Crowdsourcing: Social media model for enabling public involvement and recruitment in participation. Use of social media to collect feedback and recruit volunteer subjects.Biological Ontologies: Structured vocabularies describing concepts from the fields of biology and relationships between concepts.Social Media: Platforms that provide the ability and tools to create and publish information accessed via the INTERNET. Generally these platforms have three characteristics with content user generated, high degree of interaction between creator and viewer, and easily integrated with other sites.MuseumsCivilization: The distinctly human attributes and attainments of a particular society.Catalogs, LibraryHistory, Ancient: The period of history before 500 of the common era.Archaeology: The scientific study of past societies through artifacts, fossils, etc.Burial: The act or ceremony of putting a corpse into the ground or a vault, or into the sea; or the inurnment of CREMAINS.Fantasy: An imagined sequence of events or mental images, e.g., daydreams.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Bibliometrics: The use of statistical methods in the analysis of a body of literature to reveal the historical development of subject fields and patterns of authorship, publication, and use. Formerly called statistical bibliography. (from The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Publishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.Journal Impact Factor: A quantitative measure of the frequency on average with which articles in a journal have been cited in a given period of time.Malaria: A protozoan disease caused in humans by four species of the PLASMODIUM genus: PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM; PLASMODIUM VIVAX; PLASMODIUM OVALE; and PLASMODIUM MALARIAE; and transmitted by the bite of an infected female mosquito of the genus ANOPHELES. Malaria is endemic in parts of Asia, Africa, Central and South America, Oceania, and certain Caribbean islands. It is characterized by extreme exhaustion associated with paroxysms of high FEVER; SWEATING; shaking CHILLS; and ANEMIA. Malaria in ANIMALS is caused by other species of plasmodia.Blogging: Using an INTERNET based personal journal which may consist of reflections, comments, and often hyperlinks.Malaria, Falciparum: Malaria caused by PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM. This is the severest form of malaria and is associated with the highest levels of parasites in the blood. This disease is characterized by irregularly recurring febrile paroxysms that in extreme cases occur with acute cerebral, renal, or gastrointestinal manifestations.Malaria, Vivax: Malaria caused by PLASMODIUM VIVAX. This form of malaria is less severe than MALARIA, FALCIPARUM, but there is a higher probability for relapses to occur. Febrile paroxysms often occur every other day.Feedback: A mechanism of communication within a system in that the input signal generates an output response which returns to influence the continued activity or productivity of that system.Dissertations, Academic as Topic: Dissertations embodying results of original research and especially substantiating a specific view, e.g., substantial papers written by candidates for an academic degree under the individual direction of a professor or papers written by undergraduates desirous of achieving honors or distinction.Designer Drugs: Drugs designed and synthesized, often for illegal street use, by modification of existing drug structures (e.g., amphetamines). Of special interest are MPTP (a reverse ester of meperidine), MDA (3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine), and MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine). Many drugs act on the aminergic system, the physiologically active biogenic amines.Feedback, Sensory: A mechanism of communicating one's own sensory system information about a task, movement or skill.Feedback, Psychological: A mechanism of information stimulus and response that may control subsequent behavior, cognition, perception, or performance. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)Visual Perception: The selecting and organizing of visual stimuli based on the individual's past experience.Patents as Topic: Exclusive legal rights or privileges applied to inventions, plants, etc.Video Games: A form of interactive entertainment in which the player controls electronically generated images that appear on a video display screen. This includes video games played in the home on special machines or home computers, and those played in arcades.Telepathology: Transmission and interpretation of tissue specimens via remote telecommunication, generally for the purpose of diagnosis or consultation but may also be used for continuing education.Erythrocytes: Red blood cells. Mature erythrocytes are non-nucleated, biconcave