The use of freezing as a special surgical technique to destroy or excise tissue.
Surgical procedures conducted with the aid of computers. This is most frequently used in orthopedic and laparoscopic surgery for implant placement and instrument guidance. Image-guided surgery interactively combines prior CT scans or MRI images with real-time video.
A form of therapy consisting in the local or general use of cold. The selective destruction of tissue by extreme cold or freezing is CRYOSURGERY. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
White or pink lesions on the arms, hands, face, or scalp that arise from sun-induced DNA DAMAGE to KERATINOCYTES in exposed areas. They are considered precursor lesions to superficial SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA.
A benign neoplasm derived from mesodermal cells that form cartilage. It may remain within the substance of a cartilage or bone (true chondroma or enchondroma) or may develop on the surface of a cartilage (ecchondroma or ecchondrosis). (Dorland, 27th ed; Stedman, 25th ed)
Loss or destruction of the epithelial lining of the UTERINE CERVIX.
Liquids transforming into solids by the removal of heat.
A common, benign, usually self-limited viral infection of the skin and occasionally the conjunctivae by a poxvirus (MOLLUSCUM CONTAGIOSUM VIRUS). (Dorland, 27th ed)
Pathological processes involving the PROSTATE or its component tissues.
A disorder of the skin, the oral mucosa, and the gingiva, that usually presents as a solitary polypoid capillary hemangioma often resulting from trauma. It is manifested as an inflammatory response with similar characteristics to those of a granuloma.
Benign epidermal proliferations or tumors; some are viral in origin.
Procedures, strategies, and theories of planning.
A scraping, usually of the interior of a cavity or tract, for removal of new growth or other abnormal tissue, or to obtain material for tissue diagnosis. It is performed with a curet (curette), a spoon-shaped instrument designed for that purpose. (From Stedman, 25th ed & Dorland, 27th ed)
Eyelid diseases refer to various medical conditions that affect the function, structure, or appearance of the eyelids, including inflammatory, infectious, neoplastic, congenital, and traumatic disorders, which can impact vision, comfort, and overall ocular health.
The hairs which project from the edges of the EYELIDS.
Tumors or cancer of the LIVER.
'Skin diseases' is a broad term for various conditions affecting the skin, including inflammatory disorders, infections, benign and malignant tumors, congenital abnormalities, and degenerative diseases, which can cause symptoms such as rashes, discoloration, eruptions, lesions, itching, or pain.
A gland in males that surrounds the neck of the URINARY BLADDER and the URETHRA. It secretes a substance that liquefies coagulated semen. It is situated in the pelvic cavity behind the lower part of the PUBIC SYMPHYSIS, above the deep layer of the triangular ligament, and rests upon the RECTUM.
Expectoration or spitting of blood originating from any part of the RESPIRATORY TRACT, usually from hemorrhage in the lung parenchyma (PULMONARY ALVEOLI) and the BRONCHIAL ARTERIES.
A malignant skin neoplasm that seldom metastasizes but has potentialities for local invasion and destruction. Clinically it is divided into types: nodular, cicatricial, morphaic, and erythematoid (pagetoid). They develop on hair-bearing skin, most commonly on sun-exposed areas. Approximately 85% are found on the head and neck area and the remaining 15% on the trunk and limbs. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1471)
Tumors or cancer of the SKIN.
A carcinoma derived from stratified SQUAMOUS EPITHELIAL CELLS. It may also occur in sites where glandular or columnar epithelium is normally present. (From Stedman, 25th ed)
Hereditary disorder consisting of multiple basal cell carcinomas, odontogenic keratocysts, and multiple skeletal defects, e.g., frontal and temporoparietal bossing, bifurcated and splayed ribs, kyphoscoliosis, fusion of vertebrae, and cervicothoracic spina bifida. Genetic transmission is autosomal dominant.
A heterogeneous group of sporadic or hereditary carcinoma derived from cells of the KIDNEYS. There are several subtypes including the clear cells, the papillary, the chromophobe, the collecting duct, the spindle cells (sarcomatoid), or mixed cell-type carcinoma.
A malignant neoplasm made up of epithelial cells tending to infiltrate the surrounding tissues and give rise to metastases. It is a histological type of neoplasm but is often wrongly used as a synonym for "cancer." (From Dorland, 27th ed)
Tumors of cancer of the EYELIDS.

Cryosurgery for common skin lesions. Treatment in family physicians' offices. (1/518)

OBJECTIVE: To review the principles of use, common techniques, and effectiveness of cryosurgery for common skin lesions that can be treated by family physicians in their offices. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: MEDLINE and the Cochrane Database controlled trials register (1998 version) were searched. Much of the evidence for the effectiveness of cryosurgery or cryotherapy is based on of cryosurgery for treating common warts, external genital warts, lentigines, and basal cell carcinomas. Many of the trials reviewed were conducted in specialty clinics and, therefore, the results might not apply accurately to family practice. MAIN MESSAGE: Evidence from case report and series suggests that cryosurgery is effective for actinic keratoses, seborrheic keratoses, dermatofibroma, keloids, molluscum contagiosum, and benign nevi. Randomized comparative trials show that, for external genital warts, cryosurgery is more effective than podophyllin treatment, better than or equal to trichloroacetic acid, but less effective than electrodesiccation or surgical removal. Prospective randomized trials of cryosurgery for common warts showed that weekly cryotherapy produced more rapid cures, but the overall cure rate depended on number of treatments. Two freeze-thaw cycles and paring before freezing improved the cure rate for plantar warts.  (+info)

Interobserver agreement for grating acuity and letter acuity assessment in 1- to 5.5-year-olds with severe retinopathy of prematurity. (2/518)

PURPOSE: To evaluate interobserver test-retest reliability of the Teller Acuity Card procedure for assessment of grating acuity at ages 1, 2, 3.5, 4.5, and 5.5 years, for HOTV letter acuity at 3.5 and 4.5 years, and for Early-Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) letter acuity at 5.5 years in the multicenter study of Cryotherapy for Retinopathy of Prematurity (CRYO-ROP). METHODS: Subjects were the 73 participants in the CRYO-ROP study who had acuity assessed at one or more ages by two of the seven study visual acuity testers as part of a quality control procedure. All subjects had birth weights of less than 1251 g, and all had severe (threshold) ROP in one or both eyes. RESULTS: For sighted eyes, interobserver agreement for grating acuity (across all five test ages) was 0.5 octave or better in 57% of eyes and 1.0 octave or better in 85% of eyes. Interobserver agreement for letter acuity (3.5-, 4.5-, and 5.5-year test ages) was 0.5 octave or better in 71% of eyes and 1.0 octave or better in 93% of eyes. For all eyes (sighted and blind), Kendall rank correlation coefficients (Tau) were 0.86, 0.83, and 0.94 for grating, HOTV, and ETDRS acuity, respectively. Kappa statistics on data from all eyes indicated excellent interobserver agreement for grating, HOTV, and ETDRS acuity (0.73, 0.80, and 0.84, respectively). Interobserver agreement was not related to age or to severity of retinal residua of ROP. CONCLUSIONS: Excellent interobserver agreement for grating acuity measurements and for letter acuity measurements was obtained. Results suggest that with careful training and implementation of quality control procedures, high reliability of visual acuity results is possible in clinical populations of young children.  (+info)

Surgical treatment and other regional treatments for colorectal cancer liver metastases. (3/518)

The liver is the most common site of distant metastasis from colorectal cancer. About one-fourth of patients with liver metastases from colorectal cancer have no other sites of metastasis and can be treated with regional therapies directed toward their liver tumors. Surgical resection of colorectal cancer liver metastases can result in a 24%-38% five-year survival, but only a minority of patients are candidates for resection. Other regional therapies such as cryosurgery, radiofrequency ablation, and hepatic intra-arterial chemotherapy may be offered to patients with unresectable but isolated liver metastases. The efficacy of these treatments is still being determined. For most patients with spread of metastatic colorectal cancer beyond the liver, systemic chemotherapy rather than regional therapy is a more appropriate option.  (+info)

Surgery for postinfarction ventricular tachycardia in the pre-implantable cardioverter defibrillator era: early and long term outcomes in 100 consecutive patients. (4/518)

