A genus of plant viruses of the family BROMOVIRIDAE, which infect cucurbits and solanaceous plants. Transmission occurs via aphids in a non-persistent manner, and also via seeds. The type species Cucumber mosaic virus, a CUCUMOVIRUS, should not be confused with Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus, a TOBAMOVIRUS.
A creeping annual plant species of the CUCURBITACEAE family. It has a rough succulent, trailing stem and hairy leaves with three to five pointed lobes.
A plant species of the family FABACEAE that yields edible seeds, the familiar peanuts, which contain protein, oil and lectins.
Plants or plant parts which are harmful to man or other animals.
Viral proteins that facilitate the movement of viruses between plant cells by means of PLASMODESMATA, channels that traverse the plant cell walls.
A plant genus of the family SOLANACEAE. Members contain NICOTINE and other biologically active chemicals; its dried leaves are used for SMOKING.
Ribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of viruses.
A plant species of the family SOLANACEAE, native of South America, widely cultivated for their edible, fleshy, usually red fruit.
Viruses parasitic on plants higher than bacteria.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
Proteins found in any species of virus.
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.

Design of highly specific cytotoxins by using trans-splicing ribozymes. (1/288)

We have designed ribozymes based on a self-splicing group I intron that can trans-splice exon sequences into a chosen RNA target to create a functional chimeric mRNA and provide a highly specific trigger for gene expression. We have targeted ribozymes against the coat protein mRNA of a widespread plant pathogen, cucumber mosaic virus. The ribozymes were designed to trans-splice the coding sequence of the diphtheria toxin A chain in frame with the viral initiation codon of the target sequence. Diphtheria toxin A chain catalyzes the ADP ribosylation of elongation factor 2 and can cause the cessation of protein translation. In a Saccharomyces cerevisiae model system, ribozyme expression was shown to specifically inhibit the growth of cells expressing the virus mRNA. A point mutation at the target splice site alleviated this ribozyme-mediated toxicity. Increasing the extent of base pairing between the ribozyme and target dramatically increased specific expression of the cytotoxin and reduced illegitimate toxicity in vivo. Trans-splicing ribozymes may provide a new class of agents for engineering virus resistance and therapeutic cytotoxins.  (+info)

Strong host resistance targeted against a viral suppressor of the plant gene silencing defence mechanism. (2/288)

The 2b protein encoded by cucumber mosaic cucumovirus (Cmv2b) acts as an important virulence determinant by suppressing post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS), a natural plant defence mechanism against viruses. We report here that the tomato aspermy cucumovirus 2b protein (Tav2b), when expressed from the unrelated tobacco mosaic tobamovirus (TMV) RNA genome, activates strong host resistance responses to TMV in tobacco which are typical of the gene-for-gene disease resistance mechanism. Domain swapping between Cmv2b, which does not elicit these responses, and Tav2b, revealed functional domains in Tav2b critical for triggering virus resistance and hypersensitive cell death. Furthermore, substitution of two amino acids from Tav2b by those found at the same positions in Cmv2b, Lys21-->Val and Arg28-->Ser, abolished the ability to induce hypersensitive cell death and virus resistance. However, in Nicotiana benthamiana, a species related to tobacco, Tav2b functions as a virulence determinant and suppresses PTGS. Thus, a viral suppressor of the host gene silencing defence mechanism is the target of another independent host resistance mechanism. Our results provide new insights into the complex molecular strategies employed by viruses and their hosts for defence, counter-defence and counter counter-defence.  (+info)

Rearrangements in the 5' nontranslated region and phylogenetic analyses of cucumber mosaic virus RNA 3 indicate radial evolution of three subgroups. (3/288)

Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) has been divided into two subgroups based on serological data, peptide mapping of the coat protein, nucleic acid hybridization, and nucleotide sequence similarity. Analyses of a number of recently isolated strains suggest a further division of the subgroup I strains. Alignment of the 5' nontranslated regions of RNA 3 for 26 strains of CMV suggests the division of CMV into subgroups IA, IB, and II and suggests that rearrangements, deletions, and insertions in this region may have been the precursors of the subsequent radiation of each subgroup. Phylogeny analyses of CMV using the coat protein open reading frame of 53 strains strongly support the further division of subgroup I into IA and IB. In addition, strains within each subgroup radiate from a single point of origin, indicating that they have evolved from a single common ancestor for each subgroup.  (+info)

Host-specific cell-to-cell and long-distance movements of cucumber mosaic virus are facilitated by the movement protein of groundnut rosette virus. (4/288)

The cucumovirus, cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), requires both the 3a movement protein (MP) and the capsid protein (CP) for cell-to-cell movement. Replacement of the MP of CMV with the MP of the umbravirus, groundnut rosette virus (GRV), which does not encode a CP, resulted in a hybrid virus, CMV(ORF4), which could move cell to cell in Nicotiana tabacum and long distance in N. benthamiana. After replacement of the CMV CP in CMV(ORF4) with the gene encoding the green fluorescent protein (GFP), the hybrid virus, CMV(ORF4.GFP), expressing both the GRV MP and the GFP, could move cell to cell but not systemically in either Nicotiana species. Immunoelectron microscopic analysis of cells infected by the hybrid viruses showed different cellular barriers in the vasculature preventing long-distance movement of CMV(ORF4) in N. tabacum and CMV(ORF4.GFP) in N. benthamiana. Thus the GRV MP, which shows limited sequence similarity to the CMV MP, was able to support CP-independent cell-to-cell movement of the hybrid virus, but CP was still required for long-distance movement and entry of particular vascular cells required functions encoded by different proteins.  (+info)

Recombination between genomic RNAs of two cucumoviruses under conditions of minimal selection pressure. (5/288)

Recombination is considered to play a key role in RNA virus evolution; however, little is known about its occurrence under natural conditions. We inoculated tobacco plants with wild-type strains of two closely related cucumovirus species: cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) and tomato aspermy virus (TAV). RNA from the inoculated leaves of doubly-infected plants was tested for the presence of recombination events in an 0.8-kb central portion of the viral RNA3. Using a sensitive and specific RT-PCR procedure, we amplified recombinant segments of RNA3 in 3 of 82 tobacco plants infected with both viruses. In each plant in which recombinant segments were amplified, several different crossover sites were observed, all of which were located within a short stretch of high sequence similarity. Two plants had both CMV-TAV and TAV-CMV recombinants. In all cases, precise homologous recombination had occurred. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of interspecific recombination between wild-type plant RNA viruses under conditions of minimal selection pressure in favor of the recombinants.  (+info)

Resistance of Capsicum annuum 'Avelar' to pepper mottle potyvirus and alleviation of this resistance by co-infection with cucumber mosaic cucumovirus are associated with virus movement. (6/288)

Capsicum annuum cv. Avelar plants resist systemic infection by the Florida isolate of pepper mottle potyvirus (PepMoV-FL). Immuno-tissue blot analysis for detection of PepMoV-FL infection in selected stem segments revealed that virus moved down the stem in external phloem, and, over time, accumulated to detectable levels throughout stem sections (appearing to accumulate in external and internal phloem) taken from below the inoculated leaf. At 21 days post-inoculation, PepMoV-FL was detected in stem segments one or two internodes above the inoculated leaf; however, no virus was observed in internal phloem in stem segments beyond these internodes. In contrast to these observations, PepMoV-FL was detected in the internal phloem of all internodes of the stem located above the inoculated leaf, with subsequent movement into non-inoculated leaves, in Avelar plants co-infected with PepMoV-FL and cucumber mosaic cucumovirus (CMV-KM). No apparent enhancement of PepMoV-FL accumulation occurred in protoplasts inoculated with PepMoV-FL alone versus a mixed inoculum of PepMoV-FL and CMV-KM. These findings confirm earlier observations that potyvirus movement up the stem of Capsicum species occurs via internal phloem. It is also shown that PepMoV-FL does not accumulate to detectable levels in internal phloem in the stem of Avelar plants, thereby limiting its movement to within the inoculated leaf and lower portions of the stem; however, co-infection of Avelar plants with CMV-KM alleviates this restricted movement, allowing PepMoV-FL to invade young tissues systemically.  (+info)

