A gram-negative, facultatively chemoautotrophic bacterium, formerly called Wautersia eutropha, found in water and soil.
A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria, in the family BURKHOLDERIACEAE, that are mobile by means of peritrichous FLAGELLA. The genus was formerly called Wautersia and species in this genus were formerly in the genus RALSTONIA.
A common parasite of humans in the moist tropics and subtropics. These organisms attach to villi in the small intestine and suck blood causing diarrhea, anorexia, and anemia.
Benzoic acid or benzoic acid esters substituted with one or more chlorine atoms.
Phenols substituted with one or more chlorine atoms in any position.
A colorless, syrupy, strongly acidic liquid that can form detergents with oleic acid.
An herbicide with irritant effects on the eye and the gastrointestinal system.
A genus of intestinal parasite worms which includes one of the most important hookworms of man, NECATOR AMERICANUS. The only other known species, N. suillus, has been recovered from pigs.
A family of gram negative, aerobic, non-sporeforming, rod-shaped bacteria.
Infection of humans or animals with hookworms of the genus NECATOR. The resulting anemia from this condition is less severe than that from ANCYLOSTOMIASIS.
A species of gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria found ubiquitously and formerly called Comamonas acidovorans and Pseudomonas acidovorans. It is the type species of the genus DELFTIA.
A plant genus of the family FABACEAE that contains kukulkanin, a CHALCONE.
Polymers of organic acids and alcohols, with ester linkages--usually polyethylene terephthalate; can be cured into hard plastic, films or tapes, or fibers which can be woven into fabrics, meshes or velours.
Elimination of ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANTS; PESTICIDES and other waste using living organisms, usually involving intervention of environmental or sanitation engineers.
Proteins found in any species of bacterium.
Infection of humans or animals with hookworms of the genus ANCYLOSTOMA. Characteristics include anemia, dyspepsia, eosinophilia, and abdominal swelling.
A genus of nematode intestinal parasites that consists of several species. A. duodenale is the common hookworm in humans. A. braziliense, A. ceylonicum, and A. caninum occur primarily in cats and dogs, but all have been known to occur in humans.
A plant genus in the family VITACEAE, order Rhamnales, subclass Rosidae. It is a woody vine cultivated worldwide. It is best known for grapes, the edible fruit and used to make WINE and raisins.
Formaldehyde is a colorless, flammable, strong-smelling chemical compound, primarily used as a preservative in medical laboratories and fungicide, which is also produced naturally in the human body and released during decomposition.
A phylum of fungi which have cross-walls or septa in the mycelium. The perfect state is characterized by the formation of a saclike cell (ascus) containing ascospores. Most pathogenic fungi with a known perfect state belong to this phylum.
A superfamily of nematode parasitic hookworms consisting of four genera: ANCYLOSTOMA; NECATOR; Bunostomum; and Uncinaria. ANCYLOSTOMA and NECATOR occur in humans and other mammals. Bunostomum is common in ruminants and Uncinaria in wolves, foxes, and dogs.
The ash, dust, gases, and lava released by volcanic explosion. The gases are volatile matter composed principally of about 90% water vapor, and carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen. The ash or dust is pyroclastic ejecta and lava is molten extrusive material consisting mainly of magnesium silicate. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
Infection of humans or animals with hookworms other than those caused by the genus Ancylostoma or Necator, for which the specific terms ANCYLOSTOMIASIS and NECATORIASIS are available.
A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria. Organisms in this genus had originally been classified as members of the PSEUDOMONAS genus but overwhelming biochemical and chemical findings indicated the need to separate them from other Pseudomonas species, and hence, this new genus was created.
A strong dibasic acid with the molecular formula H2SeO4. Included under this heading is the acid form, and inorganic salts of dihydrogen selenium tetraoxide.

Analysis of 4-phosphopantetheinylation of polyhydroxybutyrate synthase from Ralstonia eutropha: generation of beta-alanine auxotrophic Tn5 mutants and cloning of the panD gene region. (1/200)

The postulated posttranslational modification of the polyhydroxybutyrate (PHA) synthase from Ralstonia eutropha by 4-phosphopantetheine was investigated. Four beta-alanine auxotrophic Tn5-induced mutants of R. eutropha HF39 were isolated, and two insertions were mapped in an open reading frame with strong similarity to the panD gene from Escherichia coli, encoding L-aspartate-1-decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.15), whereas two other insertions were mapped in an open reading frame (ORF) with strong similarity to the NAD(P)+ transhydrogenase (EC 1.6.1.1) alpha 1 subunit, encoded by the pntAA gene from Escherichia coli. The panD gene was cloned by complementation of the panD mutant of R. eutropha Q20. DNA sequencing of the panD gene region (3,312 bp) revealed an ORF of 365 bp, encoding a protein with 63 and 67% amino acid sequence similarity to PanD from E. coli and Bacillus subtilis, respectively. Subcloning of only this ORF into vectors pBBR1MCS-3 and pBluescript KS- led to complementation of the panD mutants of R. eutropha and E. coli SJ16, respectively. panD-encoded L-aspartate-1-decarboxylase was further confirmed by an enzymatic assay. Upstream of panD, an ORF with strong similarity to pntAA from E. coli, encoding NAD(P)+ transhydrogenase subunit alpha 1 was found; downstream of panD, two ORFs with strong similarity to pntAB and pntB, encoding subunits alpha 2 and beta of the NAD(P)+ transhydrogenase, respectively, were identified. Thus, a hitherto undetermined organization of pan and pnt genes was found in R. eutropha. Labeling experiments using one of the R. eutropha panD mutants and [2-14C]beta-alanine provided no evidence that R. eutropha PHA synthase is covalently modified by posttranslational attachment of 4-phosphopantetheine, nor did the E. coli panD mutant exhibit detectable labeling of functional PHA synthase from R. eutropha.  (+info)

3-Hydroxylaminophenol mutase from Ralstonia eutropha JMP134 catalyzes a Bamberger rearrangement. (2/200)

3-Hydroxylaminophenol mutase from Ralstonia eutropha JMP134 is involved in the degradative pathway of 3-nitrophenol, in which it catalyzes the conversion of 3-hydroxylaminophenol to aminohydroquinone. To show that the reaction was really catalyzed by a single enzyme without the release of intermediates, the corresponding protein was purified to apparent homogeneity from an extract of cells grown on 3-nitrophenol as the nitrogen source and succinate as the carbon and energy source. 3-Hydroxylaminophenol mutase appears to be a relatively hydrophobic but soluble and colorless protein consisting of a single 62-kDa polypeptide. The pI was determined to be at pH 4.5. In a database search, the NH2-terminal amino acid sequence of the undigested protein and of two internal sequences of 3-hydroxylaminophenol mutase were found to be most similar to those of glutamine synthetases from different species. Hydroxylaminobenzene, 4-hydroxylaminotoluene, and 2-chloro-5-hydroxylaminophenol, but not 4-hydroxylaminobenzoate, can also serve as substrates for the enzyme. The enzyme requires no oxygen or added cofactors for its reaction, which suggests an enzymatic mechanism analogous to the acid-catalyzed Bamberger rearrangement.  (+info)

