Cross Infection: Any infection which a patient contracts in a health-care institution.Equipment Contamination: The presence of an infectious agent on instruments, prostheses, or other inanimate articles.Sterilization: The destroying of all forms of life, especially microorganisms, by heat, chemical, or other means.Red Cross: International collective of humanitarian organizations led by volunteers and guided by its Congressional Charter and the Fundamental Principles of the International Red Cross Movement, to provide relief to victims of disaster and help people prevent, prepare for, and respond to emergencies.Electronic Mail: Messages between computer users via COMPUTER COMMUNICATION NETWORKS. This feature duplicates most of the features of paper mail, such as forwarding, multiple copies, and attachments of images and other file types, but with a speed advantage. The term also refers to an individual message sent in this way.Food Dispensers, Automatic: Mechanical food dispensing machines.Editorial Policies: The guidelines and policy statements set forth by the editor(s) or editorial board of a publication.Authorship: The profession of writing. Also the identity of the writer as the creator of a literary production.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Postal Service: The functions and activities carried out by the U.S. Postal Service, foreign postal services, and private postal services such as Federal Express.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity: A behavior disorder originating in childhood in which the essential features are signs of developmentally inappropriate inattention, impulsivity, and hyperactivity. Although most individuals have symptoms of both inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity, one or the other pattern may be predominant. The disorder is more frequent in males than females. Onset is in childhood. Symptoms often attenuate during late adolescence although a minority experience the full complement of symptoms into mid-adulthood. (From DSM-V)Methylphenidate: A central nervous system stimulant used most commonly in the treatment of ATTENTION DEFICIT DISORDER in children and for NARCOLEPSY. Its mechanisms appear to be similar to those of DEXTROAMPHETAMINE. The d-isomer of this drug is referred to as DEXMETHYLPHENIDATE HYDROCHLORIDE.Learning Disorders: Conditions characterized by a significant discrepancy between an individual's perceived level of intellect and their ability to acquire new language and other cognitive skills. These disorders may result from organic or psychological conditions. Relatively common subtypes include DYSLEXIA, DYSCALCULIA, and DYSGRAPHIA.Lyme Disease: An infectious disease caused by a spirochete, BORRELIA BURGDORFERI, which is transmitted chiefly by Ixodes dammini (see IXODES) and pacificus ticks in the United States and Ixodes ricinis (see IXODES) in Europe. It is a disease with early and late cutaneous manifestations plus involvement of the nervous system, heart, eye, and joints in variable combinations. The disease was formerly known as Lyme arthritis and first discovered at Old Lyme, Connecticut.Adolescent Medicine: A branch of medicine pertaining to the diagnosis and treatment of diseases occurring during the period of ADOLESCENCE.Central Nervous System Stimulants: A loosely defined group of drugs that tend to increase behavioral alertness, agitation, or excitation. They work by a variety of mechanisms, but usually not by direct excitation of neurons. The many drugs that have such actions as side effects to their main therapeutic use are not included here.Social Security: Government sponsored social insurance programs.Hospital Design and Construction: The architecture, functional design, and construction of hospitals.Clothing: Fabric or other material used to cover the body.Protective Clothing: Clothing designed to protect the individual against possible exposure to known hazards.Foot Rot: A disease of the horny parts and of the adjacent soft structures of the feet of cattle, swine, and sheep. It is usually caused by Corynebacterium pyogenes or Bacteroides nodosus (see DICHELOBACTER NODOSUS). It is also known as interdigital necrobacillosis. (From Black's Veterinary Dictionary, 18th ed)Swimming PoolsEpisiotomy: An incision of the posterior vaginal wall and a portion of the pudenda which enlarges the vaginal introitus to facilitate delivery and prevent lacerations.Water: A clear, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for most animal and plant life and is an excellent solvent for many substances. The chemical formula is hydrogen oxide (H2O). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Chlorine: A greenish-yellow, diatomic gas that is a member of the halogen family of elements. It has the atomic symbol Cl, atomic number 17, and atomic weight 70.906. It is a powerful irritant that can cause fatal pulmonary edema. Chlorine is used in manufacturing, as a reagent in synthetic chemistry, for water purification, and in the production of chlorinated lime, which is used in fabric bleaching.Water Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in water. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.Dystocia: Slow or difficult OBSTETRIC LABOR or CHILDBIRTH.Disinfectants: Substances used on inanimate objects that destroy harmful microorganisms or inhibit their activity. Disinfectants are classed as complete, destroying SPORES as well as vegetative forms of microorganisms, or incomplete, destroying only vegetative forms of the organisms. They are distinguished from ANTISEPTICS, which are local anti-infective agents used on humans and other animals. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 11th ed)ArchivesDichelobacter nodosus: A gram-negative, obligate anaerobe of the family Cardiobacteriaceae. It has polar fimbriae and is the causative agent of FOOT ROT and DIGITAL DERMATITIS. It is the lone species in the genus Dichelobacter.Dental Waste: Any waste product generated by a dental office, surgery, clinic, or laboratory including amalgams, saliva, and rinse water.Cross Reactions: Serological reactions in which an antiserum against one antigen reacts with a non-identical but closely related antigen.Influenza, Human: An acute viral infection in humans involving the respiratory tract. It is marked by inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA; the PHARYNX; and conjunctiva, and by headache and severe, often generalized, myalgia.Influenza A virus: The type species of the genus INFLUENZAVIRUS A that causes influenza and other diseases in humans and animals. Antigenic variation occurs frequently between strains, allowing classification into subtypes and variants. Transmission is usually by aerosol (human and most non-aquatic hosts) or waterborne (ducks). Infected birds shed the virus in their saliva, nasal secretions, and feces.Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype: A subtype of INFLUENZA A VIRUS with the surface proteins hemagglutinin 1 and neuraminidase 1. The H1N1 subtype was responsible for the Spanish flu pandemic of 1918.Influenza A Virus, H5N1 Subtype: A subtype of INFLUENZA A VIRUS comprised of the surface proteins hemagglutinin 5 and neuraminidase 1. The H5N1 subtype, frequently referred to as the bird flu virus, is endemic in wild birds and very contagious among both domestic (POULTRY) and wild birds. It does not usually infect humans, but some cases have been reported.Influenza in Birds: Infection of domestic and wild fowl and other BIRDS with INFLUENZA A VIRUS. Avian influenza usually does not sicken birds, but can be highly pathogenic and fatal in domestic POULTRY.Epitopes, T-Lymphocyte: Antigenic determinants recognized and bound by the T-cell receptor. Epitopes recognized by the T-cell receptor are often located in the inner, unexposed side of the antigen, and become accessible to the T-cell receptors after proteolytic processing of the antigen.Dengue: An acute febrile disease transmitted by the bite of AEDES mosquitoes infected with DENGUE VIRUS. It is self-limiting and characterized by fever, myalgia, headache, and rash. SEVERE DENGUE is a more virulent form of dengue.Computer Security: Protective measures against unauthorized access to or interference with computer operating systems, telecommunications, or data structures, especially the modification, deletion, destruction, or release of data in computers. It includes methods of forestalling interference by computer viruses or so-called computer hackers aiming to compromise stored data.Dengue Virus: A species of the genus FLAVIVIRUS which causes an acute febrile and sometimes hemorrhagic disease in man. Dengue is mosquito-borne and four serotypes are known.Micronesia: The collective name for islands of the Pacific Ocean east of the Philippines, including the Mariana, PALAU, Caroline, Marshall, and Kiribati Islands. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p761 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p350)Confidentiality: The privacy of information and its protection against unauthorized disclosure.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Flavivirus Infections: Infections with viruses of the genus FLAVIVIRUS, family FLAVIVIRIDAE.Haemosporida: An order of heteroxenous protozoa in which the macrogamete and microgamont develop independently. A conoid is usually absent.Songbirds: PASSERIFORMES of the suborder, Oscines, in which the flexor tendons of the toes are separate, and the lower syrinx has 4 to 9 pairs of tensor muscles inserted at both ends of the tracheal half rings. They include many commonly recognized birds such as CROWS; FINCHES; robins; SPARROWS; and SWALLOWS.Protozoan Infections, Animal: Infections with unicellular organisms formerly members of the subkingdom Protozoa. The infections may be experimental or veterinary.Animal Migration: Periodic movements of animals in response to seasonal changes or reproductive instinct. Hormonal changes are the trigger in at least some animals. Most migrations are made for reasons of climatic change, feeding, or breeding.Cytochromes b: Cytochromes of the b group that have alpha-band absorption of 563-564 nm. They occur as subunits in MITOCHONDRIAL ELECTRON TRANSPORT COMPLEX III.Malaria, Avian: Any of a group of infections of fowl caused by protozoa of the genera PLASMODIUM, Leucocytozoon, and Haemoproteus. The life cycles of these parasites and the disease produced bears strong resemblance to those observed in human malaria.Bird Diseases: Diseases of birds not considered poultry, therefore usually found in zoos, parks, and the wild. The concept is differentiated from POULTRY DISEASES which is for birds raised as a source of meat or eggs for human consumption, and usually found in barnyards, hatcheries, etc.

Fatal Serratia marcescens meningitis and myocarditis in a patient with an indwelling urinary catheter. (1/5242)

Serratia marcescens is commonly isolated from the urine of patients with an indwelling urinary catheter and in the absence of symptoms is often regarded as a contaminant. A case of fatal Serratia marcescens septicaemia with meningitis, brain abscesses, and myocarditis discovered at necropsy is described. The patient was an 83 year old man with an indwelling urinary catheter who suffered from several chronic medical conditions and from whose urine Serratia marcescens was isolated at the time of catheterisation. Serratia marcescens can be a virulent pathogen in particular groups of patients and when assessing its significance in catheter urine specimens, consideration should be given to recognised risk factors such as old age, previous antibiotic treatment, and underlying chronic or debilitating disease, even in the absence of clinical symptoms.  (+info)

Role of schools in the transmission of measles in rural Senegal: implications for measles control in developing countries. (2/5242)

Patterns of measles transmission at school and at home were studied in 1995 in a rural area of Senegal with a high level of vaccination coverage. Among 209 case children with a median age of 8 years, there were no deaths, although the case fatality ratio has previously been 6-7% in this area. Forty percent of the case children had been vaccinated against measles; the proportion of vaccinated children was higher among secondary cases (47%) than among index cases (33%) (prevalence ratio = 1.36, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04-1.76). Vaccinated index cases may have been less infectious than unvaccinated index cases, since they produced fewer clinical cases among exposed children (relative risk = 0.55, 95% CI 0.29-1.04). The secondary attack rate was lower in the schools than in the homes (relative risk = 0.31, 95% CI 0.20-0.49). The school outbreaks were protracted, with 4-5 generations of cases being seen in the two larger schools. Vaccine efficacy was found to be 57% (95% CI -23 to 85) in the schools and 74% (95% CI 62-82) in the residential compounds. Measles infection resulted in a mean of 3.8 days of absenteeism per case, though this did not appear to have an impact on the children's grades. Among the index cases, 56% of children were probably infected by neighbors in the community, and 7% were probably infected at health centers, 13% outside the community, and 24% in one of the three schools which had outbreaks during the epidemic. However, most of the school-related cases occurred at the beginning and therefore contributed to the general propagation of the epidemic. To prevent school outbreaks, it may be necessary to require vaccination prior to school entry and to revaccinate children in individual schools upon detection of cases of measles. Multidose measles vaccination schedules will be necessary to control measles in developing countries.  (+info)

Risk factors for nosocomial bloodstream infections due to Acinetobacter baumannii: a case-control study of adult burn patients. (3/5242)

