Crop, Avian: A thin-walled distention of the alimentary tract protruding just outside the body cavity in the distal end of the neck (esophagus), used for the temporary storage of food and water.Agriculture: The science, art or practice of cultivating soil, producing crops, and raising livestock.Plants, Genetically Modified: PLANTS, or their progeny, whose GENOME has been altered by GENETIC ENGINEERING.Food, Genetically Modified: Food derived from genetically modified organisms (ORGANISMS, GENETICALLY MODIFIED).Zea mays: A plant species of the family POACEAE. It is a tall grass grown for its EDIBLE GRAIN, corn, used as food and animal FODDER.Plant Weeds: A plant growing in a location where it is not wanted, often competing with cultivated plants.Soil: The unconsolidated mineral or organic matter on the surface of the earth that serves as a natural medium for the growth of land plants.Plant Diseases: Diseases of plants.Herbicide Resistance: Diminished or failed response of PLANTS to HERBICIDES.Brassica napus: A plant species of the family BRASSICACEAE best known for the edible roots.Seeds: The encapsulated embryos of flowering plants. They are used as is or for animal feed because of the high content of concentrated nutrients like starches, proteins, and fats. Rapeseed, cottonseed, and sunflower seed are also produced for the oils (fats) they yield.Biomass: Total mass of all the organisms of a given type and/or in a given area. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990) It includes the yield of vegetative mass produced from any given crop.Herbicides: Pesticides used to destroy unwanted vegetation, especially various types of weeds, grasses (POACEAE), and woody plants. Some plants develop HERBICIDE RESISTANCE.Genome, Plant: The genetic complement of a plant (PLANTS) as represented in its DNA.Gossypium: A plant genus of the family MALVACEAE. It is the source of COTTON FIBER; COTTONSEED OIL, which is used for cooking, and GOSSYPOL. The economically important cotton crop is a major user of agricultural PESTICIDES.Oryza sativa: Annual cereal grass of the family POACEAE and its edible starchy grain, rice, which is the staple food of roughly one-half of the world's population.Biofuels: Hydrocarbon-rich byproducts from the non-fossilized BIOMASS that are combusted to generate energy as opposed to fossilized hydrocarbon deposits (FOSSIL FUELS).Sorghum: A plant genus of the family POACEAE. The grain is used for FOOD and for ANIMAL FEED. This should not be confused with KAFFIR LIME or with KEFIR milk product.Brassica rapa: A plant species cultivated for the seed used as animal feed and as a source of canola cooking oil.Triticum: A plant genus of the family POACEAE that is the source of EDIBLE GRAIN. A hybrid with rye (SECALE CEREALE) is called TRITICALE. The seed is ground into FLOUR and used to make BREAD, and is the source of WHEAT GERM AGGLUTININS.Agricultural Irrigation: The routing of water to open or closed areas where it is used for agricultural purposes.Plant Leaves: Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)Pest Control, Biological: Use of naturally-occuring or genetically-engineered organisms to reduce or eliminate populations of pests.Plant Roots: The usually underground portions of a plant that serve as support, store food, and through which water and mineral nutrients enter the plant. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982; Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Genes, Plant: The functional hereditary units of PLANTS.Weed Control: The prevention of growth and or spread of unwanted plants.Saccharum: A plant genus of the family POACEAE widely cultivated in the tropics for the sweet cane that is processed into sugar.Food Safety: Activities involved in ensuring the safety of FOOD including avoidance of bacterial and other contamination.Gene Expression Regulation, Plant: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in plants.Beta vulgaris: A species of the Beta genus. Cultivars are used as a source of beets (root) or chard (leaves).Plant Proteins: Proteins found in plants (flowers, herbs, shrubs, trees, etc.). The concept does not include proteins found in vegetables for which VEGETABLE PROTEINS is available.Droughts: Prolonged dry periods in natural climate cycle. They are slow-onset phenomena caused by rainfall deficit combined with other predisposing factors.Pollination: The transfer of POLLEN grains (male gametes) to the plant ovule (female gamete).Panicum: A plant genus of the family POACEAE. The seed is one of the EDIBLE GRAINS used in millet cereals and in feed for birds and livestock (ANIMAL FEED). It contains diosgenin (SAPONINS).Poaceae: A large family of narrow-leaved herbaceous grasses of the order Cyperales, subclass Commelinidae, class Liliopsida (monocotyledons). Food grains (EDIBLE GRAIN) come from members of this family. RHINITIS, ALLERGIC, SEASONAL can be induced by POLLEN of many of the grasses.Cicer: A plant genus of the family FABACEAE known for the edible beans.Manihot: A plant genus of the family EUPHORBIACEAE that is perennial with conspicuous, almost palmate leaves like those of RICINUS but more deeply parted into five to nine lobes. It is a source of a starch after removal of the cyanogenic glucosides. The common name of Arrowroot is also used with Maranta (MARANTACEAE). The common name of yuca is also used for YUCCA.DNA, Plant: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of plants.Nitrogen: An element with the atomic symbol N, atomic number 7, and atomic weight [14.00643; 14.00728]. Nitrogen exists as a diatomic gas and makes up about 78% of the earth's atmosphere by volume. It is a constituent of proteins and nucleic acids and found in all living cells.Botany: The study of the origin, structure, development, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of plants.Food Supply: The production and movement of food items from point of origin to use or consumption.Conservation of Natural Resources: The protection, preservation, restoration, and rational use of all resources in the total environment.Lycopersicon esculentum: A plant species of the family SOLANACEAE, native of South America, widely cultivated for their edible, fleshy, usually red fruit.Breeding: The production of offspring by selective mating or HYBRIDIZATION, GENETIC in animals or plants.Cereals: Seeds from grasses (POACEAE) which are important in the diet.Hordeum: A plant genus of the family POACEAE. The EDIBLE GRAIN, barley, is widely used as food.Lens Plant: A plant genus of the FABACEAE family known for the seeds used as food.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Biotechnology: Body of knowledge related to the use of organisms, cells or cell-derived constituents for the purpose of developing products which are technically, scientifically and clinically useful. Alteration of biologic function at the molecular level (i.e., GENETIC ENGINEERING) is a central focus; laboratory methods used include TRANSFECTION and CLONING technologies, sequence and structure analysis algorithms, computer databases, and gene and protein structure function analysis and prediction.Arachis hypogaea: A plant species of the family FABACEAE that yields edible seeds, the familiar peanuts, which contain protein, oil and lectins.Flowers: The reproductive organs of plants.Organic Agriculture: Systems of agriculture which adhere to nationally regulated standards that restrict the use of pesticides, non-organic fertilizers, genetic engineering, growth hormones, irradiation, antibiotics, and non-organic ANIMAL FEED.Soybeans: An annual legume. The SEEDS of this plant are edible and used to produce a variety of SOY FOODS.Plants: Multicellular, eukaryotic life forms of kingdom Plantae (sensu lato), comprising the VIRIDIPLANTAE; RHODOPHYTA; and GLAUCOPHYTA; all of which acquired chloroplasts by direct endosymbiosis of CYANOBACTERIA. They are characterized by a mainly photosynthetic mode of nutrition; essentially unlimited growth at localized regions of cell divisions (MERISTEMS); cellulose within cells providing rigidity; the absence of organs of locomotion; absence of nervous and sensory systems; and an alternation of haploid and diploid generations.Disease Resistance: The capacity of an organism to defend itself against pathological processes or the agents of those processes. This most often involves innate immunity whereby the organism responds to pathogens in a generic way. The term disease resistance is used most frequently when referring to plants.Solanum tuberosum: A plant species of the genus SOLANUM, family SOLANACEAE. The starchy roots are used as food. SOLANINE is found in green parts.Archaeology: The scientific study of past societies through artifacts, fossils, etc.Chromosomes, Plant: Complex nucleoprotein structures which contain the genomic DNA and are part of the CELL NUCLEUS of PLANTS.