disks containing HEMOGLOBIN whose function is to transport OXYGEN.Plasmodium falciparum: A species of protozoa that is the causal agent of falciparum malaria (MALARIA, FALCIPARUM). It is most prevalent in the tropics and subtropics.Game Theory: Theoretical construct used in applied mathematics to analyze certain situations in which there is an interplay between parties that may have similar, opposed, or mixed interests. In a typical game, decision-making "players," who each have their own goals, try to gain advantage over the other parties by anticipating each other's decisions; the game is finally resolved as a consequence of the players' decisions.Games, Experimental: Games designed to provide information on hypotheses, policies, procedures, or strategies.Korea: Former kingdom, located on Korea Peninsula between Sea of Japan and Yellow Sea on east coast of Asia. In 1948, the kingdom ceased and two independent countries were formed, divided by the 38th parallel.Republic of Korea: The capital is Seoul. The country, established September 9, 1948, is located on the southern part of the Korean Peninsula. Its northern border is shared with the Democratic People's Republic of Korea.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Seoul virus: A species of HANTAVIRUS causing a less severe form of HEMORRHAGIC FEVER WITH RENAL SYNDROME in Asia (primarily Korea and Japan). It is transmitted by rats, especially Rattus rattus and R. norvegicus.Astronomy: The science concerned with celestial bodies and the observation and interpretation of the radiation received in the vicinity of the earth from the component parts of the universe (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed)Telescopes: Instruments used to observe distant objects.Planets: Celestial bodies orbiting around the sun or other stars.Neptune: The eighth planet in order from the sun. It is one of the five outer planets of the solar system. Its two natural satellites are Nereid and Triton.Tripelennamine: A histamine H1 antagonist with low sedative action but frequent gastrointestinal irritation. It is used to treat ASTHMA; HAY FEVER; URTICARIA; and RHINITIS; and also in veterinary applications. Tripelennamine is administered by various routes, including topically.Stars, Celestial: Large bodies consisting of self-luminous gas held together by their own gravity. (From McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)alpha-Synuclein: A synuclein that is a major component of LEWY BODIES that plays a role in neurodegeneration and neuroprotection.Agropyron: A plant genus of the family POACEAE. The common name of wheatgrass is also used for other plants in the family.Parkinson Disease: A progressive, degenerative neurologic disease characterized by a TREMOR that is maximal at rest, retropulsion (i.e. a tendency to fall backwards), rigidity, stooped posture, slowness of voluntary movements, and a masklike facial expression. Pathologic features include loss of melanin containing neurons in the substantia nigra and other pigmented nuclei of the brainstem. LEWY BODIES are present in the substantia nigra and locus coeruleus but may also be found in a related condition (LEWY BODY DISEASE, DIFFUSE) characterized by dementia in combination with varying degrees of parkinsonism. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1059, pp1067-75)Synucleins: A family of homologous proteins of low MOLECULAR WEIGHT that are predominately expressed in the BRAIN and that have been implicated in a variety of human diseases. They were originally isolated from CHOLINERGIC FIBERS of TORPEDO.Heart-Assist Devices: Small pumps, often implantable, designed for temporarily assisting the heart, usually the LEFT VENTRICLE, to pump blood. They consist of a pumping chamber and a power source, which may be partially or totally external to the body and activated by electromagnetic motors.Pharmacy Administration: The business and managerial aspects of pharmacy in its broadest sense.Toxicogenetics: The study of existing genetic knowledge, and the generation of new genetic data, to understand and thus avoid DRUG TOXICITY and adverse effects from toxic substances from the environment.Space Flight: Travel beyond the earth's atmosphere.Environmental Health: The science of controlling or modifying those conditions, influences, or forces surrounding man which relate to promoting, establishing, and maintaining health.United States Government Agencies: Agencies of the FEDERAL GOVERNMENT of the United States.National Institutes of Health (U.S.): An operating division of the US Department of Health and Human Services. It is concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to health and medical research. Until 1995, it was an agency of the United States PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE.Weightlessness: Condition in which no acceleration, whether due to gravity or any other force, can be detected by an observer within a system. It also means the absence of weight or the absence of the force of gravity acting on a body. Microgravity, gravitational force between 0 and 10 -6 g, is included here. (From NASA Thesaurus, 1988)

