A transferase that catalyzes formation of PHOSPHOCREATINE from ATP + CREATINE. The reaction stores ATP energy as phosphocreatine. Three cytoplasmic ISOENZYMES have been identified in human tissues: the MM type from SKELETAL MUSCLE, the MB type from myocardial tissue and the BB type from nervous tissue as well as a mitochondrial isoenzyme. Macro-creatine kinase refers to creatine kinase complexed with other serum proteins.
A form of creatine kinase found in the MITOCHONDRIA.
An amino acid that occurs in vertebrate tissues and in urine. In muscle tissue, creatine generally occurs as phosphocreatine. Creatine is excreted as CREATININE in the urine.
Semiautonomous, self-reproducing organelles that occur in the cytoplasm of all cells of most, but not all, eukaryotes. Each mitochondrion is surrounded by a double limiting membrane. The inner membrane is highly invaginated, and its projections are called cristae. Mitochondria are the sites of the reactions of oxidative phosphorylation, which result in the formation of ATP. They contain distinctive RIBOSOMES, transfer RNAs (RNA, TRANSFER); AMINO ACYL T RNA SYNTHETASES; and elongation and termination factors. Mitochondria depend upon genes within the nucleus of the cells in which they reside for many essential messenger RNAs (RNA, MESSENGER). Mitochondria are believed to have arisen from aerobic bacteria that established a symbiotic relationship with primitive protoeukaryotes. (King & Stansfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)
Structurally related forms of an enzyme. Each isoenzyme has the same mechanism and classification, but differs in its chemical, physical, or immunological characteristics.
An isoenzyme of creatine kinase found in the MUSCLE.
Intracellular fluid from the cytoplasm after removal of ORGANELLES and other insoluble cytoplasmic components.
Mitochondria in hepatocytes. As in all mitochondria, there are an outer membrane and an inner membrane, together creating two separate mitochondrial compartments: the internal matrix space and a much narrower intermembrane space. In the liver mitochondrion, an estimated 67% of the total mitochondrial proteins is located in the matrix. (From Alberts et al., Molecular Biology of the Cell, 2d ed, p343-4)
A form of creatine kinase found in the BRAIN.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
An isoenzyme of creatine kinase found in the CARDIAC MUSCLE.
A species of the genus SACCHAROMYCES, family Saccharomycetaceae, order Saccharomycetales, known as "baker's" or "brewer's" yeast. The dried form is used as a dietary supplement.
Phosphotransferases that catalyzes the conversion of 1-phosphatidylinositol to 1-phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate. Many members of this enzyme class are involved in RECEPTOR MEDIATED SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION and regulation of vesicular transport with the cell. Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases have been classified both according to their substrate specificity and their mode of action within the cell.
Analyses for a specific enzyme activity, or of the level of a specific enzyme that is used to assess health and disease risk, for early detection of disease or disease prediction, diagnosis, and change in disease status.
An endogenous substance found mainly in skeletal muscle of vertebrates. It has been tried in the treatment of cardiac disorders and has been added to cardioplegic solutions. (Reynolds JEF(Ed): Martindale: The Extra Pharmacopoeia (electronic version). Micromedex, Inc, Englewood, CO, 1996)
An intracellular signaling system involving the MAP kinase cascades (three-membered protein kinase cascades). Various upstream activators, which act in response to extracellular stimuli, trigger the cascades by activating the first member of a cascade, MAP KINASE KINASE KINASES; (MAPKKKs). Activated MAPKKKs phosphorylate MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE KINASES which in turn phosphorylate the MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASES; (MAPKs). The MAPKs then act on various downstream targets to affect gene expression. In mammals, there are several distinct MAP kinase pathways including the ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase) pathway, the SAPK/JNK (stress-activated protein kinase/c-jun kinase) pathway, and the p38 kinase pathway. There is some sharing of components among the pathways depending on which stimulus originates activation of the cascade.
A family of enzymes that catalyze the conversion of ATP and a protein to ADP and a phosphoprotein.
A group of enzymes that catalyzes the phosphorylation of serine or threonine residues in proteins, with ATP or other nucleotides as phosphate donors.
An enzyme that catalyzes the phosphorylation of the guanidine nitrogen of arginine in the presence of ATP and a divalent cation with formation of phosphorylarginine and ADP. EC 2.7.3.3.
Contractile tissue that produces movement in animals.
Agents that inhibit PROTEIN KINASES.
A CALMODULIN-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the phosphorylation of proteins. This enzyme is also sometimes dependent on CALCIUM. A wide range of proteins can act as acceptor, including VIMENTIN; SYNAPSINS; GLYCOGEN SYNTHASE; MYOSIN LIGHT CHAINS; and the MICROTUBULE-ASSOCIATED PROTEINS. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992, p277)
A PROTEIN-TYROSINE KINASE family that was originally identified by homology to the Rous sarcoma virus ONCOGENE PROTEIN PP60(V-SRC). They interact with a variety of cell-surface receptors and participate in intracellular signal transduction pathways. Oncogenic forms of src-family kinases can occur through altered regulation or expression of the endogenous protein and by virally encoded src (v-src) genes.
A tetrameric enzyme that, along with the coenzyme NAD+, catalyzes the interconversion of LACTATE and PYRUVATE. In vertebrates, genes for three different subunits (LDH-A, LDH-B and LDH-C) exist.
The muscle tissue of the HEART. It is composed of striated, involuntary muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC) connected to form the contractile pump to generate blood flow.
An serine-threonine protein kinase that requires the presence of physiological concentrations of CALCIUM and membrane PHOSPHOLIPIDS. The additional presence of DIACYLGLYCEROLS markedly increases its sensitivity to both calcium and phospholipids. The sensitivity of the enzyme can also be increased by PHORBOL ESTERS and it is believed that protein kinase C is the receptor protein of tumor-promoting phorbol esters.
Necrosis or disintegration of skeletal muscle often followed by myoglobinuria.
A mitogen-activated protein kinase subfamily that regulates a variety of cellular processes including CELL GROWTH PROCESSES; CELL DIFFERENTIATION; APOPTOSIS; and cellular responses to INFLAMMATION. The P38 MAP kinases are regulated by CYTOKINE RECEPTORS and can be activated in response to bacterial pathogens.
A subtype of striated muscle, attached by TENDONS to the SKELETON. Skeletal muscles are innervated and their movement can be consciously controlled. They are also called voluntary muscles.
Electrophoresis in which cellulose acetate is the diffusion medium.
An adenine nucleotide containing three phosphate groups esterified to the sugar moiety. In addition to its crucial roles in metabolism adenosine triphosphate is a neurotransmitter.
A group of enzymes that are dependent on CYCLIC AMP and catalyze the phosphorylation of SERINE or THREONINE residues on proteins. Included under this category are two cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase subtypes, each of which is defined by its subunit composition.
The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.
A proline-directed serine/threonine protein kinase which mediates signal transduction from the cell surface to the nucleus. Activation of the enzyme by phosphorylation leads to its translocation into the nucleus where it acts upon specific transcription factors. p40 MAPK and p41 MAPK are isoforms.
ATP:pyruvate 2-O-phosphotransferase. A phosphotransferase that catalyzes reversibly the phosphorylation of pyruvate to phosphoenolpyruvate in the presence of ATP. It has four isozymes (L, R, M1, and M2). Deficiency of the enzyme results in hemolytic anemia. EC 2.7.1.40.
An enzyme that catalyzes the phosphorylation of AMP to ADP in the presence of ATP or inorganic triphosphate. EC 2.7.4.3.
A family of serine-threonine kinases that bind to and are activated by MONOMERIC GTP-BINDING PROTEINS such as RAC GTP-BINDING PROTEINS and CDC42 GTP-BINDING PROTEIN. They are intracellular signaling kinases that play a role the regulation of cytoskeletal organization.
Adenosine 5'-(trihydrogen diphosphate). An adenine nucleotide containing two phosphate groups esterified to the sugar moiety at the 5'-position.
A serine-threonine protein kinase family whose members are components in protein kinase cascades activated by diverse stimuli. These MAPK kinases phosphorylate MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASES and are themselves phosphorylated by MAP KINASE KINASE KINASES. JNK kinases (also known as SAPK kinases) are a subfamily.
A subgroup of mitogen-activated protein kinases that activate TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR AP-1 via the phosphorylation of C-JUN PROTEINS. They are components of intracellular signaling pathways that regulate CELL PROLIFERATION; APOPTOSIS; and CELL DIFFERENTIATION.
This enzyme catalyzes the last step of CREATINE biosynthesis by catalyzing the METHYLATION of guanidinoacetate to CREATINE.
A 44-kDa extracellular signal-regulated MAP kinase that may play a role the initiation and regulation of MEIOSIS; MITOSIS; and postmitotic functions in differentiated cells. It phosphorylates a number of TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS; and MICROTUBULE-ASSOCIATED PROTEINS.
Acquired, familial, and congenital disorders of SKELETAL MUSCLE and SMOOTH MUSCLE.
Spectroscopic method of measuring the magnetic moment of elementary particles such as atomic nuclei, protons or electrons. It is employed in clinical applications such as NMR Tomography (MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING).
Enzymes of a subclass of TRANSFERASES that catalyze the transfer of an amidino group from donor to acceptor. EC 2.1.4.
Protein kinases that catalyze the PHOSPHORYLATION of TYROSINE residues in proteins with ATP or other nucleotides as phosphate donors.
The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.
A conjugated protein which is the oxygen-transporting pigment of muscle. It is made up of one globin polypeptide chain and one heme group.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Phosphoprotein with protein kinase activity that functions in the G2/M phase transition of the CELL CYCLE. It is the catalytic subunit of the MATURATION-PROMOTING FACTOR and complexes with both CYCLIN A and CYCLIN B in mammalian cells. The maximal activity of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 is achieved when it is fully dephosphorylated.
Protein kinases that control cell cycle progression in all eukaryotes and require physical association with CYCLINS to achieve full enzymatic activity. Cyclin-dependent kinases are regulated by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation events.
The introduction of a phosphoryl group into a compound through the formation of an ester bond between the compound and a phosphorus moiety.
Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinases (MAPKKKs) are serine-threonine protein kinases that initiate protein kinase signaling cascades. They phosphorylate MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE KINASES; (MAPKKs) which in turn phosphorylate MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASES; (MAPKs).
NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).
A dsRNA-activated cAMP-independent protein serine/threonine kinase that is induced by interferon. In the presence of dsRNA and ATP, the kinase autophosphorylates on several serine and threonine residues. The phosphorylated enzyme catalyzes the phosphorylation of the alpha subunit of EUKARYOTIC INITIATION FACTOR-2, leading to the inhibition of protein synthesis.
A ubiquitous casein kinase that is comprised of two distinct catalytic subunits and dimeric regulatory subunit. Casein kinase II has been shown to phosphorylate a large number of substrates, many of which are proteins involved in the regulation of gene expression.
A group of protein-serine-threonine kinases that was originally identified as being responsible for the PHOSPHORYLATION of CASEINS. They are ubiquitous enzymes that have a preference for acidic proteins. Casein kinases play a role in SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION by phosphorylating a variety of regulatory cytoplasmic and regulatory nuclear proteins.
The mitochondria of the myocardium.
A family of protein serine/threonine kinases which act as intracellular signalling intermediates. Ribosomal protein S6 kinases are activated through phosphorylation in response to a variety of HORMONES and INTERCELLULAR SIGNALING PEPTIDES AND PROTEINS. Phosphorylation of RIBOSOMAL PROTEIN S6 by enzymes in this class results in increased expression of 5' top MRNAs. Although specific for RIBOSOMAL PROTEIN S6 members of this class of kinases can act on a number of substrates within the cell. The immunosuppressant SIROLIMUS inhibits the activation of ribosomal protein S6 kinases.
An abundant 43-kDa mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase subtype with specificity for MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE 1 and MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE 3.
Inflammation of a muscle or muscle tissue.