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Photosynthesis: The synthesis by organisms of organic chemical compounds, especially carbohydrates, from carbon dioxide using energy obtained from light rather than from the oxidation of chemical compounds. Photosynthesis comprises two separate processes: the light reactions and the dark reactions. In higher plants; GREEN ALGAE; and CYANOBACTERIA; NADPH and ATP formed by the light reactions drive the dark reactions which result in the fixation of carbon dioxide. (from Oxford Dictionary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2001)Quantitative Trait Loci: Genetic loci associated with a QUANTITATIVE TRAIT.Lettuce: Any of the various plants of the genus Lactuca, especially L. sativa, cultivated for its edible leaves. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)Fabaceae: The large family of plants characterized by pods. Some are edible and some cause LATHYRISM or FAVISM and other forms of poisoning. Other species yield useful materials like gums from ACACIA and various LECTINS like PHYTOHEMAGGLUTININS from PHASEOLUS. Many of them harbor NITROGEN FIXATION bacteria on their roots. Many but not all species of "beans" belong to this family.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Genetic Engineering: Directed modification of the gene complement of a living organism by such techniques as altering the DNA, substituting genetic material by means of a virus, transplanting whole nuclei, transplanting cell hybrids, etc.Plant Stems: Parts of plants that usually grow vertically upwards towards the light and support the leaves, buds, and reproductive structures. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Plant Shoots: New immature growth of a plant including stem, leaves, tips of branches, and SEEDLINGS.Biodiversity: The variety of all native living organisms and their various forms and interrelationships.Insects: The class Insecta, in the phylum ARTHROPODA, whose members are characterized by division into three parts: head, thorax, and abdomen. They are the dominant group of animals on earth; several hundred thousand different kinds having been described. Three orders, HEMIPTERA; DIPTERA; and SIPHONAPTERA; are of medical interest in that they cause disease in humans and animals. (From Borror et al., An Introduction to the Study of Insects, 4th ed, p1)Fungicides, Industrial: Chemicals that kill or inhibit the growth of fungi in agricultural applications, on wood, plastics, or other materials, in swimming pools, etc.Climate: The longterm manifestations of WEATHER. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Brassica: A plant genus of the family Cruciferae. It contains many species and cultivars used as food including cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, Brussel sprouts, kale, collard greens, MUSTARD PLANT; (B. alba, B. junica, and B. nigra), turnips (BRASSICA NAPUS) and rapeseed (BRASSICA RAPA).Expressed Sequence Tags: Partial cDNA (DNA, COMPLEMENTARY) sequences that are unique to the cDNAs from which they were derived.Manure: Accumulations of solid or liquid animal excreta usually from stables and barnyards with or without litter material. Its chief application is as a fertilizer. (From Webster's 3d ed)Bacillus thuringiensis: A species of gram-positive bacteria which may be pathogenic for certain insects. It is used for the biological control of the Gypsy moth.Salt-Tolerance: The ability of organisms to sense and adapt to high concentrations of salt in their growth environment.Hemiptera: A large order of insects characterized by having the mouth parts adapted to piercing or sucking. It is comprised of four suborders: HETEROPTERA, Auchenorrhyncha, Sternorrhyncha, and Coleorrhyncha.Plant Development: Processes orchestrated or driven by a plethora of genes, plant hormones, and inherent biological timing mechanisms facilitated by secondary molecules, which result in the systematic transformation of plants and plant parts, from one stage of maturity to another.Hybridization, Genetic: The genetic process of crossbreeding between genetically dissimilar parents to produce a hybrid.Fruit: The fleshy or dry ripened ovary of a plant, enclosing the seed or seeds.Arabidopsis: A plant genus of the family BRASSICACEAE that contains ARABIDOPSIS PROTEINS and MADS DOMAIN PROTEINS. The species A. thaliana is used for experiments in classical plant genetics as well as molecular genetic studies in plant physiology, biochemistry, and development.Salinity: Degree of saltiness, which is largely the OSMOLAR CONCENTRATION of SODIUM CHLORIDE plus any other SALTS present. It is an ecological factor of considerable importance, influencing the types of organisms that live in an ENVIRONMENT.Genetic Markers: A phenotypically recognizable genetic trait which can be used to identify a genetic locus, a linkage group, or a recombination event.Pollen: The fertilizing element of plants that contains the male GAMETOPHYTES.Jatropha: A plant genus of the family EUPHORBIACEAE. Members contain jatrophone and other diterpenes.Crotalaria: A plant genus of the family FABACEAE that contains crotalarin.Bees: Insect members of the superfamily Apoidea, found almost everywhere, particularly on flowers. About 3500 species occur in North America. They differ from most WASPS in that their young are fed honey and pollen rather than animal food.Helianthus: A genus herbs of the Asteraceae family. The SEEDS yield oil and are used as food and animal feed; the roots of Helianthus tuberosus (Jerusalem artichoke) are edible.Soil Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in the soil. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.DNA Shuffling: The use of DNA recombination (RECOMBINATION, GENETIC) to prepare a large gene library of novel, chimeric genes from a population of randomly fragmented DNA from related gene sequences.Gene Flow: The change in gene frequency in a population due to migration of gametes or individuals (ANIMAL MIGRATION) across population barriers. In contrast, in GENETIC DRIFT the cause of gene frequency changes are not a result of population or gamete movement.Pennisetum: A plant genus of the family POACEAE. The seed is one of the millets used in EDIBLE GRAIN. It contains vitexin. The common name of buffelgrass is also used for CENCHRUS.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Capsicum: A plant genus of the family SOLANACEAE. The hot peppers yield CAPSAICIN, which activates VANILLOID RECEPTORS. Several varieties have sweet or pungent edible fruits that are used as vegetables when fresh and spices when the pods are dried.Tropical Climate: A climate which is typical of equatorial and tropical regions, i.e., one with continually high temperatures with considerable precipitation, at least during part of the year. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Chromosome Mapping: Any method used for determining the location of and relative distances between genes on a chromosome.Brachypodium: A plant genus in the family POACEAE. Brachypodium distachyon is a model species for functional genomics studies.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Water: A clear, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for most animal and plant life and is an excellent solvent for many substances. The chemical formula is hydrogen oxide (H2O). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Fragaria: A plant genus of the family ROSACEAE known for the edible fruit.Stress, Physiological: The unfavorable effect of environmental factors (stressors) on the physiological functions of an organism. Prolonged unresolved physiological stress can affect HOMEOSTASIS of the organism, and may lead to damaging or pathological conditions.Rhizosphere: The immediate physical zone surrounding plant roots that include the plant roots. It is an area of intense and complex biological activity involving plants, microorganisms, other soil organisms, and the soil.Cucurbitaceae: The gourd plant family of the order Violales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida. It is sometimes placed in its own order, Cucurbitales. 