Development and evaluation of a crowdsourcing methodology for knowledge base construction: identifying relationships between clinical problems and medications. (1/21)

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Crowd sourcing a new paradigm for interactome driven drug target identification in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. (2/21)

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Scholarometer: a social framework for analyzing impact across disciplines. (3/21)

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Verification in referral-based crowdsourcing. (4/21)

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Neurotree: a collaborative, graphical database of the academic genealogy of neuroscience. (5/21)

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Crowdsourcing malaria parasite quantification: an online game for analyzing images of infected thick blood smears. (6/21)

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Global mapping of infectious disease. (7/21)

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Web 2.0-based crowdsourcing for high-quality gold standard development in clinical natural language processing. (8/21)

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  • A recent decision [PDF] from the Federal Circuit has overturned a fee award in a case involving an abstract software patent on crowdsourcing. (eff.org)
  • The total crowdsourcing cost was $1290.67 ($2.58 per abstract) and took a total of 7 h. (nih.gov)
  • All possible pairwise combinations of chemicals and diseases were generated and processed either automatically or via a sentence- or abstract-scoped crowdsourcing task using the CrowdFlower interface. (nih.gov)
  • Crowdsourcing services like Amazon Mechanical Turk allow researchers to ask questions to crowds of workers and quickly receive high quality labeled responses. (nih.gov)
  • Agenda for crowdsourcing workshop with researchers. (nih.gov)
  • The researchers say that their study represents the first step in assessing how reliable crowdsourcing might be for feedback on diet. (medindia.net)
  • Crowdsourcing has potential as a way to improve adherence to dietary self monitoring over a longer period of time," write the researchers. (medindia.net)
  • Increasingly, researchers are using crowdsourcing techniques to cull data from a broader array of sources, using everything from smart watches that track respiration to holding contests to develop better algorithms for predicting seizures. (lww.com)
  • The investigators say that crowdsourcing for data enables easier access to huge datasets, faster development, and larger outreach to other researchers. (lww.com)
  • That is, researchers crowdsourced the question of prostate cancer prognosis, eventually involving over 550 international researchers and resulting in 50 computational models from 50 different teams. (news-medical.net)
  • Researchers into the COVID-19 virus have a new source of distributed computing power: crowdsourcing. (technewsworld.com)
  • Their findings, appearing online June 22, 2017, in the American Journal of Public Health , suggest greater attention needs to be given to determining what populations are and are not reachable using remote, electronic data collection platforms, and studies relying on crowdsourced respondents need to define the profile of the people generating those data, the researchers said. (ucsf.edu)
  • Participating students will see how their data may be used by other researchers in the SEA network - truly collaborative, crowdsourced science. (bytesizebio.net)
  • From basic research using a mouse cortex to the search for detecting early signs of seizures, investigators are using crowdsourcing techniques to elicit more data and answers to basic and clinical neurology questions. (lww.com)
  • There are also a growing number of architectural crowdsourcing platforms that direct their call openly to members of the public, facilitating mass-participation and self-organized collaboration to build upon and improve architectural design solutions. (wikipedia.org)
  • The ability to automate the process of identifying and labeling visual content relating to breaking events is something entirely outside the realm of feasibility with current deep learning approaches but image similarity searches and crowdsourced caption analysis make this readily possible in a production environment. (forbes.com)