OBJECTIVE: To report outcome following surgery for postinfarction ventricular tachycardia undertaken in patients before the use of implantable defibrillators. DESIGN: A retrospective review, with uniform patient selection criteria and surgical and mapping strategy throughout. Complete follow up. Long term death notification by OPCS (Office of Population Censuses and Statistics) registration. SETTING: Tertiary referral centre for arrhythmia management. PATIENTS: 100 consecutive postinfarction patients who underwent map guided endocardial resection at this hospital in the period 1981-91 for drug refractory ventricular tachyarrhythmias. RESULTS: Emergency surgery was required for intractable arrhythmias in 28 patients, and 32 had surgery within eight weeks of infarction ("early"). Surgery comprised endocardial resections in all, aneurysmectomy in 57, cryoablations in 26, and antiarrhythmic ventriculotomies in 11. Twenty five patients died < 30 days after surgery, 21 of cardiac failure. This high mortality reflects the type of patients included in the series. Only 12 received antiarrhythmic drugs after surgery. Perioperative mortality was related to preoperative left ventricular function and the context of surgery. Mortality rates for elective surgery more than eight weeks after infarction, early surgery, emergency surgery, and early emergency surgery were 18%, 31%, 46%, and 50%, respectively. Actuarial survival rates at one, three, five, and 10 years after surgery were 66%, 62%, 57%, and 35%. CONCLUSIONS: Surgery offers arrhythmia abolition at a risk proportional to the patient's preoperative risk of death from ventricular arrhythmias. The long term follow up results suggest a continuing role for surgery in selected patients even in the era of catheter ablation and implantable defibrillators.  (+info)

Hepatic cryoablation, but not radiofrequency ablation, results in lung inflammation. (5/518)

OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of 35% hepatic cryoablation with a similar degree of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) on lung inflammation, nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation, and production of NF-kappaB dependent cytokines. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Multisystem injury, including acute lung injury, is a severe complication associated with hepatic cryoablation of 30% to 35% or more of liver parenchyma, but this complication has not been reported with RFA. METHODS: Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 35% hepatic cryoablation or RFA and were killed at 1, 2, and 6 hours. Liver and lung tissue were freeze-clamped for measurement of NF-kappaB activation, which was detected by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Serum concentrations of tumor necrosis factor alpha and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Histologic studies of pulmonary tissue and electron microscopy of ablated liver tissue were compared among treatment groups. RESULTS: Histologic lung sections after cryoablation showed multiple foci of perivenular inflammation, with activated lymphocytes, foamy macrophages, and neutrophils. In animals undergoing RFA, inflammatory foci were not present. NF-kappaB activation was detected at 1 hour in both liver and lung tissue samples of animals undergoing cryoablation but not after RFA, and serum cytokine levels were significantly elevated in cryoablation versus RFA animals. Electron microscopy of cryoablation-treated liver tissue demonstrated disruption of the hepatocyte plasma membrane with extension of intact hepatocyte organelles into the space of Disse; RFA-treated liver tissue demonstrated coagulative destruction of hepatocyte organelles within an intact plasma membrane. To determine the stimulus for systemic inflammation, rats treated with cryoablation had either immediate resection of the ablated segment or delayed resection after a 15-minute thawing interval. Immediate resection of the cryoablated liver tissue prevented NF-kappaB activation and lung injury; however, pulmonary inflammatory changes were present when as little as a 15-minute thaw interval preceded hepatic resection. CONCLUSIONS: Hepatic cryoablation, but not RFA, induces NF-kappaB activation in the nonablated liver and lung and is associated with acute lung injury. Lung inflammation is associated with the thawing phase of cryoablation and may be related to soluble mediator(s) released from the cryoablated tissue. These findings correlate the clinical observation of an increased incidence of multisystem injury, including adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), after cryoablation but not RFA.  (+info)

Cryosurgery for chronic injuries of the cutaneous nerve in the upper limb. Analysis of a new open technique. (6/518)

We have treated six patients with chronic pain following nerve injury using a cryosurgical probe. All had a significant return of hand function and improvement of pain during a mean follow-up of 13.5 months. Open visualisation of the injured nervous tissue is essential for patients undergoing this technique. Four patients regained normal sensation in the dermatome of the previously injured nerve.  (+info)

Cryoablation of incessant ventricular tachycardia: case report and long-term follow-up. (7/518)

We report the case of a 52-year-old man who had incessant ventricular tachycardia despite treatment with antiarrhythmic agents. Placement of an implantable cardioverter/defibrillator, radiofrequency ablation, and antitachycardia pacing were ineffective. He underwent intraoperative arrhythmia mapping and cryoablation at our institution. Eighteen months later, he remained free of arrhythmia. He was in New York Heart Association functional class II with an ejection fraction of 30%.  (+info)

Limited posterior left atrial cryoablation in patients with chronic atrial fibrillation undergoing valvular heart sugery. (8/518)

OBJECTIVES: We sought to evaluate whether a limited surgical cryoablation of the posterior region of the left atrium was safe and effective in the cure of atrial fibrillation (AF) in patients with associated valvular heart disease. BACKGROUND: Extensive surgical ablation of AF is a complex and risky procedure. The posterior region of the left atrium seems to be important in the initiation and maintenance of AF. METHODS: In 32 patients with chronic AF who underwent heart valve surgery, linear cryolesions connecting the four pulmonary veins and the posterior mitral annulus were performed. Eighteen patients with AF who underwent valvular surgery but refused cryoablation were considered as the control group. RESULTS: Sinus rhythm (SR) was restored in 25 (78%) of 32 patients immediately after the operation. The cryoablation procedure required 20 +/- 4 min. There were no intraoperative and perioperative complications. During the hospital period, one patient died of septicemia. Thirty-one patients reached a minimum of nine months of follow-up. Two deaths occurred but were unrelated to the procedure. Twenty (69%) of 29 patients remained in SR with cryoablation alone, and 26 (90%) of 29 patients with cryoablation, drugs and radiofrequency ablation. Three (10%) of 29 patients remained in chronic AF. Right and left atrial contractility was evident in 24 (92%) of 26 patients in SR. In control group, two deaths occurred, and SR was present in only four (25%) of 16 patients. CONCLUSIONS: Linear cryoablation with lesions connecting the four pulmonary veins and the mitral annulus is effective in restoration and maintenance of SR in patients with heart valve disease and chronic AF. Limited left atrial cryoablation may represent a valid alternative to the maze procedure, reducing myocardial ischemic time and risk of bleeding.  (+info)

Cryosurgery is a medical procedure that uses extreme cold, such as liquid nitrogen or argon gas, to destroy abnormal or unwanted tissue. The intense cold causes the water inside the cells to freeze and form ice crystals, which can rupture the cell membrane and cause the cells to die. Cryosurgery is often used to treat a variety of conditions including skin growths such as warts and tumors, precancerous lesions, and some types of cancer. The procedure is typically performed in a doctor's office or outpatient setting and may require local anesthesia.

Computer-assisted surgery (CAS) refers to the use of computer systems and technologies to assist and enhance surgical procedures. These systems can include a variety of tools such as imaging software, robotic systems, and navigation devices that help surgeons plan, guide, and perform surgeries with greater precision and accuracy.

In CAS, preoperative images such as CT scans or MRI images are used to create a three-dimensional model of the surgical site. This model can be used to plan the surgery, identify potential challenges, and determine the optimal approach. During the surgery, the surgeon can use the computer system to navigate and guide instruments with real-time feedback, allowing for more precise movements and reduced risk of complications.

Robotic systems can also be used in CAS to perform minimally invasive procedures with smaller incisions and faster recovery times. The surgeon controls the robotic arms from a console, allowing for greater range of motion and accuracy than traditional hand-held instruments.

Overall, computer-assisted surgery provides a number of benefits over traditional surgical techniques, including improved precision, reduced risk of complications, and faster recovery times for patients.

Cryotherapy is a medical treatment that uses low temperatures to destroy abnormal or diseased tissue. It can be applied locally to a small area, or more widely to larger areas of the body. In local cryotherapy, a substance such as liquid nitrogen or argon gas is applied directly to the skin to freeze and destroy unwanted cells, such as in the treatment of warts, skin tags, or certain types of cancer. More widespread cryotherapy can be achieved through the use of cold chambers that lower the temperature of the air around the body, which has been used to treat conditions such as inflammation, pain, and muscle spasms.

The medical definition of cryotherapy is:

"The therapeutic application of cold temperatures to damaged tissues to reduce inflammation, promote healing, and provide pain relief."