The chemical reactions involved in the production and utilization of various forms of energy in cells.
Enzymes of the transferase class that catalyze the conversion of L-aspartate and 2-ketoglutarate to oxaloacetate and L-glutamate. EC 2.6.1.1.
A class of cellular receptors that have an intrinsic PROTEIN-TYROSINE KINASE activity.
An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of ATP and thymidine to ADP and thymidine 5'-phosphate. Deoxyuridine can also act as an acceptor and dGTP as a donor. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992) EC 2.7.1.21.
Electrophoresis in which agar or agarose gel is used as the diffusion medium.
The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.
A mitogen-activated protein kinase subfamily that is widely expressed and plays a role in regulation of MEIOSIS; MITOSIS; and post mitotic functions in differentiated cells. The extracellular signal regulated MAP kinases are regulated by a broad variety of CELL SURFACE RECEPTORS and can be activated by certain CARCINOGENS.
A mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase with specificity for JNK MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASES; P38 MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASES and the RETINOID X RECEPTORS. It takes part in a SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION pathway that is activated in response to cellular stress.
The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.
One of the three polypeptide chains that make up the TROPONIN complex. It is a cardiac-specific protein that binds to TROPOMYOSIN. It is released from damaged or injured heart muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC). Defects in the gene encoding troponin T result in FAMILIAL HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY.
One of the three polypeptide chains that make up the TROPONIN complex. It inhibits F-actin-myosin interactions.
The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.
An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of phosphatidylinositol (PHOSPHATIDYLINOSITOLS) to phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate, the first committed step in the biosynthesis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate.
A group of enzymes that transfers a phosphate group onto an alcohol group acceptor. EC 2.7.1.
A superfamily of PROTEIN-SERINE-THREONINE KINASES that are activated by diverse stimuli via protein kinase cascades. They are the final components of the cascades, activated by phosphorylation by MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE KINASES, which in turn are activated by mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinases (MAP KINASE KINASE KINASES).
A family of cell cycle-dependent kinases that are related in structure to CDC28 PROTEIN KINASE; S CEREVISIAE; and the CDC2 PROTEIN KINASE found in mammalian species.
Conversion of an inactive form of an enzyme to one possessing metabolic activity. It includes 1, activation by ions (activators); 2, activation by cofactors (coenzymes); and 3, conversion of an enzyme precursor (proenzyme or zymogen) to an active enzyme.
A heterogeneous group of inherited MYOPATHIES, characterized by wasting and weakness of the SKELETAL MUSCLE. They are categorized by the sites of MUSCLE WEAKNESS; AGE OF ONSET; and INHERITANCE PATTERNS.
Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.
A protein serine-threonine kinase that catalyzes the PHOSPHORYLATION of I KAPPA B PROTEINS. This enzyme also activates the transcription factor NF-KAPPA B and is composed of alpha and beta catalytic subunits, which are protein kinases and gamma, a regulatory subunit.
A glycogen synthase kinase that was originally described as a key enzyme involved in glycogen metabolism. It regulates a diverse array of functions such as CELL DIVISION, microtubule function and APOPTOSIS.
A family of highly conserved serine-threonine kinases that are involved in the regulation of MITOSIS. They are involved in many aspects of cell division, including centrosome duplication, SPINDLE APPARATUS formation, chromosome alignment, attachment to the spindle, checkpoint activation, and CYTOKINESIS.
A group of intracellular-signaling serine threonine kinases that bind to RHO GTP-BINDING PROTEINS. They were originally found to mediate the effects of rhoA GTP-BINDING PROTEIN on the formation of STRESS FIBERS and FOCAL ADHESIONS. Rho-associated kinases have specificity for a variety of substrates including MYOSIN-LIGHT-CHAIN PHOSPHATASE and LIM KINASES.
The uptake of naked or purified DNA by CELLS, usually meaning the process as it occurs in eukaryotic cells. It is analogous to bacterial transformation (TRANSFORMATION, BACTERIAL) and both are routinely employed in GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUES.
Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.
The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.
A ubiquitously expressed protein kinase that is involved in a variety of cellular SIGNAL PATHWAYS. Its activity is regulated by a variety of signaling protein tyrosine kinase.
A cytoplasmic serine threonine kinase involved in regulating CELL DIFFERENTIATION and CELLULAR PROLIFERATION. Overexpression of this enzyme has been shown to promote PHOSPHORYLATION of BCL-2 PROTO-ONCOGENE PROTEINS and chemoresistance in human acute leukemia cells.
Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.
Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.
Intracellular signaling protein kinases that play a signaling role in the regulation of cellular energy metabolism. Their activity largely depends upon the concentration of cellular AMP which is increased under conditions of low energy or metabolic stress. AMP-activated protein kinases modify enzymes involved in LIPID METABOLISM, which in turn provide substrates needed to convert AMP into ATP.
A characteristic feature of enzyme activity in relation to the kind of substrate on which the enzyme or catalytic molecule reacts.
Products of proto-oncogenes. Normally they do not have oncogenic or transforming properties, but are involved in the regulation or differentiation of cell growth. They often have protein kinase activity.
Damage to the MYOCARDIUM resulting from MYOCARDIAL REPERFUSION (restoration of blood flow to ischemic areas of the HEART.) Reperfusion takes place when there is spontaneous thrombolysis, THROMBOLYTIC THERAPY, collateral flow from other coronary vascular beds, or reversal of vasospasm.
The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.
A basic element found in nearly all organized tissues. It is a member of the alkaline earth family of metals with the atomic symbol Ca, atomic number 20, and atomic weight 40. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and combines with phosphorus to form calcium phosphate in the bones and teeth. It is essential for the normal functioning of nerves and muscles and plays a role in blood coagulation (as factor IV) and in many enzymatic processes.
RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.
An enzyme of the transferase class that uses ATP to catalyze the phosphorylation of diacylglycerol to a phosphatidate. EC 2.7.1.107.
The protein constituents of muscle, the major ones being ACTINS and MYOSINS. More than a dozen accessory proteins exist including TROPONIN; TROPOMYOSIN; and DYSTROPHIN.
Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.
The long cylindrical contractile organelles of STRIATED MUSCLE cells composed of ACTIN FILAMENTS; MYOSIN filaments; and other proteins organized in arrays of repeating units called SARCOMERES .
Myoglobinuria is the presence of myoglobin, a protein found in muscle fibers, in the urine, which can occur due to muscle injury or disease, and may lead to acute kidney injury if excessive.
A non-essential amino acid. In animals it is synthesized from PHENYLALANINE. It is also the precursor of EPINEPHRINE; THYROID HORMONES; and melanin.
A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.
A protein-serine-threonine kinase that is activated by PHOSPHORYLATION in response to GROWTH FACTORS or INSULIN. It plays a major role in cell metabolism, growth, and survival as a core component of SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION. Three isoforms have been described in mammalian cells.
A non-receptor protein tyrosine kinase that is localized to FOCAL ADHESIONS and is a central component of integrin-mediated SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION PATHWAYS. Focal adhesion kinase 1 interacts with PAXILLIN and undergoes PHOSPHORYLATION in response to adhesion of cell surface integrins to the EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX. Phosphorylated p125FAK protein binds to a variety of SH2 DOMAIN and SH3 DOMAIN containing proteins and helps regulate CELL ADHESION and CELL MIGRATION.
A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.
Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.
Electrophoresis in which a polyacrylamide gel is used as the diffusion medium.
An enzyme that phosphorylates myosin light chains in the presence of ATP to yield myosin-light chain phosphate and ADP, and requires calcium and CALMODULIN. The 20-kDa light chain is phosphorylated more rapidly than any other acceptor, but light chains from other myosins and myosin itself can act as acceptors. The enzyme plays a central role in the regulation of smooth muscle contraction.
Generally, restoration of blood supply to heart tissue which is ischemic due to decrease in normal blood supply. The decrease may result from any source including atherosclerotic obstruction, narrowing of the artery, or surgical clamping. Reperfusion can be induced to treat ischemia. Methods include chemical dissolution of an occluding thrombus, administration of vasodilator drugs, angioplasty, catheterization, and artery bypass graft surgery. However, it is thought that reperfusion can itself further damage the ischemic tissue, causing MYOCARDIAL REPERFUSION INJURY.
Common name for the species Gallus gallus, the domestic fowl, in the family Phasianidae, order GALLIFORMES. It is descended from the red jungle fowl of SOUTHEAST ASIA.
Compounds which restore enzymatic activity by removing an inhibitory group bound to the reactive site of the enzyme.
A Janus kinase subtype that is involved in signaling from GROWTH HORMONE RECEPTORS; PROLACTIN RECEPTORS; and a variety of CYTOKINE RECEPTORS such as ERYTHROPOIETIN RECEPTORS and INTERLEUKIN RECEPTORS. Dysregulation of Janus kinase 2 due to GENETIC TRANSLOCATIONS have been associated with a variety of MYELOPROLIFERATIVE DISORDERS.
The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.
A family of non-receptor, PROLINE-rich protein-tyrosine kinases.
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
Recombinant proteins produced by the GENETIC TRANSLATION of fused genes formed by the combination of NUCLEIC ACID REGULATORY SEQUENCES of one or more genes with the protein coding sequences of one or more genes.
A family of ribosomal protein S6 kinases that are structurally distinguished from RIBOSOMAL PROTEIN S6 KINASES, 70-KDA by their apparent molecular size and the fact they contain two functional kinase domains. Although considered RIBOSOMAL PROTEIN S6 KINASES, members of this family are activated via the MAP KINASE SIGNALING SYSTEM and have been shown to act on a diverse array of substrates that are involved in cellular regulation such as RIBOSOMAL PROTEIN S6 and CAMP RESPONSE ELEMENT-BINDING PROTEIN.
One of the mechanisms by which CELL DEATH occurs (compare with NECROSIS and AUTOPHAGOCYTOSIS). Apoptosis is the mechanism responsible for the physiological deletion of cells and appears to be intrinsically programmed. It is characterized by distinctive morphologic changes in the nucleus and cytoplasm, chromatin cleavage at regularly spaced sites, and the endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA; (DNA FRAGMENTATION); at internucleosomal sites. This mode of cell death serves as a balance to mitosis in regulating the size of animal tissues and in mediating pathologic processes associated with tumor growth.
Proteins and peptides that are involved in SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION within the cell. Included here are peptides and proteins that regulate the activity of TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS and cellular processes in response to signals from CELL SURFACE RECEPTORS. Intracellular signaling peptide and proteins may be part of an enzymatic signaling cascade or act through binding to and modifying the action of other signaling factors.
Phosphoproteins are proteins that have been post-translationally modified with the addition of a phosphate group, usually on serine, threonine or tyrosine residues, which can play a role in their regulation, function, interaction with other molecules, and localization within the cell.
A protein kinase C subtype that was originally characterized as a CALCIUM-independent, serine-threonine kinase that is activated by PHORBOL ESTERS and DIACYLGLYCEROLS. It is targeted to specific cellular compartments in response to extracellular signals that activate G-PROTEIN-COUPLED RECEPTORS; TYROSINE KINASE RECEPTORS; and intracellular protein tyrosine kinase.
The level of protein structure in which combinations of secondary protein structures (alpha helices, beta sheets, loop regions, and motifs) pack together to form folded shapes called domains. Disulfide bridges between cysteines in two different parts of the polypeptide chain along with other interactions between the chains play a role in the formation and stabilization of tertiary structure. Small proteins usually consist of only one domain but larger proteins may contain a number of domains connected by segments of polypeptide chain which lack regular secondary structure.