'Melon' generally refers to CUCUMIS; CITRULLUS; or MOMORDICA.Verticillium: A mitosporic fungal genus commonly isolated from soil. Some species are the cause of wilt diseases in many different plants.History, Ancient: The period of history before 500 of the common era.Musa: A plant genus of the family Musaceae, order Zingiberales, subclass Zingiberidae, class Liliopsida.RNA, Plant: Ribonucleic acid in plants having regulatory and catalytic roles as well as involvement in protein synthesis.Genetic Variation: Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.Vitis: A plant genus in the family VITACEAE, order Rhamnales, subclass Rosidae. It is a woody vine cultivated worldwide. It is best known for grapes, the edible fruit and used to make WINE and raisins.Cynara: A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE.Cucurbita: A plant genus of the family CUCURBITACEAE, order Violales, subclass Dilleniidae, which includes pumpkin, gourd and squash.Aphids: A family (Aphididae) of small insects, in the suborder Sternorrhyncha, that suck the juices of plants. Important genera include Schizaphis and Myzus. The latter is known to carry more than 100 virus diseases between plants.Insecticides: Pesticides designed to control insects that are harmful to man. The insects may be directly harmful, as those acting as disease vectors, or indirectly harmful, as destroyers of crops, food products, or textile fabrics.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Lolium: Common member of the Gramineae family used as cattle FODDER. It harbors several fungi and other parasites toxic to livestock and people and produces allergenic compounds, especially in its pollen. The most commonly seen varieties are L. perenne, L. multiflorum, and L. rigidum.Insect Control: The reduction or regulation of the population of noxious, destructive, or dangerous insects through chemical, biological, or other means.Phaseolus: A plant genus in the family FABACEAE which is the source of edible beans and the lectin PHYTOHEMAGGLUTININS.Prunus: A plant genus in the family ROSACEAE, order Rosales, subclass Rosidae. It is best known as a source of edible fruits such as apricot, plum, peach, cherry, and almond.Energy-Generating Resources: Materials or phenomena which can provide energy directly or via conversion.Geography: The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)Insecticide Resistance: The development by insects of resistance to insecticides.Moths: Insects of the suborder Heterocera of the order LEPIDOPTERA.Carbon: A nonmetallic element with atomic symbol C, atomic number 6, and atomic weight [12.0096; 12.0116]. It may occur as several different allotropes including DIAMOND; CHARCOAL; and GRAPHITE; and as SOOT from incompletely burned fuel.Plant Transpiration: The loss of water vapor by plants to the atmosphere. It occurs mainly from the leaves through pores (stomata) whose primary function is gas exchange. The water is replaced by a continuous column of water moving upwards from the roots within the xylem vessels. (Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Soil Pollutants: Substances which pollute the soil. Use for soil pollutants in general or for which there is no specific heading.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Ascomycota: A phylum of fungi which have cross-walls or septa in the mycelium. The perfect state is characterized by the formation of a saclike cell (ascus) containing ascospores. Most pathogenic fungi with a known perfect state belong to this phylum.Sesamum: A plant genus of the family PEDALIACEAE that is the source of the edible seed and SESAME OIL.Transcriptome: The pattern of GENE EXPRESSION at the level of genetic transcription in a specific organism or under specific circumstances in specific cells.Polyploidy: The chromosomal constitution of a cell containing multiples of the normal number of CHROMOSOMES; includes triploidy (symbol: 3N), tetraploidy (symbol: 4N), etc.Carica: A plant genus of the family Caricaceae, order Violales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida. It is the source of edible fruit and PAPAIN.Trees: Woody, usually tall, perennial higher plants (Angiosperms, Gymnosperms, and some Pterophyta) having usually a main stem and numerous branches.Microsatellite Repeats: A variety of simple repeat sequences that are distributed throughout the GENOME. They are characterized by a short repeat unit of 2-8 basepairs that is repeated up to 100 times. They are also known as short tandem repeats (STRs).Plant Physiological Phenomena: The physiological processes, properties, and states characteristic of plants.Greenhouse Effect: The effect of GLOBAL WARMING and the resulting increase in world temperatures. The predicted health effects of such long-term climatic change include increased incidence of respiratory, water-borne, and vector-borne diseases.Cucumis sativus: A creeping annual plant species of the CUCURBITACEAE family. It has a rough succulent, trailing stem and hairy leaves with three to five pointed lobes.Seedling: Very young plant after GERMINATION of SEEDS.Brassicaceae: A plant family of the order Capparales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida. They are mostly herbaceous plants with peppery-flavored leaves, due to gluconapin (GLUCOSINOLATES) and its hydrolysis product butenylisotrhiocyanate. The family includes many plants of economic importance that have been extensively altered and domesticated by humans. Flowers have 4 petals. Podlike fruits contain a number of seeds. Cress is a general term used for many in the Brassicacea family. Rockcress is usually ARABIS; Bittercress is usually CARDAMINE; Yellowcress is usually RORIPPA; Pennycress is usually THLASPI; Watercress refers to NASTURTIUM; or RORIPPA or TROPAEOLUM; Gardencress refers to LEPIDIUM; Indiancress refers to TROPAEOLUM.Citrullus: A plant genus of the family CUCURBITACEAE known for the edible fruit.Agrochemicals: Chemicals used in agriculture. These include pesticides, fumigants, fertilizers, plant hormones, steroids, antibiotics, mycotoxins, etc.Environment: The external elements and conditions which surround, influence, and affect the life and development of an organism or population.Environmental Monitoring: The monitoring of the level of toxins, chemical pollutants, microbial contaminants, or other harmful substances in the environment (soil, air, and water), workplace, or in the bodies of people and animals present in that environment.Population Dynamics: The pattern of any process, or the interrelationship of phenomena, which affects growth or change within a population.Climate Change: Any significant change in measures of climate (such as temperature, precipitation, or wind) lasting for an extended period (decades or longer). It may result from natural factors such as changes in the sun's intensity, natural processes within the climate system such as changes in ocean circulation, or human activities.Legislation, Food: Laws and regulations concerned with industrial processing and marketing of foods.Trifolium: A plant genus of the family FABACEAE.Conservation of Energy Resources: Planned management, use, and preservation of energy resources.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Daucus carota: A plant species of the family APIACEAE that is widely cultivated for the edible yellow-orange root. The plant has finely divided leaves and flat clusters of small white flowers.Cucumis melo: A plant species of the family CUCURBITACEAE, order Violales, subclass Dilleniidae known for the melon fruits with reticulated (net) surface including cantaloupes, honeydew, casaba, and Persian melons.Aluminum: A metallic element that has the atomic number 13, atomic symbol Al, and atomic weight 26.98.Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis: The detection of RESTRICTION FRAGMENT LENGTH POLYMORPHISMS by selective PCR amplification of restriction fragments derived from genomic DNA followed by electrophoretic analysis of the amplified restriction fragments.Germination: The initial stages of the growth of SEEDS into a SEEDLINGS. The embryonic shoot (plumule) and embryonic PLANT ROOTS (radicle) emerge and grow upwards and downwards respectively. Food reserves for germination come from endosperm tissue within the seed and/or from the seed leaves (COTYLEDON). (Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Molecular Sequence Annotation: The addition of descriptive information about the function or structure of a molecular sequence to its MOLECULAR SEQUENCE DATA record.Colocasia: A plant genus of the family ARACEAE. Members contain acrid calcium oxalate and LECTINS. Polynesians prepare the root into poi. Common names of Taro and Coco Yam (Cocoyam) may be confused with other ARACEAE; XANTHOSOMA; or with common yam (DIOSCOREA).Crosses, Genetic: Deliberate breeding of two different individuals that results in offspring that carry part of the genetic material of each parent. The parent organisms must be genetically compatible and may be from different varieties or closely related species.Angiosperms: Members of the group of vascular plants which bear flowers. They are differentiated from GYMNOSPERMS by their production of seeds