Salvia officinalis: A plant species of the Salvia genus known as a spice and medicinal plant.Salvia: A genus in the mint family (LAMIACEAE).Salvia miltiorrhiza: A plant species which is known as an Oriental traditional medicinal plant.Depsides: Phenolic benzoic acid esters.Lamiaceae: The mint plant family. They are characteristically aromatic, and many of them are cultivated for their oils. Most have square stems, opposite leaves, and two-lipped, open-mouthed, tubular corollas (united petals), with five-lobed, bell-like calyxes (united sepals).Diterpenes, Abietane: A group of DITERPENES cyclized into 3-ring PHENANTHRENES.Lawsonia Plant: A plant genus of the family LYTHRACEAE that is the source of henna and has cytotoxic activity.Intramolecular Lyases: Enzymes of the isomerase class that catalyze reactions in which a group can be regarded as eliminated from one part of a molecule, leaving a double bond, while remaining covalently attached to the molecule. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992) EC 5.5.Chicory: A thick-rooted perennial (Cichorium intybus) native to Europe but widely grown for its young leaves used as salad greens and for its roots, dried and ground-roasted, used to flavor or adulterate coffee. (From Webster, 3d ed)Phyllanthus emblica: A plant species of the family EUPHORBIACEAE.Calendula: A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE. Members contain CAROTENOIDS, essential oils (OILS, VOLATILE), flavonoids, mucilage, SAPONINS, and STEROLS. The plants are used both topically and internally. The common name of Marigold is also used for TAGETES.Plant Extracts: Concentrated pharmaceutical preparations of plants obtained by removing active constituents with a suitable solvent, which is evaporated away, and adjusting the residue to a prescribed standard.Sepia: A genus of cuttlefish in the family Sepiidae. They live in tropical, subtropical and temperate waters in most oceans.Distillation: A chemical process for separating the components of a liquid mixture by boiling and collecting condensed vapors.Rosmarinus: A plant genus of the LAMIACEAE family. It is known as a spice and medicinal plant.Melissa: A plant genus of the family LAMIACEAE. The common names of beebalm or lemonbalm are also used for MONARDA.Oils, Volatile: Oils which evaporate readily. The volatile oils occur in aromatic plants, to which they give odor and other characteristics. Most volatile oils consist of a mixture of two or more TERPENES or of a mixture of an eleoptene (the more volatile constituent of a volatile oil) with a stearopten (the more solid constituent). The synonym essential oils refers to the essence of a plant, as its perfume or scent, and not to its indispensability.Monoterpenes: Compounds with a core of 10 carbons generally formed via the mevalonate pathway from the combination of 3,3-dimethylallyl pyrophosphate and isopentenyl pyrophosphate. They are cyclized and oxidized in a variety of ways. Due to the low molecular weight many of them exist in the form of essential oils (OILS, VOLATILE).Polyisoprenyl Phosphates: Phosphoric or pyrophosphoric acid esters of polyisoprenoids.Valerian: A plant genus of the family VALERIANACEAE, order Dipsacales, subclass Asteridae, class Magnoliopsida. It is best known for the sedative use and valepotriate content of the roots. It is sometimes called Garden Heliotrope but is unrelated to true Heliotrope (HELIOTROPIUM).Magnolia: A plant genus of the family MAGNOLIACEAE. The germacranolide sesquiterpene lactones costunolide, parthenolide, and costunolide diepoxide have been isolated from the leaves. Bark contains honokiol and magnolol. Parts are an ingredient of Banxia Houpo Tang.Asparagus Plant: A plant genus in the family LILIACEAE (sometimes placed in Asparagaceae) that contains ECDYSTEROIDS and is an ingredient of Siotone. The shoots are used as a vegetable and the roots are used in FOLK MEDICINE.Buddleja: A plant genus of the family SCROPHULARIACEAE. Members contain mimengoside B, verbascoside, and phenylethanoids.Droughts: Prolonged dry periods in natural climate cycle. They are slow-onset phenomena caused by rainfall deficit combined with other predisposing factors.Flowers: The reproductive organs of plants.Plant Leaves: Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)Water: A clear, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for most animal and plant life and is an excellent solvent for many substances. The chemical formula is hydrogen oxide (H2O). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Ceremonial Behavior: A series of actions, sometimes symbolic actions which may be associated with a behavior pattern, and are often indispensable to its performance.