professionals are often required to complete a certain number of CE credits each year in order to maintain their licensure or certification. This helps ensure that they stay up-to-date with the latest developments in their field and are able to provide the best possible care to their patients.

Psychosomatic medicine is a branch of medicine that explores the relationships between social, psychological, and behavioral factors and their impact on bodily illnesses. It recognizes the role of mental factors in physical health and disease, and it treats the whole person, not just the physical symptoms. Psychosomatic medicine physicians use integrative medical techniques to treat both the mind and body, often working closely with other healthcare professionals such as psychologists, psychiatrists, and social workers.

The American Psychosomatic Society defines psychosomatic medicine as "the scientific study of the interactions of emotional, mental, social, and behavioral factors with bodily processes and the role of these factors in health and disease." This definition highlights the interdisciplinary nature of the field and its focus on understanding the complex interplay between biological, psychological, and social factors that contribute to illness and wellness.

In summary, psychosomatic medicine is a holistic approach to medical care that recognizes the importance of mental and emotional factors in physical health and disease. It emphasizes the need for a comprehensive assessment and treatment plan that addresses both the mind and body.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "International Educational Exchange" is not a medical term. It is a broader term used in the field of education and international relations, referring to the exchange of students, teachers, and educational materials between different countries. This can include various academic activities such as student exchanges, faculty exchanges, joint research, and cultural immersion programs. The purpose of these exchanges is to promote international understanding, cooperation, and intellectual development.

Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) is a medical approach that combines the best available scientific evidence with clinical expertise and patient values to make informed decisions about diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of diseases. It emphasizes the use of systematic research, including randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses, to guide clinical decision making. EBM aims to provide the most effective and efficient care while minimizing variations in practice, reducing errors, and improving patient outcomes.

A needs assessment in a medical context is the process of identifying and evaluating the health needs of an individual, population, or community. It is used to determine the resources, services, and interventions required to address specific health issues and improve overall health outcomes. This process often involves collecting and analyzing data on various factors such as demographics, prevalence of diseases, access to healthcare, and social determinants of health. The goal of a needs assessment is to ensure that resources are allocated effectively and efficiently to meet the most pressing health needs and priorities.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "leadership" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. Leadership is a concept that relates to the ability of an individual or an organization's management to set and achieve challenging goals, take swift and decisive action, outperform the competition, and inspire others to perform at their best.

In healthcare settings, leadership refers to the skills, behaviors, and attitudes of those in positions of authority within a healthcare organization. Effective healthcare leaders are able to create a positive organizational culture, communicate a clear vision, motivate and engage staff, manage resources effectively, and ensure high-quality patient care. They must also be able to adapt to changing circumstances, make informed decisions based on data and evidence, and work collaboratively with other healthcare professionals and stakeholders.

A CD-ROM (Compact Disc Read-Only Memory) is not a medical term, but a technology term. It refers to a type of optical storage disc that contains digital information and can be read by a computer's CD-ROM drive. The data on a CD-ROM is permanent and cannot be modified or erased, unlike other types of writable discs such as CD-R or CD-RW.

CD-ROMs were commonly used in the past to distribute software, multimedia presentations, reference materials, and educational content. In medical field, CD-ROMs have been used to distribute large databases of medical information, such as clinical guidelines, drug references, and anatomical atlases. However, with the advent of internet and cloud storage technologies, the use of CD-ROMs has become less common in recent years.

General surgery is a surgical specialty that focuses on the abdominal organs, including the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine, liver, pancreas, gallbladder and bile ducts, and often the thyroid gland. General surgeons may also deal with diseases involving the skin, breast, soft tissue, and hernias. They employ a wide range of surgical procedures, using both traditional and laparoscopic techniques.

This definition is consistent with the guidelines provided by professional medical organizations such as the American College of Surgeons and the Royal College of Surgeons. However, it's important to note that specific practices can vary based on factors like geographical location, training, and individual expertise.

Credentialing is a process used in the healthcare industry to verify and assess the qualifications, training, licensure, and background of healthcare practitioners, such as doctors, nurses, and allied health professionals. The purpose of credentialing is to ensure that healthcare providers meet the necessary standards and requirements to provide safe and competent patient care within a specific healthcare organization or facility.

The credentialing process typically includes primary source verification of the following:

1. Education: Verification of the healthcare provider's completion of an accredited educational program leading to their degree or diploma.
2. Training: Confirmation of any required internships, residencies, fellowships, or other clinical training experiences.
3. Licensure: Validation of current, active, and unrestricted licensure or registration to practice in the healthcare provider's state or jurisdiction.
4. Certification: Verification of any relevant board certifications or specialty credentials held by the healthcare provider.
5. Work history: A review of the healthcare provider's professional work experience, including any gaps in employment or practice.
6. Malpractice and disciplinary history: Investigation of any malpractice claims, lawsuits, or disciplinary actions taken against the healthcare provider by a licensing board, professional organization, or court.
7. References: Solicitation and evaluation of professional references from colleagues and supervisors who can attest to the healthcare provider's clinical skills, character, and ability to provide quality patient care.
8. Clinical privileges: Granting specific clinical privileges based on the healthcare provider's qualifications, training, and experience, allowing them to perform certain procedures or treatments within the organization.
9. Background check: A criminal background check to ensure the healthcare provider has no disqualifying convictions or pending legal issues.
10. Immunization status: Verification of the healthcare provider's immunization status to protect patients and staff from infectious diseases.

Credentialing is usually performed by a dedicated committee within a healthcare organization, often called the Medical Staff Office or Credentials Committee. The process must be repeated periodically (usually every three years) to maintain the healthcare provider's privileges and ensure their continued compliance with the organization's standards and requirements.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Interdepartmental Relations" is not a medical term per se. Instead, it is a term that refers to the relationships and interactions between different departments within an organization, including healthcare institutions. It involves communication, cooperation, and coordination among various departments such as nursing, medicine, administration, laboratory services, radiology, and others to ensure efficient and high-quality patient care.

Interdepartmental relations in a medical context can impact the overall functioning of a hospital or clinic, including patient satisfaction, clinical outcomes, and staff morale. Effective interdepartmental relations require strong leadership, clear communication channels, and a shared vision for delivering excellent healthcare services.

"General practice dentistry" is a term used to describe the provision of primary dental care to patients of all ages. A general practice dentist provides a wide range of dental services, including preventative care (such as cleanings and fluoride treatments), restorative care (fillings, crowns, bridges), endodontics (root canals), oral surgery (extractions), periodontics (treatment of gum disease), prosthodontics (dentures, implants), and orthodontics (braces). They also diagnose and manage dental diseases and provide advice on oral health. General practice dentists aim to provide comprehensive and continuous care to their patients, coordinating with other dental and medical professionals as needed.

Dental licensure is the process by which a state or jurisdiction grants a dental professional the authority to practice dentistry within its borders. In order to obtain a dental license, individuals must meet certain education, examination, and other requirements established by the licensing body. These requirements typically include graduation from an accredited dental school, passing written and clinical examinations, and completion of continuing education courses.

The purpose of dental licensure is to protect the public by ensuring that dental professionals have the necessary knowledge, skills, and abilities to provide safe and effective dental care. Licensing boards are responsible for enforcing standards of practice and disciplining dentists who engage in unprofessional or unethical conduct.

It's important to note that dental licensure requirements may vary from state to state, so it's essential for dental professionals to familiarize themselves with the specific requirements of the state(s) in which they intend to practice.

Oral pathology is a specialized field of study in medicine and dentistry that deals with the nature, identification, and management of diseases affecting the oral and maxillofacial regions. This includes any abnormalities or changes in the tissues of the mouth, jaws, salivary glands, and related structures.

Oral pathologists examine tissue samples taken from biopsies or other diagnostic procedures to determine the cause of lesions or other symptoms. They then provide a diagnosis and recommend appropriate treatment options. This may involve working closely with other healthcare professionals such as dentists, oral surgeons, and medical doctors.

Common conditions that fall under the purview of oral pathology include oral cancer, salivary gland disorders, autoimmune diseases, infections, and developmental anomalies. Oral pathologists may also be involved in research aimed at developing new diagnostic techniques and treatments for oral diseases.

Computer user training is the process of teaching individuals how to use computer software, hardware, and systems effectively and safely. This type of training can include a variety of topics, such as:

* Basic computer skills, such as using a mouse and keyboard
* Operating system fundamentals, including file management and navigation
* Application-specific training for software such as Microsoft Office or industry-specific programs
* Cybersecurity best practices to protect against online threats
* Data privacy and compliance regulations related to computer use

The goal of computer user training is to help individuals become proficient and confident in their ability to use technology to perform their job duties, communicate with others, and access information. Effective computer user training can lead to increased productivity, reduced errors, and improved job satisfaction.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Indiana" is not a medical term or concept. It is a state located in the Midwestern United States. If you have any questions about medical terminology or concepts, I would be happy to help!

Certification is the act of granting a formal warranty or guarantee (a certificate) that a product, process, or service conforms to specified requirements. In the medical field, certification often refers to the process by which a regulatory body or professional organization grants recognition to a healthcare professional, institution, or program that meets certain predetermined standards.

For example, in the United States, physicians can become certified in a particular medical specialty through the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) after completing residency training and passing a rigorous examination. Similarly, hospitals and other healthcare facilities may be certified by organizations such as The Joint Commission to demonstrate that they meet established quality and safety standards.

Medical certification serves several purposes, including:

1. Ensuring competence: Certification helps establish that the certified individual or organization possesses the necessary knowledge, skills, and abilities to provide safe and effective care in their area of expertise.
2. Protecting patients: By setting and enforcing standards, certification organizations aim to protect patients from harm and ensure they receive high-quality care.
3. Promoting continuous improvement: Certification programs often require ongoing professional development and continuing education, encouraging healthcare professionals and institutions to stay current with best practices and advancements in their field.
4. Enhancing public trust: Certification can help build public confidence in the competence and expertise of healthcare providers and organizations, making it easier for patients to make informed decisions about their care.

"Textbooks as Topic" is a medical subject heading (MeSH) used in the National Library of Medicine's cataloging system to describe works that are about textbooks as a genre or medium, rather than a specific subject. This can include discussions on the history of medical textbooks, their role in medical education, comparisons between different types of textbooks, and analysis of their content and effectiveness. It may also cover issues related to the production, distribution, and accessibility of medical textbooks.

Neurosciences is a multidisciplinary field of study that focuses on the structure, function, development, and disorders of the nervous system, which includes the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nerves. It incorporates various scientific disciplines such as biology, chemistry, physics, mathematics, engineering, and computer science to understand the complexities of the nervous system at different levels, from molecular and cellular mechanisms to systems and behavior.

The field encompasses both basic research and clinical applications, with the aim of advancing our knowledge of the nervous system and developing effective treatments for neurological and psychiatric disorders. Specialties within neurosciences include neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, neurochemistry, neuropharmacology, neurobiology, neuroimmunology, behavioral neuroscience, cognitive neuroscience, clinical neuroscience, and computational neuroscience, among others.

Radiology is a medical specialty that uses imaging technologies to diagnose and treat diseases. These imaging technologies include X-rays, computed tomography (CT) scans, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, positron emission tomography (PET) scans, ultrasound, and mammography. Radiologists are medical doctors who have completed specialized training in interpreting these images to diagnose medical conditions and guide treatment plans. They also perform image-guided procedures such as biopsies and tumor ablations. The goal of radiology is to provide accurate and timely information to help physicians make informed decisions about patient care.