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in enzyme synthesis.
One of the minor protein components of skeletal muscle. Its function is to serve as the calcium-binding component in the troponin-tropomyosin B-actin-myosin complex by conferring calcium sensitivity to the cross-linked actin and myosin filaments.
A 195-kDa MAP kinase kinase kinase with broad specificity for MAP KINASE KINASES. It is found localized in the CYTOSKELETON and can activate a variety of MAP kinase-dependent pathways.
Method of analyzing chemicals using automation.
Mitochondria of skeletal and smooth muscle. It does not include myocardial mitochondria for which MITOCHONDRIA, HEART is available.
A multifunctional calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase subtype that occurs as an oligomeric protein comprised of twelve subunits. It differs from other enzyme subtypes in that it lacks a phosphorylatable activation domain that can respond to CALCIUM-CALMODULIN-DEPENDENT PROTEIN KINASE KINASE.
The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.
Compounds or agents that combine with an enzyme in such a manner as to prevent the normal substrate-enzyme combination and the catalytic reaction.
An alkylating sulfhydryl reagent. Its actions are similar to those of iodoacetate.
PKC beta encodes two proteins (PKCB1 and PKCBII) generated by alternative splicing of C-terminal exons. It is widely distributed with wide-ranging roles in processes such as B-cell receptor regulation, oxidative stress-induced apoptosis, androgen receptor-dependent transcriptional regulation, insulin signaling, and endothelial cell proliferation.
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.
The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.
Recording of the moment-to-moment electromotive forces of the HEART as projected onto various sites on the body's surface, delineated as a scalar function of time. The recording is monitored by a tracing on slow moving chart paper or by observing it on a cardioscope, which is a CATHODE RAY TUBE DISPLAY.
An enzyme catalyzing the transfer of a phosphate group from 3-phospho-D-glycerate in the presence of ATP to yield 3-phospho-D-glyceroyl phosphate and ADP. EC 2.7.2.3.
A phorbol ester found in CROTON OIL with very effective tumor promoting activity. It stimulates the synthesis of both DNA and RNA.
The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.
A 44 kDa mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase with specificity for MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE 1 and MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE 3.
A disorder of cardiac function caused by insufficient blood flow to the muscle tissue of the heart. The decreased blood flow may be due to narrowing of the coronary arteries (CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE), to obstruction by a thrombus (CORONARY THROMBOSIS), or less commonly, to diffuse narrowing of arterioles and other small vessels within the heart. Severe interruption of the blood supply to the myocardial tissue may result in necrosis of cardiac muscle (MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION).
A serine threonine kinase that controls a wide range of growth-related cellular processes. The protein is referred to as the target of RAPAMYCIN due to the discovery that SIROLIMUS (commonly known as rapamycin) forms an inhibitory complex with TACROLIMUS BINDING PROTEIN 1A that blocks the action of its enzymatic activity.
A key regulator of CELL CYCLE progression. It partners with CYCLIN E to regulate entry into S PHASE and also interacts with CYCLIN A to phosphorylate RETINOBLASTOMA PROTEIN. Its activity is inhibited by CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE INHIBITOR P27 and CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE INHIBITOR P21.
A non-essential amino acid occurring in natural form as the L-isomer. It is synthesized from GLYCINE or THREONINE. It is involved in the biosynthesis of PURINES; PYRIMIDINES; and other amino acids.
A group of cyclic GMP-dependent enzymes that catalyze the phosphorylation of SERINE or THREONINE residues of proteins.
Derivatives of the steroid androstane having two double bonds at any site in any of the rings.
Muscular Dystrophy, Animal: A group of genetic disorders causing progressive skeletal muscle weakness and degeneration, characterized by the lack of or defective dystrophin protein, which can also affect other organ systems such as heart and brain, occurring in various forms with different degrees of severity and age of onset, like Duchenne, Becker, Myotonic, Limb-Girdle, and Facioscapulohumeral types, among others.
Inorganic salts of phosphoric acid.
A family of iminourea derivatives. The parent compound has been isolated from mushrooms, corn germ, rice hulls, mussels, earthworms, and turnip juice. Derivatives may have antiviral and antifungal properties.
A metallic element that has the atomic symbol Mg, atomic number 12, and atomic weight 24.31. It is important for the activity of many enzymes, especially those involved in OXIDATIVE PHOSPHORYLATION.
An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of ATP and PHOSPHORYLASE B to ADP and PHOSPHORYLASE A.
Immunologic method used for detecting or quantifying immunoreactive substances. The substance is identified by first immobilizing it by blotting onto a membrane and then tagging it with labeled antibodies.
A serine-threonine kinase that plays important roles in CELL DIFFERENTIATION; CELL MIGRATION; and CELL DEATH of NERVE CELLS. It is closely related to other CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASES but does not seem to participate in CELL CYCLE regulation.
Iodinated derivatives of acetic acid. Iodoacetates are commonly used as alkylating sulfhydryl reagents and enzyme inhibitors in biochemical research.
Cells grown in vitro from neoplastic tissue. If they can be established as a TUMOR CELL LINE, they can be propagated in cell culture indefinitely.
A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.
The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
Electron transfer through the cytochrome system liberating free energy which is transformed into high-energy phosphate bonds.
Technique by which phase transitions of chemical reactions can be followed by observation of the heat absorbed or liberated.
The sum of the weight of all the atoms in a molecule.
Chromones are a class of chemical compounds that contain a benzopyran-4-one core structure, which are found in various natural and synthetic substances, including some medications used to treat asthma and allergies.
The fission of a CELL. It includes CYTOKINESIS, when the CYTOPLASM of a cell is divided, and CELL NUCLEUS DIVISION.
Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.
An electrochemical process in which macromolecules or colloidal particles with a net electric charge migrate in a solution under the influence of an electric current.
Separation technique in which the stationary phase consists of ion exchange resins. The resins contain loosely held small ions that easily exchange places with other small ions of like charge present in solutions washed over the resins.
An activity in which the body is propelled by moving the legs rapidly. Running is performed at a moderate to rapid pace and should be differentiated from JOGGING, which is performed at a much slower pace.
A method of chemical analysis based on the detection of characteristic radionuclides following a nuclear bombardment. It is also known as radioactivity analysis. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.
Serologic tests in which a positive reaction manifested by visible CHEMICAL PRECIPITATION occurs when a soluble ANTIGEN reacts with its precipitins, i.e., ANTIBODIES that can form a precipitate.
Hydroxybutyrate Dehydrogenase is an enzyme involved in the metabolism of certain acids, specifically catalyzing the reversible conversion of D-3-hydroxybutyrate to acetoacetate.
Proteins that control the CELL DIVISION CYCLE. This family of proteins includes a wide variety of classes, including CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASES, mitogen-activated kinases, CYCLINS, and PHOSPHOPROTEIN PHOSPHATASES as well as their putative substrates such as chromatin-associated proteins, CYTOSKELETAL PROTEINS, and TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS.
An enzyme that catalyzes reversible reactions of a nucleoside triphosphate, e.g., ATP, with a nucleoside monophosphate, e.g., UMP, to form ADP and UDP. Many nucleoside monophosphates can act as acceptor while many ribo- and deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates can act as donor. EC 2.7.4.4.
Compounds and molecular complexes that consist of very large numbers of atoms and are generally over 500 kDa in size. In biological systems macromolecular substances usually can be visualized using ELECTRON MICROSCOPY and are distinguished from ORGANELLES by the lack of a membrane structure.
A mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase with specificity for P38 MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASES.
The rate at which oxygen is used by a tissue; microliters of oxygen STPD used per milligram of tissue per hour; the rate at which oxygen enters the blood from alveolar gas, equal in the steady state to the consumption of oxygen by tissue metabolism throughout the body. (Stedman, 25th ed, p346)
Proteins which bind to DNA. The family includes proteins which bind to both double- and single-stranded DNA and also includes specific DNA binding proteins in serum which can be used as markers for malignant diseases.
Inbred C57BL mice are a strain of laboratory mice that have been produced by many generations of brother-sister matings, resulting in a high degree of genetic uniformity and homozygosity, making them widely used for biomedical research, including studies on genetics, immunology, cancer, and neuroscience.
An examination of chemicals in the blood.
An adenine nucleotide containing one phosphate group which is esterified to both the 3'- and 5'-positions of the sugar moiety. It is a second messenger and a key intracellular regulator, functioning as a mediator of activity for a number of hormones, including epinephrine, glucagon, and ACTH.
A compound tubular gland, located around the eyes and nasal passages in marine animals and birds, the physiology of which figures in water-electrolyte balance. The Pekin duck serves as a common research animal in salt gland studies. A rectal gland or rectal salt gland in the dogfish shark is attached at the junction of the intestine and cloaca and aids the kidneys in removing excess salts from the blood. (Storer, Usinger, Stebbins & Nybakken: General Zoology, 6th ed, p658)
Morpholines are organic compounds containing a morpholine ring, which is a saturated six-membered heterocycle made up of four carbon atoms and two oxygen atoms (OCC1CCO), often used as functional groups in pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and materials science due to their versatile chemical properties.
A casein kinase that was originally described as a monomeric enzyme with a molecular weight of 30-40 kDa. Several ISOENZYMES of casein kinase I have been found which are encoded by separate genes. Many of the casein kinase I isoenzymes have been shown to play distinctive roles in intracellular SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION.
Irritants and reagents for labeling terminal amino acid groups.
A mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase with specificity for a subset of P38 MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASES that includes MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE 12; MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE 13; and MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE 14.
A c-jun amino-terminal kinase that is activated by environmental stress and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Several isoforms of the protein with molecular sizes of 43 and 48 KD exist due to multiple ALTERNATIVE SPLICING.
A technique using antibodies for identifying or quantifying a substance. Usually the substance being studied serves as antigen both in antibody production and in measurement of antibody by the test substance.
Large, multinucleate single cells, either cylindrical or prismatic in shape, that form the basic unit of SKELETAL MUSCLE. They consist of MYOFIBRILS enclosed within and attached to the SARCOLEMMA. They are derived from the fusion of skeletal myoblasts (MYOBLASTS, SKELETAL) into a syncytium, followed by differentiation.
An aurora kinase that localizes to the CENTROSOME during MITOSIS and is involved in centrosome regulation and formation of the MITOTIC SPINDLE. Aurora A overexpression in many malignant tumor types suggests that it may be directly involved in NEOPLASTIC CELL TRANSFORMATION.
Highly conserved protein-serine threonine kinases that phosphorylate and activate a group of AGC protein kinases, especially in response to the production of the SECOND MESSENGERS, phosphatidylinositol 3,4,-biphosphate (PtdIns(3,4)P2) and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate (PtdIns(3,4,5)P3).
A non-receptor protein-tyrosine kinase that is expressed primarily in the BRAIN; OSTEOBLASTS; and LYMPHOID CELLS. In the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM focal adhesion kinase 2 modulates ION CHANNEL function and MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASES activity.
The biosynthesis of RNA carried out on a template of DNA. The biosynthesis of DNA from an RNA template is called REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION.

