The continuous developmental process of a culture from simple to complex forms and from homogeneous to heterogeneous qualities.
Behavioral or attitudinal compliance with recognized social patterns or standards.
A system of government in which there is free and equal participation by the people in the political decision-making process.
Relatively permanent change in behavior that is the result of past experience or practice. The concept includes the acquisition of knowledge.
The science of language, including phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, and historical linguistics. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)
A collective expression for all behavior patterns acquired and socially transmitted through symbols. Culture includes customs, traditions, and language.
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
Any behavior caused by or affecting another individual, usually of the same species.
The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.
A verbal or nonverbal means of communicating ideas or feelings.
The process of cumulative change at the level of DNA; RNA; and PROTEINS, over successive generations.
The circulation or wide dispersal of information.

The cultural heritage shapes the pattern of tumour profiles in Europe: a correlation study. (1/209)

STUDY OBJECTIVE: This study investigates the spatial pattern of tumours in Europe to check the feasibility of a large scale ecological epidemiology approach to cancer in Europe. SETTING: The tumour types relative frequencies and cancer incidence (for men and women) reported in the European cancer registries were investigated by exploratory data analysis techniques. Socioeconomical descriptors of the female condition were considered as well. MAIN RESULTS: The classification of the European regional areas covered by the cancer registries followed almost exactly the boundaries set by the long and intermingled European history in terms of life styles and cultural heritage. This result supports the notion of a predominant role of environmental factors in cancer induction. Further support to the above result was given by the finding of a correlation between differential male-female cancer incidence, and socioeconomic descriptors of the female condition. CONCLUSIONS: From a methodological point of view, the consistency of these results pointed to the feasibility of an ecological approach to tumour epidemiology.  (+info)

The mimetic transition: a simulation study of the evolution of learning by imitation. (2/209)

Culturally transmitted ideas or memes must have had a large effect on the survival and fecundity of early humans. Those with better techniques of obtaining food and making tools, clothing and shelters would have had a substantial advantage. It has been proposed that memes can explain why our species has an unusually large brain and high cognitive ability: the brain evolved because of selection for the ability to imitate. This article presents an evolutionary model of a population in which culturally transmitted memes can have both positive and negative effects on the fitness of individuals. It is found that genes for increased imitative ability are selectively favoured. The model predicts that imitative ability increases slowly until a mimetic transition occurs where memes become able to spread like an epidemic. At this point there is a dramatic increase in the imitative ability, the number of memes known per individual and the mean fitness of the population. Selection for increased imitative ability is able to overcome substantial selection against increased brain size in some cases.  (+info)

Genetic evidence for different male and female roles during cultural transitions in the British Isles. (3/209)

Human history is punctuated by periods of rapid cultural change. Although archeologists have developed a range of models to describe cultural transitions, in most real examples we do not know whether the processes involved the movement of people or the movement of culture only. With a series of relatively well defined cultural transitions, the British Isles present an ideal opportunity to assess the demographic context of cultural change. Important transitions after the first Paleolithic settlements include the Neolithic, the development of Iron Age cultures, and various historical invasions from continental Europe. Here we show that patterns of Y-chromosome variation indicate that the Neolithic and Iron Age transitions in the British Isles occurred without large-scale male movements. The more recent invasions from Scandinavia, on the other hand, appear to have left a significant paternal genetic legacy. In contrast, patterns of mtDNA and X-chromosome variation indicate that one or more of these pre-Anglo-Saxon cultural revolutions had a major effect on the maternal genetic heritage of the British Isles.  (+info)

Solar forcing of drought frequency in the Maya lowlands. (4/209)

We analyzed lake-sediment cores from the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico, to reconstruct the climate history of the region over the past 2600 years. Time series analysis of sediment proxies, which are sensitive to the changing ratio of evaporation to precipitation (oxygen isotopes and gypsum precipitation), reveal a recurrent pattern of drought with a dominant periodicity of 208 years. This cycle is similar to the documented 206-year period in records of cosmogenic nuclide production (carbon-14 and beryllium-10) that is thought to reflect variations in solar activity. We conclude that a significant component of century-scale variability in Yucatan droughts is explained by solar forcing. Furthermore, some of the maxima in the 208-year drought cycle correspond with discontinuities in Maya cultural evolution, suggesting that the Maya were affected by these bicentennial oscillations in precipitation.  (+info)

Prehistoric human colonization of India. (5/209)

Human colonization in India encompasses a span of at least half-a-million years and is divided into two broad periods, namely the prehistoric (before the emergence of writing) and the historic (after writing). The prehistoric period is divided into stone, bronze and iron ages. The stone age is further divided into palaeolithic, mesolithic and neolithic periods. As the name suggests, the technology in these periods was primarily based on stone. Economically, the palaeolithic and mesolithic periods represented a nomadic, hunting-gathering way of life, while the neolithic period represented a settled, food-producing way of life. Subsequently copper was introduced as a new material and this period was designated as the chalcolithic period. The invention of agriculture, which took place about 8000 years ago, brought about dramatic changes in the economy, technology and demography of human societies. Human habitat in the hunting-gathering stage was essentially on hilly, rocky and forested regions, which had ample wild plant and animal food resources. The introduction of agriculture saw it shifting to the alluvial plains which had fertile soil and perennial availability of water. Hills and forests, which had so far been areas of attraction, now turned into areas of isolation. Agriculture led to the emergence of villages and towns and brought with it the division of society into occupational groups. The first urbanization took place during the bronze age in the arid and semi-arid region of northwest India in the valleys of the Indus and the Saraswati rivers, the latter represented by the now dry Ghaggar-Hakra bed. This urbanization is known as the Indus or Harappan civilization which flourished during 3500-1500 B.C. The rest of India during this period was inhabited by neolithic and chalcolithic farmers and mesolithic hunter-gatherers. With the introduction of iron technology about 3000 years ago, the focus of development shifted eastward into the Indo-Gangetic divide and the Ganga valley. The location of the Mahabharata epic, which is set in the beginning of the first millennium B.C., is the Indo-Gangetic divide and the upper Ganga-Yamuna doab (land between two rivers). Iron technology enabled pioneering farmers to clear the dense and tangled forests of the middle and lower Ganga plains. The focus of development now shifted further eastward to eastern Uttar Pradesh and western Bihar which witnessed the events of the Ramayana epic and rise of the first political entities known as Mahajanapadas as also of Buddhism and Jainism. The second phase of urbanization of India, marked by trade, coinage, script and birth of the first Indian empire, namely Magadha, with its capital at Pataliputra (modern Patna) also took place in this region in the sixth century B.C. The imposition by Brahmin priests of the concepts of racial and ritual purity, pollution, restrictions on sharing of food, endogamy, anuloma (male of upper caste eligible to marry a female of lower caste) and pratiloma (female of upper caste ineligible to marry a male of lower caste) forms of marriage, karma (reaping the fruits of the actions of previous life in the present life), rebirth, varnashrama dharma (four stages of the expected hundred-year life span) and the sixteen sanskaras (ceremonies) on traditional occupational groups led to the birth of the caste system - a unique Indian phenomenon. As a consequence of the expansion of agriculture and loss of forests and wildlife, stone age hunter-gatherers were forced to assimilate themselves into larger agriculture-based rural and urban societies. However, some of them resisted this new economic mode. To this day they have persisted with their atavistic lifestyle, but have had to supplement their resources by producing craft items or providing entertainment to the rural population.  (+info)