In the context of medicine, problem-solving refers to the cognitive process by which healthcare professionals identify, analyze, and address clinical issues or challenges in order to provide optimal care for their patients. This may involve gathering relevant information, generating potential solutions, evaluating their feasibility and risks, selecting the most appropriate course of action, and implementing and monitoring the chosen intervention. Effective problem-solving skills are essential for making informed decisions, improving patient outcomes, and reducing medical errors.

In a medical context, feedback refers to the information or data about the results of a process, procedure, or treatment that is used to evaluate and improve its effectiveness. This can include both quantitative data (such as vital signs or laboratory test results) and qualitative data (such as patient-reported symptoms or satisfaction). Feedback can come from various sources, including patients, healthcare providers, medical equipment, and electronic health records. It is an essential component of quality improvement efforts, allowing healthcare professionals to make informed decisions about changes to care processes and treatments to improve patient outcomes.

Health promotion is the process of enabling people to increase control over their health and its determinants, and to improve their health. It moves beyond a focus on individual behavior change to include social and environmental interventions that can positively influence the health of individuals, communities, and populations. Health promotion involves engaging in a wide range of activities, such as advocacy, policy development, community organization, and education that aim to create supportive environments and personal skills that foster good health. It is based on principles of empowerment, participation, and social justice.

"Self-assessment" in the context of medicine and healthcare generally refers to the process by which an individual evaluates their own health status, symptoms, or healthcare needs. This can involve various aspects such as:

1. Recognizing and acknowledging one's own signs and symptoms of a potential health issue.
2. Assessing the severity and impact of these symptoms on daily life.
3. Determining whether medical attention is needed and, if so, deciding the urgency of such care.
4. Monitoring the effectiveness of treatment plans and making adjustments as necessary.

Self-assessment tools in healthcare can include questionnaires, surveys, or other structured methods to guide patients in evaluating their health status. These tools can be particularly useful in managing chronic conditions, promoting preventive care, and supporting patient autonomy and engagement in their own healthcare. However, self-assessment should not replace regular check-ups and consultations with healthcare professionals, who can provide more comprehensive assessments, diagnoses, and treatment recommendations based on their clinical expertise and access to additional information and resources.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Inservice Training" is not a medical term per se. Instead, it is a general term used in various fields, including healthcare and education, to refer to training or professional development programs provided to staff members who are already employed or working in a particular organization or industry.

In the context of healthcare, Inservice Training might involve workshops, seminars, or other educational activities designed to enhance the knowledge, skills, and abilities of healthcare professionals such as nurses, doctors, allied health professionals, and administrative staff. These training programs can cover a wide range of topics, including new medical technologies, patient care protocols, safety procedures, regulatory requirements, and leadership development.

The primary goal of Inservice Training is to ensure that healthcare professionals remain up-to-date with the latest developments in their field and are equipped with the necessary skills to provide high-quality care to their patients. By promoting ongoing learning and professional development, organizations can improve patient outcomes, increase staff satisfaction, and enhance the overall quality of care delivered in the healthcare setting.

"Focus groups" is a term from the field of social science research, rather than medicine. It does not have a specific medical definition. However, focus groups are sometimes used in medical research to gather data and insights from a small group of people on a specific topic or product. This can include gathering feedback on patient experiences, testing prototypes of medical devices or treatments, or exploring attitudes and perceptions related to health issues. The goal is to gain a deeper understanding of the perspectives and needs of the target population through facilitated group discussion.

"Public health in the context of schools refers to the science and practice of protecting and improving the health of populations in school settings. It involves the implementation of evidence-based policies, programs, and practices to prevent disease and injury, promote healthy behaviors, and ensure that students are able to learn and thrive in a safe and healthy environment. This can include efforts to address issues such as infectious disease outbreaks, chronic disease prevention, mental health promotion, environmental health concerns, and injury prevention. Public health in schools is a multidisciplinary field that draws on expertise from fields such as medicine, nursing, nutrition, psychology, social work, education, and public health."

Cooperative behavior, in a medical or healthcare context, refers to the actions and attitudes displayed by individuals or groups working together to achieve a common goal related to health and well-being. This may involve patients following their healthcare providers' advice, healthcare professionals collaborating to diagnose and treat medical conditions, or communities coming together to promote healthy behaviors and environments. Cooperative behavior is essential for positive health outcomes, as it fosters trust, communication, and shared decision-making between patients and healthcare providers, and helps to ensure that everyone involved in the care process is working towards the same goal.

Premedical education typically refers to the educational coursework and preparation that students complete in order to apply to medical school. While the specific requirements for admission to medical school can vary, there are several common prerequisites that most schools look for in applicants. These often include:

1. Completion of a bachelor's degree: Although it is not always required, most students who apply to medical school have completed a four-year undergraduate degree. There is no specific major required, but students typically complete coursework in biology, chemistry, physics, and mathematics as part of their premedical preparation.
2. Completion of certain science courses: Medical schools generally require applicants to have completed a certain number of credit hours in biology, chemistry, and physics. These requirements can vary by school, but typically include coursework in general biology, general chemistry, organic chemistry, biochemistry, and physics.
3. Completion of the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT): The MCAT is a standardized exam that assesses students' knowledge and skills in areas relevant to medical school. It includes sections on biological and biochemical foundations of living systems, chemical and physical foundations of biological systems, psychological, social, and biological foundations of behavior, and critical analysis and reasoning skills.
4. Participation in extracurricular activities: Medical schools look for well-rounded applicants who have engaged in activities outside of the classroom. These can include research experiences, clinical volunteering, shadowing physicians, and participation in student organizations or clubs.
5. Letters of recommendation: Most medical schools require applicants to submit letters of recommendation from professors, advisors, or other individuals who can speak to their qualifications for medical school.

Overall, premedical education is designed to prepare students for the rigorous academic and clinical training they will receive in medical school. By completing the necessary coursework and extracurricular activities, students can demonstrate their readiness and commitment to pursuing a career in medicine.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Job Description" is not a medical term. It is a general human resources and employment concept. A job description is a document that provides details about the duties, responsibilities, necessary skills, working conditions, and other relevant information related to a specific job position. It serves as a guide for both employers and employees to understand the expectations and requirements of the role.

In the context of medicine, 'knowledge' refers to the understanding and comprehension of medical facts, principles, theories, and practices that are acquired through education, training, research, and experience. This encompasses a deep familiarity with anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, pharmacology, clinical guidelines, and evidence-based practices. It also includes awareness of current research developments, emerging trends, and best practices in the field. Medical knowledge is constantly evolving and requires healthcare professionals to engage in lifelong learning to maintain their expertise and provide high-quality care to patients.

Pharmacology is the branch of medicine and biology concerned with the study of drugs, their actions, and their uses. It involves understanding how drugs interact with biological systems to produce desired effects, as well as any adverse or unwanted effects. This includes studying the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of drugs (often referred to as ADME), the receptors and biochemical pathways that drugs affect, and the therapeutic benefits and risks of drug use. Pharmacologists may also be involved in the development and testing of new medications.

Child Nutrition Sciences is a field of study focused on the nutritional needs and dietary habits of children from infancy through adolescence. This interdisciplinary field incorporates aspects of nutrition, pediatrics, psychology, sociology, and public health to promote optimal growth, development, and overall health in children.

The scope of Child Nutrition Sciences includes:

1. Understanding the unique nutritional requirements during various stages of childhood, including pregnancy, lactation, infancy, early childhood, school-age, and adolescence.
2. Examining how cultural, socioeconomic, and environmental factors influence children's dietary patterns and food choices.
3. Investigating the role of nutrition in preventing chronic diseases such as obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, which often originate in childhood.
4. Developing and implementing evidence-based interventions to improve children's diets, promote healthy eating behaviors, and reduce health disparities.
5. Assessing the effectiveness of nutrition education programs for children, families, and communities.
6. Collaborating with policymakers, educators, healthcare providers, and community organizations to create supportive environments that encourage healthy eating and physical activity.
7. Conducting research on the safety, efficacy, and quality of food products, supplements, and fortified foods marketed for children.
8. Advocating for policies and regulations that protect children from marketing tactics that promote unhealthy food choices and contribute to poor diet-related health outcomes.

Overall, Child Nutrition Sciences aims to improve the nutritional status of children, enhance their overall well-being, and reduce the burden of diet-related diseases throughout the lifespan.

Physician executives are medical doctors who hold senior leadership positions within healthcare organizations, such as hospitals, health systems, or insurance companies. They are responsible for making strategic decisions that affect the overall operations and financial performance of the organization, while also ensuring high-quality patient care.

Physician executives may have titles such as Chief Medical Officer (CMO), Chief Executive Officer (CEO), or Vice President of Medical Affairs. Their duties can include developing clinical policies and procedures, overseeing medical staff affairs, managing risk and compliance issues, and leading quality improvement initiatives.

To become a physician executive, one typically needs to have significant experience as a practicing physician, as well as additional training in leadership, management, and business administration. Many physician executives hold advanced degrees such as an MBA or a Master's in Health Administration.

Tobacco use cessation is the process of discontinuing the use of tobacco products, such as cigarettes, cigars, smokeless tobacco, and electronic cigarettes. This is often a critical component of treatment for tobacco-related diseases and conditions, as well as a key strategy for preventing tobacco-related illnesses and premature death.

The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends a combination of behavioral support and medication as the most effective approach to tobacco use cessation. Behavioral support may include counseling, group therapy, and self-help materials, while medication can include nicotine replacement therapies (such as gum, lozenges, patches, inhalers, or nasal sprays), as well as prescription medications such as bupropion and varenicline.

Tobacco use cessation is a challenging process that often requires multiple attempts before successful long-term abstinence is achieved. However, with the right support and resources, many tobacco users are able to quit successfully and improve their health outcomes.

Medical societies are professional organizations composed of physicians, surgeons, and other healthcare professionals who share a common purpose of promoting medical research, education, and patient care. These societies can focus on specific medical specialties, such as the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) for cancer specialists or the American College of Surgeons (ACS) for surgeons. They may also address broader issues related to healthcare policy, advocacy, and ethics. Medical societies often provide resources for continuing medical education, publish scientific journals, establish clinical practice guidelines, and offer networking opportunities for members.

Ethics is a branch of philosophy that involves systematizing, defending, and recommending concepts of right and wrong conduct. In the medical field, ethics refers to the principles that guide doctors, nurses, and other healthcare professionals in making decisions about patient care. These principles often include respect for autonomy (the right of patients to make their own decisions), non-maleficence (doing no harm), beneficence (acting in the best interests of the patient), and justice (fairness in the distribution of resources). Medical ethics may also involve considerations of confidentiality, informed consent, and end-of-life decision making.