Metabolic engineering of poly(3-hydroxyalkanoates): from DNA to plastic. (3/200)

Poly(3-hydroxyalkanoates) (PHAs) are a class of microbially produced polyesters that have potential applications as conventional plastics, specifically thermoplastic elastomers. A wealth of biological diversity in PHA formation exists, with at least 100 different PHA constituents and at least five different dedicated PHA biosynthetic pathways. This diversity, in combination with classical microbial physiology and modern molecular biology, has now opened up this area for genetic and metabolic engineering to develop optimal PHA-producing organisms. Commercial processes for PHA production were initially developed by W. R. Grace in the 1960s and later developed by Imperial Chemical Industries, Ltd., in the United Kingdom in the 1970s and 1980s. Since the early 1990s, Metabolix Inc. and Monsanto have been the driving forces behind the commercial exploitation of PHA polymers in the United States. The gram-negative bacterium Ralstonia eutropha, formerly known as Alcaligenes eutrophus, has generally been used as the production organism of choice, and intracellular accumulation of PHA of over 90% of the cell dry weight have been reported. The advent of molecular biological techniques and a developing environmental awareness initiated a renewed scientific interest in PHAs, and the biosynthetic machinery for PHA metabolism has been studied in great detail over the last two decades. Because the structure and monomeric composition of PHAs determine the applications for each type of polymer, a variety of polymers have been synthesized by cofeeding of various substrates or by metabolic engineering of the production organism. Classical microbiology and modern molecular bacterial physiology have been brought together to decipher the intricacies of PHA metabolism both for production purposes and for the unraveling of the natural role of PHAs. This review provides an overview of the different PHA biosynthetic systems and their genetic background, followed by a detailed summation of how this natural diversity is being used to develop commercially attractive, recombinant processes for the large-scale production of PHAs.  (+info)

CDC group IV c-2: a new Ralstonia species close to Ralstonia eutropha. (4/200)

CDC group IV c-2, an environmental gram-negative bacillus recently proposed for inclusion in the genus Ralstonia, has been isolated in several human infections. Biochemical characterization and 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequencing with phylogenetic analysis were used to characterize eight clinical isolates and four type strains. Other typing tools, such as pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis, were also used. PFGE typing of clinical isolates was unsuccessful because the DNA was degraded, and RAPD analysis was poorly discriminatory. In contrast, the type strains were clearly distinguished with both PFGE and RAPD analysis. All of the 16S rDNA sequences were identical. Comparison of the 16S rDNA sequences to the GenBank sequences showed that they were consistent with CDC group IV c-2 belonging to the genus Ralstonia. The closest matches were obtained with Ralstonia eutropha. However, four differences in 32 biochemical tests separated R. eutropha from CDC group IV c-2, which suggests that CDC group IV c-2 is a new species of the genus Ralstonia.  (+info)

Chemoselective nitro group reduction and reductive dechlorination initiate degradation of 2-chloro-5-nitrophenol by Ralstonia eutropha JMP134. (5/200)

Ralstonia eutropha JMP134 utilizes 2-chloro-5-nitrophenol as a sole source of nitrogen, carbon, and energy. The initial steps for degradation of 2-chloro-5-nitrophenol are analogous to those of 3-nitrophenol degradation in R. eutropha JMP134. 2-Chloro-5-nitrophenol is initially reduced to 2-chloro-5-hydroxylaminophenol, which is subject to an enzymatic Bamberger rearrangement yielding 2-amino-5-chlorohydroquinone. The chlorine of 2-amino-5-chlorohydroquinone is removed by a reductive mechanism, and aminohydroquinone is formed. 2-Chloro-5-nitrophenol and 3-nitrophenol induce the expression of 3-nitrophenol nitroreductase, of 3-hydroxylaminophenol mutase, and of the dechlorinating activity. 3-Nitrophenol nitroreductase catalyzes chemoselective reduction of aromatic nitro groups to hydroxylamino groups in the presence of NADPH. 3-Nitrophenol nitroreductase is active with a variety of mono-, di-, and trinitroaromatic compounds, demonstrating a relaxed substrate specificity of the enzyme. Nitrosobenzene serves as a substrate for the enzyme and is converted faster than nitrobenzene.  (+info)

Earthworm egg capsules as vectors for the environmental introduction of biodegradative bacteria. (6/200)

Earthworm egg capsules (cocoons) may acquire bacteria from the environment in which they are produced. We found that Ralstonia eutropha (pJP4) can be recovered from Eisenia fetida cocoons formed in soil inoculated with this bacterium. Plasmid pJP4 contains the genes necessary for 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 2, 4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) degradation. In this study we determined that the presence of R. eutropha (pJP4) within the developing earthworm cocoon can influence the degradation and toxicity of 2,4-D and 2,4-DCP, respectively. The addition of cocoons containing R. eutropha (pJP4) at either low or high densities (10(2) or 10(5) CFU per cocoon, respectively) initiated degradation of 2,4-D in nonsterile soil microcosms. Loss of 2,4-D was observed within the first week of incubation, and respiking the soil with 2,4-D showed depletion within 24 h. Microbial analysis of the soil revealed the presence of approximately 10(4) CFU R. eutropha (pJP4) g-1 of soil. The toxicity of 2,4-DCP to developing earthworms was tested by using cocoons with or without R. eutropha (pJP4). Results showed that cocoons containing R. eutropha (pJP4) were able to tolerate higher levels of 2,4-DCP. Our results indicate that the biodegradation of 2, 4-DCP by R. eutropha (pJP4) within the cocoons may be the mechanism contributing to toxicity reduction. These results suggest that the microbiota may influence the survival of developing earthworms exposed to toxic chemicals. In addition, cocoons can be used as inoculants for the introduction into the environment of beneficial bacteria, such as strains with biodegradative capabilities.  (+info)

A novel Sinorhizobium meliloti operon encodes an alpha-glucosidase and a periplasmic-binding-protein-dependent transport system for alpha-glucosides. (7/200)