Major long-term factors influencing dental education in the twenty-first century. (6/209)

With evolutionary advances in oral science over the long term, clinical reliance on chemotherapeutics, bacterial replacement therapy, and immunization will necessitate a broader background in medicine. The dramatic increase in the old age population will also require a much stronger medical background. By 2050, those over fifty-five years of age will represent 56 percent of the population, and 25 percent of these will be sixty-five years of age and older. The merging of dental and medical education is predicted to occur within the twenty-first century. Other topics addressed include research activities, with recommended strategies to enhance the integration of scientific and clinical dental approaches; the problem of dental faculty isolation; and the implications of financial constraint and accountability.  (+info)

Orangutan cultures and the evolution of material culture. (7/209)

Geographic variation in some aspects of chimpanzee behavior has been interpreted as evidence for culture. Here we document similar geographic variation in orangutan behaviors. Moreover, as expected under a cultural interpretation, we find a correlation between geographic distance and cultural difference, a correlation between the abundance of opportunities for social learning and the size of the local cultural repertoire, and no effect of habitat on the content of culture. Hence, great-ape cultures exist, and may have done so for at least 14 million years.  (+info)

Vocal clans in sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus). (8/209)

Cultural transmission may be a significant source of variation in the behaviour of whales and dolphins, especially as regards their vocal signals. We studied variation in the vocal output of 'codas' by sperm whale social groups. Codas are patterns of clicks used by female sperm whales in social circumstances. The coda repertoires of all known social units (n = 18, each consisting of about 11 females and immatures with long-term relationships) and 61 out of 64 groups (about two social units moving together for periods of days) that were recorded in the South Pacific and Caribbean between 1985 and 2000 can be reliably allocated into six acoustic 'clans', five in the Pacific and one in the Caribbean. Clans have ranges that span thousands of kilometres, are sympatric, contain many thousands of whales and most probably result from cultural transmission of vocal patterns. Units seem to form groups preferentially with other units of their own clan. We suggest that this is a rare example of sympatric cultural variation on an oceanic scale. Culture may thus be a more important determinant of sperm whale population structure than genes or geography, a finding that has major implications for our understanding of the species' behavioural and population biology.  (+info)

Cultural evolution is a term used to describe the process of change and development in human culture over time. It refers to the way in which cultural traits, practices, beliefs, and technologies spread, change, and evolve within and between populations. Cultural evolution is influenced by various factors such as demographic changes, migration, innovation, selection, and diffusion.

The study of cultural evolution draws on insights from anthropology, sociology, psychology, archaeology, linguistics, and other disciplines to understand the patterns and dynamics of cultural change. It emphasizes the importance of understanding culture as a complex adaptive system that evolves through processes of variation, selection, and transmission.

Cultural evolution is often studied using comparative methods, which involve comparing similarities and differences in cultural traits across different populations or time periods. This allows researchers to identify patterns of cultural change and infer the underlying mechanisms that drive them. Some researchers also use mathematical models and computational simulations to study cultural evolution, allowing them to explore the dynamics of cultural change in a more controlled and systematic way.

Overall, the study of cultural evolution seeks to provide a deeper understanding of how human cultures have evolved over time, and how they continue to adapt and change in response to changing social, environmental, and technological conditions.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "social conformity" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. It is a concept that is more commonly used in sociology and psychology.

In general, social conformity refers to the process of changing one's behavior, attitudes, or beliefs to fit in with a group, society, or culture. This can be driven by a variety of factors, including the desire for social acceptance, the need to maintain social norms, and the fear of social rejection or punishment.

While not a medical term, social conformity can have implications for health and healthcare. For example, social conformity can influence people's attitudes and behaviors related to health risks, such as smoking or excessive drinking, and can affect help-seeking behaviors, such as seeking medical care when needed. Understanding the dynamics of social conformity can be useful in developing interventions and policies aimed at promoting positive health behaviors and outcomes.

I am not aware of a specific medical definition for "democracy" as it is a political science term. However, democracy generally refers to a system of government in which power is vested in the people, who rule either directly or through freely elected representatives. It is based on the principles of equality, freedom, and the rule of law.

In the context of healthcare, the concept of democracy may refer to the idea of patient-centered care, where patients are actively involved in decision-making about their own health and healthcare. This approach recognizes the importance of individual autonomy, informed consent, and shared decision-making between patients and healthcare providers. It also emphasizes the need for transparency, accountability, and responsiveness in healthcare systems and organizations.

Therefore, while "democracy" may not have a specific medical definition, its principles are relevant to the provision of high-quality, ethical, and compassionate healthcare.

In the context of medicine and healthcare, learning is often discussed in relation to learning abilities or disabilities that may impact an individual's capacity to acquire, process, retain, and apply new information or skills. Learning can be defined as the process of acquiring knowledge, understanding, behaviors, and skills through experience, instruction, or observation.

Learning disorders, also known as learning disabilities, are a type of neurodevelopmental disorder that affects an individual's ability to learn and process information in one or more areas, such as reading, writing, mathematics, or reasoning. These disorders are not related to intelligence or motivation but rather result from differences in the way the brain processes information.

It is important to note that learning can also be influenced by various factors, including age, cognitive abilities, physical and mental health status, cultural background, and educational experiences. Therefore, a comprehensive assessment of an individual's learning abilities and needs should take into account these various factors to provide appropriate support and interventions.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "linguistics" is not a term that has a medical definition. Lingustics is the scientific study of language and its structure. It involves analysing language form, language meaning, and language in context.

If you have any questions related to healthcare or medicine, I'd be happy to try to help answer them!

In the context of medical science, culture refers to the growth of microorganisms, such as bacteria or fungi, under controlled conditions in a laboratory setting. This process is used to identify and study the characteristics of these microorganisms, including their growth patterns, metabolic activities, and sensitivity to various antibiotics or other treatments.

The culture medium, which provides nutrients for the microorganisms to grow, can be modified to mimic the environment in which the organism is typically found. This helps researchers to better understand how the organism behaves in its natural habitat.

In addition to its use in diagnosis and research, culture is also an important tool in monitoring the effectiveness of treatments and tracking the spread of infectious diseases.

The term "Theoretical Models" is used in various scientific fields, including medicine, to describe a representation of a complex system or phenomenon. It is a simplified framework that explains how different components of the system interact with each other and how they contribute to the overall behavior of the system. Theoretical models are often used in medical research to understand and predict the outcomes of diseases, treatments, or public health interventions.