A single-stranded loop in the 5' untranslated region of cucumber mosaic virus RNA 4 contributes to competitive translational activity. (7/288)

The 5' untranslated region (UTR) of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) RNA 4 confers a highly competitive translational advantage on a heterologous luciferase open reading frame. Here we investigated whether secondary structure in the 5' UTR contributes to this translational advantage. Stabilization of the 5' UTR RNA secondary structure inhibited competitive translational activity. Alteration of a potential single-stranded loop to a stem by substitution mutations greatly inhibited the competitive translational activity. Tobacco plants infected with wild type virus showed a 2.5-fold higher accumulation of maximal coat protein than did plants infected with a loop-mutant virus. Amplification of viral RNA in these plants could not explain the difference in accumulation of coat protein. Phylogenetic comparison showed that potential single-stranded loops of 12-23 nucleotides in length exist widely in subgroups of CMV.  (+info)

Isolation of a putative tobacco host factor interacting with cucumber mosaic virus-encoded 2b protein by yeast two-hybrid screening. (8/288)

The cucumber mosaic virus (CMV)-encoded 2b protein has been implicated to play a role in long distance movement of the virus through the plant's transport system. It is unknown, however, how it mediates virus movement and whether any intrinsic components of plant cells also participate in this process. To isolate a host factor that interacts with 2b, the yeast two-hybrid system was used. First, it was found that the 2b protein per se could function as a transcriptional activator in yeast. However, its two carboxyl terminal deletion mutants, 2bdelta98 and 2bdelta95, which lacked 12 and 15 amino acids from the carboxyl terminus respectively, showed complete absence of transcriptional activation in yeast. A tobacco cDNA library expressing the GAL4 activation domain fusion proteins was screened using 2bdelta98 as a bait. A clone named 2bip (2b-interacting protein) was isolated whose translation product apparently interacted with 2b. Consistent with this observation, bacterially expressed GST-2bip fusion protein bound tightly to 2bdelta95 and 2bdelta98 polypeptides in vitro, as well as to the unmodified 2b protein. Nucleotide sequencing and database searches revealed that the amino acid sequence deduced from it was similar to a prokaryotic LytB protein and an unknown protein of Arabidopsis. DNA and RNA gel blot analyses showed that 2bip-related sequences were present in the tobacco genome and that transcripts corresponding to 2bip were expressed constitutively in various plant organs and in response to CMV infection. These results suggest 2bip as a novel host factor that is capable of interacting with CMV2b.  (+info)

A cucumovirus is a type of plant virus that belongs to the family Bromoviridae and the genus Cucumovirus. These viruses have a single-stranded, positive-sense RNA genome and are transmitted by various means, including mechanical inoculation, seed transmission, and insect vectors such as aphids.

Cucumoviruses infect a wide range of plants, causing symptoms such as mosaic patterns on leaves, stunted growth, and reduced yield. The type species of the genus Cucumovirus is cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), which is one of the most widespread and economically important plant viruses worldwide. Other important cucumoviruses include tomato aspermy virus (TAV) and peanut stunt virus (PSV).

Cucumoviruses have a tripartite genome, meaning that the RNA genome is divided into three segments, each of which encodes one or more viral proteins. The coat protein of cucumoviruses plays an important role in virus transmission by insect vectors and in the induction of symptoms in infected plants.

Preventing the spread of cucumoviruses involves using good hygiene practices, such as cleaning tools and equipment, removing infected plants, and using resistant plant varieties when available. There are no known treatments for plants infected with cucumoviruses, so prevention is key to managing these viruses in agricultural settings.