Bioethical issues refer to the ethical dilemmas and challenges that arise in biological research, healthcare, and medical technology. These issues often involve conflicts between scientific or medical advancements and moral, social, legal, and cultural values. Examples of bioethical issues include:

1. End-of-life care: Decisions about life-sustaining treatments, such as artificial nutrition and hydration, mechanical ventilation, and do-not-resuscitate orders, can raise ethical questions about the quality of life, patient autonomy, and the role of healthcare providers.
2. Genetic testing and screening: The use of genetic information for medical decision-making, predictive testing, and reproductive choices can have significant implications for individuals, families, and society, raising concerns about privacy, discrimination, and informed consent.
3. Organ transplantation: Issues surrounding organ donation and allocation, such as fairness, scarcity, and the definition of death, can create ethical dilemmas that require careful consideration of medical, legal, and moral principles.
4. Stem cell research: The use of embryonic stem cells for research and therapy raises questions about the moral status of embryos, potential therapeutic benefits, and the role of government in regulating scientific research.
5. Assisted reproductive technologies (ART): Techniques such as in vitro fertilization (IVF), surrogacy, and gamete donation can challenge traditional notions of family, parenthood, and reproduction, leading to debates about the rights and interests of children, parents, and society.
6. Mental health treatment: The use of psychotropic medications, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), and other interventions for mental illness can raise concerns about patient autonomy, informed consent, and the balance between therapeutic benefits and potential risks.
7. Public health emergencies: Responses to infectious disease outbreaks, bioterrorism, and other public health crises can involve difficult decisions about resource allocation, individual rights, and the role of government in protecting population health.
8. Research involving human subjects: The ethical conduct of clinical trials, observational studies, and other research that involves human participants requires careful consideration of issues such as informed consent, risk-benefit analysis, and respect for participant autonomy and privacy.
9. Health care access and financing: Debates about health care reform, insurance coverage, and affordability can raise questions about the role of government in ensuring access to essential medical services, the balance between individual rights and social responsibility, and the ethical implications of rationing limited resources.
10. Global health ethics: Issues such as international cooperation, resource distribution, and cultural sensitivity can challenge traditional notions of global justice, human rights, and the responsibilities of wealthy nations to address health disparities in low- and middle-income countries.

Pharmaceutical services refer to the direct patient care activities conducted by licensed pharmacists, which include but are not limited to:

1. Medication therapy management: This involves reviewing a patient's medications to ensure they are appropriate, effective, and safe. Pharmacists may make recommendations to the prescriber about changes to medication therapy as needed.
2. Patient education: Pharmacists provide education to patients about their medications, including how to take them, potential side effects, and storage instructions. They also provide information on disease prevention and management.
3. Immunizations: Many pharmacists are trained to administer vaccines, which can help increase access to this important preventive health service.
4. Monitoring and evaluation: Pharmacists monitor patients' responses to medication therapy and make adjustments as needed. They also evaluate the effectiveness of medication therapy and make recommendations for changes if necessary.
5. Clinical services: Pharmacists may provide a range of clinical services, such as managing anticoagulation therapy, providing diabetes education, or conducting medication reconciliation after hospital discharge.
6. Collaborative practice: Pharmacists work collaboratively with other healthcare providers to optimize medication therapy and improve patient outcomes. This may involve participating in multidisciplinary teams, consulting with prescribers, or sharing information with other healthcare professionals.

Overall, pharmaceutical services aim to improve patient outcomes by ensuring that medications are used safely and effectively.

Pediatrics is a branch of medicine that deals with the medical care and treatment of infants, children, and adolescents, typically up to the age of 18 or sometimes up to 21 years. It covers a wide range of health services including preventive healthcare, diagnosis and treatment of physical, mental, and emotional illnesses, and promotion of healthy lifestyles and behaviors in children.

Pediatricians are medical doctors who specialize in this field and have extensive training in the unique needs and developmental stages of children. They provide comprehensive care for children from birth to young adulthood, addressing various health issues such as infectious diseases, injuries, genetic disorders, developmental delays, behavioral problems, and chronic conditions like asthma, diabetes, and cancer.

In addition to medical expertise, pediatricians also need excellent communication skills to build trust with their young patients and their families, and to provide education and guidance on various aspects of child health and well-being.

Nutrition therapy is a medical treatment that focuses on providing adequate and balanced nutrition to help patients manage various medical conditions, promote recovery, improve overall health, and enhance quality of life. It involves the use of a personalized dietary plan, supplements, and enteral or parenteral nutrition support, as needed, under the guidance of healthcare professionals such as registered dietitians or nutritionists.

The goals of nutrition therapy may include:

1. Meeting nutritional needs and optimizing growth and development in children and adolescents.
2. Preventing or treating malnutrition due to illness, injury, or surgery.
3. Managing chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, kidney disease, liver disease, or gastrointestinal disorders by controlling risk factors, reducing symptoms, and slowing the progression of the condition.
4. Supporting patients during cancer treatment to maintain strength, promote healing, and improve their response to therapy.
5. Providing nutrition support for individuals with eating disorders, food allergies, or intolerances.
6. Enhancing overall health and well-being through education on healthy eating habits and lifestyle modifications.

Nutrition therapy is an essential component of comprehensive healthcare and should be tailored to each individual's unique needs, preferences, and medical history.

I'm not able to provide a medical definition of "social responsibility" as it is not a term that has a specific meaning within the field of medicine. However, I can tell you that social responsibility generally refers to the idea that individuals and organizations have a duty to act in the best interests of society and to contribute to its overall well-being. This might involve taking actions to protect the environment, promote social justice, or support the needs of vulnerable populations. In a medical context, this could mean providing care to underserved communities, engaging in public health advocacy, or conducting research that addresses important societal issues.

A "Professional Role" in the context of medicine typically refers to the specific duties, responsibilities, and expectations associated with a particular healthcare position. It encompasses the legal, ethical, and clinical aspects of the job, and is shaped by education, training, and professional standards. Examples include roles such as a physician, nurse, pharmacist, or therapist, each with their own distinct set of professional responsibilities and obligations to patients, colleagues, and society.

A dental implant is a surgical component that interfaces with the bone of the jaw or skull to support a dental prosthesis such as a crown, bridge, denture, facial prosthesis or to act as an orthodontic anchor.

A single-tooth dental implant specifically refers to the replacement of a single missing tooth. The process typically involves three stages:

1. Placement: A titanium screw is placed into the jawbone where the missing tooth once was, acting as a root for the new tooth.
2. Osseointegration: Over several months, the jawbone grows around and fuses with the implant, creating a strong and stable foundation for the replacement tooth.
3. Restoration: A custom-made crown is attached to the implant, restoring the natural appearance and function of the missing tooth.

Single-tooth dental implants are a popular choice because they look, feel, and function like natural teeth, and they do not require the alteration of adjacent teeth, as is necessary with traditional bridgework.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Ohio" is not a medical term or condition. It is the name of a state located in the Midwestern region of the United States. If you have any questions about medical conditions or terms, I would be happy to help answer those!

The Behavioral Sciences are a group of disciplines that focus on the study of human and animal behavior. These sciences use various methods, including experiments, observations, and surveys, to understand why organisms behave the way they do. Some of the key disciplines in the Behavioral Sciences include:

1. Psychology: The scientific study of the mind and behavior, including topics such as perception, cognition, emotion, motivation, and personality.
2. Sociology: The scientific study of human social behavior, including topics such as group dynamics, social norms, and cultural influences.
3. Anthropology: The scientific study of human societies and cultures, both past and present, including their evolution, development, and variation.
4. Education: The field concerned with teaching and learning processes, curriculum development, and instructional design.
5. Communication Studies: The field that examines how people use symbols, language, and communication to create and maintain relationships, communities, and cultures.
6. Political Science: The study of political systems, institutions, and behaviors, including topics such as power, governance, and public policy.
7. Economics: The study of how individuals, businesses, and societies allocate scarce resources to satisfy their needs and wants.

Overall, the Behavioral Sciences aim to provide a deeper understanding of human behavior and social phenomena, with applications in fields such as healthcare, education, business, and policy-making.

In the context of medicine, particularly in the setting of developing a care plan for patients, "goals" refer to specific, measurable, and achievable outcomes that healthcare providers and patients aim to accomplish through treatment or management strategies. These goals are often centered around improving symptoms, enhancing quality of life, promoting functional ability, preventing complications, and extending survival. Goals should be individualized to each patient's unique needs, values, and preferences and may be adjusted over time based on the patient's progress and changing circumstances.

Medical libraries are collections of resources that provide access to information related to the medical and healthcare fields. They serve as a vital tool for medical professionals, students, researchers, and patients seeking reliable and accurate health information. Medical libraries can be physical buildings or digital platforms that contain various types of materials, including:

1. Books: Medical textbooks, reference books, and monographs that cover various topics related to medicine, anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, pathology, and clinical specialties.
2. Journals: Print and electronic peer-reviewed journals that publish the latest research findings, clinical trials, and evidence-based practices in medicine.
3. Databases: Online resources that allow users to search for and access information on specific topics, such as PubMed, MEDLINE, CINAHL, and Cochrane Library.
4. Multimedia resources: Audio and video materials, such as lectures, webinars, podcasts, and instructional videos, that provide visual and auditory learning experiences.
5. Electronic resources: E-books, databases, and other digital materials that can be accessed remotely through computers, tablets, or smartphones.
6. Patient education materials: Brochures, pamphlets, and other resources that help patients understand their health conditions, treatments, and self-care strategies.
7. Archives and special collections: Rare books, historical documents, manuscripts, and artifacts related to the history of medicine and healthcare.

Medical libraries may be found in hospitals, medical schools, research institutions, and other healthcare settings. They are staffed by trained librarians and information specialists who provide assistance with locating, accessing, and evaluating information resources. Medical libraries play a critical role in supporting evidence-based medicine, continuing education, and patient care.

Computer literacy is the ability to use, understand, and create computer technology and software, including basic knowledge of computer hardware, operating systems, and common applications such as word processing, spreadsheets, and databases. It also includes an understanding of concepts related to the internet, email, and cybersecurity. Being computer literate means having the skills and knowledge necessary to effectively use computers for a variety of purposes, including communication, research, problem-solving, and productivity. It is an important skill in today's digital age and is often required for many jobs and educational programs.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Schools, Nursing" is not a recognized medical term or concept. It seems like there might be some misunderstanding or missing context in your request.

Nursing, as a profession, involves the provision of care to individuals, families, and communities so they may attain, maintain, or recover optimal health and quality of life. Nursing education, therefore, typically takes place in schools of nursing, which are institutions dedicated to providing theoretical and practical education for future nurses.

If you're referring to a specific medical condition, treatment, or concept that you think might be related to "Schools, Nursing," could you please provide more context or clarify your question? I'd be happy to help with more information.

Bioethics is a branch of ethics that deals with the ethical issues and dilemmas arising from biological and medical research and practices. It involves the study of moral principles, values, and conduct in relation to medicine, healthcare, biotechnology, and life sciences. The field of bioethics addresses questions and concerns related to topics such as end-of-life care, genetic engineering, cloning, stem cell research, organ donation, patient autonomy, informed consent, and the allocation of scarce medical resources. Bioethicists aim to provide guidance and recommendations for addressing these complex issues in a way that respects individual rights, promotes social justice, and upholds ethical integrity.

I believe there may be some confusion in your question. "Writing" is a common term used to describe the act or process of creating written content, whether it's for literary, professional, or personal purposes. However, if you're asking for a medical term related to writing, perhaps you meant "graphomotor," which refers to the fine motor skills required to produce handwriting or signing one's name. If this is not what you were looking for, please clarify your question so I can provide a more accurate answer.

Geriatrics is a branch of medicine focused on the health care and well-being of older adults, typically defined as those aged 65 years and older. It deals with the physiological, psychological, social, and environmental aspects of aging and addresses the medical, functional, and cognitive issues that are common in this population. The goal of geriatric medicine is to promote health, independence, and quality of life for older adults by preventing and managing diseases and disabilities, coordinating care, and supporting optimal functioning in their daily lives.