A theoretical model can take many forms, such as mathematical equations, computer simulations, or conceptual diagrams. It is based on a set of assumptions and hypotheses about the underlying mechanisms that drive the system. By manipulating these variables and observing the effects on the model's output, researchers can test their assumptions and generate new insights into the system's behavior.

Theoretical models are useful for medical research because they allow scientists to explore complex systems in a controlled and systematic way. They can help identify key drivers of disease or treatment outcomes, inform the design of clinical trials, and guide the development of new interventions. However, it is important to recognize that theoretical models are simplifications of reality and may not capture all the nuances and complexities of real-world systems. Therefore, they should be used in conjunction with other forms of evidence, such as experimental data and observational studies, to inform medical decision-making.

Social behavior, in the context of medicine and psychology, refers to the ways in which individuals interact and engage with others within their social environment. It involves various actions, communications, and responses that are influenced by cultural norms, personal values, emotional states, and cognitive processes. These behaviors can include but are not limited to communication, cooperation, competition, empathy, altruism, aggression, and conformity.

Abnormalities in social behavior may indicate underlying mental health conditions such as autism spectrum disorder, schizophrenia, or personality disorders. Therefore, understanding and analyzing social behavior is an essential aspect of diagnosing and treating various psychological and psychiatric conditions.

Biological evolution is the change in the genetic composition of populations of organisms over time, from one generation to the next. It is a process that results in descendants differing genetically from their ancestors. Biological evolution can be driven by several mechanisms, including natural selection, genetic drift, gene flow, and mutation. These processes can lead to changes in the frequency of alleles (variants of a gene) within populations, resulting in the development of new species and the extinction of others over long periods of time. Biological evolution provides a unifying explanation for the diversity of life on Earth and is supported by extensive evidence from many different fields of science, including genetics, paleontology, comparative anatomy, and biogeography.

In the context of medicine, particularly in neurolinguistics and speech-language pathology, language is defined as a complex system of communication that involves the use of symbols (such as words, signs, or gestures) to express and exchange information. It includes various components such as phonology (sound systems), morphology (word structures), syntax (sentence structure), semantics (meaning), and pragmatics (social rules of use). Language allows individuals to convey their thoughts, feelings, and intentions, and to understand the communication of others. Disorders of language can result from damage to specific areas of the brain, leading to impairments in comprehension, production, or both.

Molecular evolution is the process of change in the DNA sequence or protein structure over time, driven by mechanisms such as mutation, genetic drift, gene flow, and natural selection. It refers to the evolutionary study of changes in DNA, RNA, and proteins, and how these changes accumulate and lead to new species and diversity of life. Molecular evolution can be used to understand the history and relationships among different organisms, as well as the functional consequences of genetic changes.

I'm happy to help! However, I must clarify that "information dissemination" is not a medical term per se, but rather a general term used in various fields, including healthcare and medicine. It refers to the process of spreading or distributing information to a specific audience or the public.

In the context of medicine and healthcare, information dissemination often relates to sharing clinical guidelines, research findings, public health messages, or patient education materials with healthcare professionals, patients, or the general public. This can occur through various channels, such as scientific conferences, peer-reviewed journals, newsletters, websites, social media platforms, and other communication methods.

The goal of information dissemination in medicine is to ensure that accurate, evidence-based, and up-to-date information reaches the intended audience, ultimately improving healthcare quality, patient outcomes, and decision-making processes.