  • In an effort to address the important issue of variability of ALS disease progression, we took advantage of two tools: a large data set of clinical, longitudinal, patient information and the vast knowledge and new computational approaches obtainable through crowdsourcing. (nature.com)
  • http://crowdresearch.org/chi2011-workshop/ Lorimer, A.O.D. Mass-participation Architecture, Pearl, 2016, [online] https://pearl.plymouth.ac.uk//handle/10026.1/5293 [17/08/https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F0-UtNg3ots https://twitter.com/dwell/status/26889122173947904 http://aureon.nl/opinie/ontwerpen-2/ http://www.architectsjournal.co.uk/news/daily-news/architecture-crowd-sourcing-website-criticised/8620481.article Crowdsourcing Architecture and Home Remodeling Projects Arcbazar. (wikipedia.org)
  • Architecture for the crowd by the crowd Interview by Eric Blatterberg at crowdsourcing.org, October 21, 2011. (wikipedia.org)
  • by ID/Lab -wayfinding, wayshowing, placemaking, legibility, and human behaviour in navigation, January 18, 2011 Shepherding the Crowd: An Approach to More Creative Crowd Work by Steven Dow and Scott Klemmer Is crowdsourcing changing the who, what, where, and how of creative work? (wikipedia.org)
  • Europe's major crowd economy conference explores the best practices in crowdsourcing and the collaborative economy that are fundamentally changing society, mindsets and possibilities across industries. (wikipedia.org)
  • As the name implies, crowdsourcing means outsourcing to the crowd. (up.ac.za)
  • This type of information aggregation has been dubbed "crowdsourcing" i.e. outsourcing a task to a large group of people or community (a crowd) through an open call. (medgadget.com)
  • Ever since the 2005 introduction of Amazon Mechanical Turk , a Web service that pays users small amounts for completing tasks such as transcribing short audio recordings or recognizing an object in a picture, tech pundits have been talking about the benefits of digital crowdsourcing. (xconomy.com)
  • In their American Journal of Public Health study, Yank and her colleagues utilized Amazon Mechanical Turk (MTurk), the world's largest online crowdsourcing platform, to compare demographic and health characteristics of adults recruited through it to those of the U.S. population. (ucsf.edu)
  • Our crowdsourcing methodology may be a useful guide for other genomics applications. (nist.gov)
  • Originally built in 2008 to map reports of post-election violence in Kenya, Usahidi has evolved into a non-profit company with a suite of tools that enables crowdsourced information aggregation, with applications ranging from citizen journalism and crisis management to the more commercial side of brand monitoring. (oreilly.com)
  • While crowdsourcing, a practice that enables study participants to submit data electronically, has grown in use for health and medical research, a study led by UC San Francisco comparing the online approach to a standard telephone survey has found that certain crowdsourced groups are either over- or underrepresented by age, race/ethnicity, education and physical activity. (ucsf.edu)
  • Another is Servio , which creates crowdsourced editorial content for clients using a platform called CloudCrowd. (xconomy.com)
  • To accomplish this they've partnered up with Patreon , an organization set up to back creative content producers through crowdsourced funding. (core77.com)
  • The platform also provides discussion boards for crowdsourcing solutions, content sections and the ability to collaborate on teams. (prweb.com)
  • This research will define practices for crowdsourcing and what companies are doing to manage quality, ensure that originators of content are given 'credit' for their contribution, and how this vital pool of crowdsourced resources can be integrated into the content development process. (tsia.com)
  • The challenge is described as a crowdsourced computational challenge, which means it works by engaging communities of scientists to competitively solve a specific problem in a given time period by placing scientific data, tools, and the resulting predictive models into an open commons or workspace-hence, "crowdsourcing" data analysis. (genengnews.com)
  • Dieters would be able to stick to healthy foods and lose weight with crowdsourcing, as participants are equally good as trained experts in rating the healthiness of foods and giving feedback on them, indicates research published online in the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association . (medindia.net)
  • We discuss six core aspects for successful employment of crowdsourcing in empirical studies for visualization - participants, study design, study procedure, data, tasks, and metrics & measures. (springer.com)
  • If power is found in numbers, crowdsourcing groups will need to attract and incentivize a genuinely sizable group of participants. (bostonglobe.com)