Geriatricians, who specialize in geriatrics, receive additional training beyond medical school and residency to develop expertise in the unique needs and challenges of older adults. They often work as part of interdisciplinary teams that include nurses, social workers, physical therapists, occupational therapists, and other healthcare professionals to provide comprehensive care for their patients.

A complete denture is a removable dental appliance that replaces all of the teeth in an upper or lower arch. It is also commonly referred to as a "full denture." A complete denture is created specifically to fit a patient's mouth and can be made of either acrylic resin (plastic) or metal and acrylic resin.

The upper complete denture covers the palate (roof of the mouth), while the lower complete denture is shaped like a horseshoe to leave room for the tongue. Dentures are held in place by forming a seal with the gums and remaining jawbone structure, and can be secured further with the use of dental adhesives.

Complete dentures not only restore the ability to eat and speak properly but also help support the facial structures, improving the patient's appearance and overall confidence. It is important to maintain regular dental check-ups even if all teeth are missing, as the dentist will monitor the fit and health of the oral tissues and make any necessary adjustments to the denture.

A dental prosthesis known as an "overlay denture" is a type of removable restoration that covers and restores only the occlusal (biting) surfaces of the natural teeth, while leaving the remaining tooth structure and surrounding soft tissues intact. This type of denture is typically used when there are still sufficient healthy tooth structures present to provide support and stability for the prosthesis.

Overlay dentures can be made from various materials such as acrylic resin or metal alloys, and they can be fabricated to fit over the natural teeth with precision, ensuring optimal comfort and functionality. These dentures are designed to improve the patient's ability to chew and speak properly, while also enhancing their smile and overall oral esthetics.

It is important to note that proper dental hygiene and regular check-ups with a dental professional are essential for maintaining good oral health and ensuring the longevity of an overlay denture.

Preventive dentistry is a branch of dental medicine that focuses on preventing the occurrence or progression of oral diseases and maintaining optimal oral health. It encompasses a set of practices, behaviors, and interventions aimed at preserving the integrity and functionality of teeth and gums through early detection, intervention, and patient education.

The primary goal of preventive dentistry is to minimize the risk of dental caries (tooth decay), periodontal disease (gum disease), oral cancer, and other oral health conditions. This is achieved through a combination of professional dental care, personal oral hygiene habits, and lifestyle modifications.

Professional dental care includes regular dental examinations, cleanings, fluoride treatments, and sealants to protect tooth surfaces from decay. Patient education plays a crucial role in preventive dentistry, as it empowers individuals to take an active part in their oral health by teaching them proper brushing and flossing techniques, nutritional counseling, and the importance of regular dental visits.

Preventive dentistry also emphasizes the significance of risk assessment and early intervention for high-risk populations, such as children, elderly individuals, and those with medical conditions that may impact oral health. By promoting a proactive approach to dental care, preventive dentistry aims to improve overall quality of life, reduce healthcare costs, and enhance patient satisfaction.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Online Systems" is not a medical term. It generally refers to computer systems or networks that are connected to the internet and can be accessed remotely. In a medical context, it could refer to various online tools and platforms used in healthcare, such as electronic health records, telemedicine systems, or medical research databases. However, without more specific context, it's difficult to provide an accurate medical definition.

Administrative personnel in a medical context typically refer to individuals who work in healthcare facilities or organizations, but do not provide direct patient care. Their roles involve supporting the management and operations of the healthcare system through various administrative tasks. These responsibilities may include managing schedules, coordinating appointments, handling billing and insurance matters, maintaining medical records, communicating with patients and other staff members, and performing various clerical duties.

Examples of administrative personnel in a medical setting might include medical office assistants, medical receptionists, medical billers, medical coders, medical transcriptionists, and healthcare administrators. While they do not provide direct patient care, their work is essential to ensuring the smooth functioning of healthcare services and the overall quality of patient care.

Pathology is a significant branch of medical science that deals with the study of the nature of diseases, their causes, processes, development, and consequences. It involves the examination of tissues, organs, bodily fluids, and autopsies to diagnose disease and determine the course of treatment. Pathology can be divided into various sub-specialties such as anatomical pathology, clinical pathology, molecular pathology, and forensic pathology. Ultimately, pathology aims to understand the mechanisms of diseases and improve patient care through accurate diagnosis and effective treatment plans.

Community health workers (CHWs) are individuals who are trained to work within and promote the health of their own communities. They serve as a bridge between healthcare professionals and the communities they serve, often working in underserved or hard-to-reach areas. CHWs may provide a range of services, including health education, outreach, advocacy, and case management.

CHWs come from diverse backgrounds and may have different levels of training and education. They are typically trusted members of their communities and share similar language, culture, and life experiences with the people they serve. This helps to build rapport and trust with community members, making it easier for CHWs to provide culturally sensitive care and support.

The role of CHWs can vary depending on the needs of the community and the healthcare system in which they work. In some settings, CHWs may focus on specific health issues, such as maternal and child health, infectious diseases, or chronic conditions like diabetes. In other cases, they may provide more general support to help individuals navigate the healthcare system and access needed services.

Overall, community health workers play an important role in promoting health equity and improving health outcomes for vulnerable populations. By working closely with communities and connecting them to appropriate care and resources, CHWs can help to reduce disparities and improve the overall health of their communities.

Allergy and Immunology is a medical specialty that deals with the diagnosis and treatment of allergic diseases and immune system disorders. An Allergist/Immunologist is a physician who has undergone specialized training in this field.

Allergies occur when the immune system overreacts to normally harmless substances, such as pollen, dust mites, or certain foods, resulting in symptoms like sneezing, itching, runny nose, and rashes. Immunology, on the other hand, deals with disorders of the immune system, which can be caused by either an overactive or underactive immune response. Examples of immune disorders include autoimmune diseases (where the body attacks its own tissues), immunodeficiency disorders (where the immune system is weakened and unable to fight off infections), and hypersensitivity reactions (overreactions of the immune system to harmless substances).

The Allergist/Immunologist uses various diagnostic tests, such as skin prick tests, blood tests, and challenge tests, to identify the specific allergens or immune triggers that are causing a patient's symptoms. Once the diagnosis is made, they can recommend appropriate treatments, which may include medications, immunotherapy (allergy shots), lifestyle changes, or avoidance of certain substances.

In addition to treating patients, Allergist/Immunologists also conduct research into the underlying causes and mechanisms of allergic diseases and immune disorders, with the goal of developing new and more effective treatments.

Psychiatry is the branch of medicine focused on the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of mental, emotional, and behavioral disorders. A psychiatrist is a medically trained doctor who specializes in psychiatry, and they are qualified to assess both the mental and physical aspects of psychological problems. They can use a variety of treatments, including psychotherapy, medications, psychoeducation, and psychosocial interventions, to help patients manage their symptoms and improve their quality of life.

Psychiatrists often work in multidisciplinary teams that include other mental health professionals such as psychologists, social workers, and mental health nurses. They may provide services in a range of settings, including hospitals, clinics, community mental health centers, and private practices.

It's important to note that while I strive to provide accurate and helpful information, my responses should not be used as a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. If you or someone else has concerns about mental health, it is always best to consult with a qualified healthcare provider.

The Delphi technique is a structured communication method used to reach a consensus through a series of rounds of questionnaires or surveys. It was originally developed as a way for experts to share their opinions and come to an agreement on a particular topic, even when they may not be able to meet in person. The process typically involves:

1. Identifying a panel of experts in the relevant field.
2. Developing a series of questions or statements related to the topic at hand.
3. Distributing the questions or statements to the panel and collecting their responses.
4. Analyzing the responses and providing feedback to the panel.
5. Repeating steps 3-4 for multiple rounds until a consensus is reached or it becomes clear that a consensus cannot be achieved.

The Delphi technique is often used in healthcare and other fields to gather expert opinions on controversial or complex topics, such as setting clinical guidelines or developing new technologies. It can help to ensure that the perspectives of a diverse group of experts are taken into account, and that the final consensus reflects a broad range of viewpoints.

Professional ethics in the medical field are a set of principles that guide physicians and other healthcare professionals in their interactions with patients, colleagues, and society. These ethical standards are based on values such as respect for autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence, and justice. They help to ensure that medical professionals provide high-quality care that is safe, effective, and respectful of patients' rights and dignity.

Some key principles of professional ethics in medicine include:

1. Respect for autonomy: Healthcare professionals should respect patients' right to make their own decisions about their healthcare, including the right to refuse treatment.
2. Non-maleficence: Medical professionals have a duty to avoid causing harm to their patients. This includes avoiding unnecessary tests or treatments that may cause harm or waste resources.
3. Beneficence: Healthcare professionals have a duty to act in the best interests of their patients and to promote their well-being.
4. Justice: Medical professionals should treat all patients fairly and without discrimination, and should work to ensure that healthcare resources are distributed equitably.
5. Confidentiality: Medical professionals have a duty to keep patient information confidential, unless the patient gives permission to share it or there is a legal or ethical obligation to disclose it.
6. Professional competence: Medical professionals have a duty to maintain their knowledge and skills, and to provide care that meets accepted standards of practice.
7. Honesty and integrity: Medical professionals should be honest and truthful in their interactions with patients, colleagues, and other stakeholders. They should avoid conflicts of interest and should disclose any potential conflicts to patients and others.
8. Responsibility to society: Medical professionals have a responsibility to contribute to the health and well-being of society as a whole, including advocating for policies that promote public health and addressing health disparities.

I'm not aware of a specific medical definition for "role playing" as it is not a term typically used in the medical field. However, role-playing in general refers to the acting out or adopting of a particular role or character, often in a structured situation for the purpose of learning, practicing skills, therapy, or entertainment.

In a healthcare context, role-playing can be used as a teaching tool for medical students and healthcare professionals to practice communication skills, break bad news, manage difficult conversations, or learn about patient perspectives. Role-playing can also be used in therapeutic settings, such as psychodrama or drama therapy, to help individuals explore their emotions, experiences, and relationships.

It's important to note that role-playing should not be confused with "role-play," which is a paraphilic behavior where an individual derives sexual pleasure from acting out a scenario in which they adopt a specific role or character. Role-play as a paraphilia is considered a mental disorder when it causes distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other areas of functioning.

In a medical context, "achievement" generally refers to the successful completion of a specific goal or task related to a person's health or medical treatment. This could include reaching certain milestones in rehabilitation or therapy, achieving certain laboratory test results, or meeting other health-related objectives. Achievements in healthcare are often celebrated as they represent progress and improvement in a patient's condition. However, it is important to note that the definition of achievement may vary depending on the individual's medical history, current health status, and treatment plan.

Gynecology is a branch of medicine that deals with the health of the female reproductive system. It includes the diagnosis, treatment, and management of conditions related to the female reproductive organs such as the vagina, cervix, uterus, ovaries, and fallopian tubes.

Gynecologists provide routine care for women, including Pap tests, breast exams, and family planning advice. They also treat a wide range of gynecological issues, from menstrual disorders and sexually transmitted infections to reproductive system cancers and hormonal imbalances. In addition, many gynecologists also provide obstetric care, making them both ob-gyns.

It's important for women to establish a relationship with a trusted gynecologist to ensure they receive regular checkups and are able to address any concerns or issues related to their reproductive health.

Physician-patient relations, also known as doctor-patient relationships, refer to the interaction and communication between healthcare professionals and their patients. This relationship is founded on trust, respect, and understanding, with the physician providing medical care and treatment based on the patient's needs and best interests. Effective physician-patient relations involve clear communication, informed consent, shared decision-making, and confidentiality. A positive and collaborative relationship can lead to better health outcomes, improved patient satisfaction, and increased adherence to treatment plans.