Heart failure affects mitochondrial but not myofibrillar intrinsic properties of skeletal muscle. (1/49)

BACKGROUND: Congestive heart failure (CHF) induces abnormalities in skeletal muscle that are thought to in part explain exercise intolerance. The aim of the present study was to determine whether these changes actually result in contractile or metabolic functional alterations and whether they are muscle type specific. METHODS AND RESULTS: With a rat model of CHF (induced by aortic banding), we studied mitochondrial function, mechanical properties, and creatine kinase (CK) compartmentation in situ in permeabilized fibers from soleus (SOL), an oxidative slow-twitch muscle, and white gastrocnemius (GAS), a glycolytic fast-twitch muscle. Animals were studied 7 months after surgery, and CHF was documented on the basis of anatomic data. Alterations in skeletal muscle phenotype were documented with an increased proportion of fast-type fiber and fast myosin heavy chain, decreased capillary-to-fiber ratio, and decreased citrate synthase activity. Despite a slow-to-fast phenotype transition in SOL, no change was observed in contractile capacity or calcium sensitivity. However, muscles from CHF rats exhibited a dramatic decrease in oxidative capacities (oxygen consumption per gram of fiber dry weight) of 35% for SOL and 45% for GAS (P:<0.001). Moreover, the regulation of respiration with ADP and mitochondrial CK and adenylate kinase was impaired in CHF SOL. Mitochondrial CK activity and content (Western blots) were dramatically decreased in both muscles. CONCLUSIONS: CHF results in alterations in both mitochondrial function and phosphotransfer systems but unchanged myofibrillar function in skeletal muscles, which suggests a myopathy of metabolic origin in CHF.  (+info)