  • While monetary funding is the most common reason for organizations to turn to crowdsourcing, people have found plenty of other ways to use these tools to innovate and change the world. (foxbusiness.com)
  • Four years later and we're back at it with a new website, online poster sales, and some ideas on how other organizations and causes can find similar success using the creative, crowdsourced approach. (good.is)
  • To guide future designs of crowdsourcing-based studies for visualization, we review visualization research that has attempted to leverage crowdsourcing for empirical evaluations of visualizations. (springer.com)
  • Through crowdsourcing - an open call for voluntary assistance from a large group of individuals - individuals can study and tackle complex issues by conducting research over large geographic areas and over long periods of time in ways that professional scientists working alone cannot easily duplicate. (cdc.gov)
  • This research tests the feasibility of a crowdsourced approach to malaria image analysis. (techdirt.com)
  • The completion of this project will demonstrate the broad impact of crowdsourcing on solving critical technical and financial challenges faced for maintaining key biological research resources. (genomecanada.ca)
  • David S. Liebeskind, MD, FAAN, FAHA, FANA, professor of neurology and director of the Neurovascular Imaging Research Core at the University of California, Los Angeles department of neurology, views crowdsourcing as a vehicle for changing the focus of research from the traditional clinical approach. (lww.com)
  • This chapter will help the visualization community understand how to effectively and efficiently take advantage of the exciting potential crowdsourcing has to offer to support empirical visualization research. (springer.com)
  • 1 ) showcase the research potential of this type of crowdsourced data, studying genealogies based on processing 86 million public Geni profiles. (sciencemag.org)
  • We turned to crowdsourcing 13 to facilitate an unbiased assessment of the performance of diverse methods for prediction and to raise awareness of the research potential of this new data resource. (nature.com)
  • Drs. Jérôme Waldispühl (McGill University) and Olivier Tremblay-Savard (University of Manitoba) are taking genomic databases to social media, by developing a web and mobile crowdsourcing platform for curating, maintaining and updating genomic databases. (genomecanada.ca)
  • Then there's CrowdFlower , a kind of meta-platform that helps big, Fortune 500 companies with data management tasks by farming out the work to Mechanical Turk, Samasource, and other crowdsourcing engines. (xconomy.com)
  • To manage the idea stream, we're relying on an innovative crowdsourcing platform from Pleasanton, Calif.-based Spigit . (readwrite.com)
  • Usahidi is a software platform built to crowdsource information over multiple channels such as text messages, email and Twitter. (oreilly.com)
  • It's almost impossible to talk about this project without going overboard on buzzwords, because the Smart Citizen Kit environmental monitoring platform is not only campaigning for funding at Kickstarter, it also has an open-source Arduino-compatible hardware design, an open-source API, and includes a mobile app and an interactive, crowdsourced data visualization available online. (linuxtoday.com)
  • Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Clean Energy Prize has partnered with London's Skipso for a customized crowdsourcing and social media platform to manage the Clean Energy Prize application process and connect the MIT CEP community with Skipso's larger global cleantech community. (prweb.com)
  • Skipso, the new cleantech crowdsourcing and social media platform, announced today its partnership with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Clean Energy Prize (submission deadline 25th Feb 2011, 6pm EST). (prweb.com)
  • The crowdsourcing and social media cleantech platform from Skipso came out of beta testing in the fall of 2010. (prweb.com)
  • P.S. This type of crowdsourced-selfie-activity is a great way to have students participate in summarizing their learning, make a prediction, make it visible (you could use a Visible Thinking Routine, ex. (techlearning.com)
  • The NC3Rs led a crowdsourcing project to collect data on the prevalence and potential triggers of aggression in laboratory mice. (nature.com)
  • This follows from Jeff Howe's original definition of the term crowdsourcing, which emphasises the idea of an open call to an undefined group of people, because "the person who you think would be best qualified to perform the job, isn't always the best person to do it. (wikipedia.org)
  • Crowdsourcing" usually means getting people to do stuff for you for free, where you own the results and the people who created them cannot use them except by paying you (if at all). (slashdot.org)