Occupational medicine is a branch of clinical medicine that deals with the prevention and management of diseases and injuries that may arise in the workplace or as a result of work-related activities. It involves evaluating the health risks associated with various jobs, recommending measures to reduce these risks, providing medical care for workers who become ill or injured on the job, and promoting overall health and wellness in the workplace. Occupational medicine physicians may also be involved in developing policies and procedures related to workplace safety, disability management, and return-to-work programs. The ultimate goal of occupational medicine is to help ensure that workers are able to perform their jobs safely and effectively while maintaining their overall health and well-being.

Dental care refers to the practice of maintaining and improving the oral health of the teeth and gums. It involves regular check-ups, cleanings, and treatments by dental professionals such as dentists, hygienists, and dental assistants. Dental care also includes personal habits and practices, such as brushing and flossing, that help prevent tooth decay and gum disease.

Regular dental care is important for preventing common dental problems like cavities, gingivitis, and periodontal disease. It can also help detect early signs of more serious health issues, such as oral cancer or diabetes, which can have symptoms that appear in the mouth.

Dental care may involve a range of treatments, from routine cleanings and fillings to more complex procedures like root canals, crowns, bridges, and implants. Dental professionals use various tools and techniques to diagnose and treat dental problems, including X-rays, dental impressions, and local anesthesia.

Overall, dental care is a critical component of overall health and wellness, as poor oral health has been linked to a range of systemic health issues, including heart disease, stroke, and respiratory infections.

In the context of medicine, "literature" refers to scientific publications such as research articles, reviews, case reports, and clinical guidelines that report on or discuss clinical trials, experimental studies, epidemiological investigations, or other research related to medical conditions, treatments, interventions, and public health. These publications are typically peer-reviewed, meaning they have been evaluated by experts in the field for quality, accuracy, and relevance before being accepted for publication. Medical literature provides healthcare professionals with evidence-based information that can inform clinical decision making, improve patient care, and advance medical knowledge.

Microbiology is the branch of biology that deals with the study of microorganisms, which are tiny living organisms including bacteria, viruses, fungi, parasites, algae, and some types of yeasts and molds. These organisms are usually too small to be seen with the naked eye and require the use of a microscope for observation.

Microbiology encompasses various subdisciplines, including bacteriology (the study of bacteria), virology (the study of viruses), mycology (the study of fungi), parasitology (the study of parasites), and protozoology (the study of protozoa).

Microbiologists study the structure, function, ecology, evolution, and classification of microorganisms. They also investigate their role in human health and disease, as well as their impact on the environment, agriculture, and industry. Microbiology has numerous applications in medicine, including the development of vaccines, antibiotics, and other therapeutic agents, as well as in the diagnosis and treatment of infectious diseases.

I believe you are looking for a medical condition or term related to the state of Arizona. However, there is no specific medical condition or term named "Arizona." If you're looking for medical conditions or healthcare-related information specific to Arizona, I could provide some general statistics or facts about healthcare in Arizona. Please clarify if this is not what you were looking for.

Arizona has a diverse population and unique healthcare needs. Here are some key points related to healthcare in Arizona:

1. Chronic diseases: Arizona experiences high rates of chronic diseases, such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease, which can lead to various health complications if not managed properly.
2. Mental health: Access to mental health services is a concern in Arizona, with a significant portion of the population living in areas with mental health professional shortages.
3. Rural healthcare: Rural communities in Arizona often face challenges accessing quality healthcare due to provider shortages and longer travel distances to medical facilities.
4. COVID-19 pandemic: Like other states, Arizona has been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, which has strained healthcare resources and highlighted existing health disparities among various populations.
5. Indigenous communities: Arizona is home to several indigenous communities, including the Navajo Nation, which faces significant health challenges, such as higher rates of diabetes, heart disease, and COVID-19 infections compared to the general population.

If you were looking for information on a specific medical condition or term related to Arizona, please provide more context so I can give a more accurate response.

Obstetrics is a branch of medicine and surgery concerned with the care of women during pregnancy, childbirth, and the postnatal period. It involves managing potential complications that may arise during any stage of pregnancy or delivery, as well as providing advice and guidance on prenatal care, labor and delivery, and postpartum care. Obstetricians are medical doctors who specialize in obstetrics and can provide a range of services including routine check-ups, ultrasounds, genetic testing, and other diagnostic procedures to monitor the health and development of the fetus. They also perform surgical procedures such as cesarean sections when necessary.

Ethical analysis is a process of evaluating and assessing the moral implications and principles surrounding a particular medical situation, treatment, or research. It involves critical thinking and consideration of various ethical theories, principles, and guidelines to determine the right course of action. The steps in an ethical analysis typically include:

1. Identifying the ethical issue: This involves recognizing and defining the problem or dilemma that requires ethical consideration.
2. Gathering relevant information: This includes gathering all necessary medical and contextual information related to the situation, including the patient's values, preferences, and cultural background.
3. Identifying stakeholders: This involves identifying all those who are affected by or have a vested interest in the ethical issue.
4. Applying ethical principles: This involves applying ethical principles such as autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence, and justice to the situation to determine the right course of action.
5. Considering alternative courses of action: This involves exploring different options and their potential consequences for all stakeholders.
6. Making a decision: This involves weighing the various factors and coming to a conclusion about what is the right thing to do.
7. Reflecting on the decision: This involves reflecting on the decision-making process and considering whether the decision was fair, just, and respectful of all parties involved.

Ethical analysis is an essential tool for healthcare professionals, researchers, and policymakers to ensure that their actions are guided by moral principles and values.

Sleep medicine is a medical specialty or subspecialty devoted to the diagnosis and therapy of sleep disturbances and disorders. Sleep-related problems such as snoring, sleep apnea, insomnia, narcolepsy, restless legs syndrome, parasomnias, circadian rhythm disorders, and unusual behaviors during sleep are among the conditions that sleep medicine physicians diagnose and treat.

Sleep medicine specialists often work in multidisciplinary teams that include other healthcare professionals such as neurologists, psychiatrists, psychologists, pulmonologists, otolaryngologists, and dentists to provide comprehensive care for patients with sleep disorders. They use various diagnostic tools, including polysomnography (sleep studies), actigraphy, and multiple sleep latency tests, to evaluate patients' sleep patterns and diagnose their conditions accurately. Based on the diagnosis, they develop individualized treatment plans that may include lifestyle modifications, pharmacological interventions, medical devices, or surgery.

To become a sleep medicine specialist, physicians typically complete a residency in a related field such as neurology, pulmonology, psychiatry, or internal medicine and then pursue additional training and certification in sleep medicine. The American Board of Medical Specialties recognizes sleep medicine as a subspecialty, and the American Board of Sleep Medicine offers certification to qualified physicians who pass a rigorous examination.

Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) is a medical approach that integrates the best available research evidence with clinical expertise and patient values and preferences to make informed decisions about appropriate health care for individual patients. It is a process of lifelong learning and critical appraisal of new evidence to inform clinical practice. The goal of EBP is to provide high-quality, cost-effective healthcare that is based on the most current and valid scientific research, as well as the unique needs and preferences of each patient. This approach emphasizes the importance of using rigorous, systematic methods to evaluate medical research and to translate findings into clinical practice, while also taking into account individual patient circumstances and values.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "videodisc recording" is not a medical term. It is a general technology term that refers to the process of recording video images and sound onto a videodisc, such as a Laserdisc or Video CD. If you have any questions about medical terminology or concepts, I'd be happy to help with those!

A Pharmacist is a healthcare professional who practices in the field of pharmacy, focusing on the safe and effective use of medications. They are responsible for dispensing medications prescribed by physicians and other healthcare providers, as well as providing information and counseling to patients about their medications. This includes explaining how to take the medication, potential side effects, and any drug interactions. Pharmacists may also be involved in medication therapy management, monitoring patient health and adjusting medication plans as needed. They must have a deep understanding of the properties and actions of drugs, including how they are absorbed, distributed, metabolized, and excreted by the body, as well as their potential interactions with other substances and treatments. In addition to a Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) degree, pharmacists must also be licensed in the state where they practice.

Patient-centered care is a healthcare approach that places the patient at the center of the care experience and considers their preferences, values, and needs in making clinical decisions. It is based on partnership between the patient and healthcare provider, with open communication, mutual respect, and shared decision-making. Patient-centered care aims to improve the quality of care, increase patient satisfaction, and lead to better health outcomes by addressing not only the medical needs but also the emotional, social, and cultural factors that affect a patient's health.

Endocrinology is a branch of medicine that deals with the endocrine system, which consists of glands and organs that produce, store, and secrete hormones. Hormones are chemical messengers that regulate various functions in the body, such as metabolism, growth and development, tissue function, sexual function, reproduction, sleep, and mood.

Endocrinologists are medical doctors who specialize in diagnosing and treating conditions related to the endocrine system, including diabetes, thyroid disorders, pituitary gland tumors, adrenal gland disorders, osteoporosis, and sexual dysfunction. They use various diagnostic tests, such as blood tests, imaging studies, and biopsies, to evaluate hormone levels and function. Treatment options may include medication, lifestyle changes, and surgery.

In summary, endocrinology is the medical specialty focused on the study, diagnosis, and treatment of disorders related to the endocrine system and its hormones.

The "History of Medicine" refers to the evolution and development of medical knowledge, practices, and institutions over time. It includes the study of key figures, discoveries, theories, treatments, and societal attitudes that have shaped the way medicine is practiced and understood in different cultures and historical periods. This can encompass various fields such as clinical medicine, public health, medical ethics, and healthcare systems. The history of medicine provides valuable insights into the advances and setbacks in medical knowledge and offers lessons for addressing current and future medical challenges.

'Guidelines' in the medical context are systematically developed statements or sets of recommendations designed to assist healthcare professionals and patients in making informed decisions about appropriate health care for specific clinical circumstances. They are based on a thorough evaluation of the available evidence, including scientific studies, expert opinions, and patient values. Guidelines may cover a wide range of topics, such as diagnosis, treatment, prevention, screening, and management of various diseases and conditions. They aim to standardize care, improve patient outcomes, reduce unnecessary variations in practice, and promote efficient use of healthcare resources.

I apologize for any confusion, but "Australia" is not a medical term or concept. It is the world's largest island and smallest continent, located in the Southern Hemisphere, surrounded by the Pacific and Indian Oceans. It is composed of many diverse ecosystems, including deserts, rainforests, and coastal areas, and is home to a wide variety of unique plant and animal species.

If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health-related topics, I would be happy to try and help answer them for you!