within a closed chamber (OVARY, PLANT). The Angiosperms division is composed of two classes, the monocotyledons (Liliopsida) and dicotyledons (Magnoliopsida). Angiosperms represent approximately 80% of all known living plants.Environment, Controlled: A state in which the environs of hospitals, laboratories, domestic and animal housing, work places, spacecraft, and other surroundings are under technological control with regard to air conditioning, heating, lighting, humidity, ventilation, and other ambient features. The concept includes control of atmospheric composition. (From Jane's Aerospace Dictionary, 3d ed)Adaptation, Physiological: The non-genetic biological changes of an organism in response to challenges in its ENVIRONMENT.Cajanus: A plant genus of the family FABACEAE that is used for food in NIGERIA.Transgenes: Genes that are introduced into an organism using GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUES.Carbon Footprint: A measure of the total greenhouse gas emissions produced by an individual, organization, event, or product. It is measured in units of equivalent kilograms of CARBON DIOXIDE generated in a given time frame.Flowering Tops: Tops of plants when in flower, including the stems, leaves and blooms.Ecology: The branch of science concerned with the interrelationship of organisms and their ENVIRONMENT, especially as manifested by natural cycles and rhythms, community development and structure, interactions between different kinds of organisms, geographic distributions, and population alterations. (Webster's, 3d ed)Tobacco: A plant genus of the family SOLANACEAE. Members contain NICOTINE and other biologically active chemicals; its dried leaves are used for SMOKING.Food Technology: The application of knowledge to the food industry.Beetles: INSECTS of the order Coleoptera, containing over 350,000 species in 150 families. They possess hard bodies and their mouthparts are adapted for chewing.Tylenchoidea: A superfamily of nematodes whose members are free-living saprophytes or parasites of plants. Ova are sometimes found in human feces after ingestion of infected plants.Chemistry, Agricultural: The science of the chemical composition and reactions of chemicals involved in the production, protection and use of crops and livestock. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Rain: Water particles that fall from the ATMOSPHERE.Agricultural Workers' Diseases: Diseases in persons engaged in cultivating and tilling soil, growing plants, harvesting crops, raising livestock, or otherwise engaged in husbandry and farming. The diseases are not restricted to farmers in the sense of those who perform conventional farm chores: the heading applies also to those engaged in the individual activities named above, as in those only gathering harvest or in those only dusting crops.Gene Expression Profiling: The determination of the pattern of genes expressed at the level of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION, under specific circumstances or in a specific cell.Chrysanthemum: A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE. The common names of daisy or marguerite are easily confused with other plants. Some species in this genus have been reclassified to TANACETUM.Genomics: The systematic study of the complete DNA sequences (GENOME) of organisms.Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Rhizoctonia: A mitosporic Ceratobasidiaceae fungal genus that is an important plant pathogen affecting potatoes and other plants. There are numerous teleomorphs.Food Contamination: The presence in food of harmful, unpalatable, or otherwise objectionable foreign substances, e.g. chemicals, microorganisms or diluents, before, during, or after processing or storage.Orobanche: A plant genus of the family OROBANCHACEAE. Lacking chlorophyll, they are nonphotosynthetic parasitic plants. The common name is similar to Broom or Scotch Broom (CYTISUS) or Butcher's Broom (RUSCUS) or Desert Broom (BACCHARIS) or Spanish Broom (SPARTIUM) or Brome (BROMUS).Hemolysin Proteins: Proteins from BACTERIA and FUNGI that are soluble enough to be secreted to target ERYTHROCYTES and insert into the membrane to form beta-barrel pores. Biosynthesis may be regulated by HEMOLYSIN FACTORS.Food Quality: Ratings of the characteristics of food including flavor, appearance, nutritional content, and the amount of microbial and chemical contamination.Phosphorus: A non-metal element that has the atomic symbol P, atomic number 15, and atomic weight 31. It is an essential element that takes part in a broad variety of biochemical reactions.Coffea: A plant genus of the family RUBIACEAE. It is best known for the COFFEE beverage prepared from the beans (SEEDS).Synteny: The presence of two or more genetic loci on the same chromosome. Extensions of this original definition refer to the similarity in content and organization between chromosomes, of different species for example.Host-Pathogen Interactions: The interactions between a host and a pathogen, usually resulting in disease.Carbon Dioxide: A colorless, odorless gas that can be formed by the body and is necessary for the respiration cycle of plants and animals.Lepidoptera: A large order of insects comprising the butterflies and moths.Malus: A plant genus in the family ROSACEAE, order Rosales, subclass Rosidae. It is best known as a source of the edible fruit (apple) and is cultivated in temperate climates worldwide.Endotoxins: Toxins closely associated with the living cytoplasm or cell wall of certain microorganisms, which do not readily diffuse into the culture medium, but are released upon lysis of the cells.Plant Structures: The parts of plants, including SEEDS.Chromosomes, Artificial, Bacterial: DNA constructs that are composed of, at least, a REPLICATION ORIGIN, for successful replication, propagation to and maintenance as an extra chromosome in bacteria. In addition, they can carry large amounts (about 200 kilobases) of other sequence for a variety of bioengineering purposes.Begomovirus: A genus of plant viruses in the family GEMINIVIRIDAE that are transmitted in nature by whitefly Bemisia tabaci.Mustard Plant: Any of several BRASSICA species that are commonly called mustard. Brassica alba is white mustard, B. juncea is brown or Chinese mustard, and B. nigra is black, brown, or red mustard. The plant is grown both for mustard seed from which oil is extracted or used as SPICES, and for its greens used as VEGETABLES or ANIMAL FEED. There is no relationship to MUSTARD COMPOUNDS.Acclimatization: Adaptation to a new environment or to a change in the old.Aspergillus flavus: A species of imperfect fungi which grows on peanuts and other plants and produces the carcinogenic substance aflatoxin. It is also used in the production of the antibiotic flavicin.Ecotype: Geographic variety, population, or race, within a species, that is genetically adapted to a particular habitat. An ecotype typically exhibits phenotypic differences but is capable of interbreeding with other ecotypes.Nutritive Value: An indication of the contribution of a food to the nutrient content of the diet. This value depends on the quantity of a food which is digested and absorbed and the amounts of the essential nutrients (protein, fat, carbohydrate, minerals, vitamins) which it contains. This value can be affected by soil and growing conditions, handling and storage, and processing.Quantitative Trait, Heritable: A characteristic showing quantitative inheritance such as SKIN PIGMENTATION in humans. (From A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Genetic Enhancement: The use of genetic methodologies to improve functional capacities of an organism rather than to treat disease.Population Growth: Increase, over a specific period of time, in the number of individuals living in a country or region.Parrots: BIRDS of the large family Psittacidae, widely distributed in tropical regions and having a distinctive stout, curved hooked bill. The family includes LOVEBIRDS; AMAZON PARROTS; conures; PARAKEETS; and many other kinds of parrots.Weevils: BEETLES in the family Curculionidae and the largest family in the order COLEOPTERA. They have a markedly convex shape and many are considered pests.
Animals are called pests when they cause damage to agriculture by feeding on crops or parasitising livestock, such as codling ... Lice, fleas and bed bugs can all cause skin irritation. *Mosquitoes, tsetse flies and kissing bugs cause irritation and carry ... Termites, woodworm and wood ants cause structural damage. *Bookworms, silverfish, carpet beetles and clothes moths cause non- ... Wild boars damage crops, spread disease, and prey upon livestock. Invertebrates[edit]. Further information: Insect bites and ...