"cultural evolution , social science". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved 2017-03-30. "Cultural Evolution Theory Definition". ... Cultural evolution is the change of this information over time. Cultural evolution, historically also known as sociocultural ... Model of cultural evolution Cultural selection theory - Study of cultural change modelled on theories of evolutionary biology ... plato.stanford.edu/entries/evolution-cultural/ Cultural Evolution Society (CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list, CS1 errors ...
Cultural evolution is cultural change viewed from an evolutionary perspective. It may also refer to: Behavioral ecology, the ... a specific framework for studying cultural evolution Memetics, neo-Darwinist view of the transmission of cultural traits ... over time as studied in anthropology This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Cultural evolution. If ... study of the evolutionary basis for animal behavior due to ecological pressures Cultural selection theory, studies of cultural ...
Steward wrote that unlike biological evolution, in cultural evolution it is assumed that cultural patterns in different parts ... Cultural evolution had previously been treated much like biological evolution, but many anthropologists were quick to dismiss ... "Cultural Evolution". Britannica. White, Leslie (1959). The Evolution of Culture. McGraw-Hill Book Company. Barnard, Alan (2000 ... and the operation of cultural symbol systems.[citation needed] As a result, the simplistic notion of 'cultural evolution' has ...
Bourne 1977, p. 175 "Ioway Cultural Institute : History - Treaties". Retrieved 2006-08-04. Mireles-Cotera 2006, p. 53. ... Territorial evolution of the United States Territorial evolution of Canada Territorial evolution of Mexico Territorial ... Territorial Evolution > Territorial Evolution, 1874. Government of Canada. March 18, 2009. Archived from the original on June ... See Territorial evolution of North America prior to 1763 February 10, 1763 The 1763 Treaty of Paris ended the French and Indian ...
Environmental (cultural) evolution discovered much later during the Pleistocene played a significant role in human evolution ... "Early Modern Homo sapiens". Evolution of Modern Humans: A Survey of the Biological and Cultural Evolution of Archaic and Modern ... Plummer, Thomas (2004). "Flaked stones and old bones: Biological and cultural evolution at the dawn of technology". American ... The emerging field of cultural evolution studies human sociocultural change from an evolutionary perspective. The reduced ...
... and criticized Symons for viewing human sexuality as a biological fact with cultural implications rather than a cultural ... The psychologist David Buss called The Evolution of Human Sexuality "the most important treatise on the evolution of human ... Ehrlich described The Evolution of Human Sexuality as a "classic but controversial treatise on human sexual evolution". He ... The Evolution of Human Sexuality is a 1979 book about human sexuality by the anthropologist Donald Symons, in which the author ...
Șandru, Florin (2013). "Political and cultural evolution of the Romanians in the Romanian ancestral territories of Bessarabia ... The territorial evolution of Romania (Romanian: Evoluția teritorială a României) includes all the changes in the country's ... Media related to Territorial evolution of Romania at Wikimedia Commons (Articles with short description, Short description with ... Center for Transylvanian studies, the Romanian Cultural Foundation. pp. 1-159. ISBN 9789739132725. Torrey, Glenn E. (1992). " ...
... evolution Clash of Civilizations Critical juncture theory Cultural diversity Cultural evolution Cultural materialism Cultural ... Sociocultural evolution, sociocultural evolutionism or social evolution are theories of sociobiology and cultural evolution ... human evolution, and the emergence of culture (p 109-122) Robert Foley, Marta Mirazón Lahr The evolution of cultural evolution ... Cultural evolution as a theory in anthropology was developed in the nineteenth century as an outgrowth of Darwinian evolution. ...
Evolution. Art". ekaterina-foundation.ru. The Ekaterina Cultural Foundation. Retrieved 19 October 2019. "Are You Ready To Fly ... Evolution. Art (group), The Ekaterina Cultural Foundation, Moscow 2007 White Garments. Serafimo-Znamenskiy Skete. Moscow Region ... Evolution. Art. Ekaterina Cultural Foundation. 2007. (ISBN 978-5-91002-018-8). Moscow New Angelarium, Catalogue. Moscow Museum ... New Brunswick, USA The Ekaterina Cultural Foundation, Moscow, Russia New album of graphics.1991. (ISBN 5-269-00080-6). Moscow ...
... to the broad spectrum of cultural, social, and economic exchanges with the outside world." While Peaceful Evolution ideas are ... The Peaceful Evolution theory or Peaceful Evolution (Chinese: 和平演變; Chinese: 和平演变; pinyin: Hépíng yǎnbiàn; lit. 'Peaceful ... but the ideological struggle-particularly peaceful evolution-will be primary. The theory of Peaceful Evolution is a key part of ... Peaceful evolution is the main threat to China's stability today. The ideological struggle will be the most important factor in ...
Cultural Evolution». October 24, 2020. 11:15. (Rus) «Книга художника». В Петербурге представили уникальный альбом с ...
Inglehart, Ronald F. (2018). "Chapter 3. Global Cultural Patterns". Cultural Evolution. Cambridge University Press. p. 40. doi: ... Cultural differences between individualism and collectivism are differences in degrees, not in kind. Cultural individualism is ... 2 a Renaissance cultural movement that turned away from medieval scholasticism and revived interest in ancient Greek and Roman ... "The IAF-IFA fights for : the abolition of all forms of authority whether economical, political, social, religious, cultural or ...
Inglehart, Ronald F. (2018). "Chapter 3. Global Cultural Patterns". Cultural Evolution. Cambridge University Press. p. 47. doi: ... The global cultural map shows how scores of societies are located on these two dimensions. Moving upward on this map reflects ... "The WVS Cultural Map of the World". WVS. Archived from the original on October 19, 2013. Retrieved 6 October 2014. ... As the cultural component of human empowerment, emancipative values are highly consequential in manifold ways. For one, ...
Note: Scots here means "Scots" not "Gaelic" Counting-out game Distin, Kate (2010). Cultural Evolution. Cambridge University ...
"About Us". Hanna, Deirdre (September 2002). "Cultural Evolution". Canadian Architect. ISSN 0008-2872. OCLC 1553038. Archived ... The Noor Cultural Centre was an Islamic cultural centre located in the Don Mills neighbourhood in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, on ... Noor Cultural Centre often conducts interfaith activities. For example, they have hosted events with Temple Emanuel - a Jewish ... Noor Cultural Centre 43°43′35″N 79°19′44″W / 43.72626°N 79.329°W / 43.72626; -79.329 (Coordinates on Wikidata, Raymond ...
"Cultural Evolution". Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, 2007. Montagu, MF Ashley. "Introduction" to Marriage Past and Present ... "Cultural anthropology has given the world a priceless treasure ... the ethnographic descriptions of many hundreds-or thousands ... social behavior drives evolution rather than the other way around: "Contrary to Goldberg, I do not believe that a genetic or ... cultural expectation of male leadership and control). The hypothetical psychophysiological phenomenon he proposes to explain ...
9. Mesoudi, Alex (2011). Cultural Evolution. Chicago University Press. Richerson, Peter J.; Boyd, Robert (2005). Not By Genes ... in the humanities coincided with the emergence in the 1990s and 2000s of the new research domain called cultural evolution. ... According to Martindale, the principles of the evolution of art are based on statistic regularities rather than meaning, data ... In their wake, Moretti used the techniques of "distant reading": statistics and computation to study literary evolution. The ...
"Cultural Tours in Yunlin - Beigang Tourist Bridge". yunlin.gov.tw. Yunlin County Gov't. 3 August 2015. Archived from the ... "Historical Evolution". The Roots of Yunlin. Yunlin County Government. Archived from the original on 6 August 2016. Retrieved 17 ... Nui Hui Morning Market has a history of more than 100 years and has now become a large vegetable market.[3] Beigang Cultural ...
Distin, Kate (2010). Cultural Evolution. Cambridge University Press. p. 93. ISBN 978-0-521-18971-2. Hickey 2015, pp. 459-469. " ... Sport has been both one of the most unifying cultural forces in Northern England and, thanks to local rivalries such as the ... Northumbria then saw a Golden Age in cultural, scholarly and monastic activity, centred on Lindisfarne and aided by Irish monks ... Scott, Jack (1970). The evolution of the brass band and its repertoire in Northern England (phd). University of Sheffield. pp. ...