In education, a curriculum (/kəˈrɪkjʊləm/; PL: curriculums or curricula /kəˈrɪkjʊlə/) is broadly defined as the totality of ... The Curriculum. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1918. Jackson, Philip W. "Conceptions of Curriculum and Curriculum Specialists." In ... "Australian Curriculum". Retrieved 2015-01-12. "Senior secondary Australian Curriculum". Queensland Curriculum & Assessment ... Braslavsky, C. (2003). The curriculum. Adams & Adams 2003, pp. 33-34. Oxford English Dictionary, "Curriculum," 152 "Curriculum ...
... is a process of improving the curriculum. Various approaches have been used in developing curricula. ... formation of the curriculum implementation committee / curriculum evaluation committee) and review (i.e. curriculum review ... A humanistic curriculum is a curriculum based on intercultural education that allows for the plurality of society while ... A humanistic curriculum development perspective holds that for curriculum frameworks to be legitimate, the process of policy ...
Project Management Curriculum and Resources Guidelines for Undergraduate Project Management Curricula and Resources was ... Technical Education Frameworks Michigan Curriculum Framework Victorian Curriculum Assessment Authority: VELS California Content ... A curriculum framework is an organized plan or set of standards or learning outcomes that defines the content to be learned in ... A curriculum framework is part of an outcome-based education or standards based education reform design. The framework is the ...
Curriculum and Instruction (C&I) is a field within education which seeks to research, develop, and implement curriculum changes ...
... was part of the United Kingdom government's drive to get more ICT and multimedia resources in classrooms ... This was done primarily through the eLearning Credits (ELCs) scheme, which was operated by Curriculum Online. The project was ...
... is a philosophy of teaching and a way of planning a children's curriculum that focuses on being responsive ... For emergent curriculum, classrooms are often organized into core curriculum areas, where activities may have a curricular ... Jones p. 129) An idea for a curriculum topic may be sparked by things, people, events in the environment, issues that arise in ... Emergent curriculum can be practiced with children at any grade level. It prioritizes: active participation by students ...
In English, the plural of curriculum alone is often curriculums instead of the traditional Latin plural curricula, which is why ... Look up curriculum vitae in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. Wikimedia Commons has media related to Curricula Vitae. CV guide ... The English plural of curriculum vitae is however almost always curricula vitae as in Latin, and this is the only form recorded ... "American Heritage Dictionary Entry: curriculum vitae". ahdictionary.com. Retrieved 27 June 2016. Definition of "curriculum ...
Journal of Curriculum and Supervision, 5, 1, 1-5. J.J. Wallin (2011). What is ?Curriculum Theorizing: for a People Yet to Come ... Curriculum theory (CT) is an academic discipline devoted to examining and shaping educational curricula. There are many ... To aid in understanding the relationship of curriculum and child, Dewey described curriculum as, "a map, a summary, an arranged ... In his 1969 paper "The Practical: A Language for Curriculum" he declared the curriculum field "moribund". This, plus the social ...
Notable national curricula are: Australian Curriculum is a planned curriculum for schools in all states and territories of ... National Curriculum for England, in force in part since 2014 and in full since 2016 Northern Ireland Curriculum Curriculum for ... National Curriculum and Textbook Board for Bangladesh. National Curriculum Framework (NCF 2005) for India in the United Kingdom ... Bias in curricula Single national curriculum controversy (Pakistan) Textbook controversies (disambiguation) ACARA: Australian ...
... is a procedure for reviewing the operational curriculum as it is entered into an electronic database at any ... A number of independent schools have adopted the curriculum mapping process to review and revise their curriculum. The bulk of ... Some states such as South Dakota have adopted curriculum mapping on a statewide basis and provide detailed online curriculum ... in "Deciding What to Teach and Test: Developing, Auditing, and Aligning the Curriculum" (1999, Sage). Curriculum mapping is not ...
Holmes, Brian; Mclean, Martin, "Curriculum theory", The Curriculum, doi:10.4324/9780429454332-1/curriculum-theory-brian-holmes- ... A type of curriculum that focuses on the implantation of children's interests is called emergent curriculum. Emergent ... Curriculum studies is a concentration in the different types of curriculum and instruction concerned with understanding ... Important Curriculum Studies books: The Curriculum: Perspective, Paradigm, and Possibility by William Schubert in addition to ...
ISBN 978-93-5305-641-4 Happiness Curriculum blog Happiness Curriculum Twitter handle Happiness Curriculum Facebook page (CS1 ... The curriculum is laid out according to the guidelines of the National Curriculum Framework 2005. It is a grade-specific ... This curriculum was later named the Happiness Curriculum. A team of 40 professionals includes teachers from Government of Delhi ... The curriculum was launched on 2 July 2018. The launch ceremony was attended by the 14th Dalai Lama, and the Chief Minister of ...
The full Australian Curriculum can be accessed at its own website. The learning areas in the Australian Curriculum are as ... The Australian Curriculum is a national curriculum for all primary and secondary schools in Australia under progressive ... "National curriculum content not up to scratch: critics". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 15 May 2017. "New curriculum ... The curriculum is developed and reviewed by the Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority, an independent ...
"Beyond Hidden Curriculum?" Journal of Curriculum Studies. 16.1(1984): 29-36. Apple, Michael and Nancy King. "What Do Schools ... "What Should We Do with a Hidden Curriculum When We Find One?" The Hidden Curriculum and Moral Education. Ed. Giroux, Henry and ... "Social Class and the Hidden Curriculum of Work." The Hidden Curriculum and Moral Education. Ed. Giroux, Henry and David Purpel ... "Social Education in the Classroom: The Dynamics of the Hidden Curriculum." The Hidden Curriculum and Moral Education. Ed. ...
... consists of 4 research-based curricular computer science modules for grades 6-12. The 4 modules are ... By the end of the curriculum, each student has designed their own video game using the concepts (e.g. - order of operations, ... The Bootstrap curriculum consists of four modules, Bootstrap:Algebra, Bootstrap:Reactive, Bootstrap:Data Science, and Bootstrap ... In 2005, Emmanuel Schanzer wrote the first version of the Bootstrap curriculum, adapting many of the ideas from the celebrated ...
A Patriotism Curriculum or Desh/Rashtra Bhakti Curriculum is an Indian educational program for children studying in nursery to ... "All you need to know about 'deshbhakti curriculum' in Delhi govt schools". The Times of India. 29 September 2021. Retrieved 19 ... Bose, Joydeep (28 September 2021). Ray, Meenakshi (ed.). "Deshbhakti curriculum in Delhi govt schools from today in major ... Happiness Curriculum Sharma, Kritika (30 September 2021). "How Kejriwal's Delhi govt aims to teach students patriotism through ...
... was a reform of A Level examinations in the United Kingdom. It was introduced in September 2000 (with the first ... "Curriculum 2000. Select Committee on Education and Skills Third Report". House of Commons. Retrieved 2011-06-19. "Science ... Michael Gove, who implemented the A level changes which succeeded Curriculum 2000 has described the modular system as an exam ' ... "Curriculum 2000: Statement". Lancaster University. Archived from the original on 2007-08-05. Retrieved 2011-06-19. (Articles ...
This curriculum should be based on the latest in developmental research and learning theories in order to bring forth the best ... A residential curriculum is a framework used by colleges and universities to create learning opportunities and programs for ... "Residential Curriculum Element #3: Basis in Developmental Theory and Research". Pb. 2016-08-12. Retrieved 2021-03-11. ( ... When institutions have a residential curriculum. it helps to support the student staff working in residence as the intentional ...
"Curriculum Unavailable" at NBC.com "Curriculum Unavailable" at IMDb (Articles with short description, Short description is ... "Curriculum Unavailable" is the nineteenth episode of the third season of the American comedy television series Community and ... In its original broadcast, "Curriculum Unavailable" was seen by 2.99 million American viewers and achieved a 1.4 rating in the ... "Community: "Curriculum Unavailable" Review". IGN. May 11, 2012. Retrieved June 23, 2020. Surette, Tim (May 11, 2012). " ...
"SCHOOL CURRICULUM IN JAPAN , Facts and Details". factsanddetails.com. Retrieved 2022-12-08. 判例検索システム>検索結果詳細画面 (in Japanese). ... Curriculum guidelines (学習指導要領, Gakushū shidō yōryō) is a standard issued by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science ... The standard curriculum that most during this time study consists of Japanese language, geography and history, civics, ... Students in the program spend less time in the core curriculum subjects compared to regular students. After
"Scotland's Curriculum for Excellence". "A Curriculum For Excellence by the Curriculum Review Group". The Scottish Government. 1 ... England Northern Ireland Curriculum - Northern Ireland National Curriculum for Wales (2008 to 2026) - Wales (old) Curriculum ... Curriculum for Excellence is the national curriculum for Scottish schools for learners from the ages 3-18. It was developed out ... "Why Scotland doesn't have a national curriculum". Retrieved 26 July 2014. "OECD passes judgement on Scotland's Curriculum for ...
The anti-bias curriculum is a curriculum which attempts to challenge prejudices such as racism, sexism, ableism, ageism, ... The anti-bias curriculum is seen by its proponents as a catalyst in the critical analysis of various social conditions. It is ... The anti-racist curriculum is part of a wider social constructivist movement in the various societies of the Western World, ... Other critics, such as University of Tennessee professor J. Amos Hatch, have claimed that some anti-bias curricula can be ...
... is required to maximize the benefits of financial literacy curricula. A comprehensive financial literacy curriculum provides ... Financial literacy curricula aim to empower individuals with the knowledge and skills needed to manage personal finance matters ... A financial literacy curriculum is a structured educational program designed to teach basic financial skills (known as ... A financial literacy curriculum provides information on how credit scores are calculated, the importance of maintaining good ...
The European Asylum Curriculum (EAC) is for the moment the biggest practical cooperation EU project in the field of asylum and ... Immigration Services creates a European Asylum Curriculum, which provides common vocational training for employees of the ...
The first curriculum review took place in 1998-1999 in England and 2000-2004 in Northern Ireland, with a further review in ... Cross-curriculum working and personal development was not covered. In England the Dearing Report trimmed the content, but did ... The 1988 curriculum was rigidly defined by subject., prescribing both the content and the pedagogy, and had neither teacher ... The National Curriculum of Northern Ireland identifies the minimum requirements of skills for each subject and the activities ...
... curriculum-based which was embedded in the curriculum and therefore forced the metric to be the number (and rate) of units ... Curriculum-based measurement, or CBM, is also referred to as a general outcomes measures (GOMs) of a student's performance in ... This is one of the most important conundrums to surface on CBM: To evaluate the effects of a curriculum, a measurement system ... Curriculum-based measurement emerged from behavioral psychology and yet several behaviorists have become disenchanted with the ...
The Open Content Curriculum Project was initiated with MediaWiki software in 2005, and offers a standards-based K-12 curriculum ... An open-source curriculum (OSC) is an online instructional resource that can be freely used, distributed and modified. OSC is ... Its course outlines are licensed under a CC-BY license, making those outlines open-source curricula. Saylor has created nearly ... With these online repositories, a curriculum framework for a particular course is created by an instructional designer or ...
Curriculum Vitae is a compilation album by recording artists of Nigerian record label Mo' Hits Records. It was released in 2007 ... Curriculum Vitae was supported by five singles-"Why Me" (Remix), "Pere", "Ololufe", "Booty Call" and "Move Your Body". It ... Curriculum Vitae was recorded between 2005 and 2006. Produced entirely by Don Jazzy, the album features appearances from ... Curriculum Vitae was made available for digital download on iTunes in 2009. Michael Collins Ajereh - executive producer, ...