'Cucumis sativus' is the scientific name for the vegetable we commonly know as a cucumber. It belongs to the family Cucurbitaceae and is believed to have originated in South Asia. Cucumbers are widely consumed raw in salads, pickled, or used in various culinary applications. They have a high water content and contain various nutrients such as vitamin K, vitamin C, and potassium.

'Arachis hypogaea' is the scientific name for the peanut plant. It is a legume crop that grows underground, which is why it is also known as a groundnut. The peanut plant produces flowers above ground, and when the flowers are pollinated, the ovary of the flower elongates and grows downwards into the soil where the peanut eventually forms and matures.

The peanut is not only an important food crop worldwide but also has various industrial uses, including the production of biodiesel, plastics, and animal feed. The plant is native to South America and was domesticated by indigenous peoples in what is now Brazil and Peru thousands of years ago. Today, peanuts are grown in many countries around the world, with China, India, and the United States being the largest producers.

'Toxic plants' refer to those species of plants that contain toxic substances capable of causing harmful effects or adverse health reactions in humans and animals when ingested, touched, or inhaled. These toxins can cause a range of symptoms from mild irritation to serious conditions such as organ failure, paralysis, or even death depending on the plant, the amount consumed, and the individual's sensitivity to the toxin.

Toxic plants may contain various types of toxins, including alkaloids, glycosides, proteins, resinous substances, and essential oils. Some common examples of toxic plants include poison ivy, poison oak, nightshade, hemlock, oleander, castor bean, and foxglove. It is important to note that some parts of a plant may be toxic while others are not, and the toxicity can also vary depending on the stage of growth or environmental conditions.

If you suspect exposure to a toxic plant, it is essential to seek medical attention immediately and, if possible, bring a sample of the plant for identification.

Plant viral movement proteins (MPs) are specialized proteins encoded by plant viruses that play a crucial role in the infection process. These proteins are responsible for the cell-to-cell movement of the virus, allowing it to spread throughout the infected plant. MPs facilitate the transport of viral genetic material from infected cells to neighboring uninfected cells, often through plasmodesmata, which are specialized channels that connect the cytoplasm of adjacent plant cells.

Movement proteins can increase the size exclusion limit (SEL) of plasmodesmata, creating a larger pore through which viral RNA or DNA can pass. They also form complexes with viral nucleic acids and other MPs to create movement protein-viral RNA/DNA complexes that are transported between cells. The precise mechanisms by which MPs function vary among different virus families, but their role in facilitating the spread of plant viruses is well established.

It's important to note that understanding the structure and function of plant viral movement proteins can provide valuable insights into plant-virus interactions and contribute to the development of novel strategies for controlling plant virus diseases.

Tobacco is not a medical term, but it refers to the leaves of the plant Nicotiana tabacum that are dried and fermented before being used in a variety of ways. Medically speaking, tobacco is often referred to in the context of its health effects. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), "tobacco" can also refer to any product prepared from the leaf of the tobacco plant for smoking, sucking, chewing or snuffing.

Tobacco use is a major risk factor for a number of diseases, including cancer, heart disease, stroke, lung disease, and various other medical conditions. The smoke produced by burning tobacco contains thousands of chemicals, many of which are toxic and can cause serious health problems. Nicotine, one of the primary active constituents in tobacco, is highly addictive and can lead to dependence.

A viral RNA (ribonucleic acid) is the genetic material found in certain types of viruses, as opposed to viruses that contain DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid). These viruses are known as RNA viruses. The RNA can be single-stranded or double-stranded and can exist as several different forms, such as positive-sense, negative-sense, or ambisense RNA. Upon infecting a host cell, the viral RNA uses the host's cellular machinery to translate the genetic information into proteins, leading to the production of new virus particles and the continuation of the viral life cycle. Examples of human diseases caused by RNA viruses include influenza, COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2), hepatitis C, and polio.