Changes in mRNA expression profile underlie phenotypic adaptations in creatine kinase-deficient muscles. (2/49)

We have studied the mechanisms that regulate the remodeling of the glycolytic, mitochondrial and structural network of muscles of creatine kinase M (M-CK)/sarcomeric mitochondrial creatine kinase (ScCKmit) knockout mice by comparison of wild-type and mutant mRNA profiles on cDNA arrays. The magnitudes of changes in mRNA levels were most prominent in M-CK/ScCKmit (CK(-/-)) double mutants but did never exceed those of previously observed changes in protein level for any protein examined. In gastrocnemius of CK(-/-) mice we measured a 2.5-fold increase in mRNA level for mitochondrial encoded cytochrome c oxidase (COX)-III which corresponds to the increase in protein content. The level of the nuclear encoded mRNAs for COX-IV, H(+)-ATP synthase-C, adenine nucleotide translocator-1 and insulin-regulatable glucose transporter-4 showed a 1.5-fold increase, also in agreement with protein data. In contrast, no concomitant up-regulation in mRNA and protein content was detected for the mitochondrial inorganic phosphate-carrier, voltage-dependent anion channel and certain glycolytic enzymes. Our results reveal that regulation of transcript level plays an important role, but it is not the only principle involved in the remodeling of mitochondrial and cytosolic design of CK(-/-) muscles.  (+info)