"Our latest report". The Black Curriculum. Retrieved 16 July 2020. "The UK Govt Has Denied A Request From The Black Curriculum ... "Our aims". The Black Curriculum. Archived from the original on 19 July 2020. Retrieved 20 July 2020. "The Black Curriculum: ... Arday, Jason (January 2020). The Black Curriculum: Black British History in the National Curriculum Report 2020 (PDF). p. 24. ... The Black Curriculum is a British community interest company, founded in 2019, whose mission is "to address the lack of Black ...
Portelli John P (1993). "Exposing the hidden curriculum". Journal of Curriculum Studies. 25 (4): 343-358. doi:10.1080/ ... The phrase "hidden curriculum" was coined by Philip W. Jackson in his 1968 book entitled Life in Classrooms, in a section about ... The Hidden Curriculum (1970) is a book by the psychiatrist Benson R. Snyder, the then-Dean of Institute Relations at the ... He says, that while some students do not realize there is a disjunction between the two curricula, in a demanding environment, ...
National curriculum in England: English programmes of study - key stages 1 and 2 Ref: DFE-00181-2013 ... Short films of teachers and subject experts talking about the national curriculum and how to use it are also available. ... National curriculum in England: English programme of study - key stage 3 Ref: DFE-00184-2013 ... National curriculum in England: English programme of study - key stage 4 Ref: DFE-00497-2014 ...
2. Use the Theme and Content Module documents to guide your writing. 3. Have three teachers review the learning experience. 4. Send that vetted learning experience to your local Area Coordinator. Local Area Coordinator will review and upload to PB Works into the correct file.. 6. The Webmaster will then upload the vetted learning experience to the FACS framework. ...
Our schools curricula align with the New Jersey Student Learning Standards and meet or exceed the expected rigor placed on ... Curricula are living, breathing documents that are reviewed regularly. Through the input of our teachers, feedback from Tri- ...
The anti-bias curriculum is a curriculum which attempts to challenge prejudices such as racism, sexism, ableism, ageism, ... The anti-racist curriculum is part of a wider social constructivist movement in the various societies of the Western World, ... The anti-bias curriculum is seen by its proponents as a catalyst in the critical analysis of various social conditions. It is ... Anna S. King; Michael Jonathan Reiss (1993). The Multicultural Dimension of the National Curriculum (illustrated, reprint ed ...
Red Hat offers multiple training paths for wide variance of student skill sets and goals. Learn more on how to get started here.
Structural Biology and Biophysics (SBB) Curriculum. Our curriculum offers courses and trainings for structural biology / ...
Before releasing the curriculum, we will host a community consultation session where we will invite the participants from our ... Project: Experiences of Immigrant Women and Girls in the Sexual and Reproductive Health Curriculums of Canada. When it comes to ... You will be expected to take part in discussions on sexual and reproductive health curriculums in educational institutes and ... There are inconsistencies in school curricula from province to province, especially when it comes to sexual health education, ...
Curriculum and Courses for environmental science majors ... Curriculum and Courses. The course requirements for the ...
In education, a curriculum (/kəˈrɪkjʊləm/; PL: curriculums or curricula /kəˈrɪkjʊlə/) is broadly defined as the totality of ... The Curriculum. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1918. Jackson, Philip W. "Conceptions of Curriculum and Curriculum Specialists." In ... "Australian Curriculum". Retrieved 2015-01-12. "Senior secondary Australian Curriculum". Queensland Curriculum & Assessment ... Braslavsky, C. (2003). The curriculum. Adams & Adams 2003, pp. 33-34. Oxford English Dictionary, "Curriculum," 152 "Curriculum ...
... second-year medical student Sam Carley worked with attendings Adrienne Newburg and Christine Wallace on a curriculum ...
Description of training resources available for faculty and staff who work on curriculum development and maintenance. ... All curriculum proposals are submitted through Curriculog (general instructions linked). You can log on with your SJSU ... If you would like additional support, please email curriculum@sjsu.edu to schedule a one-on-one training session with the ... If you would like to have the course added to your Canvas Dashboard, please email curriculum@sjsu.edu. ...
Special Collections Browne Popular Culture Library Center for Archival Collections Curriculum Resource Center Music Library & ...
As an art major at CSB and SJU, you will choose a concentration in studio art or art education (or art history minor). Studio art majors acquire a thorough grounding in the skills and aesthetic judgment necessary for painting, drawing, printmaking, photography, computer art, sculpture, ceramics and digital video.. Art history minors focus on the meaning and evolution of various theories of art, as well as the role of art in contemporary and past cultures.. Art majors who plan to teach art in primary and secondary schools must complete a minor in education, in addition to fulfilling studio art and art history requirements. ...
Core courses and elective options for the OHSU Neuroscience Graduate Program
Garth Zeglin, Aaron Walsman, Laura Herlant, Zhaodong Zheng, Yuyang Guo, Michael C. Koval, Kevin Lenzo, Hui Jun Tay, Prasanna Velagapudi, Katie Correll, and Siddhartha S. Srinivasa. "HERBs Sure Thing: a rapid drama system for rehearsing and performing live robot theater." IEEE Workshop on Advanced Robotics and its Social Impacts, September 11-13, 2014, Evanston, IL.. Garth Zeglin, Alberto Rodriguez, and Matthew T. Mason. "A simple and compliant force sensing palm for the MLab Simple Hand." Proceedings of IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, 2013.. Ben Brown, Geoff Gordon, Sue Ann Hong, Marek Michalowski, Paul Scerri, Axel Straschnoy, Iheanyi Umez-Eronini, and Garth Zeglin. "The New Artist," video presented at the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation 2011 Workshop on Robots and Art, Frontiers in Human-Centered Robotics as Seen by the Arts. Shanghai, May 13, 2011.. G.S. Koonjul, G.J. Zeglin, and N.S. Pollard. "Measuring contact points from displacements ...
Administrative, History, & Development of Corrections, and the Correctional ...
PREP The Curriculum is a comprehensive general pediatrics review package written by experts and trusted by thousands of ... PREP The Curriculum is a comprehensive general pediatrics review package written by experts and trusted by thousands of ... 2022 PREP The Curriculum. General Pediatrics Review Package - MOC - CME American Academy of Pediatrics ... A subscription to PREP The Curriculum, online and print, includes:. *PREP Self-Assessment with 240 questions & critiques (print ...
... rounding out 2014 youre still finding yourself a bit fuzzy on the difference between the common-core standards and curriculum ... Curriculum. Opinion. I Quit Teaching to Become a Climate Activist. Heres Why. Bryce Coon , November 29, 2023 ... Clearing Up the Curriculum-Standards Confusion. By Liana Loewus. - December 31, 2014 2 min read ... Curriculum. Sponsor. Attention Teachers: Dont Miss Crayola Creativity Week 2023!. Content provided by Crayola ...
The department has eight core curriculum courses that are required by most specializations. ... Core Curriculum The department has eight core curriculum courses that are required by most specializations. CPSC 121 is the ...
Blog outlining the SANS Cloud Security Curriculum offerings and resources. ... SANS Cloud Security Curriculum. The SANS Cloud Security Curriculum is growing fast - like the Cloud itself. ... As such, our curriculum takes a holistic approach to Cloud Security. Courses range in complexity for those new to Cloud as well ... Download the SANS Cloud Security Curriculum Brochure here.. Description of a SANS Cloud Ace. Security Focused , Technically ...
Teach Democracy provides academic, non-partisan programs and curricula that increase civic knowledge, skills, and dispositions ...
... By Catherine Gewertz. - July 22, 2011 9 min read ... "It helps people figure out what to think about as they design or choose curriculum, and it asks, Do you have people with the ... Some of those involved in the discussions about curriculum validation see the publishers criteria as a way to offset the need ... AFT Presses Need for Curriculum Linked to Standards. Catherine Gewertz. , February 24, 2011 ...
Curriculum Overview The One-Year MBA program at SMU Cox builds on the skills and knowledge you bring, giving you the benefits ... This streamlined, modular curriculum lets you tailor your learning to your specific career focus by choosing from a wide range ...
The curriculum consists of two courses and one experience component that service students on the East Falls Campus:. *Course #1 ... Watch a virtual Creativity Core Curriculum presentation below (6 mins.):. &amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp; ... The Creativity Core Curriculum exists in response to this and embodies the mission: to cultivate a confident and flexible ... The Creativity Core Curriculum has six learning objectives that are tied to different components as noted below:. Hallmarks ...
Reengineering Your Science Curriculum: Session Descriptions. Reengineering Your Science Curriculum: Session Descriptions ...
... - Curriculum Task Force. The Curriculum Task Force of the ISCB Education ... Defining Guidelines for Bioinformatics Curricula, GenomeWeb Bioinform, March 21, 2014.. A Report of the Curriculum Task Force ... Bioinformatics Curriculum Guidelines: Toward a Definition of Core Competencies. PLoS Comput Biol 10(3): e1003496. doi:10.1371/ ... Applying, Evaluating and Refining Bioinformatics Core Competencies (An Update from the Curriculum Task Force of ISCBs ...
Join your peers in Tampa as we take a deep dive into Curriculum Redesign! In this workshop, subject matter experts will lead ... Workshop: Driving Curriculum Innovation Register now for this workshop taking place in Tampa, Florida. ... We will discuss how to update decades-old curriculum and share strategies for staying responsive and agile to reflect ... Draft an individualized Curriculum Review Process Plan you can take back to your institution ...
Curriculum coordinator interview questions. Learn about interview questions and interview process for 366 companies. ... A good way to simulate a real interview experience is to do a mock with one of the MongoDB Curriculum Engineer experts on ... Might be worth doing a mock interview with one of the Cloudera or ex-Cloudera Curriculum Developer experts on Prepfully? They ... Glassdoor has 825 interview questions and reports from Curriculum coordinator interviews. Prepare for your interview. Get hired ...
  • Results of search for 'su:{Curriculum. (who.int)
  • Sundin, O 2015, ' Invisible Search: Information Literacy in the Swedish curriculum for compulsory schools ', Nordic Journal of Digital Literacy , vol. 10, nr. 4, s. 193-209. (lu.se)
  • For revision of a programme curriculum, instructions are given below. (lu.se)
  • Teach Democracy provides academic, non-partisan programs and curricula that increase civic knowledge, skills, and dispositions using research-based methodologies including content about government and policy, student-directed discussion, and authentic civic engagement. (crf-usa.org)
  • Curriculum development remains the same though the content constantly changes. (glassdoor.com)
  • The planned mission reviewed the current specialized nursing curricula in Ministry of Health educational institutes in terms of content, validity, sustainability and adaptability to future developments. (who.int)
  • A curriculum map helps faculty, students, peer reviewers, and others to visualize and comprehend how course-level outcomes align with and support program-level outcomes. (cmu.edu)
  • The Eberly Center designs individualized approaches to curriculum mapping in collaboration with and according to the needs and resources of colleges, programs, and groups of faculty . (cmu.edu)
  • To support the curriculum mapping process, all program faculty review their own syllabi to assure that they contain effectively articulated learning objectives , targeted instructional strategies that foster student learning and skill development toward those objectives, and assessments to measure student achievement of those objectives. (cmu.edu)
  • Using one of the curriculum mapping guides [insert to New Page 4a] the faculty member(s) leading the process lists (in the columns of the guide) courses in the order in which they are typically taken by students. (cmu.edu)
  • Once complete, program faculty may use the curriculum map to support ongoing assessment and iterative improvement. (cmu.edu)
  • Curriculum is one of the major responsibilities of the faculty. (csusb.edu)
  • At campus level, the Academic Programs Office handles the administrative functions, the Office of the Registrar handles student functions and the Faculty Senate oversees curriculum development. (csusb.edu)
  • The Teaching Resource Center is trying to assemble all of these aspects in a coherent resource site for faculty, as well as provide the Curriculum Guide for Q2S conversion and transformation. (csusb.edu)
  • Campus Resources: This list links faculty to campus resources for various areas of curriculum such as the Bulletin (Catalog), the Campus Calendar, student concerns (e.g. (csusb.edu)
  • The Office of Institutional Effectiveness and Quality Improvement assists with assessment practices for the REAL Curriculum. (radford.edu)
  • Pernilla Honoré is administrating programme curricula for programmes in Business Administration. (lu.se)