Risk factors for Acinetobacter baumannii bloodstream infection (BSI) were studied in patients with severe thermal injury in a burn intensive care unit where A. baumannii was endemic. Of 367 patients hospitalized for severe thermal injury during the study period, 29 patients with nosocomial A. baumannii BSI were identified (attack rate, 7.9%). Cases were compared with 58 matched controls without A. baumannii BSI. The overall mortality rate was 31% among cases and 14% among controls; only two deaths (7%) were considered directly related to A. baumannii BSI. Molecular typing of A. baumannii blood isolates by means of randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed the presence of three different strain types. Multivariate analysis showed that female gender (P = .027), total body surface area burn of > 50% (P = .016), prior nosocomial colonization with A. baumannii at a distant site (P = .0002), and use of hydrotherapy (P = .037) were independently associated with the acquisition of A. baumannii BSI in burn patients. These data underscore the need for effective infection control measures for this emerging nosocomial problem.  (+info)

Infective endocarditis due to Staphylococcus aureus: 59 prospectively identified cases with follow-up. (4/5242)

Fifty-nine consecutive patients with definite Staphylococcus aureus infective endocarditis (IE) by the Duke criteria were prospectively identified at our hospital over a 3-year period. Twenty-seven (45.8%) of the 59 patients had hospital-acquired S. aureus bacteremia. The presumed source of infection was an intravascular device in 50.8% of patients. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) revealed evidence of IE in 20 patients (33.9%), whereas transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) revealed evidence of IE in 48 patients (81.4%). The outcome for patients was strongly associated with echocardiographic findings: 13 (68.4%) of 19 patients with vegetations visualized by TTE had an embolic event or died of their infection vs. five (16.7%) of 30 patients whose vegetations were visualized only by TEE (P < .01). Most patients with S. aureus IE developed their infection as a consequence of a nosocomial or intravascular device-related infection. TEE established the diagnosis of S. aureus IE in many instances when TTE was nondiagnostic. Visualization of vegetations by TTE may provide prognostic information for patients with S. aureus IE.  (+info)

Optimizing aminoglycoside therapy for nosocomial pneumonia caused by gram-negative bacteria. (5/5242)

Nosocomial pneumonia is a notable cause of morbidity and mortality and leads to increases in lengths of hospital stays and institutional expenditures. Aminoglycosides are used to treat patients with these infections, but few data on the doses and schedules required to achieve optimal therapeutic outcomes exist. We analyzed aminoglycoside treatment data for 78 patients with nosocomial pneumonia to determine if optimization of aminoglycoside pharmacodynamic parameters results in a more rapid therapeutic response (defined by outcome and days to leukocyte count resolution and temperature resolution). Cox proportional hazards, Classification and Regression Tree (CART), and logistic regression analyses were applied to the data. By all analyses, the first measured maximum concentration of drug in serum (Cmax)/MIC predicted days to temperature resolution and the second measured Cmax/MIC predicted days to leukocyte count resolution. For days to temperature resolution and leukocyte count resolution, CART analyses produced breakpoints, with an 89% success rate at 7 days of therapy for a Cmax/MIC of > 4.7 and an 86% success rate at 7 days of therapy for a Cmax/MIC of > 4.5, respectively. Logistic regression analyses predicted a 90% probability of temperature resolution and leukocyte count resolution by day 7 if a Cmax/MIC of > or = 10 is achieved within the first 48 h of aminoglycoside therapy. Aggressive aminoglycoside dosing immediately followed by individualized pharmacokinetic monitoring would ensure that Cmax/MIC targets are achieved early in therapy. This would increase the probability of a rapid therapeutic response for pneumonia caused by gram-negative bacteria and potentially decreasing durations of parenteral antibiotic therapy, lengths of hospitalization, and institutional expenditures, a situation in which both the patient and the institution benefit.  (+info)

Efficacy of sulbactam alone and in combination with ampicillin in nosocomial infections caused by multiresistant Acinetobacter baumannii. (6/5242)

From March 1995 to March 1997, sulbactam was prospectively evaluated in patients with non-life-threatening multiresistant Acinetobacter baumannii infections. During this period, 47 patients were treated with sulbactam; of them, five were excluded because they had received < or =48 h of sulbactam therapy. A total of 42 patients, 27 males and 15 females with a mean age of 60+/-15 years, were finally evaluated. Infections were as follows: surgical wound, 19; tracheobronchitis, 12; urinary tract, 7; catheter-related bacteraemia, 2; and pneumonia, 2. Eighteen patients received intravenous sulbactam alone (1 g every 8 h) and 24 patients received intravenous sulbactam/ampicillin (1 g:2 g every 8 h) with no major adverse effects. Of the 42 patients, 39 improved or were cured and showed A. baumannii eradication and one patient had persistence of wound infection after 8 days of sulbactam/ampicillin requiring surgical debridement. Two patients died after 3 days of therapy (one of the deaths was attributable to A. baumannii infection). The in-vitro activity of the sulbactam/ampicillin combination was by virtue of the antimicrobial activity exhibited by sulbactam. Killing curves showed that sulbactam was bacteriostatic; no synergy was observed between ampicillin and sulbactam. Our results indicate that sulbactam may prove effective for non-life-threatening A. baumannii infections. Its role in the treatment of severe infections is unknown. However, the current formulation of sulbactam alone may allow its use at higher doses and provide new potential synergic combinations, particularly for those infections by A. baumannii resistant to imipenem.  (+info)

Transmission dynamics of epidemic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant enterococci in England and Wales. (7/5242)

A simple epidemiological framework for the analysis of the transmission dynamics of hospital outbreaks of epidemic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (EMRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) in hospitals in England and Wales is presented. Epidemic strains EMRSA-15 and EMRSA-16 are becoming endemic in hospitals in the United Kingdom, and theory predicts that EMRSA-15 and EMRSA-16 will reach respective endemic levels of 158 (95% confidence interval [CI], 143-173) and 116 (95% CI, 109-123) affected hospitals with stochastic fluctuations of up to 30 hospitals in each case. An epidemic of VRE is still at an early stage, and the incidence of hospitals newly affected by VRE is growing exponentially at a rate r=0.51/year (95% CI, 0.48-0.54). The likely impact of introducing surveillance policies if action is taken sufficiently early is estimated. Finally, the role of heterogeneity in hospital size is considered: "Super-spreader hospitals" may increase transmission by 40%-132% above the expected mean.  (+info)

Serum is more suitable than whole blood for diagnosis of systemic candidiasis by nested PCR. (8/5242)

PCR assays for the diagnosis of systemic candidiasis can be performed either on serum or on whole blood, but results obtained with the two kinds of samples have never been formally compared. Thus we designed a nested PCR assay in which five specific inner pairs of primers were used to amplify specific targets on the rRNA genes of Candida albicans, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, C. krusei, and C. glabrata. In vitro, the lower limit of detection of each nested PCR assay was 1 fg of purified DNA from the corresponding Candida species. In rabbits with candidemia of 120 minutes' duration following intravenous (i.v.) injection of 10(8) CFU of C. albicans, the sensitivities of the PCR in serum and whole blood were not significantly different (93 versus 86%). In other rabbits, injected with only 10(5) CFU of C. albicans, detection of candidemia by culture was possible for only 1 min, whereas DNA could be detected by PCR in whole blood and in serum for 15 and 150 min, respectively. PCR was more often positive in serum than in whole blood in 40 culture-negative samples (27 versus 7%; P < 0.05%). Lastly, experiments with rabbits injected i.v. with 20 or 200 microgram of purified C. albicans DNA showed that PCRs were positive in serum from 30 to at least 120 min after injection, suggesting that the clearance of free DNA is slow. These results suggest that serum is the sample of choice, which should be used preferentially over whole blood for the diagnosis of systemic candidiasis by PCR.  (+info)

*Birmingham Accident Hospital

Prevention of cross infection was therefore a key objective. In 1941, Sir Ashley Miles, Professor of Bacteriology at University ... as one of the foremost researchers in hospital infection particularly in the prevention of burns infection, the problems of ... Whilst infection was known in the 19th century as a dangerous complication in severe burns, until the 1950s, its significance ... Graham A. Ayliffe & Mary P. English (2003). Hospital Infection:from Miasmas to MRSA. Cambridge University Press. p. 137. ISBN ...

*Medical glove

Tanner, J; Parkinson, H (2006). "Double gloving to reduce surgical cross-infection". The Cochrane Library (3): CD003087. doi: ... Double gloving is the practice of wearing two layers of medical gloves to reduce the danger of infection from glove failure or ... This should better protect the patient against infections transmitted by the surgeon. A systematic review of the literature has ... But it was unclear if there was better protection against infections transmitted by the surgeon. Another systematic review ...

*Triatoma virus

"Can Triatoma virus inhibit infection of Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas,1909 ) in Triatoma infestans (Klug)? A cross infection and co ... Triatoma virus infection leads to a 97.6% mortality rate in nymphs and inhibited molting in laboratory colonies. TrV causes ... infection study". Journal of Invertebrate Pathology. doi:10.1016/j.jip.2017.09.014. ...

*Neonatal intensive care unit

Cross-infection between babies was greatly feared. Strict nursing routines involved staff wearing gowns and masks, constant ... SCBU might provide tube-feeding, oxygen therapy, antibiotics to treat infection and phototherapy for jaundice. In a SCBU, a ... Protection from cold temperature, infection, noise, drafts and excess handling: Incubators may be described as bassinets ... However, breathing difficulties, intraventricular hemorrhage, necrotizing enterocolitis and infections still claim many infant ...

*Foot rot

The disease is different in cattle and sheep and cross-infection is not thought to occur. The first sign of a foot-rot ... Super foot rot infection occurs much faster and is usually much more severe. Most normal foot rot treatments will not cure this ... Foot rot, or infectious pododermatitis, is a hoof infection commonly found in sheep, goats, and cattle. As the name suggests, ... The cause of the infection in cattle is two species of anaerobic bacteria, Fusobacterium necrophorum and Bacteroides ...

*Dictyocaulus

2003). "Dictyocaulus species: cross infection between cattle and red deer". New Zealand Veterinary Journal. 51 (2): 93-98. doi: ... Routine deworming of horses and donkeys may help prevent cross infection when kept together. Pastures that housed donkeys may ... D. viviparus is the most common lungworm of cattle; the infection is also known as husk or parasitic bronchitis. Although ... However, both species have been shown capable of cross-infecting cattle and cervids (at least in New Zealand) . The parasite ...

*Hospital-acquired pneumonia

Also, poor hand-washing and inadequate disinfection of respiratory devices cause cross-infection and are important factors. ... It is usually caused by a bacterial infection, rather than a virus. HAP is the second most common nosocomial infection (after ... It is the most common cause of death among nosocomial infections and is the primary cause of death in intensive care units. HAP ... Pneumonia that starts in the hospital tends to be more serious than other lung infections because: people in the hospital are ...

*Jet injector

1999). "Risk of cross-patient infection with clinical use of a needleless injector device". American Journal Infect Control. 27 ... Numerous studies have found cross-infection of diseases from jet injections. An experiment using mice, published in 1985, ... Hoffman, P.N; R.A Abuknesha; N.J Andrews; D Samuel; J.S Lloyd (2001-07-16). "A model to assess the infection potential of jet ... Hepatitis B can be transmitted by less than one millionth of a millilitre so makers of injectors must ensure there is no cross- ...

*Orf (disease)

It is advisable for those handling infected animals to wear disposable gloves to prevent cross-infection and self-infection. A ... Occasionally the infection can be extensive and persistent if the animal does not produce an immune response. A live virus ... In some environments infection is injected by scratches from thistles of both growing and felled plants. Symptoms include ... Infected locations can include the finger, hand, arm, face and even the penis (caused by infection either from the hand during ...

*Mycobacterium bovis

Much of this success can be attributed to sustained cattle controls reducing cross-infection and breaking the disease cycle. ... M. bovis infections in cattle herds in the United States is not common. M. bovis is endemic in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus ... In the 1930s, 40% of cattle in the UK were infected with M. bovis and there were 50,000 new cases of human M. bovis infection ... Infection occurs if the bacterium is ingested.[citation needed] M. bovis is usually transmitted to humans by consuming raw, ...