"What Causes Ascochyta Blight in Peas?". 20/20 Seed Labs Inc. "Bravo 500, Product Label, Fungicides, Syngenta Crop Protection". ... pinodella) causes Ascochyta foot rot, and Ascochyta pisi causes Ascochyta blight and pod spot. Of the three fungi, Ascochyta ... "Prairie Soils and Crops Journal" (PDF). Jhorar, Om P. (1996). Crop-Environment-Disease Interaction Study on Ascochyta Blight of ... Crop rotation: Since infection may arise from the soil or from pea residues up to three years, an effective approach to reduce ...
... over half of which was caused by Hurricanes Charley and Ivan.[12][20] A few other tropical cyclones caused light to moderate ... Roughly 95% of sugar cane, bean, and banana crops were ruined. There were four deaths and $923 million in damage.[40] Impact in ... It also caused three deaths and $1.27 million in damage.[30] In Greenville County, South Carolina, a few roads were washed out ... Rough seas and a storm surge up to 6 ft (1.8 m) on the Outer Banks of North Carolina caused minor beach erosion and washed out ...
Usually the soil yielded crops for no longer than a year. It was then turned into grazing land until trees grew up again from ... As a result, during the period 1750-1850 forests in Central Europe had been decimated, causing a serious lack of timber. Some ... During the 20th century much of the area to the southwest of Lüneburg became a British military training area, causing further ... Even this form of forest use caused considerable destruction. It hindered growth and weakened the vitality of entire stands of ...
"Cyclone Bulbul causes Tk 263cr loss in 16 dists". The Independent. November 13, 2019. Retrieved December 9, 2019.. ... Bulbul' claims 2 lives in Odisha, extensive damage to crops (Report). ReliefWeb. Government of India. November 10, 2019. ... This wind shear caused Pawan's convection to briefly dissipate, but it soon regenerated. Pawan eventually made landfall in the ... "Cyclone Bulbul caused Rs 23,811 crore losses: West Bengal Government". India Today. Press Trust of India. November 17, 2019. ...
It also causes considerable crop losses in other regions, including other tropical and subtropical crops in its native range ... Crops most commonly affected are corn, sorghum, rice and sugarcane.[2][8] Three species cause the most damage: Striga asiatica ... Increasing nitrogen levels in the soil, growing striga-tolerant varieties, trap-cropping, and planting susceptible crops ... If it is not detected before emergence, it is too late to reduce crop losses.[9] To prevent witchweed from spreading it is ...
The cotton bollworm causes enormous losses. Other species eat food crops. Caterpillars have been the target of pest control ... In fact many moth species are best known in their caterpillar stages because of the damage they cause to fruits and other ... Caterpillars cause much damage, mainly by eating leaves. The propensity for damage is enhanced by monocultural farming ... Its venom is an anticoagulant powerful enough to cause a human to hemorrhage to death (See Lonomiasis). This chemical is being ...
Causes[edit]. Parts of the country had suffered poor harvests in previous years, most notably in 1862. The summer of 1866 was ... After a promisingly warm midsummer, freezing temperatures in early September ravaged crops; as a result, the harvest was about ... the last major naturally caused famine in Europe. ... extremely rainy, and staple crops failed widely: potatoes and ...
... main crop) or they are grown on lands which cannot be used to effectively grow food crops[21] and in some cases neither extra ... nor cause water or environmental problems, and would enhance soil fertility.[98] The selection of land on which to grow the ... "Assessment of on-farm AD in the UK", National Non-Food Crops Centre, 2008-06-09. Retrieved on 2009-05-11. ... National Non-Food Crops Centre. "Advanced Biofuels: The Potential for a UK Industry, NNFCC 11-011" Archived 31 January 2016 at ...
Genetically modified crops[edit]. GM crops are not considered to be a cause. In 2008 a meta-analysis[192] of 25 independent ... Possible causes[edit]. The mechanisms of CCD are still unknown, but many causes are currently being considered, such as ... Colony collapse disorder could cause significant economic losses because many agricultural crops worldwide depend on ... Beehives can be moved from crop to crop as needed, and the bees will visit many plants in large numbers, compensating via ...
Tsunamis can be caused by undersea earthquakes such as the 2004 Boxing Day tsunami, or by landslides such as the one in 1958 at ... Droughts result in crop failure and shortages of water. Well-known historical droughts include the 1997-2009 Millennium Drought ... Common causes include lightning and drought but wildfires may also be started by human negligence or arson. They can spread to ... Earthquakes are caused by slippage within geological faults. The underground point of origin of the earthquake is called the ...
The Russian wheat aphid (Diuraphis noxia) is an aphid that can cause significant losses in cereal crops. The species was ... Feeding by this aphid will also cause the flag leaf to turn white and curl around the head causing incomplete head emergence. ... The aphid also causes reduction in biomass of the whole plant. However, once the aphid is removed the plant quickly recovers ... Host plants: cereal grain crops including wheat and barley and to a lesser extent, wild grasses such as wheatgrasses, brome- ...
"Helen causes extensive damage to crops". The New Indian Express. Vijayawada. 25 November 2013. Retrieved 26 February 2016. " ... Agriculture The major occupation of the village is agriculture and the crops cultivated include, paddy. The primary and ...
Staff Writer (November 17, 2008). "Storm causes extensive damage to crops". The Hindu. Chennai, India. Retrieved March 1, 2009 ... The Deep Depression caused 10 deaths in the state of Orissa. The Depression also caused 15 deaths in Uttar Pradesh, its state ... 189 people were killed by the heavy rains and floods caused by the cyclone in Tamil Nadu and the death toll is expected to rise ... The Deep Depression also caused storm surge up to 15 to 20 feet high. Overall, the storm killed at least 25 people in India (10 ...
"Helen causes extensive damage to crops". The New Indian Express. Vijayawada. 25 November 2013. Retrieved 26 February 2016. ...
It snapped and uprooted trees, and caused minor crop damage. An aluminum shed was destroyed. July 18 - an F0 tornado touched ... May 8 - a tornado over Hull, Quebec caused $2M damage and tore roofs off buildings. Was caused by the same system that produced ... The tornado caused severe damage to weakly built houses. It was the third recorded tornado in the region since 1960. 1979 July ... Causing C$22.2 million in damages and injuring 14 people, no fatalities occurred. Walpole Island saw an F2 tornado, it injured ...
The major occupation of the village is agriculture and main crop cultivated is paddy. "Helen causes extensive damage to crops ...
Others cause damage to agricultural crops. Larvae of some Ephydridae live in very unusual habitats. For example, Ephydra brucei ...
"Helen causes extensive damage to crops". The New Indian Express. Vijayawada. 25 November 2013. Retrieved 26 February 2016. " ... Agriculture The major occupation of the village is agriculture and main crop cultivated is paddy. Brick industry The village is ...
Lost Crops of Africa. 3. National Academies Press. 2008. p. 277. Neuwinger, Hans Dieter (1996). African Ethnobotany: Poisons ... Rubber causes these torments; that's why we no longer want to hear its name spoken. Soldiers made young men kill or rape their ...
Plant-parasitic nematodes include several groups causing severe crop losses. The most common genera are Aphelenchoides (foliar ... Filarial nematodes cause filariasis. Soil ecosystems[edit]. About 90% of nematodes reside in the top 15 cm of soil. Nematodes ... Toxocariasis: A helminth infection of humans caused by the dog or cat roundworm, Toxocara canis or Toxocara cati ... These changes likely cause frugivorous birds to confuse the infected ants for berries, and eat them. Parasite eggs passed in ...