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Agave: A genus known for fibers obtained from their leaves: sisal from A. sisalana, henequen from A. fourcroyoides and A. cantala, or Manila-Maguey fiber from A. cantala. Some species provide a sap that is fermented to an intoxicating drink, called pulque in Mexico. Some contain agavesides.Roman World: A historical and cultural entity dispersed across a wide geographical area under the political domination and influence of ancient Rome, bringing to the conquered people the Roman civilization and culture from 753 B.C. to the beginning of the imperial rule under Augustus in 27 B.C. The early city built on seven hills grew to conquer Sicily, Sardinia, Carthage, Gaul, Spain, Britain, Greece, Asia Minor, etc., and extended ultimately from Mesopotamia to the Atlantic. Roman medicine was almost entirely in Greek hands, but Rome, with its superior water system, remains a model of sanitation and hygiene. (From A. Castiglioni, A History of Medicine, 2d ed pp196-99; from F. H. Garrison, An Introduction to the History of Medicine, 4th ed, pp107-120)Astringents: Agents, usually topical, that cause the contraction of tissues for the control of bleeding or secretions.Cosmetics: Substances intended to be applied to the human body for cleansing, beautifying, promoting attractiveness, or altering the appearance without affecting the body's structure or functions. Included in this definition are skin creams, lotions, perfumes, lipsticks, fingernail polishes, eye and facial makeup preparations, permanent waves, hair colors, toothpastes, and deodorants, as well as any material intended for use as a component of a cosmetic product. (U.S. Food & Drug Administration Center for Food Safety & Applied Nutrition Office of Cosmetics Fact Sheet (web page) Feb 1995)Tannins: Polyphenolic compounds with molecular weights of around 500-3000 daltons and containing enough hydroxyl groups (1-2 per 100 MW) for effective cross linking of other compounds (ASTRINGENTS). The two main types are HYDROLYZABLE TANNINS and CONDENSED TANNINS. Historically, the term has applied to many compounds and plant extracts able to render skin COLLAGEN impervious to degradation. The word tannin derives from the Celtic word for OAK TREE which was used for leather processing.Hydrolyzable Tannins: Polymeric derivatives of GALLIC ACID that are esters of a sugar.Nontherapeutic Human Experimentation: Human experimentation that is not intended to benefit the subjects on whom it is performed. Phase I drug studies (CLINICAL TRIALS, PHASE I AS TOPIC) and research involving healthy volunteers are examples of nontherapeutic human experimentation.Taste Perception: The process by which the nature and meaning of gustatory stimuli are recognized and interpreted by the brain. The four basic classes of taste perception are salty, sweet, bitter, and sour.Grape Seed Extract: Exudate from seeds of the grape plant Vitis vinifera, composed of oils and secondary plant metabolites (BIOFLAVONOIDS and polyphenols) credited with important medicinal properties.Herbal Medicine: The study of medicines derived from botanical sources.Waste Products: Debris resulting from a process that is of no further use to the system producing it. The concept includes materials discharged from or stored in a system in inert form as a by-product of vital activities. (From Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary, 1981)Drugs, Chinese Herbal: Chinese herbal or plant extracts which are used as drugs to treat diseases or promote general well-being. The concept does not include synthesized compounds manufactured in China.Medicine, East Asian Traditional: Medical practice or discipline that is based on the knowledge, cultures, and beliefs of the people in EAST ASIA.Medicine, Traditional: Systems of medicine based on cultural beliefs and practices handed down from generation to generation. The concept includes mystical and magical rituals (SPIRITUAL THERAPIES); PHYTOTHERAPY; and other treatments which may not be explained by modern medicine.Phytotherapy: Use of plants or herbs to treat diseases or to alleviate pain.UrobilinCommerce: The interchange of goods or commodities, especially on a large scale, between different countries or between populations within the same country. It includes trade (the buying, selling, or exchanging of commodities, whether wholesale or retail) and business (the purchase and sale of goods to make a profit). (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, p411, p2005 & p283)RestaurantsConsumer Satisfaction: Customer satisfaction or dissatisfaction with a benefit or service received.Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Food Labeling: Use of written, printed, or graphic materials upon or accompanying a food or its container or wrapper. The concept includes ingredients, NUTRITIONAL VALUE, directions, warnings, and other relevant information.Pharmacies: Facilities for the preparation and dispensing of drugs.