*Streptococcus canis

Tikofsky, L L & Zadoks, R N (March 2005). "Cross-infection between cats and cows: origin and control of Streptococcus canis ... canis infection or if it is induced from the treatment of dogs with fluoroquinolone during the infection. In other mammals, the ... these bacteria can cause opportunistic infections. These infections were known to afflict dogs and cats prior to the formal ... During infection, the bacteria have been known to cause neonatal septicemia, abortion, and cellulitis in dogs. In addition, S. ...

*Common brushtail possum in New Zealand

Much of this success can be attributed to sustained possum control reducing cross-infection and breaking the disease cycle. For ... The TB-free New Zealand programme is regarded as "world-leading". It has successfully reduced cattle and deer herd infection ... Kean, J.M.; Barlow, N. D.; Hickling, G.J. (1999). "Evaluating potential sources of bovine tuberculosis infection in a New ... of new herd infections can be traced back to possums or ferrets. The Biosecurity Act 1993, which established a national pest ...

*Cystic fibrosis

O'Malley CA (May 2009). "Infection control in cystic fibrosis: cohorting, cross-contamination, and the respiratory therapist" ( ... Antibiotics by mouth such as ciprofloxacin or azithromycin are given to help prevent infection or to control ongoing infection ... Some lung infections require surgical removal of the infected part of the lung. If this is necessary many times, lung function ... Inflammation and infection cause injury and structural changes to the lungs, leading to a variety of symptoms. In the early ...

*Syringe

These are not used much in human medicine because of the risk of cross-infection via the needle. An exception is the personal ... Zakrzewska, J. M.; Greenwood, I.; Jackson, J. (27 January 2001). "Cross-infection control: Introducing safety syringes into a ... In medical settings, single-use needles and syringes effectively reduce the risk of cross-contamination. Medical syringes are ... still unsafe as it can introduce bacteria from the skin into the bloodstream and cause serious and sometimes lethal infections ...

*Dental anesthesia

Zakrzewska, J. M.; Greenwood, I.; Jackson, J. (27 January 2001). "Cross-infection control: Introducing safety syringes into a ... Nitrous oxide (N2O), also known as "laughing gas", easily crosses the alveoli of the lung and is dissolved into the passing ...

*Phanerochaete salmonicolor

Management of P. salmonicolor and Pink Disease can be very difficult given its wide host range, making cross-infection a ... On rubber trees, initial stages of infection appear as drops of latex and silky-white mycelial growth on the bark surface. In ... In cacao trees, first symptoms of infection usually present as a sparse white mycelium on the bark surface, which can be easily ... The use of fungicides prevents the basidiospores from germinating and causing infection. Phanerochaete salmonicolor is of ...

*Kangaroo care

In its origins, this was contextually correct in protecting hospitalised infants from cross-infections. Some argue however that ... There is evidence that it is effective in reducing both infant mortality and the risk of hospital-acquired infection, and ... that overcrowding in their hospital meant that three babies in an incubator would result in potentially lethal cross-infections ... hospital-acquired infection, and low body temperature (hypothermia); it is also associated with increased weight gain, growth ...

*Hygiene

"Guidelines for the prevention of infection and cross-infection in the domestic environment: focus on home hygiene issues in ... Simply, if the chain of infection is broken, infection cannot spread. In response to the need for effective codes of hygiene in ... "Guidelines for Environmental Infection Control in Health-Care Facilities. Recommendations of CDC and the Healthcare Infection ... infection) or that it is necessary to suffer a clinical infection. Nor is there evidence that hygiene measures such as hand ...

*Helen Mayo

To combat the risks of cross-infection, she instituted a policy of strict isolation of babies from other patients. Each child ... due to the risks of cross-infection, the Adelaide Children's Hospital would not treat those under the age of two. In 1913, Mayo ... at the same time organising the Red Cross donor transfusion service. Dr Elma Linton Sandford-Morgan (22 February 1890 - 1983), ...

*Ida Ørskov

Her thesis Om Klebsiella (1956) was one of the first scientific papers addressing the presence of bacterial cross-infection. ... was the first scientific study pointing to the risk of bacterial cross-infection in hospitals. Born in Copenhagen, Ørskov was ...

*Pseudomonas aeruginosa

... causing cross-infections in hospitals and clinics. It is also able to decompose hydrocarbons and has been used to break down ... On the rare occasions where infection is superficial and limited (for example, ear infections or nail infections), topical ... and also causes other blood infections. It is the most common cause of infections of burn injuries and of the outer ear (otitis ... Cystic fibrosis patients are also predisposed to P. aeruginosa infection of the lungs. P. aeruginosa may also be a common cause ...

*Green nails

... causing cross-infections in hospitals and clinics. It is implicated in hot-tub rash. It is also able to decompose hydrocarbons ... Green nails may be (1) due to a Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection causing a green nail syndrome or (2) the result of copper in ... The symptoms of such infections are generalized inflammation and sepsis. If such colonizations occur in critical body organs, ... ISBN 0-7216-2921-0. Balcht, Aldona; Smith, Raymond (1994). Pseudomonas Aeruginosa: Infections and Treatment. Informa Health ...

*Interdigital dermatitis in cattle

This is also the agent of footrot in sheep, but strains appear to be different and there is no cross-infection. Interdigital ... Interdigital dermatitis appears as an infections of the skin between the claws and is usually very mild. There may be fluid or ...

*Gladys Dick

... to prevent cross infection among infants. Dick died of stroke in Palo Alto, California on August 21, 1963. "Gladys Rowena Henry ...

*Paper cup

These studies, as well as the reduction in the risk of cross-infection, encouraged the use of paper cups in hospitals. Dixie ...