Crop changes could then be expected to cause economic changes. Subsequent studies have found that sunny weather has a small but ... Disturbing Causes', 'Noxious Errors', and the Theory-Practice Distinction in the Economics of J.S. Mill and W.S. Jevons", The ... His reasoning was that sunspots affected the weather, which, in turn, affected crops. ... but might be based on discernible prior causes. To clarify the concept, he presented a statistical study relating business ...
Crop safety, for selective herbicides, is the relative absence of damage or stress to the crop. Most selective herbicides cause ... 2012). Modern crop protection compounds (2nd, rev. and enl. ed.). Weinheim: Wiley-VCH-Verl. pp. 197-276. ISBN 978-3-527-32965-6 ... Some herbicides cause a range of health effects ranging from skin rashes to death. The pathway of attack can arise from ... 2,4-D is a broadleaf herbicide in the phenoxy group used in turf and no-till field crop production. Now, it is mainly used in a ...
Road building has caused habitat degradation and fragmentation of chimpanzee populations and may allow poachers more access to ... People sometimes kill chimpanzees that threaten their crops.[2] Chimps may also be unintentionally maimed or killed by snares ... However, most changes in hierarchical rank are caused by dyadic interactions.[45] Chimpanzee alliances can be very fickle and ... A chimpanzee's great strength and sharp teeth mean that attacks, even on adult humans, can cause severe injuries. This was ...
Fields were inundated for over a week, causing severe losses to coffee and banana crops. Thousands of hectares of rice paddy ... The floods caused outbreaks of malaria and cholera while also decreasing food supplies. In the month after Eline struck, 384 ... The rains also caused flooding along Madagascar's west coast, which is usually spared from precipitation by mountains. Eline ... The lack of road or rail prevented farmers from selling crops that hadn't been destroyed during the storms. By March 21, the ...
In mice, MCH stimulates feeding and a mutation causing the overproduction of MCH led to overeating and obesity.[25] Orexin ... A chronic lack of nutritious food can cause various illnesses, and will eventually lead to starvation. When this happens in a ... "Ability to sit and rise from the floor as a predictor of all-cause mortality". European Journal of Preventive Cardiology. 21 ...
Bolting is typically caused by late planting when temperatures are low enough to cause vernalization of the plants. ... Pedigree breeding is used commonly for the improvement of self-pollinating crops or inbred lines of cross-pollinating crops. ... As a crop, lettuce is grown commercially wherever environmental conditions permit the production of an economically viable ... Descriptions of other breeding methods that are commonly used for different traits and crops can be found in one of several ...
... causes erosion, generates excessive wasteand damages biodiversity, according to thedaily.From 2002 to July of this year, ... where pineapple crops are grown.According to Alexis Vásquez, directorof the National Institute of Innovationand Agricultural ...
Fortified by Global Warming, Deadly Fungus Poisons Corn Crops, Causes Cancer. A carcinogenic mold, its growth exacerbated by ... Drought conditions dont cause the mold, but they do help speed its expansion. Unlike the fuzzy stuff that grows on bathroom ... The high toxicity of the mold means crops with more than 20 parts per billion-the equivalent of about 100 kernels in a ... To make matters worse, aflatoxins react strongly to the hepatitis B virus (HBV), the most common cause of liver cancer in the ...
... is emerging from the deep freeze today after a three-day winter blast that killed an elderly woman near Tallahassee but caused ... McKown said the biggest worry of growers is that the cold might have killed buds on trees, which could mean a smaller crop ... winter blast that killed an elderly woman near Tallahassee but caused only scattered damage to citrus and vegetable crops. ... Isolated pockets of frost this morning could cause more problems, Sorn said. ...
Insect pests of crops cause enormous damage and expense worldwide. Man...Wiley is pleased to announce the publication of the ... Insect pests of crops cause enormous damage and expense worldwide. Many crop pests and plant diseases they transmit have been ... Insect pests of crops cause enormous damage and expense worldwide. Man...Wiley is pleased to announce the publication of the ... a reference and textbook for swift identification and information on all major insect pests and the damage they cause to crops ...
Soybean Crop Concerns Causing Quite a Stir. Guest Contributor - September 2, 2013 2:15 PM ,. Categories: Commodities, Guest ... Overall crops are still reported to be progressing nicely, with around 58% of the US soybean crop reported to be in good or ... the current adverse weather conditions in the US and the uncertainty caused by the wait until South America plants its crop ... Dry weather at this time of year can stress the crops development, as this is when soybeans are going through the crucial pod ...
A global ban on genetically modified crops would raise food prices and add the equivalent of nearly a billion tons of carbon ... Model predicts elimination of GMO crops would cause hike in greenhouse gas emissions. Purdue University ... Countries that export crops would gain economically by the increase in food prices, while countries that import crops would ... Model predicts elimination of GMO crops would cause hike in greenhouse gas emissions ...
... crops are causing severe health problems. A legal challenge issued against Monsanto forced the multi-national... ... crops are causing severe health problems. A legal challenge issued against Monsanto forced the multi-national agriculture giant ... Genetically manipulated food crops are not fit for human consumption and should not be classified as food. No legitimate study ... The burden of proof is on the producers of such crops to verify their safety and, to date, all data has revealed that they are ...
Archives,SEE BETTER CHANCE FOR COTTON YIELD; More Cheerful Outlook for New Crop Causes Lowering of Values During the Week. SOME ... SEE BETTER CHANCE FOR COTTON YIELD; More Cheerful Outlook for New Crop Causes Lowering of Values During the Week. SOME MILLS ... More Cheerful Outlook for New Crop Causes Lowering of Values During the Week. SOME MILLS MAY CURTAIL Reports of Decrease In ...
A professor emeritus at Purdue University finds a correlation between Roundup Ready crops and a new, previously unknown ... Researcher: Glyphosate (Roundup) or Roundup Ready Crops May Cause Animal Miscarriages. Salem-News.com ... Jill Richardson :: Researcher: Glyphosate (Roundup) or Roundup Ready Crops May Cause Animal Miscarriages ... In summary, because of the high titer of this new animal pathogen in Roundup Ready crops, and its association with plant and ...
As for the crop problem, before treatment suggestions, I need to know whether it is sour crop or impacted crop. Does the crop ... Also this morning her crop is still full. Would having a sour or impacted crop cause her abdomen to be swollen or is it ... Ascites in her abdomen may have caused her impacted crop--sometimes that can be a symptom--you know sour crop progressing to ... If the crop is hard, then it is impacted crop. I dont know much on treating sour crop, but my rec commendations for impacted ...
... the storms and hail registered recently in various parts of Spain have damaged a total of 24,000 hectares of crops. The region ... Latest storms and hail in Spain caused severe damage to several crops - 360,000 hectares affected ... In the province of Ciudad Real, hail has caused plenty of damage to almond trees (just at the beginning of their harvest season ... Agroseguro said that the damage caused is covered by the agricultural insurance system and that experts have started visiting ...
... ... Geraldton) crop significantly reduced pest damage of fresh market cabbage cv. Minicole. The associated yield losses due to ... It is suggested that intercropping with clover as an IPM tool is not suitable at present for cabbage crops in the Netherlands. ... Delaying the sowing of the clover crop, or transplanting the cabbage into a rotary cultivated strip in the clover stand instead ...
... have identified beneficial fungi that have previously been tested as disease control agents in cotton crops. ... ... Efficient fungus paralyzes and kills pathogens that cause losses in cotton crops. April 15, 2015, Investigación y Desarrollo ... With over 100 diseases that can attack soybean crops, why would charcoal rot rise to the top of the most wanted list? ... This research states that the prevention of Texas rot has been achieved by implementing the rotation of crops, particularly ...