Actinic keratosis, also known as solar keratosis, is a precancerous skin condition that typically develops in areas exposed to excessive sun damage over the years. It presents as rough, scaly, or crusty patches of skin, often with a pink, red, or brownish tint. These lesions usually appear on the face, ears, scalp, neck, back of the hands, and forearms.

Actinic keratosis is caused by the prolonged exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from sunlight or artificial sources like tanning beds. The UV rays damage the skin's DNA, leading to abnormal skin cell growth and the formation of these precancerous lesions.

While most actinic keratoses remain benign, a small percentage can progress into squamous cell carcinoma, a type of skin cancer. Therefore, it is essential to have any suspicious or changing lesions evaluated by a healthcare professional for proper diagnosis and treatment. Prevention measures include protecting the skin from excessive sun exposure, wearing protective clothing, using broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of at least 30, and avoiding tanning beds.

A chondroma is a benign, slow-growing tumor that develops in the cartilage. Cartilage is a type of connective tissue found in various parts of the body, including the joints, ribcage, and nose. Chondromas are most commonly found in the hands and feet.

Chondromas are typically small, measuring less than 2 centimeters in diameter, and they usually do not cause any symptoms. However, if a chondroma grows large enough to press on nearby nerves or blood vessels, it may cause pain, numbness, or weakness in the affected area.

Chondromas are usually diagnosed through imaging tests such as X-rays, CT scans, or MRI scans. If a chondroma is suspected based on these tests, a biopsy may be performed to confirm the diagnosis and rule out other types of tumors.

Treatment for chondromas typically involves surgical removal of the tumor. In most cases, this can be done using minimally invasive techniques that allow for quicker recovery times. After surgery, patients will need to follow up with their healthcare provider to ensure that the tumor has been completely removed and to monitor for any signs of recurrence.

Uterine cervical erosion, also known as ectropion or cervical ectopy, is not typically considered a disease or a medical condition but rather a normal variant in the appearance of the cervix. It occurs when the cells that normally line the inside of the cervical canal (glandular cells) extend out onto the surface of the exocervix, which is the portion of the cervix that is visible during a routine pelvic examination.

This extension of glandular cells can appear as a red, smooth, and shiny area on the cervix, and it may be more prone to bleeding or discomfort during intercourse or menstruation. Cervical erosion can be caused by various factors, including hormonal changes, inflammation, or irritation of the cervix.

While cervical erosion is not typically harmful, it can increase the risk of certain infections, such as human papillomavirus (HPV) and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Therefore, it is essential to monitor and treat any underlying conditions that may contribute to cervical erosion. In some cases, cervical erosion may resolve on its own without treatment, but if it causes discomfort or bleeding, treatment options such as cryotherapy, laser therapy, or cauterization may be recommended.

"Freezing" is a term used in the medical field to describe a phenomenon that can occur in certain neurological conditions, most notably in Parkinson's disease. It refers to a sudden and temporary inability to move or initiate movement, often triggered by environmental factors such as narrow spaces, turning, or approaching a destination. This can increase the risk of falls and make daily activities challenging for affected individuals.

Freezing is also known as "freezing of gait" (FOG) when it specifically affects a person's ability to walk. During FOG episodes, the person may feel like their feet are glued to the ground, making it difficult to take steps forward. This can be very distressing and debilitating for those affected.

It is important to note that "freezing" has different meanings in different medical contexts, such as in the field of orthopedics, where it may refer to a loss of joint motion due to stiffness or inflammation. Always consult with a healthcare professional for accurate information tailored to your specific situation.

Molluscum contagiosum is a viral skin infection that results in small, round, painless, and pearly or flesh-colored bumps on the skin. These bumps have a dimple in the center and can appear anywhere on the body but are most commonly found in warm, moist areas such as the armpits, behind the knees, and in the groin area. The virus that causes molluscum contagiosum is called the Molluscum contagiosum virus (MCV) and is part of the poxvirus family.

The infection spreads through direct contact with an infected person or through contact with contaminated objects such as towels, clothing, or toys. It can also be transmitted through sexual contact, making it a common sexually transmitted infection (STI) in adults. The incubation period for molluscum contagiosum ranges from two weeks to six months, and the bumps typically appear 2-7 weeks after exposure.

Molluscum contagiosum is generally a self-limiting condition that resolves on its own within 6-12 months without scarring. However, treatment may be recommended for cosmetic reasons or to prevent the spread of infection. Treatment options include cryotherapy (freezing the bumps with liquid nitrogen), curettage (scrapping off the bumps), topical medications, and laser therapy.

Preventive measures such as good hygiene practices, avoiding sharing personal items, covering lesions, and practicing safe sex can help prevent the spread of molluscum contagiosum.

Prostatic diseases refer to a range of medical conditions that affect the prostate gland, a small gland that is part of the male reproductive system. The prostate is located below the bladder and surrounds the urethra, the tube that carries urine and semen out of the body. Some common prostatic diseases include:

1. Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH): This is a non-cancerous enlargement of the prostate gland that can cause difficulties with urination, such as a weak stream, frequent urination, and a feeling of incomplete bladder emptying.
2. Prostatitis: This is an inflammation or infection of the prostate gland that can cause pain, fever, difficulty urinating, and sexual dysfunction.
3. Prostate Cancer: This is a malignant tumor that develops in the prostate gland and can spread to other parts of the body. It is one of the most common types of cancer in men and can often be treated successfully if detected early.
4. Acute Bacterial Prostatitis: This is a sudden and severe infection of the prostate gland that can cause fever, chills, pain in the lower back and genital area, and difficulty urinating.
5. Chronic Bacterial Prostatitis: This is a recurring or persistent bacterial infection of the prostate gland that can cause symptoms similar to chronic pelvic pain syndrome.
6. Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome (CPPS): Also known as chronic nonbacterial prostatitis, this condition is characterized by ongoing pain in the pelvic area, often accompanied by urinary and sexual dysfunction. The exact cause of CPPS is not well understood, but it is thought to be related to inflammation or nerve damage in the prostate gland.

A pyogenic granuloma is not precisely a "granuloma" in the strict medical definition, which refers to a specific type of tissue reaction characterized by chronic inflammation and the formation of granulation tissue. Instead, a pyogenic granuloma is a benign vascular tumor that occurs most frequently on the skin or mucous membranes.

Pyogenic granulomas are typically characterized by their rapid growth, bright red to dark red color, and friable texture. They can bleed easily, especially when traumatized. Histologically, they consist of a mass of small blood vessels, surrounded by loose connective tissue and inflammatory cells.

The term "pyogenic" is somewhat misleading because these lesions are not actually associated with pus or infection, although they can become secondarily infected. The name may have originated from the initial mistaken belief that these lesions were caused by a bacterial infection.

Pyogenic granulomas can occur at any age but are most common in children and young adults. They can be caused by minor trauma, hormonal changes, or underlying medical conditions such as pregnancy or vasculitis. Treatment typically involves surgical excision, although other options such as laser surgery or cauterization may also be used.

Warts are small, rough growths on the skin or mucous membranes caused by one of several types of human papillomavirus (HPV). They can appear anywhere on the body but most often occur on the hands, fingers, and feet. Warts are benign, non-cancerous growths, but they can be unsightly, uncomfortable, or painful, depending on their location and size.

Warts are caused by HPV infecting the top layer of skin, usually through a small cut or scratch. The virus triggers an overproduction of keratin, a protein in the skin, leading to the formation of a hard, rough growth. Warts can vary in appearance depending on their location and type, but they are generally round or irregularly shaped, with a rough surface that may be flat or slightly raised. They may also contain small black dots, which are actually tiny blood vessels that have clotted.

Warts are contagious and can spread from person to person through direct skin-to-skin contact or by sharing personal items such as towels or razors. They can also be spread by touching a wart and then touching another part of the body. Warts may take several months to develop after exposure to HPV, so it may not always be clear when or how they were contracted.

There are several types of warts, including common warts, plantar warts (which occur on the soles of the feet), flat warts (which are smaller and smoother than other types of warts), and genital warts (which are sexually transmitted). While most warts are harmless and will eventually go away on their own, some may require medical treatment if they are causing discomfort or are unsightly. Treatment options for warts include topical medications, cryotherapy (freezing the wart with liquid nitrogen), and surgical removal.

I'm happy to help, but I must clarify that "planning techniques" is not a medical term per se. However, in the context of healthcare and medicine, planning techniques can refer to various methods and approaches used to organize, coordinate, and implement care plans for patients. These techniques are often utilized by healthcare professionals, such as doctors, nurses, and social workers, to ensure that patients receive high-quality, evidence-based care that meets their individual needs and goals.