The most abundant carbon source transported into legume root nodules is photosynthetically produced sucrose, yet the importance of its metabolism by rhizobia in planta is not yet known. To identify genes involved in sucrose uptake and hydrolysis, we screened a Sinorhizobium meliloti genomic library and discovered a segment of S. meliloti DNA which allows Ralstonia eutropha to grow on the alpha-glucosides sucrose, maltose, and trehalose. Tn5 mutagenesis localized the required genes to a 6.8-kb region containing five open reading frames which were named agl, for alpha-glucoside utilization. Four of these (aglE, aglF, aglG, and aglK) appear to encode a periplasmic-binding-protein-dependent sugar transport system, and one (aglA) appears to encode an alpha-glucosidase with homology to family 13 of glycosyl hydrolases. Cosmid-borne agl genes permit uptake of radiolabeled sucrose into R. eutropha cells. Analysis of the properties of agl mutants suggests that S. meliloti possesses at least one additional alpha-glucosidase as well as a lower-affinity transport system for alpha-glucosides. It is possible that the Fix+ phenotype of agl mutants on alfalfa is due to these additional functions. Loci found by DNA sequencing to be adjacent to aglEFGAK include a probable regulatory gene (aglR), zwf and edd, which encode the first two enzymes of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway, pgl, which shows homology to a gene encoding a putative phosphogluconolactonase, and a novel Rhizobium-specific repeat element.  (+info)

Mutational analysis of the cbb operon (CO2 assimilation) promoter of Ralstonia eutropha. (8/200)

PL promoters direct the transcription of the duplicated cbb operons from the facultative chemoautotroph Ralstonia eutropha H16. The operons encode most enzymes of the Calvin-Benson-Bassham carbon reduction cycle required for CO2 assimilation. Their transcription depends on the activator protein CbbR. Structure-function relationships in the cloned chromosomal promoter region were analyzed by site-directed mutagenesis. PL was altered in its presumed hexameric -35 and/or -10 box or in the spacer region between the boxes to achieve a greater or lesser resemblance to the structure of the sigma70 consensus promoter of Escherichia coli. PL::lacZ transcriptional fusions of various promoter variants were assayed in transconjugant strains of R. eutropha as well as in corresponding cbbR deletion mutants. Mutations increasing the similarity of the -35 and/or -10 box to the consensus sequence stimulated PL activity to various extents, whereas mutations deviating from the consensus decreased the activity. The length of the spacer region also proved to be critical. The conversion of the boxes, either individually or simultaneously, into the consensus sequences resulted in a highly active PL. All improved PL mutants, however, retained the activation under inducing or derepressing growth conditions, although the full-consensus promoter was nearly constitutive. They were also activated in the cbbR mutants. The activity of the overlapping, divergently oriented cbbR promoter was less affected by the mutations. The half- and full-consensus PL mutants were comparably active in E. coli. Two major conclusions were drawn from the results: (i) the location and function of PL were verified, and (ii) indirect evidence was obtained for the involvement of another regulator(s), besides CbbR, in the transcriptional control of the R. eutropha cbb operons.  (+info)

"Cupriavidus necator" (formerly known as "Ralstonia eutropha") is a species of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria that is commonly found in soil and water environments. It is a versatile organism capable of using various organic compounds as carbon and energy sources for growth. One notable characteristic of this bacterium is its ability to fix nitrogen from the atmosphere, making it an important player in the global nitrogen cycle. Additionally, "Cupriavidus necator" has gained attention in recent years due to its potential use in bioremediation, as well as its ability to produce hydrogen and other valuable chemicals through metabolic engineering.

'Cupriavidus' is a genus of bacteria that are gram-negative, motile, and aerobic. They are capable of surviving in various environments, including soil, water, and clinical settings. Some species of this genus were previously classified under the genera 'Ralstonia' and 'Wautersia'. The name 'Cupriavidus' is derived from the Latin word "cuprum," which means copper, reflecting their ability to use copper as an electron acceptor during respiration.

These bacteria are known for their metabolic versatility and can degrade various organic compounds, making them relevant in bioremediation applications. In clinical settings, some species of 'Cupriavidus' have been associated with human infections, particularly in immunocompromised individuals. However, such cases are relatively rare compared to other bacterial pathogens.

It is essential to consult a reliable medical or scientific source for the most up-to-date and accurate information on 'Cupriavidus' species, as research in this field continues to evolve.

Necator americanus is a species of parasitic hookworm that primarily infects the human intestine. The medical definition of Necator americanus would be:

A nematode (roundworm) of the family Ancylostomatidae, which is one of the most common causes of human hookworm infection worldwide. The adult worms live in the small intestine and feed on blood, causing iron deficiency anemia and protein loss. Infection occurs through contact with contaminated soil, often through bare feet, and results in a skin infection called cutaneous larva migrans (creeping eruption). After penetrating the skin, the larvae migrate to the lungs, ascend the respiratory tract, are swallowed, and then mature into adults in the small intestine.

The life cycle of Necator americanus involves several developmental stages, including eggs, larvae, and adult worms. The eggs are passed in the feces of infected individuals and hatch in warm, moist soil. The larvae then mature and become infective, able to penetrate human skin upon contact.

Preventive measures include wearing shoes in areas with known hookworm infection, avoiding walking barefoot on contaminated soil, improving sanitation and hygiene practices, and treating infected individuals to break the transmission cycle. Treatment of hookworm infection typically involves administration of anthelmintic medications, such as albendazole or mebendazole, which kill the adult worms in the intestine.

Chlorobenzoates are a group of chemical compounds that consist of a benzene ring substituted with one or more chlorine atoms and a carboxylate group. They are derivatives of benzoic acid, where one or more hydrogen atoms on the benzene ring have been replaced by chlorine atoms.

Chlorobenzoates can be found in various industrial applications, such as solvents, plasticizers, and pesticides. Some chlorobenzoates also have medical uses, for example, as antimicrobial agents or as intermediates in the synthesis of pharmaceuticals.

However, some chlorobenzoates can be toxic and harmful to the environment, so their use is regulated in many countries. It's important to handle and dispose of these substances properly to minimize potential health and environmental risks.

Chlorophenols are a group of chemical compounds that consist of a phenol ring substituted with one or more chlorine atoms. They are widely used as pesticides, disinfectants, and preservatives. Some common examples of chlorophenols include pentachlorophenol, trichlorophenol, and dichlorophenol.

Chlorophenols can be harmful to human health and the environment. They have been linked to a variety of adverse health effects, including skin and eye irritation, respiratory problems, damage to the liver and kidneys, and an increased risk of cancer. Exposure to chlorophenols can occur through contact with contaminated soil, water, or air, as well as through ingestion or absorption through the skin.

It is important to handle chlorophenols with care and to follow proper safety precautions when using them. If you are concerned about exposure to chlorophenols, it is recommended that you speak with a healthcare professional for further guidance.

Isethionic acid is not typically considered a medical term, but it does have relevance in the field of pharmaceuticals and cosmetics. It's a chemical compound with the formula CH2CH2SO3H. Here's a definition related to its chemical and industrial uses:

Isethionic acid is an organic compound that serves as a detergent, surfactant, and pH adjuster in various pharmaceutical, cosmetic, and cleaning formulations. It is a type of carboxylic acid that contains a sulfonate group, making it a zwitterion at neutral pH. This property imparts excellent water solubility and mildness to isethionic acid and its salts, which are often used as alternatives to sulfates in personal care products.