  • To deal with this issue, many firms use crowdsourcing: engaging large groups of people to provide the data. (baselinemag.com)
  • And unlike bonkers ideas such as "photonic fences", this crowdsourced approach requires little beyond bandwidth for distributing images and enough people participating. (techdirt.com)
  • Some crowdsourcing competitions, like the X-Prize, ask people to come up with technological solutions to a problem. (technologyreview.com)
  • Crowdsourcing is a mechanism by which people can contribute their ideas or actions to a common goal. (campustechnology.com)
  • Crowdsourcing is rapidly evolving and applied in situations where ideas, labour, opinion or expertise of large groups of people is used. (springer.com)
  • These games make use of the power of crowdsourcing to find solutions and offers new ways of looking at problems that workers in the field may have missed. (asbmb.org)
  • Crowdsourcing is our best hope for sifting through those variables to find the optimal method for managing the flow of current between the motor and the power storage system. (campustechnology.com)
  • An unprecedented business model for crowdsourcing architectural design was launched by Cambridge, MA based high-tech company Arcbazar in 2010. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although there are other corporate-sponsored crowdsourcing sites like Innocentive , which recently launched a challenge to contain the Gulf oil spill , and can offer up to $1 million in prizes, Myoo Create is the first community dedicated specifically to sustainability-related challenges. (fastcompany.com)
  • Geospatial data is central to many enterprise crowdsourcing efforts, and data quality challenges result from the multiple and diverse sources. (baselinemag.com)
  • Prizes and challenges, forms of crowdsourcing, enable the Federal government to tap into the expertise and creativity of the public in new ways. (cdc.gov)
  • The study also highlights, however, the challenges associated with using crowdsourced audio-questionnaires of this kind and the need for statistical analysis of results to control for substantial amounts of variation. (frontiersin.org)
  • Experimenting with a week of television news, Google's Web Entities feature offers a powerful new lens through which to understand the visual realm of television through automated crowdsourcing of the open Web. (forbes.com)
  • This ability to essentially crowdsource the open Web to quantify the global contextualization of an image is a uniquely powerful capability that is in many ways even more powerful than traditional deep learning image labeling. (forbes.com)
  • That having been said, the ability of the Internet to create efficient markets is something that shouldn't be taken lightly and is a reason why there's so much potential for companies like DesignBay , 99 Designs and other crowdsourcing sites, if they can get it right. (thenextweb.com)
  • Crowdsourcing offers great potential to overcome the limitations of controlled lab studies. (springer.com)
  • A widely-cited 2015 article in the American Journal of Public Health about recent influenza seasons concluded that crowdsourced symptom reporting has the potential to serve as a viable complement to traditional surveillance systems, offering advantages in the areas of speed, sensitivity, and scalability. (worldbank.org)
  • These ideas have been uploaded as part of a new crowdsourcing contest: The winner takes home $4,500 in prizes and corporate sponsor Levi's gets new insight into how its consumers think about saving water and energy. (fastcompany.com)
  • This article examines crowdsourcing as a tool for policy-making and explores the nuances of the technology and its use and implications for different stages of the policy process. (springer.com)
  • The results of this study found that when basic feedback on diet quality by peer raters is crowdsourced, it is comparable to feedback from expert raters, and that peers can rate both healthy and unhealthy foods in the expected direction," they conclude. (medindia.net)
  • Crowdsourcing the Next Big Neurology Study - Novel Approache. (lww.com)
  • Antimicrobial resistant pathogens crowdsource friendly bacteria to survive in immune cells and cause disease, a new study by the University of Sheffield has revealed. (sheffield.ac.uk)
  • Importantly, S. aureus is not a dominant member of our bacterial flora and so this study can explain how relatively few pathogenic bacteria can crowdsource from the other organisms present on our skin to allow it to set an infection that may ultimately prove fatal. (sheffield.ac.uk)
  • Crowdsourcing, in which self-selected individuals provide electronic data or feedback, is currently one of the most innovative methods for study population accrual. (ucsf.edu)