Inglehart, R. (2018). Cultural Evolution. Peoples Motivations are Changing and Reshaping World. Cambridge University Press. Fog ... This is true even between countries with shared cultural histories. Additionally, even cultural clusters of countries do not ... Fog, A (2022). "Two-Dimensional Models of Cultural Differences: Statistical and Theoretical Analysis". Cross-Cultural Research ... a meta-analysis of studies of cultural differences finds that many other studies of cultural differences have resulted in ...
Cultural Evolution. Retrieved June 5, 2012. (CS1 Russian-language sources (ru), Articles with hCards, Articles containing ...
Lewens, Tim (2020). "Cultural Evolution". In Zalta, Edward N. (ed.). Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Stanford University. ... Approaches to language as part of cultural evolution can be roughly divided into two main groups: genetic determinism which ... William James selects "zoölogical evolution", William Croft prefers botanical evolution, but most theorists zoom in to more ... Behavioural ecology and dual inheritance theory, the study of gene-culture co-evolution, emphasise the role of culture as a ...
Patel, Mary F. (May 30, 2007). "Cultural Evolution". Philadelphia City Paper. Archived from the original on January 19, 2016. ...
... sociocultural evolution; cultural materialism; Piaget, developmental psychology and primitive thought; the evolution of ... "Book Review: The Evolution of Moral Understanding" Winther, Rasmus Grønfeldt; McManus, Fabrizzio Guerrero. Evolution, Volume 68 ... and Cultural Evolution (Castalia House, May 2020) On The Wilder Shores Of Life: Living With Primitive Tribes (Ellie White, 2021 ... The Co-Evolution of Religious Thought and Science: The Co-Evolution of Religious Thought and Science. Oxford University Press. ...
Mesoudi, Alex (2011). Cultural Evolution. ; How Darwinian Theory Can Explain Human Culture and Synthesize the Social Sciences. ... Henrich, Joseph; Boyd, Robert; Richerson, Peter J. (19 April 2008). "Five Misunderstandings About Cultural Evolution". Human ... "The cultural evolution of prosocial religions". Behavioral and Brain Sciences. 39: e1. doi:10.1017/S0140525X14001356. PMID ... which serves a cognitive constraint of cultural evolution. However, ecological factors also play a role in determining which ...
Cultural Evolution. Cambridge University Press. Conway, Lucian; Houck, Shannon; Gornick, Laura; Repke, Meredith (December 2017 ... However, a 2003 cross-cultural study examined the relation between authoritarianism and individualism-collectivism in samples ( ... but less effective in other countries such as France due to cultural differences and translation issues. Bob Altemeyer, the ... Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology. 34 (3): 304-322. doi:10.1177/0022022103034003005. S2CID 32361036. Rubinstein, G (1996). " ...
Smith, Bruce D. (2000). "Guilá Naquitz Revisited". Cultural Evolution. New York: Kluwer Academic. pp. 15-60. doi:10.1007/978-1- ... Feinman, Gary M.; Manzanilla, Linda (2000). Cultural Evolution: Contemporary Viewpoints. New York: Kluwer Academic. pp. 20-25, ...
"Cultural Evolution". [Cambridge University Press]. Retrieved 12 April 2020. Inglehart, Ronald (March 2018). "Cultural Evolution ... The conclusion considers the implications of their findings for cultural policies. The book Cultural Evolution: People's ... On December 16, 2018, Fareed Zakaria chose Cultural Evolution as his book of the week, describing it as "really brilliant work ... Cultural Evolution: People's Motivations are Changing, and Reshaping the World, Cambridge University Press, 2018, ISBN ...
Fox, Kieran C. R. (October 2017). "The social and cultural roots of whale and dolphin brains" (PDF). Nature Ecology & Evolution ... Xu, Shixia (Fall 2017). "Genetic basis of brain size evolution in cetaceans: insights from adaptive evolution of seven primary ... during human evolution, has been responsible for the evolution of human intelligence, however defined. While a complex ... "Origin and evolution of large brains in toothed whales", Lori Marino1,Daniel W. McShea2, Mark D. Uhen, The Anatomoical Record, ...
Ecology and Evolution; Classical Studies; Film, Theater, and Performing Arts; Global Cultural Studies; Higher Education; ...
"cultural evolution , social science". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved 2017-03-30. "Cultural Evolution Theory Definition". ... Cultural evolution is the change of this information over time. Cultural evolution, historically also known as sociocultural ... Model of cultural evolution Cultural selection theory - Study of cultural change modelled on theories of evolutionary biology ... plato.stanford.edu/entries/evolution-cultural/ Cultural Evolution Society (CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list, CS1 errors ...
... is one of the most recent and interesting approaches to the crucial task of understanding how society works ... Cultural Evolution is one of the most recent and interesting approaches to the crucial task of understanding how society works ... To develop computer models of cultural change.. *To understand long-term cultural dynamics using archaeological and historical ... www.bsc.es/ca/research-development/research-areas/social-simulation/cultural-evolution ...
... undertakes research into the evolutionary processes that shape patterns of modern and ancient human molecular and cultural ... Molecular and Cultural Evolution Lab. Molecular and Cultural Evolution Lab. The Molecular and Cultural Evolution Lab (MACE) ... We investigated the evolution of mobility using an agent-based and spatially explicit cultural evolutionary model that ... Over the years, the Molecular and Cultural Evolution Lab has often been called upon by the media to provide commentaries or to ...
Nova publishes a wide array of books and journals from authors around the globe, focusing on Medicine and Health, Science and Technology and the Social Sciences and Humanities.. We publish over 1,500 new titles per year by leading researchers each year, and have a network of expert authors, editors and advisors spanning the global academic community in pursuit of advanced research developments.. Headquarters ...
Continuing the evolution of a food. During the 19th and 20th centuries, thanks to improved methods of communication and better ...
The newspapers debut feature-length documentary, "The South Got Something to Say," chronicles the evolution of Atlantas ...
The cultural evolution of emergent group-level traits - Volume 37 Issue 3 ... Henrich, J. (2004b) Demography and cultural evolution: How adaptive cultural processes can produce maladaptive losses: The ... The central role of development in cultural evolution. In: Integrating evolution and development: From theory to practice, ed. ... I discuss the emergence and evolution of group-level traits and the implications for the theory of cultural evolution, ...
All the latest science news about cultural evolution from Phys.org ... Kindness has persisted in a competitive world-cultural evolution can explain why. Recently, I was walking with some fellow ... A more prosocial world: How the principles of evolution can create lasting global change. Evolution goes beyond the genetic ... Understanding the traits that have undergone positive selection during human evolution can provide insight into the events that ...
... and statisticians contributing to a general theory of cultural evolution.. Cultural evolution aims in part to explain the ... Thus, we aim to place the study of cultural evolution on a firm theoretical footing, and provide a bridge between that theory ... The multidisciplinary Theory in Cultural Evolution Lab (TICE Lab) brings together a unique group of mathematicians, physicists ... students or post-doctoral researchers with interest or experience in theoretical cultural evolution, especially from ...
"Beyond the Melting Pot: Cultural Transmission, Marriage, and the Evolution of Ethnic and Religious Traits," Papers 1999-10, ... "Beyond the Melting Pot : Cultural Transmission, Marriage, and the Evolution of Ethnic and Religious Traits," DELTA Working ... "Beyond the Melting Pot: Cultural Transmission, Marriage, and the Evolution of Ethnic and Religious Traits," The Quarterly ... Beyond the Melting Pot : Cultural Transmission, Marriage, and the Evolution of Ethnic and Religious Traits. ...
cultural evolution. Human sacrifice built complex societies - In the News. In the News , Published: 05 April 2016. 03 May 2017 ...