*Nursing in Japan

In 1887, the Japanese Red Cross (JRC) was founded and by 1890 had begun teaching and recruiting nurses for training. Though ... Infection Control Nursing, Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing or Women's Health Nursing, after obtaining their national ... In response to disaster relief, the Japanese Red Cross became an integral part of nursing development. By 1915, nurse ... infection control, infertility nursing, neonatal care, rehabilitative care, respiratory care, and other specialized fields. ...
Empiric therapeutic regimens for hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP), health care-associated pneumonia (HCAP), and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) are outlined below, including those for early onset, late onset, and multidrug-resistant (MDR) factors. Definitions HAP: diagnosis made > 48h after admission VAP: diagnosis made 48-72h after ...
Ms. Jordana Schmier and Ms. Svetlana Semenova recently published, "Estimated Hospital Costs Associated with Preventable Health Care-Associated Infections if Health Care Antiseptic Products Were Unavailable." The article was published in ClinicoEconomics and Outcomes Research.. Health care-associated infections (HAIs) pose a significant health care and cost burden. This study estimates annual HAI hospital costs in the US avoided through use of health care antiseptics (health care personnel hand washes and rubs; surgical hand scrubs and rubs; patient preoperative and preinjection skin preparations).. Click here to view the article. ...
Newborn infants hospitalized in a NICU have host factors that not only make them more vulnerable to acquisition of health care-associated infections but also increase their risk of developing more serious illnesses. Whether an infant is born preterm or at term, many components of their innate and adaptive immune systems exhibit diminished function when compared with older children and adults. Infants with birth weights less than1500 g (very low birth weight) have rates of health care-associated infections 3 times higher than those who weigh greater than 1500 g at birth. However, the increased susceptibility to infection in infants of very low birth weight is multifactorial and related to both the developmental deficiencies in the innate and adaptive immune systems and a greater likelihood of a critical illness requiring invasive monitoring and procedures. Furthermore, the immunologic deficiencies can be exacerbated by the critical nature of many of the illnesses affecting newborn ...
BACKGROUND: Pneumonia surveillance is difficult and time-consuming. The definition is complicated, and there are many opportunities for subjectivity in determining infection status. OBJECTIVE: To compare traditional infection control professional (ICP) surveillance for pneumonia among neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) patients with computerized surveillance of chest x-ray reports using an automated detection system based on a natural language processor. METHODS: This system evaluated chest x-rays from 2 NICUs over a 2-year period. It flagged x-rays indicative of pneumonia according to rules derived from the National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance System definition as applied to radiology reports. Data from the automated system were compared with pneumonia data collected prospectively by an ICP. RESULTS: Sensitivity of the computerized surveillance in NICU 1 was 71%, and specificity was 99.8%. The positive predictive value was 7.9%, and the negative predictive value (NPV) was >99%. Data from ...
New publication on Attributable Mortality of Healthcare-Associated Infections Due to Multidrug-Resistant Gram-Negative Bacteria and Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus from Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology Attributable Mortality of Healthcare-Associated Infections Due to Multidrug-Resistant Gram-Negative Bacteria and Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus
The incidence, mortality, and medical care costs of Clostridium difficile (C. difficile), a common and sometimes fatal health care-associated infection, are all at historic highs, according to a report released yesterday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The report shows that C. difficile is not just a problem in hospitals-it is a patient safety issue in all types of medical facilities, including nursing homes, physician offices, and outpatient facilities. C. difficile causes diarrhea linked to 14,000 American deaths each year. Almost half of the infections occur in people younger than 65, but more than 90% of deaths occur in people 65 and older. About 25% of C. difficile infections first show symptoms in hospital patients; 75% first show in nursing home patients or in people recently cared for in physician offices and clinics.. To help reduce the spread of C. difficile, CDC provides guidelines and tools to the health care community, including a podcast on 6 steps to ...
1. Klevens RM, Edwards JR, Richards CL Jr, et al. Estimating health care-associated infections and deaths in U.S. hospitals, 2002. Public Health Rep 2007;122:160-166.. 2. Palumbo, Aimee J, Loveless, Ann, et al., Evaluation of Healthcare-Associated Infection Surveillance in Pennsylvania Hospitals, 2012. Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology2012; Vol. 33, No. 2, February 2012.. 24. Gerding DN, Muto CA, Owens RC. Measures to control and prevent Clostridium difficile infection. Clin Infect Dis 2008; 46(suppl 1):S43-S49.. 27. Huang SS, Datta R, Platt R. Risk of acquiring antibiotic-resistant bacteria from prior room occupants. Arch Intern Med 2006;166: 1945-1951.. 29. Shaughnessy, M., MD, Micielli, R., MD, et al. Evaluation of Hospital Room Assignment and Acquisition of Clostridium Difficile Infection. Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology. Vol. 32, No. 3 (March 2011), pp 201-206.. 30. Klevens RM, Edwards JR, Richards CL, et al. Estimating health care-associated infections and deaths in ...
The California Department of Public Health (CDPH) released two annual reports recently. The reports provide information about healthcare-associated infections (HAI) and influenza vaccination rates among health care providers.. While California hospitals have made progress in preventing healthcare-associated infections, HAIs continue to be a significant public health issue in the state. In 2015, hospitals reported 19,847 healthcare-associated infections to CDPH. From 2014 to 2015, 56 hospitals demonstrated significant improvement in preventing one or more HAI type. Hospitals are making progress in preventing HAI with the exception of C. difficile diarrheal infections (CDI), which increased 8 percent since 2011. CDPH offered infection-prevention assistance to 73 hospitals with high infection rates.. The departments influenza vaccination report indicates that vaccination rates among health care providers have improved in the past five years. Since 2011, vaccination rates increased 21 percent for ...
As a significant cause of death, healthcare-associated infections (HAI) are a critical challenge to public health in the United States. At any given time, about 1 in 25 patients has an infection while receiving care in U.S. hospitals. These infections result in up to $33 billion in excess medical costs every year.. ASTHO is working with HHS, CDC, and the Keystone Center to determine the role of state health officials in decreasing and preventing HAIs, specifically addressing priorities, challenges, and solutions at the state and regional level. In March 2011, ASTHO and CDC jointly released the HAI policy toolkit -Eliminating Healthcare-Associated Infections: State Policy Options. The companion report, Policies for Eliminating Healthcare-Associated Infections: Lessons from State Stakeholder Engagement was released in January 2012. ASTHO also maintains situational awareness on HAI-related policies and initiatives, shares this information with members, and represents the state health agency ...
Nosocomial infection is one of the leading problems in the health system, therefore it is directly related to increased costs and hospitalization time. The prevalence rate of nosocomial infection in terms of geographic region, type of hospital, the patient, and the calculating method even in various regions of the country is different. According to the WHO report, the prevalence of the nosocomial infection in developed countries is below 5%, however, in developing countries, this rate is different (6). In this study, the incidence of nosocomial infection is about 1.1%, which is not comparable to the global statistics in developing countries; a study conducted in Benin, in 2012, patients from the same ward were studied in the same day in each hospital for real estimation of nosocomial infection, and data showed that the prevalence rate of nosocomial infection was 19.1% (10). Other studies, especially from developing countries, reported the prevalence rate of 13.9% - 17.9% (11, 12). The prevalence ...
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OBJECTIVE: To describe the epidemiology of infections in intensive care units (ICUs), whether present at admission or acquired during the stay. METHODS: Prospective data collection lasting 6 months in 71 Italian adult ICUs. Patients were screened for infections and risk factors at ICU admission and daily during their stay. MAIN RESULTS: Out of 9,493 consecutive patients admitted to the 71 ICUs, 11.6% had a community-acquired infection, 7.4% a hospital-acquired infection, and 11.4% an ICU-acquired infection. The risk curve of acquiring infection in the ICU was higher in patients who entered without infection than in those already infected (log-rank test, p , .0001; at 15 days, 44.0% vs. 34.6%). Hospital mortality (27.8% overall) was higher in patients admitted with infection than in those who acquired infection in the ICU (45.0% vs. 32.4%, p , .0001). Although the presence of infection per se did not influence mortality, the conditions of severe sepsis and septic shock were strong prognostic ...
The costs of hospital-acquired (nosocomial) and other health care-associated infections are great. These infections have affected as many as 1.7 million patients at a cost of ~$28-33 billion and 99,000 lives in U.S. hospitals annually. Although efforts to lower infection risks have been challenged by the numbers of immunocompromised patients, antibiotic-resistant bacteria, fungal and viral superinfections, and invasive devices and procedures, a prevailing viewpoint-often termed "zero tolerance"-is that almost all health care-associated infections should be avoidable with strict application of evidence-based prevention guidelines (Table 168-1). In fact, rates of device-related infections-historically, the largest drivers of risk-have fallen steadily over the past few years. Unfortunately, at the same time, antimicrobial-resistant pathogens have risen in number and are estimated to contribute to ~23,000 deaths in and outside of hospitals annually. This chapter reviews health care-associated and ...
Glossary for healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). Information includes common acronyms and terms relating to healthcare-associated infections.
TY - JOUR. T1 - Bacterial contamination of patients medical charts in a surgical ward and the intensive care unit. T2 - Impact on nosocomial infections. AU - Teng, Sing On. AU - Lee, Wen Sen. AU - Ou, Tsong Yih. AU - Hsieh, Yu Chia. AU - Lee, Wuan Chan. AU - Lin, Yi Chun. PY - 2009/2. Y1 - 2009/2. N2 - Background and purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the degree of bacterial contamination of patients files, and to compare the colonized bacteria between files from the surgical intensive care unit (ICU) and the surgical ward at the Wan Fang Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. Methods: 180 medical charts were randomly selected from the surgical ICU (n = 90) and the surgical ward (n = 90). The charts were sampled using sterile swabs moistened with sterile normal saline. The swabs were immediately transferred to trypticase soy broth and incubated aerobically for 48 h, then subcultured to separated sheep blood and eosin-methylene blue agars. Microorganisms were identified by the standard ...
HYPOTHESIS:The levels of cholesterol, its fractions (high-density lipoprotein cholesterol [HDL-C] and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDL-C]), and serum albumin reflect nutritional status and are related to in-hospital death, nosocomial infection, and length of stay in the hospital. DESIGN:A prospective cohort study of hospitalized patients. SETTING:The Service of General Surgery of a tertiary hospital. PATIENTS:A consecutive series of 2989 patients admitted for more than 1 day. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:Nosocomial infection, in-hospital death, and length of stay. RESULTS:During follow-up, 62 (2%) of the patients died, 382 (13%) developed a nosocomial infection, and 257 (9%) developed a surgical site infection. Serum albumin (lowest quintile vs highest quintile: adjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-2.9) and HDL-C (lowest quintile vs highest quintile: OR, 2.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-3.0) levels showed an inverse and highly significant relationship with nosocomial ...
This meta-analysis presents a summary of the estimated benefit of CHG bathing to prevent infection in the ICU. CHG bathing was most effective for the prevention of CLABSI among ICU patients, demonstrating a 56% reduction. However, the magnitude of benefit is affected by the underlying risk of CLABSI among ICU populations. Even among an average risk group of five CLABSI per 1000 central-line-days, 360 patients will need to be bathed with CHG to prevent a single event. If the underlying risk of CLABSI is only 1 per 1000 central-line-days than the NNT increases to 1780. Effectiveness was also shown for reducing MRSA colonisation and MRSA bacteraemia. However, even among average baseline-risk populations, the NNT is approximately 600 and 2800, respectively. Because of varying study designs (before-and-after versus randomised crossover trials), there remains uncertainty in the effectiveness of CHG-B to prevent other infections among adults in the ICU.. Previous reviews of daily CHG bathing to reduce ...
The point prevalence survey of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) and antimicrobial use organized by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC-PPS) and the Global Point Prevalence Survey of antimicrobial consumption (Global-PPS) were simultaneously performed in Belgian acute care hospitals in 2017. Belgian acute care hospitals were invited to participate in either the ECDC or Global-PPS. Hospital/ward/patient-level data were collected between September-December 2017. All patients present in the wards at 8 a.m. on the day of the PPS were included. The data of the ECDC and Global-PPS on antimicrobial consumption were pooled. Detailed data on HAIs were analysed for ECDC-PPS. Overall, 110 Belgian acute care hospital sites participated in the ECDC and Global-PPS (countrywide participation rate: 81.4%, 28,007 patients). Overall, a crude prevalence of patients with at least one antimicrobial of 27.1% (95% confidence interval (CI) 26.5-27.6%) was found. The most frequently reported
Overview Problem: Hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) is the second most common nosocomial infection and is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. In the surgical population, HAP is associated with a 55% increase in length of stay and increased costs of approximately $31,000.00 per case. Neurologically impaired patients (those with brain injury causing alterations in mental status, immobility, impaired swallowing and cough, and increased risk of aspiration) are particularly vulnerable to HAP. HAP negatively impacts patient comfort and satisfaction, increases costs associated with diagnostic tests and treatments, increases risk for sepsis, and potential for higher level of care. It is estimated 95% of care-dependent patients on the Royal Columbian Hospital (RCH) neuroscience unit acquire HAP during their stay.. Gap: Research studies have shown improving oral hygiene in critical care, neuroscience intensive care units and cardiac surgery reduces the incidence of HAP. However, in the acutely ...
Healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) can be serious and even deadly for patients. Those who access the health care system for illness or injury are expecting care and treatment, not additional illness and complications, yet the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 1 in 20 hospitalized patients develop an HAI. Treatment of HAIs can be difficult and may last for years, especially when the organism is resistant to multiple antibiotics. In addition to the human burden, excess costs are incurred across the health care system and many patients and payors are no longer willing to accept these avoidable costs.. Transmission of organisms that cause HAIs can occur in many ways: caregiver-to-patient, environment-to-patient, or patient-to-patient. Programs that have been successful in reducing HAIs have made this a strategic imperative and generally focused on improving multiple interventions, such as hand hygiene, use of contact and other precautions, active screening, and robust ...
David B. Nash, M.D., MBA, FACP and editor of the American Journal of Medical Quality will unveil a groundbreaking supplement with three peer-reviewed articles about hospital-acquired infections in the National Press Club (Murrow Room), 529 14th Street, NW, Washington, DC on November 20, from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Two of the studies confront the issue of "blaming" patient characteristics (age, risk factors, severity of illness) for higher infection rates - instead of a hospitals processes of care (hand washing, timeliness of pre-surgical antibiotics, elevation of pneumonia patients, proper placement of IV tubes). The third article highlights one hospitals infection reduction efforts, which demonstrate that the costs of treating a hospital-acquired infection can outstrip the payment system - in essence creating a "lose-lose-lose" situation for patients, hospitals and payers.. Hospital-acquired infections are an important issue which Congress (the House Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations) ...
The services that the Division of Infectious Diseases and Hospital Epidemiology provides are comprehensive. In some circumstances, these services are chiefly consultative and collaborative, working hand-in-hand with referring physicians. In other circumstances, care is longitudinal and the Division serves as the principal caregiver for patients that are hospitalized for the diagnosis and treatment of infectious diseases. In nearly all instances, care is multidisciplinary, involving other physicians and medical professionals.. ...