"Lycopersicon esculentum" is the scientific name for the common red tomato. It is a species of fruit from the nightshade family (Solanaceae) that is native to western South America and Central America. Tomatoes are widely grown and consumed in many parts of the world as a vegetable, although they are technically a fruit. They are rich in nutrients such as vitamin C, potassium, and lycopene, which has been studied for its potential health benefits.

A plant virus is not defined in medical terms, as viruses are typically considered within the context of living organisms and plants are not classified as such. However, I can provide a general virology definition for you:

Plant viruses are small infectious agents that consist of nucleic acid (DNA or RNA) enclosed in a protein coat. They infect various plant species, causing a wide range of symptoms and diseases, which can result in significant economic losses in agriculture and horticulture. Plant viruses lack the ability to replicate outside a host cell, and they rely on the host's metabolic machinery for their reproduction. They can be transmitted through various means, such as insect vectors, seeds, or mechanical contact.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

A base sequence in the context of molecular biology refers to the specific order of nucleotides in a DNA or RNA molecule. In DNA, these nucleotides are adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T). In RNA, uracil (U) takes the place of thymine. The base sequence contains genetic information that is transcribed into RNA and ultimately translated into proteins. It is the exact order of these bases that determines the genetic code and thus the function of the DNA or RNA molecule.

Viral proteins are the proteins that are encoded by the viral genome and are essential for the viral life cycle. These proteins can be structural or non-structural and play various roles in the virus's replication, infection, and assembly process. Structural proteins make up the physical structure of the virus, including the capsid (the protein shell that surrounds the viral genome) and any envelope proteins (that may be present on enveloped viruses). Non-structural proteins are involved in the replication of the viral genome and modulation of the host cell environment to favor viral replication. Overall, a thorough understanding of viral proteins is crucial for developing antiviral therapies and vaccines.

An amino acid sequence is the specific order of amino acids in a protein or peptide molecule, formed by the linking of the amino group (-NH2) of one amino acid to the carboxyl group (-COOH) of another amino acid through a peptide bond. The sequence is determined by the genetic code and is unique to each type of protein or peptide. It plays a crucial role in determining the three-dimensional structure and function of proteins.

No data available that match "cucumovirus"