Mitochondrial creatine kinase: properties and function. (3/49)

This review describes properties of mitochondrial creatine kinase from heart and skeletal muscle studied in the author's group at the Department of Biochemistry of Moscow State University. The results are compared to the data in the literature. The author's point of view on the physiological role of mitochondrial creatine kinase is presented.  (+info)

Multiple interference of anthracyclines with mitochondrial creatine kinases: preferential damage of the cardiac isoenzyme and its implications for drug cardiotoxicity. (4/49)

Anthracyclines are among the most efficient drugs of cancer chemotherapy, but their use is limited by a significant risk of cardiotoxicity, which is still far from being understood. This study investigates whether impairment of mitochondrial creatine kinase (MtCK), a key enzyme in cellular energy metabolism, could be involved in anthracycline cardiotoxicity. We have analyzed the effects of three anthracyclines, doxorubicin, daunorubicin, and idarubicin, on two MtCK isoenzymes, sarcomeric/cardiac sMtCK and ubiquitous uMtCK, from human and chicken. Using surface plasmon resonance, gel filtration, and enzyme assays, we have quantified properties that are of basic importance for MtCK functioning in vivo: membrane binding, octameric state, and enzymatic activity. Anthracyclines significantly impaired all three properties with differences in dose-, time-, and drug-dependence. Membrane binding and enzymatic activity were already affected at low anthracycline concentrations (5-100 microM), indicating high clinical relevance. Effects on membrane binding were immediate, probably because of competitive binding of the drug to cardiolipin. In contrast, dissociation of MtCK octamers into dimers, enzymatic inactivation and cross-linking occurred only after hours to days. Different protection assays suggest that the deleterious effects were caused by oxidative damage, mainly affecting the highly susceptible MtCK cysteines, followed by generation of free oxygen radicals at higher drug concentrations. Enzymatic inactivation occurred mainly at the active site and involved Cys278, as indicated by experiments with protective agents and sMtCK mutant C278G. All anthracycline effects were significantly more pronounced for sMtCK than for uMtCK. These in vitro results suggest that sMtCK damage may play a role in anthracycline cardiotoxicity.  (+info)

Expression of creatine kinase isoenzyme genes during postnatal development of rat brain cerebellum: evidence for transcriptional regulation. (5/49)

Transcription and accumulation of brain-type creatine kinase (CKB) mRNA and its protein was examined during postnatal development of rat brain cerebellum, the brain region containing highest CKB mRNA in the adult. CKB protein was extremely low at day 1, increased about 10-fold until week 4 and remained constant until week 10. This time course was paralleled by cerebellar CKB mRNA, which was also extremely low at day 1 and increased 5-fold during the first 3 weeks and then remained constant. High levels of CKB protein were also detected in cultured primary cerebellar granular neurons. Nuclear run-on assays directly showed that CKB mRNA accumulation during postnatal cerebellar development was due to increased transcription. When compared with cerebrum and whole brain, cerebellar CKB mRNA accumulation during postnatal development was temporally delayed. Analysis of myocyte enhancer factor (MEF)-2 and Sp1, factors known to initiate or sustain CKB transcription in tissues other than brain, revealed that MEF-2 in cerebellum was low at week 1 but increased 3.5-fold by week 7, while Sp1 remained unchanged. The increase in CKB protein during cerebellar postnatal development was coincident with that of the ubiquitous mitochondrial CK protein and mRNA, indicating that a functional phosphocreatine energy shuttle probably exists for efficient ATP regeneration in the cerebellum. This should be beneficial for the many energy-demanding requirements during cerebellar development, as indicated by the observed temporal co-expression of CKB with myelin basic protein, which is involved in axon myelination by oligodendrocytes.  (+info)

Mitochondrial creatine kinase is critically necessary for normal myocardial high-energy phosphate metabolism. (6/49)

The individual functional significance of the various creatine kinase (CK) isoenzymes for myocardial energy homeostasis is poorly understood. Whereas transgenic hearts lacking the M subunit of CK (M-CK) show unaltered cardiac energetics and left ventricular (LV) performance, deletion of M-CK in combination with loss of sarcomeric mitochondrial CK (ScCKmit) leads to significant alterations in myocardial high-energy phosphate metabolites. To address the question as to whether this alteration is due to a decrease in total CK activity below a critical threshold or due to the specific loss of ScCKmit, we studied isolated perfused hearts with selective loss of ScCKmit (ScCKmit(-/-), remaining total CK activity approximately 70%) using (31)P NMR spectroscopy at two different workloads. LV performance in ScCKmit(-/-) hearts (n = 11) was similar compared with wild-type hearts (n = 9). Phosphocreatine/ATP, however, was significantly reduced in ScCKmit(-/-) compared with wild-type hearts (1.02 +/- 0.05 vs. 1.54 +/- 0.07, P < 0.05). In parallel, free [ADP] was higher (144 +/- 11 vs. 67 +/- 7 microM, P < 0.01) and free energy release for ATP hydrolysis (DeltaG(ATP)) was lower (-55.8 +/- 0.5 vs. -58.5 +/- 0.5 kJ/mol, P < 0.01) in ScCKmit(-/-) compared with wild-type hearts. These results demonstrate that M- and B-CK containing isoenzymes are unable to fully substitute for the loss of ScCKmit. We conclude that ScCKmit, in contrast to M-CK, is critically necessary to maintain normal high-energy phosphate metabolite levels in the heart.  (+info)

Differential effects of peroxynitrite on human mitochondrial creatine kinase isoenzymes. Inactivation, octamer destabilization, and identification of involved residues. (7/49)