GM Soybean Oil Causes Less Obesity and Insulin Resistance: Soybean oil, the vegetable cooking oil commonly used in the United ... Subscribe to Crop Biotech Update Newsletter. Crop Biotech Update Archive. Crop Biotech Update RSS. Biofuels Supplement RSS ... Biotech Information Centers , Crop Biotech Update , Biofuels Supplement , Biotech Information Directory , Crop Biotechnology ... GM Soybean Oil Causes Less Obesity and Insulin Resistance. Soybean oil, the vegetable cooking oil commonly used in the United ...
... Media contact: Mary Hightower [email protected] ... Specialty crops. The output of small and specialty crop producers who provide to grocery stores and other local markets is not ... "Much of the crop was planted in Mississippi County on well-drained soil," Faske said. "As a result, damage from excessive ... The weather caused different problems for cotton growers. The cloud cover diminished the plants ability to produce the energy ...
Hurricane Irma causes $2.5B in damage to Florida crops. Published on October 4, 2017. in Statewide/Top Headlines by Associated ... Irma dealt Floridas iconic orange crop the most devastating blow causing more than $760 million in damage. Beef cattle and ... Growers talked of trees standing in 3 feet (.9 meters) of water, which is a death sentence for a crop already under a decade- ... Much of the fruit was young, and its too late in the season for a new crop. ...
Remote sensing of crop damage caused by potato cyst nematodes (PCN). Posted 2 August 2004 ... They feed in the roots of the potato crop making it less efficient at taking up both water and nutrients from the soil, ... A reduction in plant health status can be measured by comparing the ratio of NIR and visible light reflected from the crop ... Aircraft sensors recorded reflected light from the crop at more than 140 wavelengths, enabling very detailed calculations on ...
Bt corn, a lepidopteran-resistant corn plant, has helped lessen crop loss caused by insect infestation, however, the farm ... Researchers Study Spatial Distribution and Losses Caused by Corn Ear Pests in Bt and Non-Bt Corn. August 15, 2018 ... Lets work together to see more people have access to the Crop Biotech Update (CBU) and other ISAAA materials. Your donation ... In the study conducted in Brazil, scientists compared the distribution and damage caused by cornsilk fly, earworm and fall ...
114 thoughts on "Green heads to explode: elimination of GMO crops would cause hike in greenhouse gas emissions" * Tom Halla. ... Green heads to explode: elimination of GMO crops would cause hike in greenhouse gas emissions. Anthony Watts / November 7, ... Countries that export crops would gain economically by the increase in food prices, while countries that import crops would ... Model predicts elimination of GMO crops would cause hike in greenhouse gas emissions ...
Pesticides, Not Crop Intensification, Found To Be the Primary Cause of Bird Declines. (Beyond Pesticides, February 22, 2013) ... One Response to "Pesticides, Not Crop Intensification, Found To Be the Primary Cause of Bird Declines". * 1 ... Glyphosate Causes Changes to DNA Function Resulting in Chronic Disease, According to Study (31,207) ... Glyphosate Causes Changes to DNA Function Resulting in Chronic Disease, According to Study (31,207) ...
Causing crop damage that has been exasperated by drought conditions, soybean aphids moved into area fields earlier than experts ...
If you can see a problem with a crop, its a good idea to first check whats going on below the surface. Prevention is the best ... THE ROOT CAUSES of Some Common Crop Problems June 7, 2017. By Melhem Sawaya ... If you can see a problem with a crop, its a good idea to first check whats going on below the surface. Prevention is the best ... Most of the time we go overboard on fixing the problem rather than looking into the cause and preventing it. During my 39 years ...
Dorian causes severe damage to Annapolis Valley crops. CTV Atlantic Published Tuesday, September 10, 2019 8:54PM ADT ... So, this kind of year, where theres not a normal crop, then we certainly have overhead that we have to cover, which makes it ... Larry Lutz of the Nova Scotia Fruit Growers Association says the last major storm to wreak this much havoc with crops in the ... Larry Lutz of the Nova Scotia Fruit Growers Association says the last major storm to wreak this much havoc with crops in the ...
Burning of farm waste causes severe pollution of land and water on local as well ... Crop residue burning is one among the many sources of air pollution. ... Pollution Caused by Agricultural Waste Burning and Possible Alternate Uses of Crop Stubble: A Case Study of Punjab. Erstes ... Crop residue burning is one among the many sources of air pollution. Burning of farm waste causes severe pollution of land and ...
  • Using a model to assess the economic and environmental value of GMO crops, agricultural economists found that replacing GMO corn, soybeans and cotton with conventionally bred varieties worldwide would cause a 0.27 to 2.2 percent increase in food costs, depending on the region, with poorer countries hit hardest. (eurekalert.org)
  • This research states that the prevention of Texas rot has been achieved by implementing the rotation of crops, particularly soybeans, sorghum, cabbage, onion and garlic, which produce substances that prevent the harmful fungi. (phys.org)
  • Specialists at the Center of Genomic Biotechnology from the National Polytechnic Institute (IPN-CBG) in Mexico, have identified beneficial fungi that have previously been tested as disease control agents in cotton crops. (phys.org)
  • Fungi cause illnesses like athlete's foot and yeast infections. (cdc.gov)
  • It is suggested that intercropping with clover as an IPM tool is not suitable at present for cabbage crops in the Netherlands. (wur.nl)
  • If what we did before worked we try to repeat it - but that is only if we kept records we can review before starting to grow crops we produced before. (greenhousecanada.com)
  • Growing sustainable energy crops without increasing greenhouse gas emissions, may be possible on seasonally wet, environmentally sensitive landscapes, according to researchers who conducted a study on. (azocleantech.com)
  • McKown said the biggest worry of growers is that the cold might have killed buds on trees, which could mean a smaller crop during the next harvest. (orlandosentinel.com)
  • Growers talked of trees standing in 3 feet (.9 meters) of water, which is a death sentence for a crop already under a decade-long siege by citrus greening disease . (saintpetersblog.com)
  • Larry Lutz of the Nova Scotia Fruit Growers Association says the last major storm to wreak this much havoc with crops in the Valley was Hurricane Edna in September 1954. (ctvnews.ca)
  • Russia has muscled into Australia's traditional grain markets in south-east Asia and the Middle East as grain growers face a slide in winter crop production, exporters say. (abc.net.au)
  • In the aftermath of Irene, the hurricane/tropical storm that battered the East Coast in August, the Food and Drug Administration has released updated advice on how growers can judge the safety of their crops when flood waters have come in contact with the edible portions, and when they have not, as well as when to replant flooded fields and how to avoid cross-contamination of food crops after a flood. (foodsafetynews.com)
  • Growers of food crops are responsible for determining the safety of their crops when fields have been flooded. (foodsafetynews.com)
  • Said bombshell is an open letter written by Dr. Don Huber, professor emeritus at Purdue University, to Tom Vilsack, presenting a finding of a correlation between either glyphosate or Roundup Ready crops and a new, previously unknown organism that may be the cause of animal miscarriages and infertility. (salem-news.com)
  • The study further found that glyphosate, the active ingredient in RoundUp on its own causes necrosis, that is the death of tissue, in amounts lower than that used in agriculture. (blogspot.com)
  • Myriam Fernandez, a plant disease specialist with Agriculture Canada, found that fusarium in organic systems tended to be dominated by saprophytic species (not disease causing) whereas pathogenic fusarium (causing disease) were more abundant in other systems where GM crops and glyphosate were commonly used. (gmoevidence.com)
  • If all these problems are in fact linked to glyphosate and Roundup Ready crops, why are we not hearing of widespread crop failure? (gmoevidence.com)