The latest market report published by Credence Research, Inc. "Nosocomial Infection Treatment Market - Growth, Share, Opportunities, Competitive Analysis, and Forecast, 2016-2024," the global nosocomial infection treatment market was valued at US$ 28,565 Mn in 2015, and is expected to reach US$ 36,746 Mn by 2024, expanding at a CAGR of 2.5% from 2016 to 2024.. Browse the full report Nosocomial Infection Treatment Market - Growth, Share, Opportunities, Competitive Analysis, and Forecast, 2016 - 2024 report at http://www.credenceresearch.com/report/nosocomial-infection-treatment-market. Market Insights. Nosocomial infection, also known as hospital acquired or associated infection (HAI) is defined as an infection developed in patients during the hospital stay that was earlier not present or incubated during admission in the hospital. Nosocomial infection is majorly caused by bacteria, virus, or fungal pathogen and is becoming the leading cause of morbidity and mortality globally, causing enormous ...
Vascular device-related infection is suspected on the basis of the appearance of the catheter site or the presence of fever or bacteremia without another source in patients with vascular catheters. The diagnosis is confirmed by the recovery of the same species of microorganism from peripheral-blood cultures (preferably two cultures drawn from peripheral veins by separate venipunctures) and from semiquantitative or quantitative cultures of the vascular catheter tip. Less commonly used diagnostic measures include differential time to positivity (,2 h) for blood drawn through the vascular access device compared with a sample from a peripheral vein or differences in quantitative cultures (a 5- to 10-fold or greater "step-up") for blood samples drawn simultaneously from a peripheral vein and from a CVC.When infusionrelated sepsis is considered (e.g., because of the abrupt onset of fever or shock temporally related to infusion therapy), a sample of the infusate or blood product should be retained for ...
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Study highlights serious problem of hospital-acquired infections in Africa. Research funded by the Wellcome Trust has highlighted the scale of the problem of hospital-acquired infections in sub-Saharan Africa. The study, published today in the Lancet, suggests that bloodstream infections acquired while in care might contribute to one in every 20 deaths that occur in children in hospitals in the region.. The issue of HAIs is well recognised in high-income countries, with major initiatives promoting cleanliness among hospital staff and visitors. However, despite many African hospitals being severely overcrowded, and suffering frequent shortages of basic supplies such as running water and clean linen, virtually no data exist on the number of hospital-acquired infections in the region.. "The conditions in African hospitals are often poor, and it is very likely that these environments lead to considerable amounts of sickness among patients who are already debilitated by their primary illness," ...
AHRQ News and Numbers provides statistical highlights on the use and cost of health services and health insurance in the United States.
Our water lines are regularly checked to ensure they pass the highest water quality standards.. Additional technology includes an ultrasonic bath for pre-sterilization cleaning, an intra-oral camera and a 17 inch medical grade monitor. This enables our patients to see high resolution images of the area that we are working on, and also pre and post operative results.. Other features include an autoclave tower for sterilization, and an ecowater system. Our cabinetry is among the most innovative and hygienic available. It includes Scandanavian design, and teflon seals on all the doors and drawers. The surfaces are MRSA resistant.. Whether the treatment involves surgically placing a dental implant or a childrens check-up, Monkstown Dental Surgery maintains optimum hygiene standards at all times.. ...
Infectious diseases pose special challenges in healthcare settings, where people are more at risk due to underlying illness and vulnerability. Healthcare-associated infections (HAI) are common causes of morbidity and mortality and lead to high financial burden on healthcare systems.
The first nationwide estimates of the burden of invasive MRSA were derived from ABCs; in 2005, ≈94,000 cases and ≈18,000 deaths were attributed to invasive MRSA (16). Most (≈84%) infections were health care-associated-either hospital-onset (culture obtained ,3 days after admission) or health care-associated community-onset (culture obtained from outpatient or within 3 calendar days after admission from a patient with a health care-associated risk factor, which include presence of a central venous catheter within 2 days before MRSA culture or history of surgery, hospitalization, dialysis, or residence of long-term care facility in the 12 months preceding culture date). The prominence of health care-associated community-onset infections was newly brought to light by the ABCs network (16). This report led to increased awareness of MRSA infections, and prevention of health care-associated MRSA became a goal for public health agencies and policy makers (17-19). ABCs documented a 54% decline in ...
In efforts to combat healthcare-associated infections, nanosilver materials are used in many medical devices for silvers antimicrobial properties.
Evidence-based statements to deliver quality improvements in preventing and controlling healthcare-associated infections in secondary care settings
Two board members of the Vitamin D Council, Dr. Sadeq Quraishi and Dr. William Grant, write a response to a study on healthcare-associated infections.
NIH Funding Opportunities and Notices in the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts: BRAIN Initiative: Next-Generation Invasive Devices for Recording and Modulation in the Human Central Nervous System (UG3/UH3 - Clinical Trial Required) RFA-NS-18-021. NINDS
CUPERTINO, Calif., Aug. 21, 2017-- Cagan McAfee Capital Partners and seasoned investor/operator, Myles Sherman of Austin, TX, have teamed up to acquire Minimally Invasive Devices. Wayne Poll, will continue with the new company to be called FloShield, Inc.. Objective Capital Partners, a leading M&A investment banking firm specializing in middle market M&A,...
A prospective study of nosocomial sepsis was performed in the NICU of Surgiscope Pvt. Hospital to determine the organisms causing nosocomial infection in neonates and their resistance patterns; also studied were risk factors, clinical presentation, hematologic parameters, and outcomes over a 12-month period. A total of 363 neonates were admitted to the ICU. A total of 250 blood samples were sent for culture and sensitivity testing in suspicious cases of nosocomial infection. All patients were on antibiotics. Of these, 36.8% (92 of 250) had a positive result on culture. Isolated bacteria were mostly gram-negative bacilli (80.43%) with a marked predominance of Klebsiella (n = 32 [43.2%]) followed by Escherichia coli (n = 18 [24.32%]), Pseudomonas (n = 16 [21.62%]), and acinetobacter (n = 5 [6.75%]). Resistance to gentamicin was 100% for all organisms. Resistance to amikacin was 100% for E coli, Pseudomonas, and acinetobacter and 40% for Klebsiella. Resistance of these gram-negative rods ranged ...
Hospital-acquired infections occur because a hospital puts many people with infections in one place. Learn more about hospital-acquired infections.
Latest nosocomial infections emerging treatments studies and research news. Medical professionals and specialists can stay updated on nosocomial infections research.
Previous reports on pediatric HAIs are sparse, with many studies restricted to a few hospitals or a limited time period. 14 - 16 While many studies provide data on HAI incidence among pediatric patients, few focus on pathogens and antimicrobial resistance profiles. This report is an update of the NHSNs previous pediatric-specific HAI antimicrobial resistance report, 2 and it provides a summary of pathogens and AST data reported from ,2,500 healthcare facilities. This report can be used by the pediatric infectious disease community and other pediatric or neonatal healthcare professionals, as well as by infection control and public health organizations, to inform prevention and antimicrobial stewardship policies that seek improvements in antimicrobial prescribing for pediatric patients.. Overall, 60% of pathogens included in this analysis were reported from general acute-care hospitals. Because of federal reporting requirements for participation in the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services ...
(EMAILWIRE.COM, September 11, 2017 ) Healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) are a major threat to patient safety. HAIs occur in hospitalized patients, and are not present at the time of admission. The most common types of HAIs are related to the use of invasive devices or surgical procedures, and...
An EU-wide survey estimated that 4.2 million healthcare-associated infections occur every year in European long-term care facilities, compared to an estimated 3.5 million occurring in European acute care hospitals, and that on any given day, over 116 400 residents have at least one active healthcare-associated infection. Pete Kinross, an expert in surveillance of healthcare-associated infections at the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC), speaks about these findings during a session on antimicrobial resistance in these healthcare settings, at ECCMID 2017.. ...
For hospital-acquired infection ID consultation is recommended.. Weigh risks and benefits of adding aminoglycoside for critical illness, immunocompromise, or history of infection or colonization with drug-resistant Gram-negative rods.. At UCSF Medical Center, refer to the UCSFMC Code Sepsis Guidelines.. For patients with neutropenia, organ transplant, severe hepatic failure, or current/recent (,7 days) piperacillin/tazobactam or cefepime:. Vancomycin. Plus. MeropenemID-R: SFGH VASF 1-2 g IV q8h ...
... A hospital-acquired infection, also known as a HAI or in medical literature as a nosocomial infection, is an infection whose development is favoured by a hospital environment, such as one acquired by a patient during a hospital visit or one developing among hospital staff. Such infections include fungal and bacterial infections and are aggravated by the reduced resistance of individual patients.
... are infections which are acquired in healthcare facilities or hospitals, after the person is admitted for reasons other than the infection. This is the forum for discussing anything related to this health condition
... are infections which are acquired in healthcare facilities or hospitals, after the person is admitted for reasons other than the infection. This is the forum for discussing anything related to this health condition
|p|The aim of this study was to determine the types nosocomial infections (NIs) and the risk factors for NIs in the central intensive care unit (ICU) of Trakya University Hospital. The patients admitted to the ICU were observed prospectively by the unit-directed active surveillance method based on patient and the laboratory over a 9-month-period. The samples of urine, blood, sputum or tracheal aspirate were taken from the patients on the first and the third days of their hospitalization in ICU; the patients were cultured routinely. Other samples were taken and cultured if there was suspicion of an infection. Infections were considered as ICU-associated if they developed after 48 hours of hospitalization in the unit and 5 days after discharge from the unit if the patients had been sent to a different ward in the hospital. The rate of NIs in 135 patients assigned was found to be 68%. The most common infection sites were lower respiratory tract, urinary tract, bloodstream, catheter site
Madrid, Spain, May 23-27, 2017. BACKGROUND: Healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) result in increased morbidity and mortality, prolonged lengths of stay and increased medical costs. Rates of HAIs in Greek NICUs are among the highest in Europe. An understanding of healthcare worker (HCW) attitudes and cultural perspectives around the barriers to preventing HAI is an important precursor to the development and implementation of preventative strategies.. Διαβάστε Περισσότερα ...
1. The determination of hospital infections, classification and conditions promoting the development.. 2. Etiology, pathogenesis and clinical forms of hospital infections caused by pathogenic bacteria (salmonelosis, escherichiosis, tuberculosis, chlamidia and micoplasmic urethritis).. 3. Opportunistic jatrogenic infections. Hospital strain. Hospital ecotype senseless to antibiotics, antiseptics. The role of medical interference and immunodeficiency. Superinfection by hospital ecotape.. 4. Bacteriological diagnostics of hospital infections caused by the pathogenic and conditional pathogenic microorganisms.. 5. The principles of prophilaxis and treatment of hospital infections. Sterilization, desinfection, antiseptic, chemotherapeutics, immunoprophylaxis, immunotherapy, pidemic measures: isolation of the sick, premises and materials. Danger of transfusions.. PROCEDURE OF PRACTICAL SESSION. Task 1. To study the smears from patients material.. Task 2. To study the growth of the Staphylococcus ...
3 May 2016 , Cairo-- On the occasion of World Hand Hygiene Day, celebrated worldwide on 5 May, the World Health Organization (WHO) urges all health care workers to increase safety through improving hand hygiene and reducing health care-associated infections. The subject of this years campaign is surgical site infections, with particular focus on ensuring clean hands from the moment the patient enters the hospital, through surgical preparation and post-operative care, until the patient is discharged ...
Many people are astonished to learn that the chances of contracting an infection or illness while in the care of a hospital are one in four, or 25%. Nearly 2 million infections reported each year are blamed on hospital or healthcare center negligence. An estimated 100,000 of those are fatal. These serious infections can be caused by viruses or bacteria from surgery or surgical instruments, catheters, IVs, injections, and ventilators. Commonly reported hospital-acquired infections include:. Staph - caused by bacteria, some forms of staph, such as MRSA, are extremely resistant to antibiotics and cause serious problems. MRSA is often spread from person to person by healthcare providers with contaminated hands.. Pneumonia - for people receiving assisted mechanical ventilation, pneumonia is a risk. For patients not on a ventilator, hospital-acquired pneumonia can develop post-operatively.. Urinary Tract - the majority of this type of hospital-caused infection is due to a urinary catheter that remains ...
Nowadays, there is a need for identification and production of new antigens, common for one or more genera of Gram-negative bacteria, especially bacterial strains causing nosocomial infections, e.g. Shigella spp., Salmonella spp., Klebsiella spp., Serratia spp., Enterobacter and E. coli. Those antigens could be used for efficient prevention of disases, such as nosocomial infections, septic shock and enteric infections. Therefore, it would be highly beneficial to develop a vaccine/therapeutic composition based on such common antigen against a broad range of Gram-negative bacteria.. ...
Many studies have shown that the #1 method most important for the prevention of hospital-acquired infections (often drug resistant) is consistent and effective hand hygiene on the part of caregivers and visitors. The CDC is encouraging hospitals to show this short film (or podcast) to all patients admitted to the hospital (which is what we are doing now where I work). It is also applicable to family, agency, or PCA caregivers in your home. Take the time now to look at it now:
Many studies have shown that the #1 method most important for the prevention of hospital-acquired infections (often drug resistant) is consistent and effective hand hygiene on the part of caregivers and visitors. The CDC is encouraging hospitals to show this short film (or podcast) to all patients admitted to the hospital (which is what we are doing now where I work). It is also applicable to family, agency, or PCA caregivers in your home. Take the time now to look at it now:
Q: Is it appropriate to assign code Y95, nosocomial condition, based on the documentation of healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP) or hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAC)? It is appropriate to assign code Y95, nosocomial condition, for documented healthcare associated conditions. Should this still be queried for specificity, and should the HAC condition (i.e. pneumonia) be coded as bacterial, viral, or something else?
National plans, trainings, and projects to improve health care quality, reduce health care-associated infections and adverse drug events, and develop resources for patients and professionals.
To quantify the magnitude of healthcare-associated infections in long-term care facilities at the European level, ECDC provided funding for the Healthcare-Associated infections in Long-Term care facilities (HALT) project, which developed a sustainable methodology based on a repeated Point Prevalence Survey design to study their prevalence and to explore related infection prevention and control structures and process indicators in the same group of facilities ...
Illnesses caused by the bacterium remain at historically high levels, while most other health care-associated infections are declining.
Although healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) remain a large and at least partly avoidable problem in hospitals, it appears to be less of one than it was a few years ago, according to the Agency fo
Ondine Biomedical Inc. is dedicated to the development of non-antibiotic, anti-infective therapies for a broad spectrum of bacterial, viral and fungal infections.
Our goal is to ensure that the control of healthcare-associated infection and antimicrobial resistance is implemented in practice.. Management of healthcare-associated infection and antimicrobial resistance is critical to everything we do for patients. This requires a change in public policy and attitudes to the prevention of infection, antimicrobial use and environmental health.. ...
Prices from ₹ 200 - Enquire for a fast quote from Dr Deepak Sharma. 7 verified patient reviews. Our goal is to help our patients attain the highest level of oral health possible. Sterilization and cross infection control is given top priorities s...
The use of cabin hospitals wont result in cross infection while it has achieved a good performance in treating the novel coronavirus pneumonia, a senior national health commission official said on Saturday.
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Pine Disinfectant with Detergent Removes general soil from all washable surfaces Kills bacteria & helps prevent cross infection. Passes EN 1276 at recommended dilution rate & contact time Ideal in schools, surgeries, nursing homes & leisure centres