Here are some examples of planning techniques commonly used in healthcare:

1. Advance Care Planning (ACP): A process that helps individuals plan for future medical care in the event they become unable to make decisions for themselves. This can include creating an advance directive, such as a living will or healthcare power of attorney.
2. Goal-Setting: A collaborative process between patients and healthcare providers to establish specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound (SMART) goals for treatment and care.
3. Care Mapping: A visual tool used to map out a patient's care plan, including their medical history, diagnoses, treatments, and support needs. This can help healthcare providers coordinate care and ensure that all team members are on the same page.
4. Root Cause Analysis (RCA): A problem-solving technique used to identify the underlying causes of medical errors or adverse events, with the goal of preventing similar incidents from occurring in the future.
5. Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA): A proactive risk assessment tool used to identify potential failures in a system or process, and to develop strategies to mitigate those risks.
6. Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) Cycle: A continuous quality improvement technique that involves planning a change, implementing the change, studying its effects, and then acting on the results to make further improvements.

These are just a few examples of the many planning techniques used in healthcare. The specific methods and approaches used will depend on the individual patient's needs, as well as the context and resources available within the healthcare system.

Curettage is a medical procedure that involves scraping or removing tissue from the lining of an organ or body cavity, typically performed using a curette, which is a long, thin surgical instrument with a looped or sharp end. In gynecology, curettage is often used to remove tissue from the uterus during a procedure called dilation and curettage (D&C) to diagnose or treat abnormal uterine bleeding, or to remove residual placental or fetal tissue following a miscarriage or abortion. Curettage may also be used in other medical specialties to remove damaged or diseased tissue from areas such as the nose, throat, or skin.

Eyelid diseases refer to a variety of medical conditions that affect the function and/or appearance of the eyelids. These can include structural abnormalities, such as entropion (inward turning of the eyelid) or ectropion (outward turning of the eyelid), as well as functional issues like ptosis (drooping of the upper eyelid). Other common eyelid diseases include blepharitis (inflammation of the eyelid margin), chalazion (a blocked oil gland in the eyelid), and cancerous or benign growths on the eyelid. Symptoms of eyelid diseases can vary widely, but often include redness, swelling, pain, itching, tearing, and sensitivity to light. Treatment for these conditions depends on the specific diagnosis and may range from self-care measures and medications to surgical intervention.

Eyelashes are defined in medical terms as the slender, hair-like growths that originate from the edges of the eyelids. They are made up of keratin and follicles, and their primary function is to protect the eyes from debris, sweat, and other irritants by acting as a physical barrier. Additionally, they play a role in enhancing the aesthetic appeal of the eyes and can also serve as a sensory organ, helping to detect potential threats near the eye area.

Liver neoplasms refer to abnormal growths in the liver that can be benign or malignant. Benign liver neoplasms are non-cancerous tumors that do not spread to other parts of the body, while malignant liver neoplasms are cancerous tumors that can invade and destroy surrounding tissue and spread to other organs.

Liver neoplasms can be primary, meaning they originate in the liver, or secondary, meaning they have metastasized (spread) to the liver from another part of the body. Primary liver neoplasms can be further classified into different types based on their cell of origin and behavior, including hepatocellular carcinoma, cholangiocarcinoma, and hepatic hemangioma.

The diagnosis of liver neoplasms typically involves a combination of imaging studies, such as ultrasound, CT scan, or MRI, and biopsy to confirm the type and stage of the tumor. Treatment options depend on the type and extent of the neoplasm and may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or liver transplantation.

Skin diseases, also known as dermatological conditions, refer to any medical condition that affects the skin, which is the largest organ of the human body. These diseases can affect the skin's function, appearance, or overall health. They can be caused by various factors, including genetics, infections, allergies, environmental factors, and aging.

Skin diseases can present in many different forms, such as rashes, blisters, sores, discolorations, growths, or changes in texture. Some common examples of skin diseases include acne, eczema, psoriasis, dermatitis, fungal infections, viral infections, bacterial infections, and skin cancer.

The symptoms and severity of skin diseases can vary widely depending on the specific condition and individual factors. Some skin diseases are mild and can be treated with over-the-counter medications or topical creams, while others may require more intensive treatments such as prescription medications, light therapy, or even surgery.

It is important to seek medical attention if you experience any unusual or persistent changes in your skin, as some skin diseases can be serious or indicative of other underlying health conditions. A dermatologist is a medical doctor who specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of skin diseases.

The prostate is a small gland that is part of the male reproductive system. Its main function is to produce a fluid that, together with sperm cells from the testicles and fluids from other glands, makes up semen. This fluid nourishes and protects the sperm, helping it to survive and facilitating its movement.

The prostate is located below the bladder and in front of the rectum. It surrounds part of the urethra, the tube that carries urine and semen out of the body. This means that prostate problems can affect urination and sexual function. The prostate gland is about the size of a walnut in adult men.

Prostate health is an important aspect of male health, particularly as men age. Common prostate issues include benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), which is an enlarged prostate not caused by cancer, and prostate cancer, which is one of the most common types of cancer in men. Regular check-ups with a healthcare provider can help to detect any potential problems early and improve outcomes.

Hemoptysis is the medical term for coughing up blood that originates from the lungs or lower respiratory tract. It can range in severity from streaks of blood mixed with mucus to large amounts of pure blood. Hemoptysis may be a sign of various underlying conditions, such as bronchitis, pneumonia, tuberculosis, cancer, or blood disorders. Immediate medical attention is required when hemoptysis occurs, especially if it's in significant quantities, to determine the cause and provide appropriate treatment.

Carcinoma, basal cell is a type of skin cancer that arises from the basal cells, which are located in the lower part of the epidermis (the outermost layer of the skin). It is also known as basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and is the most common form of skin cancer.

BCC typically appears as a small, shiny, pearly bump or nodule on the skin, often in sun-exposed areas such as the face, ears, neck, hands, and arms. It may also appear as a scar-like area that is white, yellow, or waxy. BCCs are usually slow growing and rarely spread (metastasize) to other parts of the body. However, they can be locally invasive and destroy surrounding tissue if left untreated.

The exact cause of BCC is not known, but it is thought to be related to a combination of genetic and environmental factors, including exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun or tanning beds. People with fair skin, light hair, and blue or green eyes are at increased risk of developing BCC.

Treatment for BCC typically involves surgical removal of the tumor, along with a margin of healthy tissue. Other treatment options may include radiation therapy, topical chemotherapy, or photodynamic therapy. Prevention measures include protecting your skin from UV radiation by wearing protective clothing, using sunscreen, and avoiding tanning beds.

Skin neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the skin that can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). They result from uncontrolled multiplication of skin cells, which can form various types of lesions. These growths may appear as lumps, bumps, sores, patches, or discolored areas on the skin.

Benign skin neoplasms include conditions such as moles, warts, and seborrheic keratoses, while malignant skin neoplasms are primarily classified into melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and basal cell carcinoma. These three types of cancerous skin growths are collectively known as non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSCs). Melanoma is the most aggressive and dangerous form of skin cancer, while NMSCs tend to be less invasive but more common.

It's essential to monitor any changes in existing skin lesions or the appearance of new growths and consult a healthcare professional for proper evaluation and treatment if needed.

Squamous cell carcinoma is a type of skin cancer that begins in the squamous cells, which are flat, thin cells that form the outer layer of the skin (epidermis). It commonly occurs on sun-exposed areas such as the face, ears, lips, and backs of the hands. Squamous cell carcinoma can also develop in other areas of the body including the mouth, lungs, and cervix.

This type of cancer usually develops slowly and may appear as a rough or scaly patch of skin, a red, firm nodule, or a sore or ulcer that doesn't heal. While squamous cell carcinoma is not as aggressive as some other types of cancer, it can metastasize (spread) to other parts of the body if left untreated, making early detection and treatment important.

Risk factors for developing squamous cell carcinoma include prolonged exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun or tanning beds, fair skin, a history of sunburns, a weakened immune system, and older age. Prevention measures include protecting your skin from the sun by wearing protective clothing, using a broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of at least 30, avoiding tanning beds, and getting regular skin examinations.

Basal Cell Nevus Syndrome (BCNS), also known as Gorlin-Goltz Syndrome, is a rare genetic disorder that is characterized by the development of multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs), which are skin cancer tumors that arise from the basal cells in the outermost layer of the skin.