  • Crowdsourcing, members of the public adding information to records, is being used as a method for Libraries to enhance the details of their collections. (nla.gov.au)
  • Kim added that use of such crowdsourced information also could give guidance to other public-health mapping, such as for noise or pollution. (eurekalert.org)
  • Crowdsourcing - small amounts of money, knowledge or ideas contributed from a large number of individuals - has become a popular way to build up resources that wouldn't otherwise be available to small businesses and social causes. (foxbusiness.com)
  • Her initial focus will be on how the design and process influence the outcome of crowdsourcing events, after which she will share her insights on what explains the success of ideas and ideators. (up.ac.za)
  • We're going to crowdsource ideas in five key areas - education, healthcare, business, finance and government. (readwrite.com)
  • Carnegie Mellon University has turned to crowdsourcing to develop new ideas for managing power in electric cars. (campustechnology.com)
  • Crowdsourcing new product ideas over time: An analysis of the Dell IdeaStorm community. (springer.com)
  • Crowdsourcing has already shown its disruptive power in a number of fields. (readwrite.com)
  • Usually crowdsourcing involves information or opinion gathering, but in this case it involves computing power. (technewsworld.com)
  • U.S. President Barack Obama has signed legislation that eliminates restrictions preventing entrepreneurs from seeking crowdsourced funding online and removes some other financial regulations for small businesses. (pcworld.com)
  • Crowdsourcing is responsible for the wonderful success of Wikipedia-who would ever have predicted that volunteer editors from around the world could generate a resource that is so valuable for all of us? (asbmb.org)
  • Wikipedia is perhaps the best-known example of a crowdsourcing success story, leading Encyclopedia Britannica to give up on its print edition earlier this year. (readwrite.com)
  • Launching in April of this year, Myoo Create (that's "me + you") has ties to another crowdsourcing company, Jovoto , which hosted the recent Starbucks Beta Cup challenge that ended last week. (fastcompany.com)
  • EFSA crowdsourcing challenge: extracting d. (europa.eu)
  • The challenge is part of a wider project exploring the risks and opportunities of crowdsourcing as an innovative way for EFSA to collect and process data and increase the openness of the organisation. (europa.eu)
  • To further support crowdsourcing, projects can also use the candidate OGC Event Service Interface Specification to incorporate real-time, complex event processing on incoming O&M-encoded volunteered geographic information data streams. (baselinemag.com)
  • Structures for Creativity: The crowdsourcing of design by Jeffrey V. Nickerson, Yasuaki Sakamoto, and Lixiu Yu. (wikipedia.org)
  • Crowdsourcing has been slow to take hold because the quality of the output is low and it doesn't scale. (xconomy.com)
  • Panoply incorporates recent advances in crowdsourcing and human computation to ensure that feedback is timely and vetted for quality. (mit.edu)
  • We have developed a crowdsourcing web application for image quality control employed by the Dark Energy Survey. (uni-muenchen.de)
  • OpenStreetMap, the crowdsourced Wikipedia of cartography, looks to have much better coverage of the Olympic sites, as the images in this gallery show. (wired.com)
  • Most crowdsourcing and design contest sites claim you can "set your own budget. (thelogofactory.com)
  • Crowdsourcing Design: The End of Architecture, or a New Beginning? (wikipedia.org)
  • We take a partially impartial look at spec work, design contests and design crowdsourcing from a buyer's POV. (thelogofactory.com)
  • You know everything they tell you about spec work, design contests and crowdsourcing? (thelogofactory.com)
  • Over the years we've written a lot of blog posts, opinion pieces and articles about logo design contests , spec work & crowdsourcing . (thelogofactory.com)
  • A no-holds-barred look at spec work, design contests & crowdsourcing. (thelogofactory.com)
  • While new drug design is serious work, discovering how proteins fold can be fun, too: A crowdsourcing game called Foldit allows players to try different fold configurations for points and rankings. (lbl.gov)
  • It's not the first time that a car brand has used crowdsourcing as part of product development, but it's certainly one of the most ambitious examples that I've heard of based on the fact that it relies on fans to have some level of knowledge of car design. (econsultancy.com)
  • Another example of a car company buying into crowdsourcing, Citroen launched a Facebook app last April that allowed users to choose the design for a special edition of the company's new C1 city car, called the C1 Connexion. (econsultancy.com)