2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) is a type of synthetic auxin, which is a plant growth regulator. It is a white crystalline powder with a sour taste and mild characteristic odor. It is soluble in water, alcohol, and acetone, and has a melting point of 130-140°C.

2,4-D is a widely used herbicide that is primarily used to control broadleaf weeds in a variety of settings, including agriculture, lawns, and golf courses. It works by mimicking the natural plant hormone auxin, which causes uncontrolled growth in susceptible plants leading to their death.

In medicine, 2,4-D has been used experimentally as a cytotoxic agent for the treatment of cancer, but its use is not widespread due to its toxicity and potential carcinogenicity. It is important to handle this chemical with care, as it can cause skin and eye irritation, and prolonged exposure can lead to more serious health effects.

"Necator" is a genus of parasitic roundworms that are known to infect humans. The most common species in this genus is "Necator americanus," which is one of the two major hookworms that cause human helminthiasis (a type of intestinal worm infection). Necator americanus, also known as the New World hookworm, primarily infects people through contact with contaminated soil. The larvae penetrate the skin and migrate to the lungs, where they are coughed up and swallowed, eventually reaching the small intestine, where they mature into adults and attach to the intestinal wall to feed on blood. Heavy infections can lead to iron deficiency anemia, protein loss, and impaired growth and cognitive development, particularly in children.

Burkholderiaceae is a family of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria within the order Burkholderiales. This family includes several genera of medically important organisms, such as Burkholderia and Bordetella. Many species in this family are environmental organisms that can be found in soil, water, and associated with plants. However, some members of this family are also known to cause various types of human infections.

For example, Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC) is a group of closely related species that can cause serious respiratory infections in people with weakened immune systems or chronic lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis. B. pseudomallei and B. mallei are two other species in this family that can cause severe and potentially life-threatening infections, including melioidosis and glanders, respectively.

Bordetella species, on the other hand, are known to cause respiratory tract infections in humans, such as whooping cough (caused by B. pertussis) and kennel cough (caused by B. bronchiseptica).

Overall, Burkholderiaceae is a diverse family of bacteria that includes both environmental organisms and important human pathogens. Accurate identification and characterization of these organisms is essential for appropriate diagnosis and treatment of infections caused by members of this family.

Necatoriasis is a parasitic infection caused by the nematode (roundworm) Necator americanus, also known as the "New World hookworm." This condition is primarily found in areas with warm, moist climates and poor sanitation. The infection typically occurs when the larvae of the parasite penetrate the skin, usually through bare feet that come into contact with contaminated soil.

Once inside the human body, the larvae migrate to the lungs, where they mature and are coughed up and swallowed. They then reside in the small intestine, where they feed on blood and cause symptoms such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, anemia, and growth retardation in children. Necatoriasis is usually treated with anthelmintic medications like albendazole or mebendazole. Preventive measures include wearing shoes in areas where the parasite is common and improving sanitation to reduce the spread of contaminated soil.

"Delftia acidovorans" is a species of gram-negative, motile, aerobic bacteria that is commonly found in various environments such as soil, water, and clinical settings. It is a rod-shaped bacterium that is known to be able to degrade a wide range of organic compounds, including aromatic hydrocarbons and other pollutants.

In clinical settings, "Delftia acidovorans" has been isolated from various types of human infections, including respiratory tract infections, urinary tract infections, and bacteremia. However, it is considered to be a rare cause of infection, and its clinical significance is not well understood.

It's worth noting that the genus "Delftia" was previously classified as part of the genus "Comamonas," but was reclassified based on genetic and biochemical evidence. Therefore, some older literature may refer to this bacterium as "Comamonas acidovorans."

I am not aware of a widely recognized medical definition for the term "Mimosa." In general, it may refer to a type of plant or a cocktail made with champagne and orange juice. If you are looking for information on a specific medical condition or concept, please provide more context so that I can give you a more accurate and helpful response. Is there something specific you had in mind?

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Polyesters" is not a medical term. It is a term used in materials science and textile industry to describe a type of synthetic fiber made from polymers characterized by the presence of ester groups in their main chain. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or concepts, I'd be happy to help with those instead!

Environmental biodegradation is the breakdown of materials, especially man-made substances such as plastics and industrial chemicals, by microorganisms such as bacteria and fungi in order to use them as a source of energy or nutrients. This process occurs naturally in the environment and helps to break down organic matter into simpler compounds that can be more easily absorbed and assimilated by living organisms.

Biodegradation in the environment is influenced by various factors, including the chemical composition of the substance being degraded, the environmental conditions (such as temperature, moisture, and pH), and the type and abundance of microorganisms present. Some substances are more easily biodegraded than others, and some may even be resistant to biodegradation altogether.

Biodegradation is an important process for maintaining the health and balance of ecosystems, as it helps to prevent the accumulation of harmful substances in the environment. However, some man-made substances, such as certain types of plastics and industrial chemicals, may persist in the environment for long periods of time due to their resistance to biodegradation, leading to negative impacts on wildlife and ecosystems.

In recent years, there has been increasing interest in developing biodegradable materials that can break down more easily in the environment as a way to reduce waste and minimize environmental harm. These efforts have led to the development of various biodegradable plastics, coatings, and other materials that are designed to degrade under specific environmental conditions.

Bacterial proteins are a type of protein that are produced by bacteria as part of their structural or functional components. These proteins can be involved in various cellular processes, such as metabolism, DNA replication, transcription, and translation. They can also play a role in bacterial pathogenesis, helping the bacteria to evade the host's immune system, acquire nutrients, and multiply within the host.

Bacterial proteins can be classified into different categories based on their function, such as:

1. Enzymes: Proteins that catalyze chemical reactions in the bacterial cell.
2. Structural proteins: Proteins that provide structural support and maintain the shape of the bacterial cell.
3. Signaling proteins: Proteins that help bacteria to communicate with each other and coordinate their behavior.
4. Transport proteins: Proteins that facilitate the movement of molecules across the bacterial cell membrane.
5. Toxins: Proteins that are produced by pathogenic bacteria to damage host cells and promote infection.
6. Surface proteins: Proteins that are located on the surface of the bacterial cell and interact with the environment or host cells.

Understanding the structure and function of bacterial proteins is important for developing new antibiotics, vaccines, and other therapeutic strategies to combat bacterial infections.

Ancylostomiasis is a parasitic infection caused by the hookworms, Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus. These tiny worms infect the human intestines, specifically in the small intestine, where they attach themselves to the intestinal wall and feed on the host's blood.

The infection is typically acquired through skin contact with contaminated soil, particularly in areas where human feces are used as fertilizer or where there is poor sanitation. The larvae penetrate the skin, enter the bloodstream, and migrate to the lungs, where they mature further before being coughed up and swallowed, eventually reaching the small intestine.

Symptoms of ancylostomiasis can range from mild to severe and may include abdominal pain, diarrhea, anemia, weight loss, and fatigue. In severe cases, particularly in children or individuals with weakened immune systems, the infection can lead to protein-energy malnutrition, cognitive impairment, and even death.