The Cultural Evolution: Identity, Performance and Fashion. FORMAT22 Presents:. The Cultural Evolution: Identity, Performance ... The artists exhibited in The Cultural Evolution all demonstrate an awareness of the rapidly changing cultural landscape and the ... The Cultural Evolution: Identity, Performance and Fashion is curated by Azu Nwagbogu, Director Lagos Photo and African Artists ... This cultural evolution is mediated through the Internet and the networks and community engendered thereby. ...
This groundbreaking book explores the cultural side of language evolution. It proposes a new overarching framework based on ... The book is ideally suited as study material for an advanced course on language evolution and it will be of interest to anyone ... The fascinating question of the origins and evolution of language has been drawing a lot of attention recently, not only from ... Experiments in Cultural Language Evolution. Volumen 3 de Advances in interaction studies. Experiments in Cultural Language ...
Recognize the importance of cultural evolution now. * Explore the role of diversity, equity and inclusion in cultural evolution ...
Cultural Evolution 건너 뜀 Cultural Evolution. Deep Transformation (Podcast). * Chief Ryan Johansen & Ret. Lt. Chris Orrey ( ...
Cultural evolution circa 500 b.c.. John Mcreery ([email protected]). Wed, 11 May 1994 14:11:27 JST * Messages sorted by: [ date ][ ... evolution of the great religions, a place to begin might be the writings. of German philosopher Karl Jaspers, who wrote about ...
The evolution-similarity matrix: an evolutionary psychology perspective on cross-cultural advertising * Received April 23, 2020 ... The evolution-similarity matrix: an evolutionary psychology perspective on cross-cultural advertising ... Figure 1. Developing an evolutionary typology of cross-cultural advertising cues. *Figure 2. The evolution-similarity matrix of ... Hatzithomas, L., Zotos, Y., & Boutsouki, C. (2011). Humor and cultural values in print advertising: a cross-cultural study. ...
Previous works on cultural evolution have proposed Iterated Learning procedures, in which the behavioral output of one ... A statistical mechanics approach to cultural evolution of structured behavior in non-human primates: From disorder to tetris- ... This paper explores a statistical mechanics approach to cultural evolution of structured behavior in non-human primates. ... Within this line of research, previous work has suggested that even in non-human primates this paradigm shows that cultural ...
Cultural Evolution, Inglehart, Ronald F.; : , 291 oldal; Presents and tests a theory that helps explain the rise of ... Cultural Evolution argues that peoples values and behavior are shaped by the degree to which survival is secure; it was ... Global cultural patterns; 4. The end of secularization?; 5. Cultural change, slow and fast: the distinctive trajectory of norms ... The unprecedented prosperity and security of the postwar era brought cultural change, the environmentalist movement, and the ...
The history of uncontested divorces in Alabama is very interesting and represents a change in the cultural perspective on ... The Evolution of Uncontested Divorces: An Examination of Legal and Cultural Shifts. Posted Jul 13, 2023. by Steven A. Harris , ... The evolution of uncontested divorces in Alabama paints a picture of significant legal and cultural shifts. From the early days ... This article aims to unravel the long legal and cultural history of uncontested divorces-also known as no-fault or non- ...
Conflicts and cultural evolution: All for one and one for all? Researchers from the School of Arts & Sciences show that, when ... "Our capacity to accumulate cultural knowledge is part of what makes us human, and its what has enabled us to settle and live ... The conflict between individuals and groups could also explain the cross-cultural ubiquity of social rituals that function to ... "Our results provide a novel hypothesis for the evolution of rituals and social norms that promote social connections," Smolla ...
Iarzutkina*, A. (2019). Gramophone And Chukchi: Origin And Evolution Of Cultural Markers. In D. Karim-Sultanovich Bataev, S. ... Burykin, A. A. (2002). Anecdotes about Chukchi as a socio-cultural phenomenon (specialists notes). Anecdote as a Cultural ... Cultural Biography of Things , we are not analyzing a biography of a specific object, but its generalized variant, taking the ... At that, this most recent form may not be the last and continue its evolution further and turning back into a thing, acquiring ...
... with the hypothesis that people infer emotional meaning in facial movements using emotion knowledge embrained by cultural ... Heyes, C. M. & Frith, C. D. The cultural evolution of mind reading. Science 344, 1243091, https://doi.org/10.1126/science. ... industrialized cultural contexts, in both the cultural east and west, and in a small-scale societal context15. ... cultural diversity (i.e., variation across societies; for review see10). And, notably, until 2008, only three papers (two of ...
Centre for Cultural Evolution © Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Phone: +46 (0)8-16 20 00 ...
Cultural Evolution. When the culture of the group promotes social learning, it becomes possible for knowledge and skills that ... Genetic and cultural evolution reinforce each other. The special human intelligence we were looking for is this group ... Once the ratchet effect exists, cultural evolution emerges: beneficial ideas and practices are retained and bad ideas die out. ... The cultural intelligence hypothesis holds that living in groups creates opportunities for apes to mimic each other. Over time ...
Cultural Evolution. Home Page. Mission &. Board of Directors. Services. Materials. Books. Outline. Bibliography. Whos Who ...
... cultural variations in terminology, and their future in an ever-changing world. ... Evolution of Semi-Trailer. Design The evolution of semi-trailer design mirrors the quest for efficiency, safety, and ... Cultural and Regional Variations. Language is a living organism that reflects culture, history, and geography in an ever- ... The evolution of transportation terminology mirrors this change, shifting with time as the need for clear communication became ...
Cultural Evolution of the Firm. Weeks, J. and Galunic, Ch. . A Theory of the Cultural Evolution of the Firm: The Intra- ... Auteur DPCategorieën Building Blocks, Corporate MemeTags bedrijfscultuur, cultural evolution, cultuur, evolution, firm theory, ... A theory of the cultural evolution of the firm is proposed. Evolutionary and cultural thinking is applied to the questions: ... Why has the cultural evolution process led to a situation where the memes bundle together as firms? (p 1337). The scope of the ...
  • The Molecular and Cultural Evolution Lab (MACE) undertakes research into the evolutionary processes that shape patterns of modern and ancient human molecular and cultural variation. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • In fact, the Region is characterized by a distinct socioeconomic, cultural, and epidemiological diversity. (who.int)
  • The geographic and seasonal distribution of vector populations, and the diseases they can carry, depends not only on climate but also on land use, socioeconomic and cultural factors, pest control, access to health care, and human responses to disease risk, among other factors. (cdc.gov)
  • There has progressively been increased recognition of the need to address behavioural, lifestyle (harmful cultural practices) and other underlying socioeconomic, physical and biological factors, referred to here as the broad determinants of health, so as to improve health. (who.int)
  • The project will combine prehistoric human genomic, archaeological, environmental, stable isotope and climate data to better understand the processes that shaped our biological and cultural past from the time of the first farmers to the Iron Age (between 6000 to 500 BC). (ucl.ac.uk)
  • Phipps' book can be seen as an attempt, not so much to argue for a scientifically viable theory of biological evolution, as to make philosophical and religious sense of it. (integralworld.net)
  • Are all these authors equally qualified to speak out on this topic of biological evolution? (integralworld.net)
  • Cultural evolution' as a field applies the insight that cultural change may be like biological evolution. (rug.nl)
  • Concepts, methods and ideas from the well-established theory of biological evolution are applied to cultural processes, such as the spread and diversification of languages or technology. (rug.nl)
  • Some researchers even suggest that evolutionary theory may serve as a synthetic framework for unifying the humanities and the social sciences, just as biological evolution is viewed as a unifying principle underlying all life sciences. (rug.nl)
  • Biological and cultural evolution of Homo sapiens. (anthropogeny.org)
  • How did our cultural evolution interact with our biological evolution? (anthropogeny.org)