Creatine kinase isoenzymes are very susceptible to free radical damage and are inactivated by superoxide radicals and peroxynitrite. In this study, we have analyzed the effects of peroxynitrite on enzymatic activity and octamer stability of the two human mitochondrial isoenzymes (ubiquitous mitochondrial creatine kinase (uMtCK) and sarcomeric mitochondrial creatine kinase (sMtCK)), as well as of chicken sMtCK, and identified the involved residues. Inactivation by peroxynitrite was concentration-dependent and similar for both types of MtCK isoenzymes. Because peroxynitrite did not lower the residual activity of a sMtCK mutant missing the active site cysteine (C278G), oxidation of this residue is sufficient to explain MtCK inactivation. Mass spectrometric analysis confirmed oxidation of Cys-278 and further revealed oxidation of the C-terminal Cys-358, possibly involved in MtCK/membrane interaction. Peroxynitrite also led to concentration-dependent dissociation of MtCK octamers into dimers. In this study, ubiquitous uMtCK was much more stable than sarcomeric sMtCK. Mass spectrometric analysis revealed chemical modifications in peptide Gly-263-Arg-271 located at the dimer/dimer interface, including oxidation of Met-267 and nitration of Trp-268 and/or Trp-264, the latter being a very critical residue for octamer stability. These data demonstrate that peroxynitrite affects the octameric state of MtCK and confirms human sMtCK as the generally more susceptible isoenzyme. The results provide a molecular explanation of how oxidative damage can lead to inactivation and decreased octamer/dimer ratio of MtCK, as seen in neurodegenerative diseases and heart pathology, respectively.  (+info)

Protective effect of creatine against inhibition by methylglyoxal of mitochondrial respiration of cardiac cells. (8/49)

Previous publications from our laboratory have shown that methylglyoxal inhibits mitochondrial respiration of malignant and cardiac cells, but it has no effect on mitochondrial respiration of other normal cells [Biswas, Ray, Misra, Dutta and Ray (1997) Biochem. J. 323, 343-348; Ray, Biswas and Ray (1997) Mol. Cell. Biochem. 171, 95-103]. However, this inhibitory effect of methylglyoxal is not significant in cardiac tissue slices. Moreover, post-mitochondrial supernatant (PMS) of cardiac cells could almost completely protect the mitochondrial respiration against the inhibitory effect of methylglyoxal. A systematic search indicated that creatine present in cardiac cells is responsible for this protective effect. Glutathione has also some protective effect. However, creatine phosphate, creatinine, urea, glutathione disulphide and beta-mercaptoethanol have no protective effect. The inhibitory and protective effects of methylglyoxal and creatine respectively on cardiac mitochondrial respiration were studied with various concentrations of both methylglyoxal and creatine. Interestingly, neither creatine nor glutathione have any protective effect on the inhibition by methylglyoxal on the mitochondrial respiration of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells. The creatine and glutathione contents of several PMS, which were tested for the possible protective effect, were measured. The activities of two important enzymes, namely glyoxalase I and creatine kinase, which act upon glutathione plus methylglyoxal and creatine respectively, were also measured in different PMS. Whether mitochondrial creatine kinase had any role in the protective effect of creatine had also been investigated using 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, an inhibitor of creatine kinase. The differential effect of creatine on mitochondria of cardiac and malignant cells has been discussed with reference to the therapeutic potential of methylglyoxal.  (+info)

Creatine kinase (CK) is a muscle enzyme that is normally present in small amounts in the blood. It is primarily found in tissues that require a lot of energy, such as the heart, brain, and skeletal muscles. When these tissues are damaged or injured, CK is released into the bloodstream, causing the levels to rise.

Creatine kinase exists in several forms, known as isoenzymes, which can be measured in the blood to help identify the location of tissue damage. The three main isoenzymes are:

1. CK-MM: Found primarily in skeletal muscle
2. CK-MB: Found primarily in heart muscle
3. CK-BB: Found primarily in the brain

Elevated levels of creatine kinase, particularly CK-MB, can indicate damage to the heart muscle, such as occurs with a heart attack. Similarly, elevated levels of CK-BB may suggest brain injury or disease. Overall, measuring creatine kinase levels is a useful diagnostic tool for assessing tissue damage and determining the severity of injuries or illnesses.

Creatine kinase (CK), also known as creatine phosphokinase (CPK), is an enzyme found in various tissues in the body, including the heart, brain, and skeletal muscles. It plays a crucial role in energy metabolism by catalyzing the conversion of creatine and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to phosphocreatine and adenosine diphosphate (ADP). This reaction helps regenerate ATP, which is the primary source of energy for cellular functions.

There are three main forms of CK found in the body: CK-MM (muscle form), CK-BB (brain form), and CK-MB (mixture of muscle and brain forms). Additionally, there is a mitochondrial form of creatine kinase called CKmt or CK-MT, which is primarily located within the mitochondria.

Mitochondrial creatine kinase (CKmt) has two main isoforms: ubiquitous CKmt1 and sarcomeric CKmt2. These isoforms are responsible for catalyzing the transfer of high-energy phosphates between ATP and phosphocreatine within the mitochondria, which helps maintain energy homeostasis in the cell.

Abnormal levels of creatine kinase, including the mitochondrial form, can indicate tissue damage or disease. For example, increased CKmt levels may be associated with mitochondrial disorders, neurodegenerative diseases, or muscle-wasting conditions. However, measuring CKmt specifically is not as common in clinical practice as measuring other CK isoforms, and its interpretation requires specialized knowledge and context.

Creatine is a organic acid that is produced naturally in the liver, kidneys and pancreas. It is also found in small amounts in certain foods such as meat and fish. The chemical formula for creatine is C4H9N3O2. In the body, creatine is converted into creatine phosphate, which is used to help produce energy during high-intensity exercise, such as weightlifting or sprinting.

Creatine can also be taken as a dietary supplement, in the form of creatine monohydrate, with the goal of increasing muscle creatine and phosphocreatine levels, which may improve athletic performance and help with muscle growth. However, it is important to note that while some studies have found that creatine supplementation can improve exercise performance and muscle mass in certain populations, others have not found significant benefits.

Creatine supplements are generally considered safe when used as directed, but they can cause side effects such as weight gain, stomach discomfort, and muscle cramps in some people. It is always recommended to consult a healthcare professional before starting any new supplement regimen.

Mitochondria are specialized structures located inside cells that convert the energy from food into ATP (adenosine triphosphate), which is the primary form of energy used by cells. They are often referred to as the "powerhouses" of the cell because they generate most of the cell's supply of chemical energy. Mitochondria are also involved in various other cellular processes, such as signaling, differentiation, and apoptosis (programmed cell death).

Mitochondria have their own DNA, known as mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), which is inherited maternally. This means that mtDNA is passed down from the mother to her offspring through the egg cells. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to a variety of diseases and conditions, including neurodegenerative disorders, diabetes, and aging.

Isoenzymes, also known as isoforms, are multiple forms of an enzyme that catalyze the same chemical reaction but differ in their amino acid sequence, structure, and/or kinetic properties. They are encoded by different genes or alternative splicing of the same gene. Isoenzymes can be found in various tissues and organs, and they play a crucial role in biological processes such as metabolism, detoxification, and cell signaling. Measurement of isoenzyme levels in body fluids (such as blood) can provide valuable diagnostic information for certain medical conditions, including tissue damage, inflammation, and various diseases.

Creatine kinase (CK) is an enzyme found in various tissues in the body, including the heart, brain, and skeletal muscles. It plays a crucial role in energy metabolism by catalyzing the conversion of creatine and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to phosphocreatine and adenosine diphosphate (ADP). This reaction helps regenerate ATP, which is the primary source of energy for cellular functions.

There are three main isoforms of CK in the human body: CK-MM, CK-MB, and CK-BB. The CK-MM form is primarily found in skeletal muscles and constitutes approximately 95% to 99% of the total CK activity in healthy individuals. It is a dimer composed of two muscle-specific subunits (M-CK).