Treatment for ancylostomiasis typically involves administration of anthelmintic medications such as albendazole or mebendazole, which kill the parasitic worms. Improved sanitation and hygiene practices can help prevent reinfection and reduce the spread of the disease.

Ancylostoma is a genus of parasitic roundworms that are commonly known as hookworms. These intestinal parasites infect humans and other animals through contact with contaminated soil, often via the skin or mouth. Two species of Ancylostoma that commonly infect humans are Ancylostoma duodenale and Ancylostoma ceylanicum.

Ancylostoma duodenale is found primarily in tropical and subtropical regions, including parts of the Mediterranean, Africa, Asia, and southern Europe. It can cause a disease called ancylostomiasis or hookworm infection, which can lead to symptoms such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, anemia, and impaired growth in children.

Ancylostoma ceylanicum is found mainly in Southeast Asia, southern China, and some parts of Australia. It can also cause ancylostomiasis, with symptoms similar to those caused by Ancylostoma duodenale. However, Ancylostoma ceylanicum infections are often less severe than those caused by Ancylostoma duodenale.

Preventive measures for hookworm infection include wearing shoes in areas where the soil may be contaminated with feces, washing hands thoroughly after using the toilet or handling soil, and avoiding ingestion of contaminated soil or water. Treatment for hookworm infection typically involves administration of anthelmintic drugs to eliminate the parasites from the body.

"Vitis" is a genus name and it refers to a group of flowering plants in the grape family, Vitaceae. This genus includes over 70 species of grapes that are native to the Northern Hemisphere, particularly in North America and Asia. The most commonly cultivated species is "Vitis vinifera," which is the source of most of the world's table and wine grapes.

Therefore, a medical definition of 'Vitis' may not be directly applicable as it is more commonly used in botany and agriculture rather than medicine. However, some compounds derived from Vitis species have been studied for their potential medicinal properties, such as resveratrol found in the skin of red grapes, which has been investigated for its anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and cardioprotective effects.

Formaldehyde is not a medication or a term commonly used in human medicine. It is a chemical compound with the formula CH2O, which is commonly used in industry for various purposes such as a preservative, disinfectant, and embalming agent. Formaldehyde is also found naturally in the environment and is produced in small amounts by certain animals, plants, and humans.

Exposure to formaldehyde can cause irritation of the eyes, nose, throat, and skin, and prolonged exposure has been linked to cancer, particularly nasopharyngeal cancer and leukemia. Therefore, it is important to limit exposure to this chemical and use appropriate protective equipment when handling it.

Ascomycota is a phylum in the kingdom Fungi, also known as sac fungi. This group includes both unicellular and multicellular organisms, such as yeasts, mold species, and morel mushrooms. Ascomycetes are characterized by their reproductive structures called ascus, which contain typically eight haploid spores produced sexually through a process called ascogony. Some members of this phylum have significant ecological and economic importance, as they can be decomposers, mutualistic symbionts, or plant pathogens causing various diseases. Examples include the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ergot fungus Claviceps purpurea, and morel mushroom Morchella esculenta.

Ancylostomatoidea is a superfamily of nematode (roundworm) parasites that includes the genera Ancylostoma and Necator, which are commonly known as hookworms. These parasites are primarily found in the small intestine of their hosts, which can include humans and other animals.

Ancylostomatoidea parasites have a complex life cycle that involves both free-living and parasitic stages. The life cycle begins when the parasite's eggs are passed in the feces of an infected host and hatch into larvae in the soil. The larvae then infect a new host by penetrating the skin, usually through contact with contaminated soil.

Once inside the host, the larvae migrate through the body to the lungs, where they mature and are coughed up and swallowed, allowing them to reach the small intestine. Here, they attach to the intestinal wall and feed on the host's blood, causing anemia and other symptoms of hookworm infection.

Hookworm infections can cause a range of symptoms, including abdominal pain, diarrhea, weight loss, and fatigue. In severe cases, they can lead to anemia, intestinal obstruction, and even death. Prevention measures include wearing shoes in areas with contaminated soil, practicing good hygiene, and treating infected individuals to prevent the spread of the parasite.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Volcanic Eruptions" are not a medical term or concept. Volcanic eruptions refer to the release of molten rock, ash, and gases from a volcano's opening, or vent, onto the Earth's surface. This is a geological event that occurs due to the movement of tectonic plates and the build-up of pressure within the Earth's crust.

If you have any medical questions or terms you would like me to define, please feel free to ask!

Hookworm infections are parasitic diseases caused by the ingestion or penetration of hookworm larvae (immature worms) into the human body. The two main species that infect humans are Necator americanus and Ancylostoma duodenale.

The infection typically occurs through skin contact with contaminated soil, often when walking barefoot on dirty ground. The larvae then penetrate the skin, enter the bloodstream, and travel to the lungs where they mature further. They are coughed up and swallowed, eventually reaching the small intestine, where they attach to the intestinal wall and feed on blood.

Hookworm infections can cause a range of symptoms, including abdominal pain, diarrhea, anemia, weight loss, and fatigue. In severe cases, chronic hookworm infections can lead to serious complications such as protein malnutrition and heart failure. Treatment typically involves the use of anti-parasitic medications, such as albendazole or mebendazole, which kill the adult worms and allow the body to expel them. Preventive measures include improving sanitation and hygiene practices, wearing shoes in areas with contaminated soil, and regular deworming of at-risk populations.

Burkholderia is a genus of gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria that are widely distributed in the environment, including soil, water, and associated with plants. Some species of Burkholderia are opportunistic pathogens, meaning they can cause infection in individuals with weakened immune systems or underlying medical conditions.

One of the most well-known species of Burkholderia is B. cepacia, which can cause respiratory infections in people with cystic fibrosis and chronic granulomatous disease. Other notable species include B. pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, a potentially serious infection that primarily affects the respiratory system; and B. mallei, which causes glanders, a rare but severe disease that can affect humans and animals.

Burkholderia species are known for their resistance to many antibiotics, making them difficult to treat in some cases. Proper identification of the specific Burkholderia species involved in an infection is important for determining the most appropriate treatment approach.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Selenic Acid" is not a recognized term in medicine or physiology. Selenium, however, is an essential trace element that is important for proper immune function, antioxidant activity, and thyroid hormone metabolism. Selenious acid (H2SeO3) is a compound of selenium, but it's more commonly used in the context of chemistry or industrial processes rather than medicine or biology. If you have any questions related to medicine or health, I'd be happy to try and help with those!