  • As we gaze into the future, chit chat continues to evolve in response to cultural shifts and technological advancements. (mrgayeurope.net)
  • Yet at present, most work on the evolution of culture has focused solely on the transmission of individual-level traits. (cambridge.org)
  • In this target article, I discuss the emergence and evolution of group-level traits and the implications for the theory of cultural evolution, including ramifications for the evolution of human cooperation, technology, and cultural institutions, and for the equivalency of multilevel selection and inclusive fitness approaches. (cambridge.org)
  • Understanding the traits that have undergone positive selection during human evolution can provide insight into the events that have shaped our species, as well as into the diseases that continue to plague us today. (phys.org)
  • Cultural evolution aims in part to explain the dynamics of cultural change, defined as changes in the frequency and diversity of cultural traits over time. (mpg.de)
  • Beyond the Melting Pot : Cultural Transmission, Marriage, and the Evolution of Ethnic and Religious Traits ," DELTA Working Papers 1999-10, DELTA (Ecole normale supérieure). (repec.org)
  • 'Beyond the Melting Pot': Cultural Transmission, Marriage, and the Evolution of Ethnic and Religious Traits ," The Quarterly Journal of Economics , Oxford University Press, vol. 115(3), pages 955-988. (repec.org)
  • Cultural evolution is an evolutionary theory of social change. (wikipedia.org)
  • There have been a number of different approaches to the study of cultural evolution, including dual inheritance theory, sociocultural evolution, memetics, cultural evolutionism, and other variants on cultural selection theory. (wikipedia.org)
  • work that was developed into a full theory of "socio-cultural evolution" in 1965 (a work that includes references to other works in the then current revival of interest in the field). (wikipedia.org)
  • I propose a conceptual extension of the theory of cultural evolution, particularly related to the evolutionary competition between cultural groups. (cambridge.org)
  • The multidisciplinary Theory in Cultural Evolution Lab (TICE Lab) brings together a unique group of mathematicians, physicists, theoretical biologists, and statisticians contributing to a general theory of cultural evolution. (mpg.de)
  • Thus, we aim to place the study of cultural evolution on a firm theoretical footing, and provide a bridge between that theory and the cultural data collected by anthropologists and archaeologists. (mpg.de)
  • The paper contributes to advertising theory by providing a meta-framework for the study of cross-cultural similarities and differences in the processing of advertising cues. (businessperspectives.org)
  • The Neurology and Evolution of Humor, Laughter, and Smiling: The False Alarm Theory. (businessperspectives.org)
  • A theory of the cultural evolution of the firm is proposed. (magrathea-tlc.nl)
  • It is argued that a truly descriptive theory of the firm takes seriously the idea that firms are fundamentally cultural in nature and that culture evolves. (magrathea-tlc.nl)
  • Cultural evolution, historically also known as sociocultural evolution, was originally developed in the 19th century by anthropologists stemming from Charles Darwin's research on evolution. (wikipedia.org)
  • Special attention is given to human evolution, primate behavior, genetics, ancient civilizations, sociocultural theories, and the value of human language for symbolic communication. (lu.se)
  • This paper explores a statistical mechanics approach to cultural evolution of structured behavior in non-human primates. (edpsciences.org)
  • Previous works on cultural evolution have proposed Iterated Learning procedures, in which the behavioral output of one individual becomes the target behavior for the next individual in the chain. (edpsciences.org)
  • Understanding the dynamics of conformistand anticonformist-biased transmission may have implications for research on human and nonhuman animal behavior, the evolution of cooperation, and frequency-dependent transmission in general. (tau.ac.il)
  • Cultural evolution, in the Darwinian sense of variation and selective inheritance, could be said to trace back to Darwin himself. (wikipedia.org)
  • The distribution of genetic and cultural variation in human populations is shaped by demographic history, natural selection, mutation (or innovation) and random factors (drift). (ucl.ac.uk)
  • A sketch of the evidence for selection on inter-group cultural variation in humans. (cambridge.org)
  • Evolution of human lactation and complementary feeding: Implications for understanding contemporary cross-cultural variation / D.W. Sellen -- 19. (who.int)
  • Evolution goes beyond the genetic code and the transformation of physical form, from land-mammal to whale or dinosaur to bird. (phys.org)
  • We work on the premise that a mechanistic understanding of the processes underlying cultural change can help us to explain something about the human species beyond what can be gleaned from genetic or even cultural data alone. (mpg.de)
  • Seeking ways to improve human adaptation in order to confront global sustainability challenges: How can new insights into exploratory learning and cognitive specialisation contribute to understanding of human adaptation and cultural evolution? (ces-transformationfund.org)
  • Within this line of research, previous work has suggested that even in non-human primates this paradigm shows that cultural transmission can lead to the progressive emergence of tetris-like structures. (edpsciences.org)
  • The approaches differ not just in the history of their development and discipline of origin but in how they conceptualize the process of cultural evolution and the assumptions, theories, and methods that they apply to its study. (wikipedia.org)
  • In recent years, there has been a convergence of the cluster of related theories towards seeing cultural evolution as a unified discipline in its own right. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dunér, D 2014, ' Cultural evolution, conceptual metaphors and science ', [Publication information missing] , s. 80-80. (lu.se)
  • These findings offer new perspectives on prehistoric milk exploitation and LP evolution. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • By embracing the historical and cultural perspectives of chit chat, we not only honor its past but also shape its trajectory for the future, ensuring that this timeless art of conversation continues to enrich our lives. (mrgayeurope.net)
  • Cultural Evolution is one of the most recent and interesting approaches to the crucial task of understanding how society works. (bsc.es)
  • Such an elaborate scheme immediately raises the question about the validity of each of these approaches to evolution. (integralworld.net)
  • In this highly readable and informative essay, Phipps distinguished no less than twelve approaches to evolution. (integralworld.net)
  • The evolution of uncontested divorces in Alabama paints a picture of significant legal and cultural shifts. (theharrisfirmllc.com)
  • Such shifts can alter disease incidence depending on vector-host interaction, host immunity, and pathogen evolution. (cdc.gov)
  • Using archaeological and ethnographic data, we seek to quantify these differences, and by doing so, better understand the evolution of our dietary preferences, including why we often seek foods that are unhealthy. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • The paper highlights three distinct categories - human universals (evolved similarities), local adaptations (evolved differences), and local socialization (differences not due to evolution). (businessperspectives.org)
  • To test for systematic acoustic differences between these vocal domains, we analyzed a broad, cross-cultural corpus representing over 2 h of speech, singing, and nonverbal vocalizations. (lu.se)
  • He argued for both customs (1874 p. 239) and "inherited habits" as contributing to human evolution, grounding both in the innate capacity for acquiring language. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dietary change has been linked to many aspects of human evolution over the last 3 million years, including tool use, brain size increase, aerobic capacity and gut biology. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • Not by genes alone : how culture transformed human evolution. (businessperspectives.org)
  • The science of human evolution has recently been changing rapidly, and we know that Homo sapiens is the last surviving branch of a once-luxuriant tree of hominid species. (anthropogeny.org)
  • The function and evolution of moral norms and Moral norms and cultural relativism. (lu.se)
  • To do this, we focus on developing analytical and simulation models of various cultural phenomena. (mpg.de)