Programmes to suit a wide range of applications: Ideal for office kitchens, retail showrooms, common rooms and day centres.. Option of 85°C rinse temperature: Provides increased level of hygiene control to reduce cross infection.. Easy installation on PG 8080 & PG 8080 U: Simply plugs into a 13A switch socket.. Option of liquid detergent feed: Eliminates potential hazard associated with manual dosing.. Available as semi and fully integrated versions: Appearance can be matched to the finish of adjacent kitchen units.. Download the Spec sheet. ...
A high quality alcohol based aerosol combining sanitising and air freshening properties. Cleans and sanitises telephones. Prevents cross infection by reducing the spread of airborne bacteria. De-odorises and freshens sick rooms. Also suitable as a general purpose air freshener ...
Selden Selgiene Extreme 5 Litre (C500) An essential everyday product in the fight against cross infection. Ideal for use in care & catering sectors.
This Washable Wireless Mouse provides a positive step towards solving the problem of bacterial cross infection and maximisers user comfort.
Linking to a non-federal website does not constitute an endorsement by CDC or any of its employees of the sponsors or the information and products presented on the website ...
Ondine Biomedical Inc. is dedicated to the development of non-antibiotic, anti-infective therapies for a broad spectrum of bacterial, viral and fungal infections.
If youve ever been more concerned about contracting an illness at a health care facility instead of being healed, youre not alone. Infections contracted at the hospital or another health care facility are called "nosocomial infections." Related symptoms can start to appear soon after being admitted for a non-related reason or as many as 30 days after an operation or hospital stay.. According to the CDC, 1 in 25 people acquire a hospital-related infection during their stay. In 2011, at least 722,000 documented nosocomial infections occurred in US hospitals. Roughly 75,000 of those documented infections resulted in death. Here are the most common hospital acquired infections listed by the CDC, the number of individuals affected by the illness in 2011, and some tips for minimizing the risk.. ...
Infeksi nosocomial yang juga dikenal dengan HAI (Hospital-Acquired Infection) adalah suatu infeksi yang didapat di rumah sakit, selain dari penyakit yang diderita sebelumnya. HAI ini ada karena lingkungan di rumah sakit sangat ideal bagi mikroorganisme untuk tumbuh subur. Infeksi yang secara klinis terbukti setelah 48 jam atau lebih pasien dirawat di RS dikategorikan sebagai infeksi nosocomial. Infeksi nosocomial dapat menyebabkan infeksi pneumonia yang parah, infeksi saluran kemih, infeksi yang masuk melalui pembuluh darah, dll. Sepertiga dari infeksi nosocomial ini sebenarnya termasuk yang dapat dicegah ...
On any given day, one American inpatient in 25 has a healthcare-associated infection, but the rates of many such infections have been falling, according to two CDC reports.
If you want to make a claim for a hospital infection, or another infection suffered in hospital, read this guide for information, including average payout amounts.
View Notes - Hospital Infections from BSC BSC1086 at Broward College. been implicated in 3 epidemics, probably because of its ability to grow in D5W at room temperature. 9. Preventability It has been
Nosocomial infections (NIS) are among the important issues of the previous century and current area that impose heavy costs on the healthcare system, elongate the period of hospitalization, and increase the mortality and morbidity rate among patients. The present research seeks to determine the...
Recently a good question was raised by @gwendolbowling about the occurrence of a nosocomial infection in an university hospital, referenced as best of the class? My first answer was to refer to a continous quality improvement process/PDCA wheel by including on a regular basis, health process audit and ICP inspection; as explained in another blog…
Nosocomial Infection Treatment Market Was Valued At US$ 28,565 Mn In 2015, And Is Expected To Reach US$ 36,746 Mn By 2024, Expanding At A CAGR Of 2.5% From 2016 To 2024
Jiménez, A., Castro, J. G., Munoz-Price, L., De Pascale, D., Shimose, L., Mustapha, M. M., Spychala, C. N., Mettus, R. T., Cooper, V. S. & Doi, Y., Mar 1 2017, In : Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology. 38, 3, p. 320-326 7 p.. Research output: Contribution to journal › Article ...
The aim of this essay is to ascertain what hospital acquired infection entails, the detrimental effects it causes and to highlight the active role nurses can take in the prevention of this type of infection.Hospital acquired (or nosocomial) infection i...
At any given time in the United States, 1 in 20 inpatients have an infection associated with health care they have received, and every year about 99,000 people die from a healthcare-associated infection (HAI). Can HAIs be eliminated altogether? The University of Michigan says yes and will receive a national recognition for its efforts-and results.. ...
An overview of the N.C. Healthcare-Associated Infections (HAIs) Prevention Plan. Includes a link to download the full plan document.
CIDRAP News) Reports from 17 states show that one major type of healthcare-associated infection (HAI) dropped 18% in the first half of 2009, suggesting that the healthcare system is making progress in the battle against infections in hospitals, national health officials announced today. ...
Researchers say some of the infections are more of an inconvenience, but some of them can actually be fatal. Among those potentially fatal infections are staph infections. About 30 percent of us carry a harmless form of it in our noses. Researchers studied the antibiotic Bactroban when it was rubbed in patients noses before surgery. The result was a nearly 50-percent reduction in infections among carriers of the bacteria.. Another lethal infection is the pseudomonas, it is the single most fatal organism you can get in a hospital say specialists. Researchers say they have developed a polymer that, when placed in the intestine, does not disturb the ecosystem of the intestine but just provides a chemical shield. In mice, it was 100-percent effective, however research is still in the process and one day researchers hope that they might be able to help humans .. ...
Not all cases are life-threatening. In people who arent immunocompromised, the disease is extremely difficult to detect. Unless a patient has an infection, or is specifically tested for the disease, they could show no signs until months or years later. In fact, 10 percent of people who check in to the hospital will unknowingly leave with an infection they didnt have upon arrival. Some people live for years with the disease, before they find out that they have it ...
Infections in U.S. hospitals kill tens of thousands of people each year, and many institutions fight back by screening new patients to see if they carry a dangerous germ, and isolating those who do. But a big study suggests a far more effective approach:
An infection that you got in the hospital. Happens every so often, something hospitals are loath to disclose. Note: Dont read this and panic about your...
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This shouldnt be so much of a problem -- after all, having the runs for a couple of days isnt such a big deal despite the discomfort -- if this strategy didnt also select resistant forms of various infectious micro-organisms. In a microbial population, one or two individuals may have a mutation in their genome that confers a resistance to the antibiotic and allows them to survive. Subsequently, they will efficiently reproduce, passing this resistance onto the next generations that will then be able to carry on contaminating further hosts. This is more and more common these days, and the abuse of antibiotics has also favoured the rise of nosocomial (hospital-acquired) infections, as patients with a weakened immune system are commonly given large doses of antibiotics ...
Hospital-acquired infections continue to be a big problem in health care, with 4 percent of patients getting a new infection while hospitalized, a study
8 out of 100! It is the average number of in-patients who catch a nosocomial infection in developed countries. It can come from contamination via surgical or medical instruments. Microbes can also...
Antimicrobial-Resistant Pathogens Associated with Healthcare-Associated Infections Summary of Data Reported to the National Healthcare Safety Network at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2009-2010 - Volume 34 Issue 1 - Dawn M. Sievert, Philip Ricks, Jonathan R. Edwards, Amy Schneider, Jean Patel, Arjun Srinivasan, Alex Kallen, Brandi Limbago, Scott Fridkin, National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) Team and Participating NHSN Facilities
We carried out a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized trials to explore the effectiveness of oral chlorhexidine on nosocomial pneumonia, causative bacteria, and mortality. PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials were searched for randomized trials in critically ill patients receiving oral chlorhexidine. Odds ratios (OR) were pooled with the random effects model. Twenty-two randomized trials including 4277 patients were identified. Chlorhexidine significantly reduced the incidence of nosocomial pneumonia (OR 0.66; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.51-0.85) and ventilator-associated pneumonia (OR 0.68, 95% CI 0.53-0.87). There was a significant reduction of nosocomial pneumonia due to both Gram-positive (OR 0.41; 95% CI 0.19-0.85) and Gram-negative (OR 0.68; 95% CI 0.51-0.90) bacteria, but only pneumonia due to "normal" flora (OR 0.51; 95% CI 0.33-0.80). The subgroup analysis revealed a significant benefit of chlorhexidine on nosocomial pneumonia in surgical ...
article{1887963, author = {Reunes, Sofie and Rombaut, Vicky and Vogelaers, Dirk and Brusselaers, Nele and Lizy, Christelle and Cankurtaran, Mustafa and Labeau, Sonia and Petrovic, Mirko and Blot, Stijn}, issn = {0953-6205}, journal = {EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF INTERNAL MEDICINE}, keyword = {ANTIMICROBIAL THERAPY,HOSPITAL MORTALITY,MULTIDRUG-RESISTANCE,OLD PATIENTS,ATTRIBUTABLE MORTALITY,Bloodstream infection,Elderly,Risk factors,Geriatric patient,Mortality,CRITICALLY-ILL PATIENTS,CARE-UNIT PATIENTS,INTENSIVE-CARE,PSEUDOMONAS-AERUGINOSA,BACTEREMIA}, language = {eng}, number = {5}, pages = {e39--e44}, title = {Risk factors and mortality for nosocomial bloodstream infections in elderly patients}, url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejim.2011.02.004}, volume = {22}, year = {2011 ...
November 19, 2016 at 8:03 am Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. November 2016 V.60 N.11 P.:6787-6794. Laura F. Mataseje, Kahina Abdesselam, Julie Vachon, Robyn Mitchel, Elizabeth Bryce, Diane Roscoe, David A. Boyd, Joanne Embree, Kevin Katz, Pamela Kibsey, Andrew E. Simor, Geoffrey Taylor, Nathalie Turgeon, Joanne Langley, Denise Gravel, Kanchana Amaratunga, and Michael R. Mulvey , on behalf of the Canadian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Program. aAntimicrobial Resistance and Nosocomial Infections, Public Health Agency of Canada, Winnipeg, MB, Canada. bCenter for Communicable Diseases and Infection Control, Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada. cDepartment of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Vancouver General Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada. dDepartment of Pediatrics and Child Health, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada. eDepartment of Infection Prevention and Control, North York General Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada. fDepartment of Laboratory Medicine, Victoria General ...
The NHSN is a secure, Internet-based surveillance system that expands and integrates patient and healthcare personnel safety surveillance systems managed by the Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion (DHQP) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In addition, facilities that participate in certain reporting programs operated by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) can do so through use of NHSN. Furthermore, some U.S. states use NHSN as a means for healthcare facilities to submit data on healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) mandated through their specific state legislation ...
1] NHSN overview -- [2] Identifying Healthcare-associated Infections (HAI) for NHSN Surveillance -- [3] Patient Safety Monthly Reporting Plan and Annual Surveys -- [4] Bloodstream Infection Event (Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infection and Non-central line-associated Bloodstream Infection) -- [5] Central Line Insertion Practices (CLIP) Adherence Monitoring -- [6] Pneumonia (Ventilator-associated [VAP] and non-ventilator-associated Pneumonia [PNEU]) Event -- [7] Urinary Tract Infection (Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection [CAUTI] and Non-Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection [UTI]) and Other Urinary System Infection [USI]) Events -- [9] Surgical Site Infection (SSI) Event -- [10] Ventilator-Associated Event (VAE) -- [11] Antimicrobial Use and Resistance (AUR) Module -- [12] Multidrug-Resistant Organism & Clostridium difficile Infection (MDRO/CDI) Module -- [15] Instructions for Mapping Patient Care Locations in NHSN -- [16] General Key Terms -- CDC/NHSN Surveillance ...
ContextConcerns about rates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) health care-associated infections have prompted calls for mandatory screening
Device-associated infections (i.e., central line-associated bloodstream infections, catheter-associated urinary tract infections, and ventilator-associated pneumonia) accounted for about one-quarter (26%) of all HAIs in 2011.. It is important to understand the different types of HAIs and how they are spread to be able to effectively prevent them.. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) occur when germs enter the urinary system and affect the bladder (which stores the urine) and/or the kidneys (which filter the blood to make urine). These infections are often associated with the use of a catheter, which is a tube placed into the bladder to drain urine.. Surgical site infections (SSIs) occur after surgery in the part of the body where the surgery took place. These infections may involve only the skin, or may be more serious and involve tissue under the skin, organs, or implanted material. SSIs sometimes take days or months after surgery to develop.. Respiratory or lung infections (such as pneumonia) can ...
IVTEAM #Intravenous literature: Kubiak, D.W., Gilmore, E.T., Buckley, M.W., Lynch, R., Marty, F.M. and Koo, S. (2014) Adjunctive management of central line-associated bloodstream infections with 70% ethanol-lock therapy. The Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. February 12th. [epub ahead of print].. Abstract:. OBJECTIVES: Ethanol is bactericidal against most pathogens implicated in central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) and biofilms. Current Infectious Diseases Society of America guidelines cite insufficient evidence to support adjunctive ethanol-lock therapy (ELT) for central venous catheter (CVC) salvage in patients with CLABSI in combination with systemic antimicrobial treatment. We evaluated the safety and potential efficacy of 70% ELT for CLABSI at our institution after implementation of a hospital ELT protocol.. METHODS: We collected data on all patients treated with adjunctive 70% ELT for catheter salvage from September 2009 to September 2011 and assessed clinical ...
Purpose We aimed to evaluate the impact of a multidimensional infection control strategy for the reduction of the incidence of catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) in patients hospitalized in adult intensive care units (AICUs) of hospitals which are members of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC), from 40 cities of 15 developing countries: Argentina, Brazil, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, India, Lebanon, Macedonia, Mexico, Morocco, Panama, Peru, Philippines, and Turkey. Methods We conducted a prospective before-after surveillance study of CAUTI rates on 56,429 patients hospitalized in 57 AICUs, during 360,667 bed-days. The study was divided into the baseline period (Phase 1) and the intervention period (Phase 2). In Phase 1, active surveillance was performed. In Phase 2, we implemented a multidimensional infection control approach that included: (1) a bundle of preventive measures, (2) education, (3) outcome surveillance, (4) process surveillance, ...
Catheter-associated urinary tract infections are one of the most common sources of infection, accounting for up to 40% of health care-associated infections each year in the United States. Extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae are frequent causes of urinary tract infections in health care settings. Prevalent use of carbapenems has led to the emergence of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae infections, leaving clinicians with few treatment options. Reducing carbapenem use and investigating alternative options for low-severity extended-spectrum β-lactamase infections is imperative to prevent more cases of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae. Although carbapenems are the antibiotics of choice for treating extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae catheter-associated urinary tract infections, carbapenem-sparing regimens may be appropriate for treating hemodynamically stable patients with low inoculum levels. Moreover, frontline health care providers ...
We studied a dataset of care episodes in a regional Swedish hospital system. We followed how 2,314,477 patients moved between 8,507 units (hospital wards and outpatient clinics) over seven years. The data also included information on the date when patients tested positive with methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus. To simplify the complex flow of patients, we represented it as a network of units, where two units were connected if a patient moved from one unit to another, without visiting a third unit in between. From this network, we characterized the typical network position of units with a high prevalence of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and how the patients location in the network changed upon testing positive. On average, units with medium values of the analyzed centrality measures had the highest average prevalence. We saw a weak effect of the hospital systems response to the patient testing positive - after a positive test, the patient moved to units with a lower ...
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Critical blood shortage: Red Cross urges blood and platelet donors to give nowCritical blood shortage: Red Cross urges blood and platelet donors to give now