The syndrome is caused by mutations in the PTCH1 gene, which regulates the hedgehog signaling pathway involved in embryonic development and tissue growth regulation. The condition is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, meaning that a child has a 50% chance of inheriting the mutated gene from an affected parent.

Individuals with BCNS typically develop hundreds to thousands of BCCs over their lifetime, often beginning in childhood or adolescence. They may also have other benign and malignant tumors, such as medulloblastomas (brain tumors), fibromas, and rhabdomyosarcomas.

Additional features of BCNS can include:

1. Facial abnormalities, such as a broad nasal bridge, widely spaced eyes, and pits or depressions on the palms and soles.
2. Skeletal abnormalities, such as spine deformities, rib anomalies, and jaw cysts.
3. Developmental delays and intellectual disabilities in some cases.
4. Increased risk of other cancers, including breast, ovarian, and lung cancer.

Early detection and management of BCCs and other tumors are crucial for individuals with BCNS to prevent complications and improve their quality of life. Regular dermatological examinations, sun protection measures, and surgical removal of tumors are common treatment approaches.

Carcinoma, renal cell (also known as renal cell carcinoma or RCC) is a type of cancer that originates in the lining of the tubules of the kidney. These tubules are small structures within the kidney that help filter waste and fluids from the blood to form urine.

Renal cell carcinoma is the most common type of kidney cancer in adults, accounting for about 80-85% of all cases. It can affect people of any age, but it is more commonly diagnosed in those over the age of 50.

There are several subtypes of renal cell carcinoma, including clear cell, papillary, chromophobe, and collecting duct carcinomas, among others. Each subtype has a different appearance under the microscope and may have a different prognosis and response to treatment.

Symptoms of renal cell carcinoma can vary but may include blood in the urine, flank pain, a lump or mass in the abdomen, unexplained weight loss, fatigue, and fever. Treatment options for renal cell carcinoma depend on the stage and grade of the cancer, as well as the patient's overall health and preferences. Treatment may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, immunotherapy, or targeted therapy.

Carcinoma is a type of cancer that develops from epithelial cells, which are the cells that line the inner and outer surfaces of the body. These cells cover organs, glands, and other structures within the body. Carcinomas can occur in various parts of the body, including the skin, lungs, breasts, prostate, colon, and pancreas. They are often characterized by the uncontrolled growth and division of abnormal cells that can invade surrounding tissues and spread to other parts of the body through a process called metastasis. Carcinomas can be further classified based on their appearance under a microscope, such as adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and basal cell carcinoma.

Eyelid neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors that develop in the tissues of the eyelids. These growths can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Common types of benign eyelid neoplasms include papillomas, hemangiomas, and nevi. Malignant eyelid neoplasms are typically classified as basal cell carcinomas, squamous cell carcinomas, or melanomas. These malignant tumors can be aggressive and may spread to other parts of the body if left untreated. Treatment options for eyelid neoplasms depend on the type, size, and location of the growth, as well as the patient's overall health. Surgical excision is often the preferred treatment approach, although radiation therapy and chemotherapy may also be used in some cases. Regular follow-up care is important to monitor for recurrence or new growths.