  • A standardized S. officinalis ethanolic extract at a dose of 333 mg was used in a study evaluating its effects on memory and attention in healthy older volunteers. (drugs.com)
  • Sage Leaf extract has a long history of use throughout Europe as a culinary herb and one of Solgar's premium quality food supplements. (health4youonline.com)
  • Here, we demonstrate that a standard ethyl acetate extract of S. officinalis efficiently suppresses the formation of PGE 2 in a cell-free assay by direct interference with microsomal PGE 2 synthase (mPGES)-1. (aspetjournals.org)
  • The results of this were the characterization of an antidepressant-like activity in the salvia water extract (SWE) when given orally at a concentration of 50mg/kg in the forced swimming test (FST) and tail suspension test (TST). (ufl.edu)
  • The essential oil and ethanolic extract of S. Officinalis show strong bactericidal and bacteriostatic effects against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. (wetality.com)
  • The results of this study indicate the efficacy of S. officinalis extract in the management of mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • While animals may not prefer their aromas, many salvias are used in perfumes or medicinally. (staugustine.com)
  • According to scholars at Georgetown University, the herb was first used medicinally (rather than for culinary purposes) and was an important part of the pharmacopeia of ancient Greece and Rome, used to treat everything from insomnia to venereal disease. (gracelinks.org)
  • Chia, the seeds of a type of sage (Salvia hispanica), rich in omega-3 fatty acids, protein and calcium. (gracelinks.org)
  • The specific epithet officinalis refers to plants with a well-established medicinal or culinary value. (wikipedia.org)
  • When Linnaeus invented the binomial system of nomenclature, he gave the specific name 'officinalis' to plants (and sometimes animals) with an established medicinal, culinary, or other use. (seedaholic.com)
  • Completed human trials are summarised, and factors influencing the potency of Salvia plants are covered. (springer.com)
  • Finally, directions for future research are proposed to enhance our understanding of the potential health benefits of Salvia plants. (springer.com)
  • Salvia plants and their constituents can influence several biological mechanisms associated with cognition including their effects on amyloid-β, cholinergic activity, neurotrophins, oxidative stress, inflammation and anxiolytic/antidepressant behaviours. (springer.com)
  • Salvia plants are traditionally noted for their antioxidant effects and ability to enhance 'head and brain' function, improve memory, quicken the senses, and delay age-associated cognitive decline [ 1 ]. (springer.com)
  • As detailed in Table 1 , Salvia plants are a rich source of polyphenol compounds with over 160 identified polyphenols, comprising an array of phenolic acids and flavonoids. (springer.com)
  • White sage (Salvia apiana), used in "smudging" rituals (where a bundle of dried sage, sometimes mixed with other plants, is burned to promote spiritual cleansing), and also sacred to some Native American groups. (gracelinks.org)
  • Would it be okay to cut back some of my Salvia 'Hot lips' now as it's towering over many other plants and becoming quite straggly? (greenplantswap.co.uk)
  • To view Salvia plants offered near you, enter your postcode or log in . (greenplantswap.co.uk)
  • A family run herb farm with over 30 years' experience in growing and using medicinal and culinary herb plants and seeds. (jekkas.com)