  • Linda Öberg is administrating curricula for all other programmes. (lu.se)
  • The REAL Curriculum documents how students develop these competencies within foundational courses and in majors, minors, and certificates. (radford.edu)
  • Leading advocates of the standards have been trying to think through possible approaches to validating curricula as sound embodiments of the standards. (edweek.org)
  • The department has eight core curriculum courses that are required by most specializations. (ubc.ca)
  • Integrating ACT curriculum into college courses about child development and developmental disabilities. (cdc.gov)
  • The two publishers' criteria documents, totaling 24 pages, land in a swirl of discussion about how to create good curricula for the common-core standards, which emerged from an initiative led by the nation's governors and state schools chiefs. (edweek.org)
  • Register now and save 150 USD for the Innovative Curriculum Conference (Virtual - March 20-22) and the Workshop: Driving Curriculum Innovation (in-person - April 3-4, Tampa, Florida) and pay 1,440 USD. (aacsb.edu)
  • The Canadian Advisory of Women Immigrants (CAWI), is conducting a community research project to find out more about the sexual and reproductive health (SRH) curriculums taught in schools across Canada, the findings from this project will be used to inform the development of a SRH curriculum. (google.com)
  • During the summer of 2016, second-year medical student Sam Carley worked with attendings Adrienne Newburg and Christine Wallace on a curriculum development fund project to formulate a new Flexible Clinical Elective (FCE). (umassmed.edu)
  • With the development of the larger curriculum, SANS has conscientiously looked at job roles, training needs within those roles, and how we help students progress along their professional cloud security journey. (sans.org)
  • Policies & Procedures: This page provides information about the curriculum development process (to include CourseLeaf information), campus policies, the Master Plan and scheduling resources. (csusb.edu)
  • It was later determined that the actual curriculum development could not be conducted under this contract, so activities were limited to gathering background data and identifying community needs. (cdc.gov)
  • Systems approach to teacher training and curriculum development : the case of developing countries / Taher A. Razik. (who.int)
  • Before releasing the curriculum, we will host a community consultation session where we will invite the participants from our focus group discussions, as well as any interested community members to approve/review the curriculum resource (unpaid contribution). (google.com)
  • But no moves have been made to do either, partly because other sectors' models don't translate well to education and partly because of sensitivity to issues of influence over curriculum, according to participants in those talks. (edweek.org)
  • Expected outcomes of each grant - new curriculum either embedded into an existing course, or a brand-new course. (uwm.edu)
  • All curriculum proposals are submitted through Curriculog (general instructions linked). (sjsu.edu)
  • The Health Education Curriculum Analysis Tool (HECAT) is an assessment tool developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in partnership with heath education experts from state and local education agencies, schools, colleges and universities, and national organizations. (cdc.gov)
  • AkkeNeel Talsma & Jeana Holt - I ntegrate design and entrepreneurial thinking into the existing curriculum for two graduate nursing programs to address current healthcare problems. (uwm.edu)
  • Integrating ACT curriculum into LEND training programs, which provide long-term, graduate-level interdisciplinary training as well as interdisciplinary services and care to improve the health of infants, children, and adolescents with disabilities. (cdc.gov)
  • New guidelines on crafting curriculum materials for the common standards in English/language arts are reigniting debate about how to ensure a marketplace of good instructional materials for the new standards without crossing the line into telling teachers how to teach. (edweek.org)
  • The Curriculum Task Force of the ISCB Education Committee seeks to define curricular guidelines for those who train and educate bioinformaticians. (iscb.org)
  • The curricula which was developed by a team of academics from across Sierra Leone's universities and public health training institutions , working together with a WHO technical team will serve as the working document for the training of health care workers in surveillance and response in Sierra Leone. (who.int)
  • Q2S Curriculum Guide: The guide provides definitions of conversion & transformation, as well as considerations for programs (e.g. majors, minors, tracks, certificates) and the steps for curriculum approval. (csusb.edu)
  • Integrating ACT curriculum into residency and fellowship programs. (cdc.gov)
  • Our schools' curricula align with the New Jersey Student Learning Standards and meet or exceed the expected rigor placed on instruction. (google.com)
  • F]our years after signing off on the final draft of the standards, [Zimba] spends his weekends trying to make up for what he considers the lackluster curriculum at his daughter's school, and his weekdays battling the lackluster curriculum and teaching at schools around the country that are struggling to shift to the common core," Garland writes. (edweek.org)
  • Jason Zimba contacted me to inform me that he and his wife began Saturday tutoring because their daughter's school had decided to retain its pre-common-core curriculum. (edweek.org)
  • The Gates Foundation, for instance, has convened conversations that included representatives from other sectors, among them the environmental-protection and food industries, to talk about how their certification processes might inform parallel work in the curriculum world. (edweek.org)
  • Resources to help your students take action on issues that matter to them, including our free Civic Action Project (CAP) curriculum! (crf-usa.org)
  • In recognition of this approach, Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine (AZCOM) has developed, and continues to refine, a four-year curriculum that educates students in the biopsychosocial approach to patient care, as well as the basic medical arts and sciences. (midwestern.edu)
  • Within this curricular format, AZCOM students spend their first two years completing a rigorous basic science and introductory clinical curriculum, preparing for their clinical studies, including early simulated and clinical experiences. (midwestern.edu)
  • By stimulating intellectual curiosity and teaching problem-solving skills, the AZCOM curriculum encourages students to regard learning as a lifelong process. (midwestern.edu)
  • An opioid-centered curriculum for medical students improves awareness of pain management and treatment of opioid use disorder (OUD) and may help mitigate the current opioid crisis in the US, new research suggests. (medscape.com)
  • The proposed curriculum, he said, instills confidence in students and teaches important lessons they can apply no matter what field they choose. (medscape.com)
  • If you are a committee member or in an approval role and do not have the right roles assigned to your account, please email [email protected] . (sjsu.edu)
  • This guide is being developed by the Q2S Steering Committee, Curriculum Subcommittee. (csusb.edu)
  • If you would like additional support, please email [email protected] to schedule a one-on-one training session with the Curriculum and Academic Program Analyst. (sjsu.edu)
  • Given the unmitigated growth of Cloud, we have launched the Cloud Security Curriculum to give you the training and skills you need to become a cloud security expert. (sans.org)
  • If you are a developer, an architect, an engineer, an analyst, or a manger, the SANS Cloud Security Curriculum has training for you. (sans.org)
  • AHA Team Training's exclusive TeamSTEPPS Master Training course curriculum is ever evolving and includes the most up-to-date innovations in the field including TeamSTEPPS 3.0 and human-centered design thinking. (aha.org)
  • The community partners felt that this curriculum could also be used in a "Train the Trainer" format, so that community members could provide regular training and education sessions to residents on numerous issues in toxicology. (cdc.gov)
  • Featuring materials and Autism Case Training curriculum at trainings, often in tandem with other relevant topics. (cdc.gov)
  • Second-Trimester Dilation and Evacuation: A Simulation-Based Team Training Curriculum. (bvsalud.org)
  • PREP The Curriculum is a comprehensive general pediatrics review package written by experts and trusted by thousands of pediatricians for over 40 years. (aap.org)
  • Each week residents have four hours of protected time for educational programming to cover the curriculum, journal article review, Morbidity & Mortality (M&M) Conferences and Grand Rounds. (cedars-sinai.edu)
  • A WHO mission to review the specialized nursing curriculum took place from 9 to 13 June 2013. (who.int)
  • A Guide to curriculum review for basic nursing education : orientation to primary health care and community health. (who.int)
  • Teaching Curriculum Resources (TCR) emerge as indispensable allies in this endeavor, providing a rich repository of high-quality materials that support teachers in their quest for excellence. (tcrecord.org)
  • The programme curricula are administrated by the Dean's office. (lu.se)
  • If, in rounding out 2014, you're still finding yourself a bit fuzzy on the difference between the common-core standards and curriculum, two recent NPR pieces might offer some clarity. (edweek.org)
  • You will be expected to take part in discussions on sexual and reproductive health curriculums in educational institutes and the potential barriers and gaps for immigrant women and girls. (google.com)
  • In conclusion, Teaching Curriculum Resources stand as a beacon of support for teachers, providing them with the tools and guidance they need to navigate the complexities of education. (tcrecord.org)
  • Archived 2004-12-12 at the Wayback Machine Anti-Defamation League Quotation: "Anti-bias education takes an active, problem solving approach that is integrated into all aspects of an existing curriculum and a school's environment. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are inconsistencies in school curricula from province to province, especially when it comes to sexual health education, making a widespread, baseline education level unavailable. (google.com)
  • The Ministry of Health and Sanitation together with the Ministry of Technical and Higher Education with the support of the World Health Organization in Sierra Leone has launched the Integrated Diseases Surveillance and Response (IDSR) pre and in-service curricula in Bo city. (who.int)
  • Manual for developing a nutrition education curriculum / by Isobel R. Contento and Kathleen Morin. (who.int)
  • CONTACT US to get support from an Eberly colleague to facilitate your curriculum mapping. (cmu.edu)
  • The tutoring was "not to make up for bad CCSS curriculum and/or teaching," he wrote in an email. (edweek.org)
  • another has been the question of who should shape curriculum design. (edweek.org)
  • Why do you want to integrate creative- design- or entrepreneurial thinking into curriculum? (uwm.edu)
  • In 1998, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) requested the Institute of Public Health (IPH) at Florida A&M University to provide technical services in the design of a curriculum for communities. (cdc.gov)
  • Browse lessons on U.S. history, world history, government, and current events from Bill of Rights in Action, our flagship curriculum magazine. (crf-usa.org)
  • The purpose of this curricula is to have a comprehensive, evidence-based strategy for strengthening national public health surveillance and response system" said Dr. Njuguna. (who.int)
  • Short films of teachers and subject experts talking about the national curriculum and how to use it are also available. (www.gov.uk)
  • Might be worth doing a mock interview with one of the Cloudera or ex-Cloudera Curriculum Developer experts on Prepfully? (glassdoor.com)
  • A good way to simulate a real interview experience is to do a mock with one of the MongoDB Curriculum Engineer experts on Prepfully, rated super strongly on TrustPilot. (glassdoor.com)
  • Connect with experts and other teachers to build curriculum. (microsoft.com)
  • Watch a virtual Creativity Core Curriculum presentation below (6 mins. (jefferson.edu)
  • Ultrasound is vertically integrated into the core concepts within the four-year curriculum. (midwestern.edu)
  • We will discuss how to update decades-old curriculum and share strategies for staying responsive and agile to reflect environmental, political, and social changes in our business school curriculum portfolios. (aacsb.edu)
  • Can a Novel Med School Curriculum Curb the US Opioid Epidemic? (medscape.com)
  • Primary school curriculum planning and selected case studies. (who.int)
  • Curricula are living, breathing documents that are reviewed regularly. (google.com)
  • Vetted informally among publishers, researchers, state officials, teachers, and others, the documents are being circulated more widely now, and are eventually headed for posting online to guide not only publishers, but also anyone developing curriculum for the standards. (edweek.org)
  • Use the Files tab to share curriculum and coauthor documents in real time. (microsoft.com)