"Cryosurgery in Cancer Treatment". National Cancer Institute. 2005-09-09. Andrews, MD (2004). "Cryosurgery for common skin ... More common complications of cryosurgery include blistering and edema which are transient. Cryosurgery may cause complications ... "A Closer Look At Cryosurgery For Neuromas". Podiatry Today. Katz, Marc (November 2007). "Case Studies in Cryosurgery for Heel ... can be treated with cryosurgery. Cryosurgery works by taking advantage of the destructive force of freezing temperatures on ...
... cryosurgery (Lublin); USG - gynecology, pregnancy, ovulation monitoring (Warsaw, Cracow) ultrasound - abdomen, testis, prostate ...
In: Cryosurgery. Rand R.W., Rinfret A.P., von Lode H., Eds. Springfield, IL: Charles C. Thomas, 1968) and by Mazur (1984): ice ...
Heppt MV, Steeb T, Ruzicka T, Berking C (April 2019). "Cryosurgery combined with topical interventions for actinic keratosis: a ... Lubritz RR, Smolewski SA (November 1982). "Cryosurgery cure rate of actinic keratoses". Journal of the American Academy of ... Kuflik EG (December 1994). "Cryosurgery updated". Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology. 31 (6): 925-44, quiz 944-6. ... Zimmerman EE, Crawford P (December 2012). "Cutaneous cryosurgery". American Family Physician. 86 (12): 1118-24. PMID 23316984. ...
People with a few local lesions can often be treated with local measures such as radiation therapy or cryosurgery. Weak ... Zimmerman EE, Crawford P (December 2012). "Cutaneous cryosurgery". American Family Physician. 86 (12): 1118-24. PMID 23316984. ...
Rand also utilized cryosurgery to treat thousands of patients with tumors of the pituitary gland via a procedure termed ... OCLC 747118156 Cryosurgery. C. C. Thomas. 1968. LCCN 68013774. ISBN 0801640792, ISBN 0801640776, ISBN 080164187X "Robert W. ... Rand personally performed over 2,000 surgeries for the treatment of Parkinson's Disease in which he used cryosurgery and ... Cryosurgery (1968), and three editions of Microneurosurgery (1969, 1978, 1985). He also holds a number of patents. He created ...
History of Cryosurgery. 2008. McCarthy EF (2006). "The Toxins of William B. Coley and the Treatment of Cancer". Iowa Orthop J. ... Cryosurgery initiates inflammation and leaves tumor-specific antigens intact, which may induce an anti-tumor immune response. ... Cryosurgery initiates inflammation and leaves tumor-specific antigens intact, which may induce an anti-tumor immune response. ... Richard J. Ablin (1998). "The Use of Cryosurgery for Breast Cancer". Arch Surg. 133 (1): 106. doi:10.1001/archsurg.133.1.106. ...
Cryosurgery initiates inflammation and leaves tumor-specific antigens intact, which may induce an anti-tumor immune response. ... The most common heart operations in which cryosurgery may be used in this way are mitral valve repairs and coronary artery ... A physician may recommend cryosurgery being used during the course of heart surgery as a secondary procedure to treat any ... Gage AA (1998). "History of cryosurgery". Semin Surg Oncol. 14 (2): 99-109. doi:10.1002/(sici)1098-2388(199803)14:2. 3.0.co;2-1 ...
History of Cryosurgery. 2008. "Cryotherapy-As Ancient as the Pharaohs". {{cite journal}}: Cite journal requires ,journal= (help ... Regarded as "the father of modern cryosurgery", Arnott was the first to utilize extreme cold locally for the destruction of ... Cooper, SM; Dawber, RP (2001). "The history of cryosurgery". J R Soc Med. 94 (4): 196-201. doi:10.1177/014107680109400416. PMC ... "The biology and role of cryosurgery" (PDF). {{cite journal}}: Cite journal requires ,journal= (help) (CS1 errors: missing ...
"International Cryosurgery Center". 2013. Niu, LZ; Li, JL; Zeng, JY; Mu, F; Liao, MT; Yao, F; Li, L; Liu, CY; Chen, JB; Zuo, JS ... History of Cryosurgery. 2008. Krieg, AM; Yi, AK; Matson, S; Waldschmidt, TJ; Bishop, GA; Teasdale, R; Koretzky, GA; Klinman, DM ... History of Cryosurgery. 1997. "FAQ". "FDA Review Letter" (PDF). "History of Ablatherm HIFU". "British National Formulary". ... James Arnott, "the father of modern cryosurgery", starts to use cryotherapy to freeze tumours in the treatment of breast and ...
Cooper (2001). "The History of Cryosurgery". Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 94 (4): 196-201. doi:10.1177/ ...
"Cryosurgery in Cancer Treatment". National Cancer Institute. 2005-09-09. Retrieved 2019-06-02. Kuflik, Emanuel G. (1985-11-01 ... Zacarian, Setrag A (1985). Cryosurgery for Skin Cancer and Cutaneous Disorders. St. Louis : Mosby. "Hypothermia". nhs.uk. 2017- ... Beyond injury management, cryotherapy has notable surgical applications (referred to as cryosurgery), in which extremely cool ... "Cryosurgery for Skin Cancer and Cutaneous Disorders". Archives of Dermatology. 121 (11): 1463. doi:10.1001/archderm. ...
Dermatological Cryosurgery and Cryotherapy. Springer. p. 18. ISBN 978-1-44716-765-5. "Dr. Philip J. Cohen". health.usnews.com. ...
He advanced cryosurgery for cataracts and retinal detachments during 1962 at Baragwanath hospital in Soweto. This led to the ... "The history of cryosurgery."[permanent dead link] J R Soc Med. 2001 Apr;94(4):196-201. PMID 11317629. Ophthalmic treatment ... Cryosurgery in ophthalmology (Textbook) Pitman Medical (1975) ISBN 0-272-00468-5 "Presentation of National Orders - 27 ...
Keanini, R. G.; Rubinsky, B. (1 November 1992). "Optimization of Multiprobe Cryosurgery". Journal of Heat Transfer. 114 (4): ... He also worked on computational optimization for planning noninvasive cryosurgeries. 2020 - Kirk Bryan Award, Geological ... "Optimization of Multiprobe Cryosurgery". Journal of Heat Transfer. 114 (4): 796-801. doi:10.1115/1.2911885.[non-primary source ...
Cryosurgery is used to treat a number of diseases and disorders, most especially skin conditions like warts, moles, skin tags ... Cryosurgery is the application of extremely low temperatures to destroy abnormal or diseased tissue and is used most commonly ... In addition to their use in cryosurgery, several types of cold aerosol sprays are used for short-term pain relief. Unlike other ... Contraindications to the use of cryosurgery include but are not limited to; using it over a neoplasm, someone with conditions ...
Cooper, S. M.; Dawber, R. P. (2001). "The history of cryosurgery". Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 94 (4): 196-201. ...
... s can also be frozen off with liquid nitrogen; that is, via cryosurgery. Freckle Lentigo List of cutaneous conditions ...
"International Society of Cryosurgery, 16th World Congress Vienna". www.isc.cryosurgery.at. Retrieved 2016-04-29. "2012年"白求恩奖章"获 ... He is honorary Chairman of the International Society of Cryosurgery (ISC). He was awarded the "Bethune Medal" in 2012 for his ... Modern Cryosurgery for Cancer, World Scientific Publishing, Singapore 2012. "Pro.Xu Kecheng_Fuda Cancer Hospital--Fuda ... Xu, Kecheng; Korpan, Nikolai N; Niu, Lizhi (2012). Modern Cryosurgery for Cancer. doi:10.1142/8004. ISBN 978-981-4329-65-1. ...
Kumar M, Bandyopadhyay P, Kundu D, Mishra L (March 2013). "Cryosurgery by tetrafluoroethane: An answer to black gums". Journal ... Some methods used to eliminate or reduce this pigmentation include gingivectomy, laser therapy and cryosurgery. There are pros ... Thai KE, Sinclair RD (November 1999). "Cryosurgery of benign skin lesions". The Australasian Journal of Dermatology. 40 (4): ...
"Letter of Commendation for Professor Shepherd". Shepherd, J P. (1983). "Wound Healing and scarring after cryosurgery". ... he studied wound healing after cryosurgery under the supervision of Rodney Dawber. He discovered that the reasons low ...
Cryosurgery Or Sclerosing Injections: Which Is Better For Neuromas? A Caporusso EF, Fallat LM, Savoy-Moore R (Sep-Oct 2002). " ... "Cryosurgery for Morton's Neuroma, UK Clinic". {{cite journal}}: Cite journal requires ,journal= (help) Bencardino J, Rosenberg ... Cryogenic neuroablation (also known as cryoinjection therapy, cryoneurolysis, cryosurgery or cryoablation) is a lesser-known ...
Also used is cryosurgery and radiotherapy. The prognosis varies dramatically, depending on the type and stage at the time of ...
Cryosurgery is a minimally invasive method of treating prostate cancer in which the prostate gland is exposed to freezing ... Cryosurgery is less invasive than radical prostatectomy.[citation needed] In metastatic disease, where cancer has spread beyond ... General anesthesia is less commonly used for cryosurgery meaning it can often be performed in an outpatient clinic setting. It ... Potential adverse effects associated with cryosurgery include urinary retention, incontinence, and pain in the perineal region ...
He constructed various cryogenic apparatus for cryosurgery. In 1982 he habilitated on thermal conductivity of Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, ...
Tadeusz Krwawicz, Polish ophthalmologist; he pioneered the use of cryosurgery in ophthalmology; he was the first to describe a ...
He pioneered the use of cryosurgery in ophthalmology. He was the first to formulate a method of cataract extraction by ...
Other modalities of treatment include cryosurgery and radiotherapy; intralesional injection of methotrexate or 5-fluorouracil ...
Cryotherapy (or cryosurgery) refers to the application of extreme cold to treat keloids. This treatment method is easy to ... Zouboulis CC, Blume U, Büttner P, Orfanos CE (September 1993). "Outcomes of cryosurgery in keloids and hypertrophic scars. A ... cryosurgery (freezing), radiation, laser therapy (pulsed dye laser), interferon (IFN), fluorouracil (5-FU) and surgical ...
Scar therapies, such as cryosurgery, may speed up the healing process from a hypertrophic scar to a flatter, paler one. Early ... Zouboulis CC, Blume U, Büttner P, Orfanos CE (September 1993). "Outcomes of cryosurgery in keloids and hypertrophic scars. A ...
"Cryosurgery in Cancer Treatment". National Cancer Institute. 2005-09-09. Andrews, MD (2004). "Cryosurgery for common skin ... More common complications of cryosurgery include blistering and edema which are transient. Cryosurgery may cause complications ... "A Closer Look At Cryosurgery For Neuromas". Podiatry Today. Katz, Marc (November 2007). "Case Studies in Cryosurgery for Heel ... can be treated with cryosurgery. Cryosurgery works by taking advantage of the destructive force of freezing temperatures on ...