  • Huber suggested that Roundup Ready crops, treated with glyphosate, had higher levels of mycotoxins and lower nutrient levels than conventional crops. (gmoevidence.com)
  • Those findings prompted him to look at the potential of cover crops as an alternative source. (fwi.co.uk)
  • One of the first challenges was getting cover crops to establish successfully on dry sands. (fwi.co.uk)
  • Since plant and animal genetic resources are the foundation of sustainable agriculture and global food security, conserving crop varieties helps prevent "genetic erosion. (ipsnews.net)
  • Since plant and animal genetic resources are the foundation of sustainable agriculture and global food security, conserving crop varieties helps prevent "genetic erosion", said Abberton, referring to the tendency of losing varieties either as a result of the development of new varieties or disasters. (ipsnews.net)
  • Early blight is a fungal disease that causes yield loss each year on all varieties of tomatoes. (growingproduce.com)
  • This year they're estimated to produce an 83 million tonne crop, which is 15 per cent higher than last year's previous record," said Ms Jansen. (abc.net.au)
  • Winter crop production was now tipped to be down 41 per cent on last year's record, with warm, dry conditions damaging crops in NSW and Queensland. (abc.net.au)
  • With the cereal harvest nearing completion, most indications are that Algeria's wheat and barley production will be 'as good' if not 'better' than last year's crops. (allaboutfeed.net)
  • According to the study, published Oct. 27 in the Journal of Environmental Protection , a ban on GMOs would also trigger negative environmental consequences: The conversion of pastures and forests to cropland - to compensate for conventional crops' lower productivity - would release substantial amounts of stored carbon to the atmosphere. (eurekalert.org)
  • The study also compared both conventional soybean oil and Plenish® to coconut oil, which is rich in saturated fatty acids and causes the least amount of weight gain among all the high-fat diets tested. (isaaa.org)
  • When consumed, the GM crops were more likely to cause disease, infertility, birth defects, cancer and allergic reactions than conventional crops. (gmoevidence.com)
  • The first crops of cucumbers and tomatoes cultivated inside electricity-generating solar greenhouses were as healthy as those grown in conventional greenhouses, indicating that 'smart' greenhouses hold significant potential for dual-use farming and renewable electricity production. (azocleantech.com)
  • With an artificially limited gene pool, most conventional food crops cannot evolve new defenses quickly from one generation to the next to deal with a changing environment. (care2.com)
  • Our team has been together since March 2019 and since then, we have grown to a core team of over 20 college and high school students working together to further our cause. (volunteermatch.org)
  • Approximately 84% of the 2019 crop has been seeded. (cropchatter.com)
  • Of course, the consumption of GE crops has no relevance to this particular blog post, which concerns cotton genetically engineered with a protein used by organic farmers for 50 years. (scienceblogs.com)
  • For example, rice production has come under growing pressure from alternative crops such as cotton, which currently provides a better return per megalitre of water for farmers. (abc.net.au)
  • P. omnívora (Texas rot) is a disease in northern Mexico and the Southern United States, which attacks more than 200 plant species, causing infection in the root, preventing movement of the sap. (phys.org)
  • A reduction in plant health status can be measured by comparing the ratio of NIR and visible light reflected from the crop canopy. (harper-adams.ac.uk)
  • WMV can cause severe stunting and leaf distortion (8) and PRSV and ZYMV can induce severe leaf mosaic, plant stunting, and malformation of foliage with blisters and shoestring (3) on cucurbits. (sare.org)
  • Crops on heavier land have suffered from the prolonged wet spell over the past three months with plant death, tiller loss and severe yellowing of foliage. (agriland.ie)
  • Crops have generally overwintered well with good plant stands and low disease levels. (agriland.ie)
  • and 'broke' the double plant - 'causing the plant to drop as an item, but it left behind the "head" portion of the double plant. (mojang.com)
  • Cause the mushroom a block update by placing the double_plant next to the mushroom. (mojang.com)
  • Placing the plant before the mushroom/crop does not 'pop' either item. (mojang.com)
  • Placing the double plant adjacent to the mushroom (at y-1) where the "head" of the double plant updates the mushroom does not cause the mushroom to drop, nor does it affect the double_plant. (mojang.com)
  • The bigger concern is for a contamination of the kind of leafy parts of the plant so the extent that, that's a problem for these crops that's being consumed. (whnt.com)
  • A new technology is planned for a water reclamation plant in Cicero, Illinois that would remove nutrient pollution from wastewater and convert it to pellets to be sold as fertilizer for crops and lawns. (whotv.com)
  • While considered strictly a disease of brassica (crucifers) it is known that P. brassicae can cause disease on other plant families (See Table 1). (gov.mb.ca)
  • GM crops, they said, might have "Increased levels of known naturally occurring toxins,…appearance of new, not previously identified" toxins, and an increased tendency to gather "toxic substances from the environment" such as "pesticides or heavy metals. (responsibletechnology.org)
  • Farmers who use pesticides that spare bees but kill other insects might be ignoring important sources of crop pollination, according to an Australian-led international study. (edu.au)
  • Bayer makes pesticides that some beekeepers and researchers have cited as a possible cause of colony collapse disorder, and Bromenshenk's conclusions in this study could benefit the company. (discovermagazine.com)
  • By 2024, the scenario saw global food prices spike by as much as 395 percent due to prolonged crop failures in key food basket regions, driven largely by climate change, oil price spikes, and confused responses from the international community. (bibliotecapleyades.net)
  • UPM researchers are studying the effects of climate change on Spanish vineyards and they suggest adopting adaptation choices of crops in order to make premium wines more globally competitive. (azocleantech.com)
  • Can Queensland's crops cope with climate change? (edu.au)
  • Climate forecasts to 2050 suggest sorghum is set to remain Queensland's top crop as temperatures rise and rainfall decreases across the State. (edu.au)
  • For a variety of reasons, such as Canada's lower population density and generally stronger housing construction due to the colder climate, Canadian tornadoes have historically caused far fewer fatalities than tornadoes in the United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • This raises obvious concerns about growing crops on fields contaminated with wastewater treatment discharge or sewage sludge , a process that could introduce MPs into the food chain . (phys.org)
  • The years between successive canola crops in a rotation would have to be increased from existing practices. (gov.mb.ca)
  • GTAP-BIO predicted a modest and region-specific rise in overall food costs under a global GMO ban, a result of the lower productivity of non-GMO crops. (eurekalert.org)
  • The FDA policy ignored the scientists' warnings and allowed GM food crops onto the market without any required safety studies. (responsibletechnology.org)
  • Bacteria cause illnesses such as strep throat and food poisoning. (cdc.gov)
  • The FDA said that if the edible portion of a food crop is exposed to flood waters, it is considered adulterated under federal law and there's no way to salvage it for sale. (foodsafetynews.com)
  • And since these three crops account for 42 percent of the calories people eat worldwide, any uptick in scarcity could give rise to food insecurity and conflict, particularly in poorer parts of the globe. (newvision.co.ug)
  • The excess rain during fall, coupled with having fed hay for the last several months has caused areas in many pastures to be destroyed, with very little grass left. (drovers.com)
  • Boil - An abscess of skin or painful, circumscribed inflammation of the skin or a hair follicle, having a dead, pus-forming inner core, usually caused by a staphylococcal infection. (google.com)
  • What are the Causes of Hookworm Infection? (medindia.net)