Poulins liver and kidneys failed following a serious blood infection. The situation became urgent when his liver hemorrhaged. ... Right now, the Red Cross has less than a five-day blood supply on hand. The Red Cross strives to have a five-day supply at all ... About the American Red Cross. The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; ... 2020 The American National Red Cross About Us Contact Us RedCross.org Terms of Use Privacy Policy Supporters ...
more infohttps://www.redcrossblood.org/local-homepage/news/article/critical-blood-shortage-3A-red-cross-urges-blood-and-platelet-donors-to-give-now-16.html

Cross-infection in a surgical unit. | The BMJCross-infection in a surgical unit. | The BMJ

Cross-infection in a surgical unit. Br Med J 1967; 4 :620 ... Cross-infection in a surgical unit.. Br Med J 1967; 4 doi: ...
more infohttp://www.bmj.com/content/4/5579/620.1

HealthBoards - View Single Post -  Lyme Disease-cross infection QuestionHealthBoards - View Single Post - Lyme Disease-cross infection Question

Re: Lyme Disease-cross infection Question Thanks for the answers, I wasnt sure if Brucella was a co-infection and caused by ...
more infohttps://www.healthboards.com/boards/1440900-post4.html

Android Malware Cross-infection | Mobile Phone DevelopmentAndroid Malware Cross-infection | Mobile Phone Development

Android Malware Cross-infection. Posted on January 23, 2014. by Simon Judge ... Android Malware Cross-infection was last modified: January 23rd, 2014 by Simon Judge ...
more infohttp://www.mobilephonedevelopment.com/archives/1705

Cross infection policy update » Cystic Fibrosis NZCross infection policy update » Cystic Fibrosis NZ

Cross infection policy update. 4 July 2019. After several years work by the Clinical Advisory Panel, CFNZ has released revised ... For outdoor events there is no way to completely prevent the risk of cross infection and the safest approach is for people with ... CFNZ has updated its Cross Infection Policy to reflect the new global findings reflected in the position statement. ... It recognises that there is no reliable way to completely prevent the risk of cross infection. ...
more infohttps://www.cfnz.org.nz/news-and-events/latest-news/cross-infection-policy-update/

Copper in hospitals may limit cross-infection (a Cystic Fibrosis concern)Copper in hospitals may limit cross-infection (a Cystic Fibrosis concern)

... may reduce cross-infection. Cystic Fibrosis cross infection is a common concern in cystic fibrosis centers. ... Tags:copper,cross-contamination,high-touch surfaces,hospitals,infection. Previous post Distinguishing Relapse from Reinfection ... Given the cross-infection concerns at CF Centers and among people with CF who are often regularly hospitalized, the use of ... The use of copper in hospital rooms, may reduce cross-infection, a common concern in cystic fibrosis centers. ...
more infohttp://cysticfibrosis.com/copper-in-hospitals-to-limit-cross-infection/

Sabinet | Identity tags : a vector for cross-infection? : researchSabinet | Identity tags : a vector for cross-infection? : research

... and could possibly harbour bacteria and be a vector for cross-infection. Method. Saline-moistened swabs of the front and back ... The ID tag has been identified as a possible source of infection spread in this and previous studies. The ID tag has to date ... Healthcare providers play an important role in the transmission of these infections on their hands, clothing and equipment. ... Prevention of hospital-acquired infections is important in any setting. ...
more infohttp://journals.co.za/content/m_samj/106/5/EJC188153

Study on the prevention of cross-infection by aerosols during scaling | AbstractStudy on the prevention of cross-infection by aerosols during scaling | Abstract

The purpose of this study was to prevent cross-contamination of dental hygienists by aerosols. We performed prophylactic ... Study on the prevention of cross-infection by aerosols during scaling. The purpose of this study was to prevent cross- ... In conclusion, the risks of cross-infection will be reduced through these methods. ... and these microorganisms were identified as microbes causing opportunistic infection in human body. In addition, chlorhexidine ...
more infohttp://www.alliedacademies.org/abstract/study-on-the-prevention-of-crossinfection-by-aerosols-during-scaling-10867.html

TYPE VIII PNEUMOCOCCUS: DEVELOPMENT OF SULFADIAZINE RESISTANCE, TRANSMISSION BY CROSS INFECTION, AND PERSISTENCE IN CARRIERS* |...TYPE VIII PNEUMOCOCCUS: DEVELOPMENT OF SULFADIAZINE RESISTANCE, TRANSMISSION BY CROSS INFECTION, AND PERSISTENCE IN CARRIERS* |...

TYPE VIII PNEUMOCOCCUS: DEVELOPMENT OF SULFADIAZINE RESISTANCE, TRANSMISSION BY CROSS INFECTION, AND PERSISTENCE IN CARRIERS* ... TYPE VIII PNEUMOCOCCUS: DEVELOPMENT OF SULFADIAZINE RESISTANCE, TRANSMISSION BY CROSS INFECTION, AND PERSISTENCE IN CARRIERS*. ... by a type VIII pneumococcus and the transmission of this strain to another patient by cross infection. The evidence to be ...
more infohttps://annals.org/aim/article-abstract/672692/type-viii-pneumococcus-development-sulfadiazine-resistance-transmission-cross-infection-persistence

Most recent papers with the keyword Cross Infection In Dentistry | Read by QxMDMost recent papers with the keyword Cross Infection In Dentistry | Read by QxMD

Prevention of cross infection has significant effect on infection control. The standard procedure of rinsing impressions under ... Cross-infection control in dentistry is a significant issue in everyday clinical practice due to the recent increase in some ... Cross-infection control in clinical training: Development of a device for storing a composite resin in restorative dentistry. ... Background: Disinfection of dental impression is mandatory for preventing the cross infection between dental staff and dental ...
more infohttps://www.readbyqxmd.com/keyword/168006

Browsing  by Subject Cross InfectionBrowsing by Subject "Cross Infection"

Practical guidelines for infection control in health care facilities  World Health Organization. Regional Office for the ...
more infohttps://iris.wpro.who.int/browse?authority=Cross+Infection&type=mesh

Browsing  by Subject Cross InfectionBrowsing by Subject "Cross Infection"

Practical guidelines for infection control in health care facilities  World Health Organization. Regional Office for the ...
more infohttps://iris.wpro.who.int/browse?authority=Cross+Infection&type=mesh&locale-attribute=zh

Water birthing: retrospective review of 2625 water births. Contamination of birth pool water and risk of microbial cross...Water birthing: retrospective review of 2625 water births. Contamination of birth pool water and risk of microbial cross...