Cucumovirus is a genus of viruses, in the family Bromoviridae. Plants serve as natural hosts. There are four species in this ... ICTV Report: Bromoviridae ICTVdb Virus Description Viralzone: Cucumovirus (Articles with short description, Short description ... Cucumber mosaic virus Gayfeather mild mottle virus Peanut stunt virus Tomato aspermy virus Viruses in the genus Cucumovirus are ... colloquially one would say cucumovirus is transmitted by aphids). "ICTV Report Bromoviridae". "Virus Taxonomy: 2020 Release". ...
Characterization of defective RNAs derived from RNA 3 of the Fny strain of cucumber mosaic cucumovirus. Journal of virology. ... Characterization of defective RNAs derived from RNA 3 of the Fny strain of cucumber mosaic cucumovirus. / Graves, Michael V.; ... This transcript can be replicated in tobacco plants infected with subgroup I and II cucumber mosaic cucumovirus strains and ... This transcript can be replicated in tobacco plants infected with subgroup I and II cucumber mosaic cucumovirus strains and ...
The genera include: ALFAMOVIRUS; BROMOVIRUS; CUCUMOVIRUS; ILARVIRUS; and OLEAVIRUS. * Bunyaviridae 0 domande A family of ...
... the cucumovirus group, the family Rhabdoviridae, the family Reoviridae, or the cryptic virus group. Alternatively, the capsid ...
","Cucumovirus coat protein, chain A; GNAT domain; TatD family; Peptidase S9, prolyl oligopeptidase, catalytic domain; UspA; ...
Transporte Ativo do Núcleo Celular/fisiologia , Cucumovirus/fisiologia , Imunidade Vegetal/fisiologia , Interferência de RNA/ ... Calmodulin-, CAMTA3-, or BN2-knockdown/knockout plants show increased susceptibility to geminivirus, cucumovirus, and potyvirus ... Cucumovirus/patogenicidade , Endonucleases/metabolismo , Geminiviridae/patogenicidade , MicroRNAs/metabolismo , Doenças das ...
Belonging to the genus Cucumovirus, these viruses invade the cells of over 800 different plant species. Theyre transmitted ...
Shi B. J., Symons R. H., Palukaitis P. 2007; The cucumovirus 2b gene drives selection of inter-viral recombinants affecting the ...
I1.880.853.100.257 Cucumovirus B4.820.464.180 Culdoscopy E4.800.250.160 E4.502.250.160 Cultural Characteristics I1.880.143.329 ...
I1.880.853.100.257 Cucumovirus B4.820.464.180 Culdoscopy E4.800.250.160 E4.502.250.160 Cultural Characteristics I1.880.143.329 ...
Riboviria / Orthornavirae / Kitrinoviricota / Alsuviricetes / Martellivirales / Bromoviridae / Cucumovirus / Tomato aspermy ...
3)Cucumovirus. (4)Ilarvirus. (5)Oleavirus. 15.Closteroviridae. (1)Closterovirus. (2)Crinivirus ...
Cucumovirus / growth & development Actions. * Search in PubMed * Search in MeSH * Add to Search ...
Technical Abstract: Tomato aspermy virus (TAV), belongs to the genus Cucumovirus in the family Bromoviridae and has been ...
Cucumovirus B04.715.464.600 Potyvirus B04.715.464.600.600 Plum Pox Virus B04.715.464.725 Tobamovirus B04.715.464.725.800 ... Cucumovirus B04.715.081.400 Ilarvirus B04.715.081.700 Oleavirus B04.715.102 Caulimoviridae B04.715.102.074 Badnavirus B04.715. ... Cucumovirus B04.820.081.400 Ilarvirus B04.820.081.700 Oleavirus B04.820.087 Bunyaviridae B04.820.087.440 Hantavirus B04.820. ...
The genera include: ALFAMOVIRUS; BROMOVIRUS; CUCUMOVIRUS; ILARVIRUS; and OLEAVIRUS.. Annotation:. coord IM with specific plant ...
Cucumovirus Current Synonym true false 2648214014 Genus Cucumovirus Current Synonym true false ...
I1.880.853.100.257 Cucumovirus B4.820.464.180 Culdoscopy E4.800.250.160 E4.502.250.160 Cultural Characteristics I1.880.143.329 ...
use CUCUMOVIRUS to search CUCUMBER MOSAIC VIRUSES 1994-96. History Note. 94; CUCUMBER MOSAIC VIRUSES was see CUCUMOVIRUS 1994- ... Cucumovirus Preferred Term Term UI T053228. Date01/01/1999. LexicalTag ABX. ThesaurusID NLM (1994). ... Cucumovirus. Tree Number(s). B04.715.081.180. B04.715.464.180. B04.820.578.282.180. Unique ID. D017799. RDF Unique Identifier. ... Cucumovirus Preferred Concept UI. M0026893. Registry Number. txid12304. Related Numbers. txid12305. Scope Note. A genus of ...