... is a Gram-negative soil bacterium of the class Betaproteobacteria. Cupriavidus necator has gone through a ... To better characterize the lifestyle of C. necator, the genomes of two strains have been sequenced. Cupriavidus necator can use ... necator. Because C. necator was named in 1987 far before the name change to R. eutropha and W. eutropha, the name C. necator ... Cupriavidus necator is a hydrogen-oxidizing bacterium ("knallgas" bacterium) capable of growing at the interface of anaerobic ...
... moved into the genus Cupriavidus after 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed it to be most closely related to Cupriavidus necator. ... Cupriavidus gilardii is a Gram-negative, aerobic, motile, oxidase-positive bacterium from the genus Cupriavidus and the family ... "Cupriavidus necator gen. nov., sp. nov.: a nonobligate bacterial predator of bacteria in soil". Int J Syst Bacteriol. 37 (4): ... Cupriavidus gilardii may be resistant to multiple antibiotic agents; carbapenem-resistant C. gilardii has been found in stool ...
These bacteria include Hydrogenobacter thermophilus, Cupriavidus necator, and Hydrogenovibrio marinus. There are both Gram ...
Johnson CW (2021-03-15). "BETO 2021 Peer Review - Improving Formate Upgrading by Cupriavidus Necator 2.3.2.111". OSTI 1772964 ... RTK17.1 Cupriavidus necator Desulfurococcus amylolyticus Thermococcus onnurineus Methylobacterium extorquens Recent metagenomic ... C. necator is one of the most well-studied aerobic formatotrophs. It can use carbon dioxide, formate, and hydrogen as carbon ... necator. Microorganism growing in serpentinization systems are of interest to understand carbon cycling between abiotic and ...
Cupriavidus necator (=Ralstonia eutropha) is a Gram-negative soil bacterium of the class Betaproteobacteria. It is capable of ... A culture of C. necator (composed of a strain tolerant to electricity) is kept within the H2O and CO2 mixture. The culture of C ... necator then converts formic acid from the mixture into isobutanol. The biosynthesized isobutanol is then separated from the ...
"Sulfoacetate is degraded via a novel pathway involving sulfoacetyl-CoA and sulfoacetaldehyde in Cupriavidus necator H16". The ...
These include 4-toluene sulfonate which may be transported by the TsaS of Cupriavidus necator (TC# 2.A.102.1.1), sulfolactate ... Weinitschke, S; Denger, K; Cook, AM; Smits, TH (September 2007). "The DUF81 protein TauE in Cupriavidus necator H16, a sulfite ... Weinitschke, S; Denger, K; Cook, AM; Smits, TH (September 2007). "The DUF81 protein TauE in Cupriavidus necator H16, a sulfite ... Cysteate-nitrogen assimilation by Cupriavidus necator H16 with excretion of 3-sulfolactate: a patchwork pathway". Archives of ...
Jugder BE, Welch J, Braidy N, Marquis CP (2016-07-26). "Construction and use of a Cupriavidus necator H16 soluble hydrogenase ...
Jugder BE, Welch J, Braidy N, Marquis CP (2016-07-26). "Construction and use of a Cupriavidus necator H16 soluble hydrogenase ...
"Production of poly-3-hydroxybutyrate by Cupriavidus necator fromcorn syrup: statisticalmodeling and optimization of biomass ...
... containing high 3-hydroxyhexanoate monomer fraction from crude palm kernel oil by recombinant Cupriavidus necator". Bioresource ...
PHB is produced by microorganisms (such as Cupriavidus necator, Methylobacterium rhodesianum or Bacillus megaterium) apparently ...
... system from Pseudomonas putida for orthogonal gene expression control in Escherichia coli and Cupriavidus necator". Scientific ...
"An analysis of the changes in soluble hydrogenase and global gene expression in Cupriavidus necator ( Ralstonia eutropha ) H16 ...
"An analysis of the changes in soluble hydrogenase and global gene expression in Cupriavidus necator ( Ralstonia eutropha ) H16 ...
To induce PHA production in a laboratory setting, a culture of a micro-organism such as Cupriavidus necator can be placed in a ... including Cupriavidus necator and Alcaligenes latus (PHB). Poly (HA MCL) from hydroxy fatty acids with medium chain lengths ...
Hydrogen-oxidizing organisms, such as Cupriavidus necator (formerly Ralstonia eutropha), often inhabit oxic-anoxic interfaces ...
... including Cupriavidus necator and Alcaligenes latus (PHB). mcl-PHA from hydroxy fatty acids with medium chain lengths including ... Cuprividus necator). Specific types of PHAs include poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB), polyhydroxyvalerate (PHV) and ...
It is also found in the NorA protein from Cupriavidus necator, this protein is a regulator of response to nitric oxide, which ...
Cupriavidus species, including C. metallidurans, are well characterised in the field of microbe-metal interactions, and are ... Both the species C. necator and C. metallidurans (when not distinguished as separate species) were originally classified in the ... Vandamme, Peter; Coenye, Tom (2004-11-01). "Taxonomy of the genus Cupriavidus: a tale of lost and found". International Journal ... metal transporting P1-type ATPases and a chemiosmotic antiporter efflux system similar to CzcCBA of Cupriavidus metallidurans. ...
Cupriavidus necator is a Gram-negative soil bacterium of the class Betaproteobacteria. Cupriavidus necator has gone through a ... To better characterize the lifestyle of C. necator, the genomes of two strains have been sequenced. Cupriavidus necator can use ... necator. Because C. necator was named in 1987 far before the name change to R. eutropha and W. eutropha, the name C. necator ... Cupriavidus necator is a hydrogen-oxidizing bacterium ("knallgas" bacterium) capable of growing at the interface of anaerobic ...
Growth Data Record: Cupriavidus necator H16 on Mr medium + d-fructose. Media: MR Medium + D-fructose. Source: Park jm et al, ... Growth Data Record: Cupriavidus necator H16 on Mr medium + d-fructose. Media: MR Medium + D-fructose. Source: Park jm et al, ... Growth Data Record: Cupriavidus necator H16 on Mr medium + d-fructose. Media: MR Medium + D-fructose. Source: Park jm et al, ... Growth Data Record: Cupriavidus necator H16 on Nitrogen-limited mr medium. Media: Nitrogen-limited MR medium. Source: Park jm ...
Cupriavidus necator. P17296. 0 transm. helices 320 amino acids. 35387. Swiss-Prot ...
3.10 The PHA Production Machinery in Pseudomonas putida, Cupriavidus necator, Halomonas spp. and Paracoccus spp. ... 3.11 Domain Organization and Structural Comparison of PhaC from Cupriavidus necator, Halomonas lutea and Paracoccus ...
Effect of sodium accumulation on heterotrophic growth and polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) production by Cupriavidus necator. ...
Cupriavidus necator LMG 1199. Cyanobacteria. Enterobacter agglomerans. Enterobacter cloacae. Escherichia coli O157:H8. ...