Contamination of birth pool water and risk of microbial cross-infection. Thöni A. 1, Mussner K. 2, Ploner F. 3 ✉ ... Despite this, water birthing was found to be safe for the neonate and did not carry a higher risk of neonatal infection when ... The microbial load of the birth pool water was analyzed, and neonatal infection rates after water birth and after land delivery ... as indicated by clinical and laboratory suspicion of infection, was administered to only 0.98% of babies after water birth ...
more infohttps://www.minervamedica.it/en/journals/minerva-ginecologica/article.php?cod=R09Y2010N03A0203

Iran virus deaths reach 2,757, infections cross 40,000-472802Iran virus deaths reach 2,757, infections cross 40,000-472802

Irans official coronavirus death toll reached 2,757 on Monday and the number of infections crossed 40,000, as President Hassan ... Iran virus deaths reach 2,757, infections cross 40,000. AFP. 30th March, 2020 05:44:59 ... Irans official coronavirus death toll reached 2,757 on Monday and the number of infections crossed 40,000, as President Hassan ...
more infohttps://www.daily-sun.com/post/472802/2020/03/30/Iran-virus-deaths-reach-2757-infections-cross-40000

cross-infection Archives - Source Suppliescross-infection Archives - Source Supplies

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue well assume that you are happy to receive all cookies from this website. Close. ...
more infohttp://www.sourcesupplies.co.uk/blog/tag/cross-infection/

Cross Infection Control: Bacteria. Self assessmentCross Infection Control: Bacteria. Self assessment

Cross Infection Control. Using an interactive question and answer format, this module introduces Cross Infection Control, an ... To improve my Infection Control. Take the Dentaljuce Infection Control module. • Recognise the importance of infection control. ... Member Feedback on Cross Infection Control. *Fab course. Thankyou.. *Very useful information which refreshed theoretical ... The Cross Infection Control online learning module has clear and concise aims, objectives and anticipated outcomes, listed ...
more infohttps://www.dentaljuce.com/cross-infection-control-bacteria-self-assessment

Hepatitis B reservoirs and attack rates in an Australian community: a basis for vaccination and cross-infection policies «...Hepatitis B reservoirs and attack rates in an Australian community: a basis for vaccination and cross-infection policies «...

... a basis for vaccination and cross-infection policies ... a basis for vaccination and cross-infection policies. by ... Hepatitis B reservoirs and attack rates in an Australian community: a basis for vaccination and cross-infection policies ...
more infohttp://www.healthinfonet.ecu.edu.au/key-resources/bibliography?page=24&q=&q_exact=&q_author=&q_keyword=&sorter=year-DESC&health_topic%5B%5D=1005&year_start=1840&year_end=2013&lid=11921

JCI -
Memory T cells established by seasonal human influenza A infection cross-react with avian influenza A (H5N1) in healthy...JCI - Memory T cells established by seasonal human influenza A infection cross-react with avian influenza A (H5N1) in healthy...

Memory T cells established by seasonal human influenza A infection cross-react with avian influenza A (H5N1) in healthy ... Memory T cells established by seasonal human influenza A infection cross-react with avian influenza A (H5N1) in healthy ... To determine how common cross-reactive T cells are, we performed a comprehensive ex vivo analysis of cross-reactive CD4+ and ... Matrix protein 1 (M1) and nucleoprotein (NP) were the immunodominant targets of cross-recognition. In addition, cross-reactive ...
more infohttps://www.jci.org/articles/view/32460/figure/1

JCI -
Memory T cells established by seasonal human influenza A infection cross-react with avian influenza A (H5N1) in healthy...JCI - Memory T cells established by seasonal human influenza A infection cross-react with avian influenza A (H5N1) in healthy...

33) but were significantly lower than those found in chronic viral infections (e.g., HIV, CMV; ref. 34). Cross-recognition of ... Memory T cells established by seasonal human influenza A infection cross-react with avian influenza A (H5N1) in healthy ... To determine how common cross-reactive T cells are, we performed a comprehensive ex vivo analysis of cross-reactive CD4+ and ... Matrix protein 1 (M1) and nucleoprotein (NP) were the immunodominant targets of cross-recognition. In addition, cross-reactive ...
more infohttps://www.jci.org/articles/view/32460

Subject: cross infection / Journal: Microbial pathogenesis - PubAg Search ResultsSubject: 'cross infection' / Journal: Microbial pathogenesis - PubAg Search Results

You searched for: Subject cross infection Remove constraint Subject: cross infection Journal Microbial pathogenesis Remove ... cross infection, etc ; Acinetobacter baumannii; animal models; blood flow; blood serum; immunoglobulin G; mice; microbial load ... cross infection, etc ; Candida; antifungal agents; death; ears; mortality; pathogens; patients; risk factors; therapeutics; ... cross infection, etc ; Eucalyptus globulus; antibiotic resistance; biofilm; cineole; essential oils; mechanism of action; ...
more infohttps://pubag.nal.usda.gov/?f%5Bjournal_name%5D%5B%5D=Microbial+pathogenesis&q=%22cross+infection%22&search_field=subject

Cross-species infection of blood parasites between resident and migratory songbirds in AfricaCross-species infection of blood parasites between resident and migratory songbirds in Africa

... Waldenström, Jonas LU ; Bensch, ... Cross-species infection of blood parasites between resident and migratory songbirds in Africa}, url = {http://dx.doi.org/ ...
more infohttps://lup.lub.lu.se/search/publication/138319

WHO HQ Library catalog ›

    Results of search for su:{Cross infection.}WHO HQ Library catalog › Results of search for 'su:{Cross infection.}'

Control of hospital infection : a practical handbook / edited by G. A. J. Ayliffe ... [et al.]. by Ayliffe, G. A. J ... Hospital-acquired infections : guidelines to laboratory methods / edited by M. T. Parker.. by Parker, M. T , World Health ... A Manual on infection control in health facilities. by World Health Organization. Regional Office for South-East Asia ... Guide des méthodes de laboratoire applicables aux infections hospitalières / préparé par M. T. Parker.. by Parker, M. T , World ...
more infohttps://kohahq.searo.who.int/cgi-bin/koha/opac-search.pl?q=su:%7BCross%20infection.%7D

Subject: cross infection / Journal: Genomics Data / Subject: genes and cross infection - PubAg Search ResultsSubject: 'cross infection' / Journal: Genomics Data / Subject: genes and cross infection - PubAg Search Results

You searched for: Subject cross infection Remove constraint Subject: cross infection Journal Genomics Data Remove ... cross infection Remove constraint Subject: cross infection Start Over ... cross infection, etc ; Acinetobacter; aminoacyl tRNA ligases; genes; ribosomal RNA; sequence analysis; Show all 6 Subjects. ... cross infection, etc ; Acinetobacter; aminoacyl tRNA ligases; genes; ribosomal RNA; sequence analysis; Show all 6 Subjects. ...
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Dietary habits and Helicobacter pylori infection: a cross sectional study at a Lebanese hospital | SpringerLinkDietary habits and Helicobacter pylori infection: a cross sectional study at a Lebanese hospital | SpringerLink

... infection among patients at a tertiary healthcare center in Lebanon. ... 33] reported no relationship between H. pylori infection and education. In contrast, a cross-sectional study on 19,272 subjects ... dietary patterns are associated with Helicobacter pylori infection in Chinese adults: a cross-sectional study. Sci Rep. 2016;6: ... Dietary habits and Helicobacter pylori infection: a cross sectional study at a Lebanese hospital. ...
more infohttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1186/s12876-018-0775-1
  • People without CF rarely carry the particular bacteria that cause chronic infection in CF, but they may still carry other bacteria or viruses that cause problems for people with CF. Thus, "The concept of 'less threatening' bacteria is no longer accepted and all pathogens should be considered as potentially transmissible and universal precautions should be taken. (cfnz.org.nz)
  • Oral health, the mirror of general well being, is altered by many mediators like infection, chronic inflammation, and genetic predisposition. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • Periodontal disease, also generally called periodontitis or gum disease, is a chronic infection-induced inflammatory disease that causes tooth loss if not properly treated, and is considered as a modifying factor in systemic health. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • According to the results, it was confirmed that Gram-positive and Gram-negative microorganisms were present in the aerosol, and these microorganisms were identified as microbes causing opportunistic infection in human body. (alliedacademies.org)
  • This cross-sectional clinical study analyzed patients rehabilitated with endosseous dental implants between September 2011 and July 2015, at the University Dental Clinic, School of Dentistry, International University of Catalonia (UIC). (readbyqxmd.com)
  • The scale differentiated between subgroups of persons with the hepatitis B infection in terms of age, gender, employment, education, disease duration, and stage of disease. (ovid.com)
  • WHO HQ Library catalog › Results of search for 'su:{Cross infection} and au:Fabry, J. (who.int)
  • Horses are particularly at risk, being prone to small puncture wounds (eg from thorns or nails), through which infection can enter the body and then thrive. (bluecross.org.uk)
  • To determine how common cross-reactive T cells are, we performed a comprehensive ex vivo analysis of cross-reactive CD4+ and CD8+ memory T cell responses to overlapping peptides spanning the full proteome of influenza A/Viet Nam/CL26/2005 (H5N1) and influenza A/New York/232/2004 (H3N2) in healthy individuals from the United Kingdom and Viet Nam. (jci.org)
  • Does immunity after Zika virus infection cross-protect against dengue? (physiciansweekly.com)
  • Infection can occur following inhalation of the airborne virus from other infected horses or by indirect transmission via, for example, the stable, equipment or grooms. (bluecross.org.uk)
  • Signs of infection, which begin to develop a few days after exposure to the virus, include a husky cough and nasal discharge (which changes over a period of four to five days from thin to thick mucus), combined with general signs of ill health. (bluecross.org.uk)
  • Spain has the world's second-highest death toll after Italy, with the virus so far claiming 9,053 lives and the number of confirmed cases reaching 102,136, although the rate of new infections continued its downward trend, health ministry figures showed. (bhatkallys.com)
  • Memory CD4+ and CD8+ T cells isolated from the majority of participants exhibited human influenza-specific responses and showed cross-recognition of at least one H5N1 internal protein. (jci.org)
  • The purpose of this study was to prevent cross-contamination of dental hygienists by aerosols. (alliedacademies.org)
  • The purpose of the present study is to report the development of "sulfadiazine-tolerance" by a type VIII pneumococcus and the transmission of this strain to another patient by cross infection. (annals.org)
  • Healthcare providers play an important role in the transmission of these infections on their hands, clothing and equipment. (journals.co.za)
  • It is, however, not known whether international travel is more important for spread of the epidemic as compared to endogenous infections within single countries. (eur.nl)
  • Because infections through travelling between countries is not frequently observed it is important to have good surveillance of the national HIV-1 epidemics. (eur.nl)
  • Multivariable logistic regression was conducted to identify the association between socio-demographic, lifestyle, dietary and other health-related variables with H pylori infection. (springer.com)
  • Staywell®´´, an independent company, offers health and wellness engagement tools and information on behalf of Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts. (ahealthyme.com)
  • Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts is a leading provider of quality health insurance for residents of Massachusetts. (ahealthyme.com)
  • The healthier the horse and the higher the standards of horse care, the greater the chance of fighting and minimising the effects of an infection. (bluecross.org.uk)
  • These access and ID tags are often worn around the neck on a lanyard, and could possibly harbour bacteria and be a vector for cross-infection. (journals.co.za)
  • Each colored segment represents the source protein corresponding to peptide pools eliciting H5N1 cross-reactive T cell responses. (jci.org)
  • Studies on the association of smoking and alcohol consumption with the infection show conflicting results. (springer.com)
  • Additionally, staff working in a dental practice also have a right to be safe from infection acquired at work. (dentaljuce.com)
  • The infection takes three weeks to have an obvious effect, with the first signs (muscle stiffness, spasms and a reluctance to move) often becoming apparent some time after the wound has healed. (bluecross.org.uk)
  • In addition, cross-reactive CD4+ and CD8+ T cells recognized target cells infected with recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing either H5N1 M1 or NP. (jci.org)