Cervix cryosurgery is a procedure to freeze and destroy abnormal tissue in the cervix. ... Cervix cryosurgery is a procedure to freeze and destroy abnormal tissue in the cervix. ... Cryosurgery may cause scarring of the cervix, but most of the time, it is very minor. More severe scarring may make it more ... Cervix cryosurgery is a procedure to freeze and destroy abnormal tissue in the cervix. ...
This cryosurgery comes with a five year warranty with one year unconditional and for years to act against technical problems ... This cryosurgery has an exclusive two-trigger design that allows physicians to accurately control freezing as well as ... Optional accessories that come with this cryosurgery include N20 and CO2 cylinders of 20 Lb that offer eighty minutes of free ... Doctors and health care professionals who visit Medical Device Depot to purchase a cryosurgery are sure to feel satisfied when ...
Explore a range of podiatry and chiropody cryosurgery supplies. Shop for brands including CryoIQ, Cryopen and more. Visit ...
Cryotherapy (cryosurgery). Cryotherapy is used most often for pre-cancerous skin conditions such as actinic keratosis. It might ...
Avoid cryosurgery for cancers on the ala of the nose, the lip, and the ear. If Mohs surgery is indicated, cryosurgery is not. ... Cryosurgery is never an appropriate treatment for melanoma.. • Nevi should not be treated with cryosurgery because if a nevus ... Cryosurgery Methods. Many different techniques are used to perform cryosurgery. The most common ones are listed in Table 15-7, ... Advantages of Cryosurgery. The advantages of cryosurgery can be categorized into those for the clinician and those for the ...
cryosurgery. A Guide To Laser Tattoo Removal In London. For some time, tattoos were considered permanent; they were irremovable ... From dermabrasion to cryosurgery, excision and the now trending and more widely accepted laser tattoo removal techniques, ...
Cryosurgery for dogs has a shorter recovery period. ... How does cryosurgery work?. Cryosurgery is a cutting-edge ... Cryosurgery. Non-invasive surgery to freeze and kill pet skin disorders.. Were proud to offer cryosurgery for our patients. ... Cryosurgery is a safe, noninvasive form of surgery that uses liquid nitrogen to freeze and destory small skin masses and ... If you think your pet could benefit from cryosurgery, give us a call at (864) 486-8177 to learn more or to schedule a ...
Your personal data will be used to support your experience throughout this website, to manage access to your account, and for other purposes described in our privacy policy.. ...
Cryosurgery. Cryosurgery is a rapid and effective means of treating simple HPV disease. It works by freezing the intracellular ... Expected effects of cryosurgery include pain, edema, vesicles, bullae, weeping, and some necrosis. There is a small risk of ... With the exception of cryosurgery, these modalities usually have the common advantage of complete treatment following one ... infection, bleeding, abnormal scarring, pigment alteration, paresthesias, and alopecia with cryosurgery. Similarly, laser ...
The Head Office of International Society of Cryosurgery. E-mail:[email protected] ... and has always been committed to promote the research and continuing medical education in the field of cryosurgery, cryobiology ... and honor that I stand before you today as the newly elected President of the 23rd International Society of Cryosurgery (ISC). ...
Cryosurgery for dogs has a shorter recovery period. ... How does cryosurgery work?. Cryosurgery is a cutting-edge ... Cryosurgery. Non-invasive surgery to freeze and kill pet skin disorders.. Were proud to offer cryosurgery for our patients. ... Cryosurgery is a safe, noninvasive form of surgery that uses liquid nitrogen to freeze and destory small skin masses and ... If you think your pet could benefit from cryosurgery, give us a call at (281) 495-9445 to learn more or to schedule a ...
Cryosurgery involves the use of liquid nitrogen to freeze the tumor. Tumor cells that are frozen will die so cryosurgery can be ... Cryosurgery is a procedure where the tumor and adjacent skin are frozen. It is generally considered for use only with small ...
Hayward Animal Clinic offers Cryosurgery for pets to remove unwanted skin growths or masses. ... Pet Cryosurgery. Hayward Animal Clinic offers Cryosurgery for pets to remove unwanted skin growths or masses. A simple, quick, ... Cryosurgery is often less than a regular surgical procedure and offers limited side effects. Most treatments are performed ...
As a part of an ongoing effort to develop computerized training tools for cryosurgery, this study presents a computational ... Cryosurgery is the destruction of undesired tissues by freezing, where prostate cryosurgery often involves the complete ... Geometric Deformation of Three-Dimensional Prostate Model With Applications to Computerized Training of Cryosurgery Anjali ... As a part of an ongoing effort to develop computerized training tools for cryosurgery, this study presents a computational ...
EIDT, Gustavo; MAAS, Jorge Ricardo Schmidt e NETO, Leo Kraether. Cryosurgery as squamous papilloma treatment in pediatric ... Cryosurgery was chosen for treatment because of his minimally invasive surgical characteristics and theoretical advantages ... Objective: to report the diagnosis and treatment of a possible squamous papilloma in a child using cryosurgery with liquid ...
Verrucafreeze Extra Large Replacement Podiatry Canister includes: · 236 ml of Cryogen (approx. 100 freezes) · Extender tube · Physician Instruction Booklet · Patient instruction pad
Cryosurgery is effective for smaller, superficial BCCs. It is especially useful for patients with bleeding disorders or ... When weighing the pros and cons of treatment options, its important to consider that radiation, cryosurgery and topical ...
Cryosurgery uses liquid nitrogen to freeze masses without the use of sutures. This is ideal for patients with masses on the ... Pet Cryosurgery. Cryosurgery uses liquid nitrogen to freeze masses without the use of sutures. This is ideal for patients with ... Pet Cryosurgery in New Port Richey, FL. Cryosurgical treatment for masses can be performed without sedation or anesthesia and ... We proudly offer cryosurgery, an innovative procedure that freezes growths and masses without the need for sutures, ensuring ...
5-FU/SA achieved greater histological clearance and lower recurrence of grade II/III hyperkeratotic AKs than cryosurgery. AE ... cryosurgery for the treatment of hyperkeratotic actinic keratosis J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2015 May;29(5):881-9. doi: ... cryosurgery in patients with moderate/severe (grade II/III) hyperkeratotic AKs (NCT01358851). ... in the cryosurgery group. Most (74.5%) lesions were grade II (grade III, 25.5%). Mean change in lesion count from baseline to ...
Efrima, B, Ovadia, J, Drukman, I, Khoury, A, Rath, E, Dadia, S, Gortzak, Y, Albagli, A, Sternheim, A & Segal, O 2021, Cryo-surgery ... Cryo-surgery for symptomatic extra-abdominal desmoids. A proof of concept study. Ben Efrima*, Joshua Ovadia, Ido Drukman, Amal ... Cryo-surgery for symptomatic extra-abdominal desmoids. A proof of concept study. In: Journal of Surgical Oncology. 2021 ; Vol. ... Cryo-surgery for symptomatic extra-abdominal desmoids. A proof of concept study. Journal of Surgical Oncology. 2021 Sep 15;124( ...
ক্রায়োসার্জারি চিকিৎসা পদ্ধতি ব্যাখ্যা কর - cryosurgery ki - neotericit.com. ক্রায়োসার্জারি চিকিত্সা পদ্ধতি. ক্রায়োসার্জারি ...
Cryosurgery. *Curettage and Cautery. *Defibrillation. *Dental Nerve Blocks. *Diagnostic Electrophysiology Study with Programmed ...
Cryosurgery: Freezing warts or destroying abnormal cells with liquid nitrogen.. *Loop electrosurgical excision procedure (LEEP) ...
76 the short-term sexual function was worse for cryosurgery than EBRT. 254 At 3 years, men in the cryosurgery group experienced ... than simply clients given cryosurgery. 257 In another analysis, patients given cryosurgery had way more incontinence compared ... About three nonrandomized education of all the way down quality opposed cryosurgery so you can brachytherapy to own urinary, ... Doctors is to modify surrounding prostate cancer tumors clients one to whole-gland cryosurgery are from the bad intimate ...
If you need an Emergency Cryosurgery Veterinarian in Rockland County call Howard Gittelman DVM at: (845) 638-3600 ... Cat and pet Cryosurgery Veterinarian in New City, New York. ... Cryosurgery. Cryosurgery is a surgical process used to destroy ... Cryosurgery has in many ways surpassed the efficacy of alternative treatment modalities since its introduction to the ... Controlled cryosurgery is particularly suitable as intra and post-operative problems such as hemorrhage, infection and suture ...
Cryotherapy is also called cryosurgery. It means removing cancer by freezing it. NICE has approved cryotherapy as a treatment ...
Cryosurgery: A treatment that uses an instrument to freeze and destroy abnormal tissue. This type of treatment is also called ...
Contact Sutter Cancer Center at . Sutter Cancer Center is located at 2800 L Street, Sacramento CA 95816 and is part of the Sutter Health Network.
  • Cryosurgery is often less than a regular surgical procedure and offers limited side effects. (haywardanimalclinic.com)
  • Cryosurgery was chosen for treatment because of his minimally invasive surgical characteristics and theoretical advantages relating to the conventional surgical technique, especially with regards to patient management. (bvsalud.org)
  • Cryosurgery is a surgical process used to destroy tissue using extreme temperatures of cold. (animalmedicalnc.com)
  • Human papillomavirus (HPV) XS2 was isolated from cil cream, imiquimod 5% cream, cryosurgery, surgical warts on an immunosuppressed patient. (cdc.gov)
  • From dermabrasion to cryosurgery, excision and the now trending and more widely accepted laser tattoo removal techniques, several tattoo removal methods have been adopted. (lifestyleblogger.co.uk)
  • Cryosurgery is also used to treat internal and external tumors as well as tumors in the bone. (wikipedia.org)
  • After cryosurgery, the frozen tissue is either naturally absorbed by the body in the case of internal tumors, or it dissolves and forms a scab for external tumors. (wikipedia.org)
  • Doctors is to modify surrounding prostate cancer tumors clients one to whole-gland cryosurgery are from the bad intimate harmful effects and you can similar urinary and you may intestinal/rectal harmful effects as the individuals immediately following radiation therapy. (bitflamenco.cc)