use CUCUMOVIRUS to search CUCUMBER MOSAIC VIRUSES 1994-96. History Note. 94; CUCUMBER MOSAIC VIRUSES was see CUCUMOVIRUS 1994- ... Cucumovirus Preferred Term Term UI T053228. Date01/01/1999. LexicalTag ABX. ThesaurusID NLM (1994). ... Cucumovirus. Tree Number(s). B04.715.081.180. B04.715.464.180. B04.820.578.282.180. Unique ID. D017799. RDF Unique Identifier. ... Cucumovirus Preferred Concept UI. M0026893. Registry Number. txid12304. Related Numbers. txid12305. Scope Note. A genus of ...
... cucumovirus,noun,E0409070,yes alpha-viral,adj,E0509517,alpha-virus,noun,E0008249,yes sub-focal,adj,E0618797,sub-focus,noun, ...
The genera include: ALFAMOVIRUS; BROMOVIRUS; CUCUMOVIRUS; ILARVIRUS; and OLEAVIRUS. * Bunyaviridae 0 domande A family of ...
Chen B., Francki R. I. B. 1990; Cucumovirus transmission by the aphid Myzus persicae is determined solely by the viral coat ...
... type member of the genus Cucumovirus). When CMV was mechanically inoculated into tomato plants and viral coat accumulation was ...
"ویروس موزاییک خیار Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) گونه شاخص جنس Cucumovirus از خانواده Bromoviridae است. در این تحقیق بیان برخی ... ویروس موزاییک خیار Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) گونه شاخص جنس Cucumovirus از خانواده Bromoviridae است. در این تحقیق بیان برخی ... Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) is a type member of Cucumovirus genus in the family Bromoviridae. In this research, the expression ...
The genome of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), a member of the genus Cucumovirus in the family Bromoviridae consists of three RNA ... Shi B.-J., Symons R. H., Palukaitis P.. 2008;The cucumovirus 2b gene drives selection of inter-viral recombinants affecting the ... Characterization of defective RNAs derived from RNA 3 of the Fny strain of cucumber mosaic cucumovirus. J. Virol. 69:4746-4751 ...
洋桔梗上胡瓜嵌紋病毒鑑定及傳播試驗:Identification and Transmission of a Cucumovirus from Lisianthus rusellianus ... 洋桔梗上胡瓜嵌紋病毒之分離及鑑定:
... cucumovirus,noun,E0409070,yes parahippocampal,adj,E0235817,parahippocampus,noun,E0226102,yes quadrigeminal,adj,E0051517, ...
I1.880.853.100.257 Cucumovirus B4.820.464.180 Culdoscopy E4.800.250.160 E4.502.250.160 Cultural Characteristics I1.880.143.329 ...
"Cucumovirus" page will bring up sequences for this virus genus. ...
Cucumovirus Cucurbita Cucurbitaceae Cucurbitacins Cues Culdoscopes Culdoscopy Culex Culicidae Cullin Proteins Cultural ...
  • Cucumovirus is a genus of viruses, in the family Bromoviridae. (wikipedia.org)
  • The following species are assigned to the genus: Cucumber mosaic virus Gayfeather mild mottle virus Peanut stunt virus Tomato aspermy virus Viruses in the genus Cucumovirus are non-enveloped, with icosahedral and Spherical geometries, and T=3 symmetry. (wikipedia.org)
  • Belonging to the genus Cucumovirus, these viruses invade the cells of over 800 different plant species. (cleave-rock.com)
  • This transcript can be replicated in tobacco plants infected with subgroup I and II cucumber mosaic cucumovirus strains and with peanut stunt cucumovirus. (psu.edu)
  • Tomato aspermy virus (TAV), belongs to the genus Cucumovirus in the family Bromoviridae and has been reported to infect tomato, chrysanthemum, gladiolus, and pepper worldwide (Inoue et al. (usda.gov)
  • ویروس موزاییک خیار Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) گونه شاخص جنس Cucumovirus از خانواده Bromoviridae است. (ac.ir)
  • Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) is a type member of Cucumovirus genus in the family Bromoviridae. (ac.ir)
  • The genome of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), a member of the genus Cucumovirus in the family Bromoviridae consists of three RNA segments designated as RNA1, RNA2, and RNA3 in descending order in length ( Palukaitis and García-Arenal, 2003 ). (ppjonline.org)
  • For example, the links on the " Bromoviridae " page will bring up the nucleotide or protein sequences belonging exclusively to this virus family, and the links on the " Cucumovirus " page will bring up sequences for this virus genus. (nih.gov)
  • The type species Cucumber mosaic virus, a CUCUMOVIRUS , should not be confused with Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus, a TOBAMOVIRUS . (nih.gov)
  • Cucumovirus transmission by the aphid Myzus persicae is determined solely by the viral coat protein. (microbiologyresearch.org)