Cupriavidus necator LMG 1199. Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides group strain ARK 10044. Dyella sp. AD56. ...
Replacing the Calvin cycle with the reductive glycine pathway in Cupriavidus necator. Metabolic Engineering 62, pp. 30 - 41 ( ...
These include sulfolactate which may be exported by the TauE protein of Cupriavidus necator (Weinitschke et al. 2007; Mayer et ... 2007). The DUF81 protein TauE in Cupriavidus necator H16, a sulfite exporter in the metabolism of C2 sulfonates. Microbiology ... 2012). (R)-Cysteate-nitrogen assimilation by Cupriavidus necator H16 with excretion of 3-sulfolactate: a patchwork pathway. ...
Cupriavidus necator Preferred Term Term UI T665387. Date01/30/2006. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID NLM (2007). ... Cupriavidus necator Preferred Concept UI. M0029859. Registry Number. txid106590. Scope Note. A gram-negative, facultatively ... Cupriavidus necator. Tree Number(s). B03.440.400.425.251.200.200. B03.660.075.090.688.200.200. Unique ID. D020118. RDF Unique ...
3-Chlorobenzoate is taken up by a chromosomally encoded transport system in Cupriavidus necator JMP134. Microbiology 155:2757- ...
C16 - Congenital, Hereditary, and Neonatal Diseases and Abnormalities ...
C16 - Congenital, Hereditary, and Neonatal Diseases and Abnormalities ...
C16 - Congenital, Hereditary, and Neonatal Diseases and Abnormalities ...
C16 - Congenital, Hereditary, and Neonatal Diseases and Abnormalities ...
C16 - Congenital, Hereditary, and Neonatal Diseases and Abnormalities ...
C16 - Congenital, Hereditary, and Neonatal Diseases and Abnormalities ...
C16 - Congenital, Hereditary, and Neonatal Diseases and Abnormalities ...
C16 - Congenital, Hereditary, and Neonatal Diseases and Abnormalities ...
C16 - Congenital, Hereditary, and Neonatal Diseases and Abnormalities ...
C16 - Congenital, Hereditary, and Neonatal Diseases and Abnormalities ...
C16 - Congenital, Hereditary, and Neonatal Diseases and Abnormalities ...
C16 - Congenital, Hereditary, and Neonatal Diseases and Abnormalities ...
Cupriavidus necator molecule tags Transport protein total genus 106 structure length 314 ...
Cupriavidus necator has gone through a ... Cupriavidus necator can use hydrogen gas as a source of energy when growing under ... "The DUF81 protein TauE in Cupriavidus necator H16, a sulfite ... Cysteate-nitrogen assimilation by Cupriavidus necator H16 with ... Improving Formate Upgrading by Cupriavidus Necator 2.3.2.111". OSTI 1772964 ... RTK17.1 Cupriavidus necator Desulfurococcus ... CupriavidusCupriavidus necatorBurkholderiaceaeMimosa2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic AcidFuraldehydeChlorobenzoatesVolcanic Eruptions ...
Hydrogen-driven cofactor regeneration for stereoselective whole-cell C=C bond reduction in Cupriavidus necator. Assil ... Hetero- and Autotrophically Driven Biotransformations in C.Necator. Assil Companioni, L., Schmidt, S., Heidinger, P., Schwab, H ... Hetero- and autotrophically driven C=C bond reduction in recombinant C. necator. Assil Companioni, L., Schmidt, S., Heidinger, ...
Cupriavidus necator N-1. Magnesium (Mg), Cobalt (Co), Nickel (Ni), Manganese (Mn). Mg2+ and Co2+ transporter CorA ... Cupriavidus taiwanensis LMG 19424. Magnesium (Mg), Cobalt (Co), Nickel (Ni), Manganese (Mn). mg2+/ni2+/co2+ transporter (mg ... Cupriavidus basilensis OR16. Magnesium (Mg), Cobalt (Co), Nickel (Ni), Manganese (Mn). magnesium and cobalt transport protein ... Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34. Magnesium (Mg), Cobalt (Co), Nickel (Ni), Manganese (Mn). magnesium/nickel/cobalt transporter ...
Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34. 20. Tfc6. 339326888. Tfc. NC_015726. Cupriavidus necator N-1. ...
NC_015724:339500 Cupriavidus necator N-1 plasmid BB2p, complete sequence. Host Lineage: Cupriavidus necator; Cupriavidus; ... General Information: Cupriavidus necator also known as Ralstonia eutropha is a soil bacterium with diverse metabolic abilities ...
  • Because C. necator was named in 1987 far before the name change to R. eutropha and W. eutropha, the name C. necator was assigned to R. eutropha according to Rule 23a of the International Code of Nomenclature of Bacteria. (wikipedia.org)
  • nodA and nifH phylogenies for Cupriavidus nodule bacteria from native legumes in Texas and Costa Rica grouped all strains into a single clade nested among neotropical Burkholderia strains. (lookformedical.com)
  • Paleomicrobiology to investigate copper resistance in bacteria : isolation and description of Cupriavidus necator B9 in the soil of a medieval foundry. (ac.be)
  • Looking at DNA-DNA hybridization and phenotype comparison with Cupriavidus necator, W. eutropha was found to be the same species as previously described C. necator. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cupriavidus necator (strain ATCC 43291 / DSM 13513 / N-1) (Ralstonia eutropha). (inrae.fr)
  • D-(-)-3-hydroxybutyrate oligomer hydrolase , cupnh-hboh Cupriavidus necator (strain ATCC 17699 / H16 / DSM 428 / Stanier 337) (Ralstonia eutropha). (inrae.fr)
  • cupnh-q0kdw6 Cupriavidus necator (strain ATCC 17699 / DSM 428 / KCTC 22496 / NCIMB 10442 / H16 / Stanier 337) (Ralstonia eutropha). (inrae.fr)
  • The degradation pathway of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP), a hazardous pollutant, in the aerobic bacterium Cupriavidus necator JMP134(pJP4) (formerly Ralstonia eutropha JMP134) is encoded by the tcp genes. (lookformedical.com)
  • General Information: Cupriavidus necator also known as Ralstonia eutropha is a soil bacterium with diverse metabolic abilities. (up.ac.za)
  • Cupriavidus necator is a Gram-negative soil bacterium of the class Betaproteobacteria. (wikipedia.org)
  • Thus, Cupriavidus symbiotic genes were not acquired independently in different regions and are derived from other Betaproteobacteria rather than from alpha-rhizobial donors. (lookformedical.com)
  • To better characterize the lifestyle of C. necator, the genomes of two strains have been sequenced. (wikipedia.org)
  • Plasmids pMOL28 and pMOL30 of Cupriavidus metallidurans are specialized in the maximal viable response to heavy metals. (lookformedical.com)
  • 233,720 bp), in the genome of Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34. (lookformedical.com)
  • When growing under autotrophic conditions, C. necator fixes carbon through the reductive pentose phosphate pathway. (wikipedia.org)
  • Replacing the Calvin cycle with the reductive glycine pathway in Cupriavidus necator. (mpg.de)
  • 2012). (R)-Cysteate-nitrogen assimilation by Cupriavidus necator H16 with excretion of 3-sulfolactate: a patchwork pathway. (tcdb.org)