  • Cervix cryosurgery is a procedure to freeze and destroy abnormal tissue in the cervix . (medlineplus.gov)
  • Cryosurgery is a safe, noninvasive form of surgery that uses liquid nitrogen to freeze and destory small skin masses and lesions. (healthpointevet.com)
  • Cryosurgery is a cutting-edge procedure that uses liquid nitrogen cooled to -127°F to freeze skin masses and unwanted tissue. (healthpointevet.com)
  • Cryosurgery cannot be used on lesions that would subsequently require biopsy as the technique destroys tissue and precludes the use of histopathology. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cryosurgery is an easily mastered technique that is extremely useful for treating benign and premalignant lesions. (plasticsurgerykey.com)
  • Soft tissue conditions such as plantar fasciitis (jogger's heel) and fibroma (benign excrescence of connective tissue) can be treated with cryosurgery. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cryosurgery has in many ways surpassed the efficacy of alternative treatment modalities since its introduction to the veterinary medicine as a useful adjunct in the removal of unwanted cellular tissue. (animalmedicalnc.com)
  • Hayward Animal Clinic offers Cryosurgery for pets to remove unwanted skin growths or masses. (haywardanimalclinic.com)
  • Objective: to report the diagnosis and treatment of a possible squamous papilloma in a child using cryosurgery with liquid nitrogen. (bvsalud.org)
  • Cryosurgery has been historically used to treat a number of diseases and disorders, especially a variety of benign and malignant skin conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • When compared to traditional surgery, cryosurgery is cost-effective, requires fewer follow up appointments, and typically involves a much shorter recovery period. (healthpointevet.com)
  • In experienced hands cryosurgery is also a valuable technique for treating small, nonaggressive nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSCs). (plasticsurgerykey.com)
  • Airapetian A. Hayrapetyan A.M Treatment of skin neoplasms by means of cryosurgery. (doctors.am)
  • Airapetian A. Hayrapetyan A.M Cryosurgery in treatment of skin can¬cer. (doctors.am)
  • In the past half century, ISC has followed the charter of its original establishment, and has always been committed to promote the research and continuing medical education in the field of cryosurgery, cryobiology, cryoimmunotherapy, cryopreservation, and low temperature medicine. (csimit.cn)
  • We're proud to offer cryosurgery for our patients. (healthpointevet.com)
  • 257 In another analysis, patients given cryosurgery had way more incontinence compared to those treated with brachytherapy (10 year price brachytherapy 0.61 in the place of cryosurgery 2.44). (bitflamenco.cc)
  • You may need more frequent Pap smears for the first 2 years after cryosurgery for cervical dysplasia. (medlineplus.gov)
  • If you think your pet could benefit from cryosurgery, give us a call at (864) 486-8177 to learn more or to schedule a consultation. (healthpointevet.com)
  • As a part of an ongoing effort to develop computerized training tools for cryosurgery, this study presents a computational technique to geometrically deform a three-dimensional organ template in order to generate clinically relevant prostate models. (asme.org)
  • Cryosurgery was first used to treat prostate cancer in the early 1970s but it was not until 1993, when the results from percutaneous ultrasound-guided cryosurgery were published, that the potential advantages of this treatment became apparent. (medscape.com)
  • With the decision of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), formerly the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA), in 1999 to approve prostate cryosurgery for the treatment of primary prostate cancer, treatment options for patients were expanded. (medscape.com)
  • The improvements in cryosurgical results gained in recent years due to the basic understanding of the thermal destruction of tissue, the advances in cryosurgical technique, and its unique inherent advantages may ultimately identify image-guided prostate cryosurgery (or perhaps another similarly image-guided ablative technology) as the treatment of first choice in treating all stages and grades of nonmetastatic prostate cancer. (medscape.com)
  • On November 21, 2000, my husband had cryosurgery for his prostate cancer. (cancer.org)
  • 5. Single center experience with third-generation cryosurgery for management of organ-confined prostate cancer: critical evaluation of short-term outcomes, complications, and patient quality of life. (nih.gov)
  • 6. Cryosurgery for prostate cancer. (nih.gov)
  • 9. Cryosurgery for prostate cancer: new technology and indications. (nih.gov)
  • Cryosurgery is a minimally invasive treat-ment option for prostate cancer. (ima.org.il)
  • Cryotherapy and cryosurgery date back to the 19th century, with local applications of cooling used for pain control and to treat advanced cancers. (mspca.org)
  • The recent demonstration that "nerve-sparing" cryosurgery is possible suggests that cryosurgery may be used more often. (medscape.com)
  • This suggests that cryosurgery may be applied not only to destroy a primary neoplasia but also to stimulate or enhance the resistance of the tumour host, an attempt, in short, at cryoimmunotherapy. (arizona.edu)
  • Cervix cryosurgery is a procedure to freeze and destroy abnormal tissue in the cervix . (medlineplus.gov)
  • Cryosurgery may cause scarring of the cervix, but most of the time, it is very minor. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Is the procedure (cryosurgery) uniform throughout the country, how does the duration of pain compare with standard surgical excision, are there any new published articles or studies on the subject and similar questions intrique me. (cancer.org)
  • However, some people have not heard of cryosurgery, a procedure that freezes a growth and destroys the tumor by delivering cold ice to temperatures of minus 40 degrees Celsius (-40 degrees Fahrenheit). (gaurology.com)
  • Cryosurgery is a minimally invasive procedure. (gaurology.com)
  • In the light of the results presented to the IIIrd International Cryosurgery Congress (Valencia, October, 1977) and to the XVth Annual Meeting of the Cryobiology Society (Tokyo, August, 1978), the possibilities that the immunitary response to cryonecrosis destroys the neoplasia or produces an enhancement effect are discussed. (arizona.edu)
  • Cryosurgery was chosen for treatment because of his minimally invasive surgical characteristics and theoretical advantages relating to the conventional surgical technique, especially with regards to patient management. (bvsalud.org)
  • Current treatment for this condition primarily consists of cryosurgery and the topical therapy Aldara (imiquimod). (drugs.com)
  • Human papillomavirus (HPV) XS2 was isolated from cil cream, imiquimod 5% cream, cryosurgery, surgical warts on an immunosuppressed patient. (cdc.gov)
  • Changes in equipment and techniques have improved the results of cryosurgery, in both tumor control and lower morbidity. (medscape.com)
  • Cryosurgery is as effective as alternative therapies for most cases of molluscum contagiosum, dermatofibromas, keloids, and plantar or genital warts. (nih.gov)
  • Adding cryosurgery as still another treatment option to this already confusing environment further complicates patient choices. (medscape.com)
  • Cryosurgery is generally the treatment of choice for actinic keratosis. (nih.gov)
  • The course of cryosurgery treatment may involve several sessions and is practically painless. (airomedical.com)
  • The total price for Cancer treatment with cryosurgery is €9,699. (airomedical.com)
  • No, Cancer treatment with cryosurgery is an outpatient deal. (airomedical.com)
  • AiroMedical gallery has 1 photo related to Cancer treatment with cryosurgery . (airomedical.com)
  • Objective: to report the diagnosis and treatment of a possible squamous papilloma in a child using cryosurgery with liquid nitrogen. (bvsalud.org)
  • Cryosurgery uses a liquid nitrogen spray or a very cold probe to freeze and kill abnormal cells. (cancer.org)
  • Since the ultrasound-guided percutaneous transperineal approach for prostate cryosurgery is essentially identical to that of a radiation seed implantation, the potential advantages of cryosurgery can be well appreciated if freezing is viewed as another new implantable radiation source (Figs 1 and 2). (medscape.com)
  • Headquartered in Connecticut, this family-owned company provides the largest selection of spray tips, probes and accessories for cryosurgery, enabling medical personnel to treat a variety of skin lesions with greater control and accuracy. (bechtold.pl)
  • cryosurgery apparatuses , contact probes, spray probes , extenders and adapters , as well as additional accessories such as thermal bags . (bechtold.pl)
  • Compressed gases such as nitrous oxide (N 2 O) are often used to obtain the cold temperatures needed for cryosurgery. (cdc.gov)
  • Cutaneous cryosurgery refers to localized application of freezing temperatures to achieve destruction of skin lesions. (nih.gov)
  • Advantages of cryosurgery include the ability to re-treat patients without added morbidity and to treat salvage postradiation patients with acceptable results and morbidity. (medscape.com)
  • Complications from cryosurgery include hypopigmentation and alopecia, and can be avoided by limiting freeze times to less than 30 seconds. (nih.gov)
  • The more modern approach of cryosurgery began between the collaboration of a physician, Dr. Irving Cooper, and an engineer, Arnold Lee. (mspca.org)
  • Cryosurgery can also be used to treat some cancers, like those in the liver and prostate. (cancer.org)
  • Through constant research and keeping up with technological innovations, it has become a world leader in the design and manufacture of precision handheld cryosurgery equipment. (bechtold.pl)
  • Diagram showing the transperineal approach of prostate cryosurgery. (medscape.com)
  • In addition, patients undergoing cryosurgery usually experience redness and minor local pain or discomfort. (gaurology.com)
  • Your provider will help you to decide if cryosurgery is right for your condition. (medlineplus.gov)