  • This five-volume Encyclopedia of Anthropology is a unique collection of over 1,000 entries that focuses on topics in physical anthropology, archaeology, cultural anthropology, linguistics, and applied anthropology. (lu.se)
  • Today, cultural evolution has become the basis for a growing field of scientific research in the social sciences, including anthropology, economics, psychology, and organizational studies. (wikipedia.org)
  • The fascinating question of the origins and evolution of language has been drawing a lot of attention recently, not only from linguists, but also from anthropologists, evolutionary biologists, and brain scientists. (google.es)
  • Cultural evolution is the change of this information over time. (wikipedia.org)
  • The aim of this initiative is to develop a unified framework capable of understanding cultural change beyond the knowledge of any single discipline. (bsc.es)
  • It uses formal models and computer simulations to explore the complexity of cultural change: from the interaction between individuals to large-scale dynamics. (bsc.es)
  • However, data on cultural change is difficult to collect and analyse. (bsc.es)
  • To develop computer models of cultural change. (bsc.es)
  • The unprecedented prosperity and security of the postwar era brought cultural change, the environmentalist movement, and the spread of democracy. (prospero.hu)
  • The diverse cultural manifestations of chit chat remind us that while times change, the fundamental need for conversation remains constant. (mrgayeurope.net)
  • In any cultural change, it is easy to say that it is the other person who has to do the changing. (who.int)
  • the resulting cultural patterns are observed and interpreted by others. (magrathea-tlc.nl)
  • The standardization/adaptation debate in cross-cultural advertising is a topic on which little consensus prevails and which remains heavily discussed. (businessperspectives.org)
  • In turn, this suggests that humans contribute to the process of knowledge-creation, and cultural adaptation, in complementary ways. (ces-transformationfund.org)
  • Evolution of human starts from develops from simple reproduction organisms to more and more complex and flexible - it concerns adaptation to environmental prerequisites organisms. (culturalmedicine.se)
  • Not only psychology (including psychiatric trying to understand Neocortex-Limbic information processing dysfunctions) but the health care as a "whole" (biopsychosocial-cultural medicine ideographic and nomothetic process) needs to have a reasonable biopsychosocial-cultural evolutionary paradigm (while we do not have access to absolute knowledge! (culturalmedicine.se)
  • The underlying assumption was that Cultural Evolution itself led to the growth and development of civilization. (wikipedia.org)
  • The artists exhibited in The Cultural Evolution all demonstrate an awareness of the rapidly changing cultural landscape and the need to insert themselves across various aspects and genres of the rapidly transforming visual cultural scene. (formatfestival.com)
  • The email newsletter's evolution showcases how it has adapted to the rapidly changing digital landscape. (benchmarkemail.com)
  • The subject of this article is the object in its social, material, historical and cultural expression. (europeanproceedings.com)
  • These cultural nuances underscore the varied ways in which chit chat has been integrated into social fabrics. (mrgayeurope.net)
  • The email newsletter has had a profound cultural and social impact, influencing the way we consume news, connect with communities, and engage with brands. (benchmarkemail.com)
  • Instead of culture one rarely meets with civilisation even, the decorations of the Buddha's teaching are taken for essential, revolution is preached as necessary to evolution, and moral standards have become baseless and senseless, notwithstanding the daily repetition of the observance of the pañca sīla . (buddhasasana.net)
  • This article aims to unravel the long legal and cultural history of uncontested divorces-also known as no-fault or non-contested divorces-in Alabama. (theharrisfirmllc.com)
  • As we embark on a journey through the evolution of the email newsletter, we unravel its rich history and the pivotal role it has played in connecting individuals, businesses, and communities. (benchmarkemail.com)
  • To understand long-term cultural dynamics using archaeological and historical data. (bsc.es)
  • Only morbidity and mortality [ 1 ], and its mane women of Saharawi origin and without any agement is a complex issue that includes previous systemic diseases were eligible a wide range of cultural and psychosocial for this investigation. (who.int)
  • It further assists advertising practice by delivering a framework aiding in cross-cultural advertising copy decisions. (businessperspectives.org)
  • All our understanding of also present human beings needs to be based a more articulated (trying to understand) evolution of this, for modern human beings, decisive interaction of the tow completely different codes! (culturalmedicine.se)
  • Others pursued more specific analogies notably the anthropologist F. T. (Ted) Cloak who argued in 1975 for the existence of learnt cultural instructions (cultural corpuscles or i-culture) resulting in material artefacts (m-culture) such as wheels. (wikipedia.org)
  • The newspaper's debut feature-length documentary, " The South Got Something to Say, " chronicles the evolution of Atlanta's journey to become a dominant force in both popular music and culture while the city experiences its own growth and development. (ajc.com)
  • Emphasizing of originality often leads to highlighting cultural markers that are not necessarily connected to the traditional culture. (europeanproceedings.com)
  • Boyd and Richerson used models of conformist and anticonformist bias to explain the evolution of large-scale cooperation, and subsequent research has extended these models. (tau.ac.il)
  • Therefore, the effect of conformity on the evolution of cooperation by group selection may be more complicated than previously stated. (tau.ac.il)
  • Conformist bias occurs when the probability of adopting a more common cultural variant in a population exceeds its frequency, and anticonformist bias occurs when the reverse is true. (tau.ac.il)
  • Design The evolution of semi-trailer design mirrors the quest for efficiency, safety, and functionality in transportation. (a1autotransport.com)
  • The evolution of chit chat from ancient times to the modern era mirrors the evolution of human society itself. (mrgayeurope.net)
  • Cultural evolutionary concepts, or even metaphors, revived more slowly. (wikipedia.org)
  • During this evolution of EHMRs and exhalation valves, research was needed to understand the impact that modifying, covering, removing, or adding filtered adaptors may have on the respirator user. (cdc.gov)
  • To create new data science methods and tools designed to analyse evolution. (bsc.es)
  • Taking the idea of evolution from science and run with it is for sure not the same as illuminating its intricate workings. (integralworld.net)
  • We are currently in the next reset and are witnessing a cultural shift and transformation evolving at a rapid pace. (formatfestival.com)
  • The book is ideally suited as study material for an advanced course on language evolution and it will be of interest to anyone who wonders how human languages may have originated. (google.es)
  • In this study, we used a self-documentation and collaborative interpretation method (cultural probes, n = 9) as well as farm interviews (n = 11) to identify factors affecting the adoption and implementation of safety information. (cdc.gov)
  • Cross-cultural studies of facial expression. (businessperspectives.org)
  • Rather, our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that people infer emotional meaning in facial movements using emotion knowledge embrained by cultural learning. (nature.com)
  • Darwin also surveyed well-traveled colleagues and missionaries from the "old and new worlds" to learn about the facial movements of people who lived in remote, non-urbanized cultural contexts. (nature.com)
  • In conclusion, calling attention to mass media, cultural studies relates to how the audience can decode the messages put forward by the media. (ipl.org)
  • Using evolutionary psychology, this paper presents a typology of advertising cues and explains their cross-cultural relevance and transportability. (businessperspectives.org)
  • The evolution of chit chat raises questions about the quality of interactions amidst the quantity. (mrgayeurope.net)
  • Now we're taking it to the next level with a closer look at the Medieval period fashion as well as evolution of fashion in modern India. (dishafashioninstitute.com)