  • Cupriavidus necator is a hydrogen-oxidizing bacterium ("knallgas" bacterium) capable of growing at the interface of anaerobic and aerobic environments. (wikipedia.org)
  • Both organic compounds and hydrogen can be used as a source of energy C. necator can perform aerobic or anaerobic respiration by denitrification of nitrate and/or nitrite to nitrogen gas. (wikipedia.org)
  • Five other open reading frames encoding maleylacetate reductases, in addition to the tcpD gene, were found in the genome of C. necator, and two of them provide this function in the tcpD mutant. (lookformedical.com)
  • Cupriavidus necator can use hydrogen gas as a source of energy when growing under autotrophic conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • The present study focuses on sustainable production of biodegradable polymers by Cupriavidus necator DSMZ 545 using glycerol as substrate. (fkit.hr)
  • The membrane-bound hydrogenase (MBH) is linked to the respiratory chain through a specific cytochrome b-related protein in C. necator. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2007). The DUF81 protein TauE in Cupriavidus necator H16, a sulfite exporter in the metabolism of C2 sulfonates. (tcdb.org)
  • 3.10 The PHA Production Machinery in Pseudomonas putida , Cupriavidus necator , Halomonas spp. (routledge.com)
  • Industrial production of PHA bioplastics applies pure cultures such as Cuprivavidus necator, Alcaligenes sp. (azpdf.org)
  • Use of agro-industrial residue from the canned pineapple industry for polyhydroxybutyrate production by Cupriavidus necator strain A-04," Biotechnology for Biofuels. (utm.my)
  • The number of genes encoding β-oxidation enzymes in Cupriavidus necator H16 (synonym, Ralstonia eutropha H16) is high, but only the operons A0459-A0464 and A1526-A1531, each encoding four genes for β-oxidation enzymes, were expressed during growth with long-chain-length fatty acids (LCFAs). (nih.gov)
  • cupnh-q0k189 Ralstonia eutropha (Cupriavidus necator (strain ATCC 17699 / H16 / DSM 428 / Stanier 337) putative uncharacterized protein h16_b1447 , cupnh-q0k399 Ralstonia eutropha (Cupriavidus necator strain ATCC 17699 / H16 / DSM 428 / Stanier 337) AlphaBeta_hydrolase superfamily , cupnh-q0kbr4 Ralstonia eutropha (Cupriavidus necator strain ATCC 17699 / H16 / DSM 428 / Stanier 337) (EC 3.1.1. (inrae.fr)
  • cupnh-q0kbs3 Ralstonia eutropha (Cupriavidus necator strain ATCC 17699 / H16 / DSM 428 / Stanier 337) predicted hydrolase or acyltransferase (EC 3. (inrae.fr)
  • alceu-CBNC Alcaligenes eutrophus Cupriavidus necator (Ralstonia eutropha), Pseudomonas chlororaphis (P. fluorescens) Achromobacter xylosoxidans, Comamonas acidovorans, P. aeruginosa, Bordetella petrii Delftia acidovorans (Ps. (inrae.fr)
  • Cupriavidus necator also known as Ralstonia eutropha is a soil bacterium with diverse metabolic abilities. (up.ac.za)
  • A famous example is that of the aromatic compound-loving Cupriavidus necator , which in older publications (depending how far back in time you go) were known under the names of either Hydrogenomonas eutrophus , Alcaligenes eutropha , Ralstonia eutropha or Wautersia eutropha . (elignindatabase.com)
  • Because C. necator was named in 1987 far before the name change to R. eutropha and W. eutropha, the name C. necator was assigned to R. eutropha according to Rule 23a of the International Code of Nomenclature of Bacteria. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cupriavidus necator , a Gram‐negative bacteria strain is exposed to REEs like europium, samarium, and neodymium in this study. (nsf.gov)
  • In this study volatile fatty acids (VFAs), which are by-products from anaerobic fermentations, have been used as the carbon source for polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) production by pure culture bacteria, Cupriavidus necator. (southwales.ac.uk)
  • The microorganisms collected f rom the main room walls were mostly isolated from the east and west walls where the genera Bacillus , Cupriavidus , Paenibacillus , Pseudomonas , and Streptomyces were commonly identified in three or more walls. (e-jcs.org)
  • Background Cupriavidus strain STM 6070 was isolated from nickel-rich soil collected near Koniambo massif, New Caledonia, using the invasive legume trap host Mimosa pudica. (researchsquare.com)
  • Symbiotic Cupriavidus strains belonging mainly to the species C. taiwanensis have been isolated from nodules of the invasive species Mimosa diplotricha Sauvalle , Mimosa pigra L. and Mimosa pudica L., with the type strain C. taiwanensis LMG 19424 T being isolated from a nodule of M. pudica growing in Taiwan [6, 9-16]. (researchsquare.com)
  • 2023). 'Full Copper Resistance in Cupriavidus metallidurans Requires the Interplay of Many Resistance Systems', Appl Environ Microbiol: e0056723. (ufz.de)
  • 2023. Conformational and mechanical stability of the isolated large subunit of membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenase from Cupriavidus necator . (ibpc.fr)
  • Engineering the biological conversion of formate into crotonate in Cupriavidus necator. (mpg.de)
  • When growing under autotrophic conditions, C. necator fixes carbon through the reductive pentose phosphate pathway. (wikipedia.org)
  • Replacing the Calvin cycle with the reductive glycine pathway in Cupriavidus necator. (mpg.de)
  • Dielectrophoretic crossover frequency experiments were performed on the native C. necator species pre‐ and post‐exposure to the REEs at MHz frequency range. (nsf.gov)
  • The estimated properties of the membrane published by our group are used to develop a microfluidic sorter by modeling and simulation to separate REE absorbed C. necator from the unabsorbed native C. necator species using COMSOL Multiphysics commercial software package v5.5. (nsf.gov)
  • ANI values show that STM 6070 is a new species of Cupriavidus. (researchsquare.com)
  • Seven of these HMR clusters were common to symbiotic and non-symbiotic Cupriavidus species, while four clusters were specific to STM 6070, with three of these being associated with insertion sequences. (researchsquare.com)
  • Conclusions STM 6070 belongs to a new Cupriavidus species, for which we have proposed the name Cupriavidus neocaledonicus sp. (researchsquare.com)
  • Within Cupriavidus , several species seem particularly adapted to metal-rich environments [21, 22]. (researchsquare.com)
  • The net conductivity of native C. necator , Cupriavidus europium , Cupriavidus samarium , and Cupriavidus neodymium are 15.95 ± 0.029 μS/cm, 16.15 ± 0.028 μS/cm, 16.05 ± 0.029 μS/cm, 15.61 ± 0.005 μS/cm respectively. (nsf.gov)
  • We first identified and characterized Mdh2 from Cupriavidus necator N-1 with significant activity towards methanol. (escholarship.org)