Elevated levels of CK-MM in the blood can indicate damage or injury to skeletal muscles. This can occur due to various reasons, such as muscle trauma, strenuous exercise, muscle diseases, and certain medications. Measuring CK-MM levels is essential in diagnosing and monitoring conditions associated with muscle damage or disease.

Cytosol refers to the liquid portion of the cytoplasm found within a eukaryotic cell, excluding the organelles and structures suspended in it. It is the site of various metabolic activities and contains a variety of ions, small molecules, and enzymes. The cytosol is where many biochemical reactions take place, including glycolysis, protein synthesis, and the regulation of cellular pH. It is also where some organelles, such as ribosomes and vesicles, are located. In contrast to the cytosol, the term "cytoplasm" refers to the entire contents of a cell, including both the cytosol and the organelles suspended within it.

I'd be happy to help! However, I believe there might be a slight misunderstanding in your question. Mitochondria are organelles found in the cells of all complex living organisms, including humans, while the liver is a large, solid organ located in the upper right portion of the abdomen. They don't have a medical definition together. I can certainly provide you with separate definitions for each:

1. Mitochondria: These are double-membrane-bound cellular organelles that generate most of the chemical energy needed to power the cell's biochemical reactions. Commonly known as the "powerhouse of the cell," mitochondria convert organic substrates, such as glucose, fatty acids, and amino acids, into adenosine triphosphate (ATP) through a process called oxidative phosphorylation. Mitochondria are dynamic structures that can change their shape, size, and number through fission (division) and fusion (merging) processes. They play essential roles in various cellular functions, including calcium signaling, apoptosis (programmed cell death), and the regulation of cellular metabolism.

2. Liver: The liver is a large, lobulated organ that lies mainly in the upper right portion of the abdominal cavity, just below the diaphragm. It plays a crucial role in various physiological functions, such as detoxification, protein synthesis, metabolism, and nutrient storage. The liver is responsible for removing toxins from the bloodstream, producing bile to aid in digestion, regulating glucose levels, synthesizing plasma proteins, and storing glycogen, vitamins, and minerals. It also contributes to the metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, and amino acids, helping maintain energy homeostasis in the body.

I hope this clarifies any confusion! If you have any further questions or need more information, please don't hesitate to ask.

Creatine kinase (CK) is an enzyme found in various tissues in the body, including the heart, brain, and skeletal muscles. It plays a crucial role in energy metabolism by catalyzing the conversion of creatine and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to phosphocreatine and adenosine diphosphate (ADP). This reaction helps regenerate ATP, which is the primary source of energy for cellular functions.

There are three main isoforms of CK in the human body: CK-MM, CK-MB, and CK-BB. The BB form of creatine kinase (CK-BB) is primarily found in the brain and is present in very low concentrations in other tissues. It is mainly located in the cytosol of neurons and glial cells.

An elevated level of CK-BB in the blood can indicate damage to the central nervous system, particularly in cases of stroke, traumatic brain injury, brain tumors, or neurodegenerative disorders like multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. However, it is essential to note that CK-BB levels alone are not considered a definitive diagnostic marker for these conditions, as other factors can influence its concentration in the bloodstream. Measurement of CK-BB, along with other biomarkers and clinical assessments, contributes to a more comprehensive understanding of the patient's condition.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

An amino acid sequence is the specific order of amino acids in a protein or peptide molecule, formed by the linking of the amino group (-NH2) of one amino acid to the carboxyl group (-COOH) of another amino acid through a peptide bond. The sequence is determined by the genetic code and is unique to each type of protein or peptide. It plays a crucial role in determining the three-dimensional structure and function of proteins.

A base sequence in the context of molecular biology refers to the specific order of nucleotides in a DNA or RNA molecule. In DNA, these nucleotides are adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T). In RNA, uracil (U) takes the place of thymine. The base sequence contains genetic information that is transcribed into RNA and ultimately translated into proteins. It is the exact order of these bases that determines the genetic code and thus the function of the DNA or RNA molecule.

Creatine kinase (CK) is an enzyme found in various cells throughout the body, including heart muscle cells and skeletal muscle fibers. The CK enzyme exists in different forms, depending on the type of tissue where it is found. One such form is creatine kinase MB (CK-MB), which is primarily found in cardiac muscle cells.

An increase in the levels of CK-MB in the blood can indicate damage to the heart muscle, such as that caused by a heart attack or myocardial infarction. When heart muscle cells are damaged, they release their contents, including CK-MB, into the bloodstream. Therefore, measuring CK-MB levels is a useful diagnostic tool for detecting and monitoring heart muscle damage.

It's important to note that while an elevated CK-MB level can suggest heart muscle damage, it is not specific to the heart and can also be elevated in other conditions such as skeletal muscle damage or certain muscle disorders. Therefore, CK-MB levels should be interpreted in conjunction with other clinical findings and diagnostic tests.

"Saccharomyces cerevisiae" is not typically considered a medical term, but it is a scientific name used in the field of microbiology. It refers to a species of yeast that is commonly used in various industrial processes, such as baking and brewing. It's also widely used in scientific research due to its genetic tractability and eukaryotic cellular organization.

However, it does have some relevance to medical fields like medicine and nutrition. For example, certain strains of S. cerevisiae are used as probiotics, which can provide health benefits when consumed. They may help support gut health, enhance the immune system, and even assist in the digestion of certain nutrients.

In summary, "Saccharomyces cerevisiae" is a species of yeast with various industrial and potential medical applications.

Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases (PI3Ks) are a family of enzymes that play a crucial role in intracellular signal transduction. They phosphorylate the 3-hydroxyl group of the inositol ring in phosphatidylinositol and its derivatives, which results in the production of second messengers that regulate various cellular processes such as cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, motility, and survival.

PI3Ks are divided into three classes based on their structure and substrate specificity. Class I PI3Ks are further subdivided into two categories: class IA and class IB. Class IA PI3Ks are heterodimers consisting of a catalytic subunit (p110α, p110β, or p110δ) and a regulatory subunit (p85α, p85β, p55γ, or p50γ). They are primarily activated by receptor tyrosine kinases and G protein-coupled receptors. Class IB PI3Ks consist of a catalytic subunit (p110γ) and a regulatory subunit (p101 or p84/87). They are mainly activated by G protein-coupled receptors.

Dysregulation of PI3K signaling has been implicated in various human diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and autoimmune disorders. Therefore, PI3Ks have emerged as important targets for drug development in these areas.

Clinical enzyme tests are laboratory tests that measure the amount or activity of certain enzymes in biological samples, such as blood or bodily fluids. These tests are used to help diagnose and monitor various medical conditions, including organ damage, infection, inflammation, and genetic disorders.

Enzymes are proteins that catalyze chemical reactions in the body. Some enzymes are found primarily within specific organs or tissues, so elevated levels of these enzymes in the blood can indicate damage to those organs or tissues. For example, high levels of creatine kinase (CK) may suggest muscle damage, while increased levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) can indicate liver damage.

There are several types of clinical enzyme tests, including:

1. Serum enzyme tests: These measure the level of enzymes in the blood serum, which is the liquid portion of the blood after clotting. Examples include CK, AST, ALT, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH).
2. Urine enzyme tests: These measure the level of enzymes in the urine. An example is N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG), which can indicate kidney damage.
3. Enzyme immunoassays (EIAs): These use antibodies to detect and quantify specific enzymes or proteins in a sample. They are often used for the diagnosis of infectious diseases, such as HIV or hepatitis.
4. Genetic enzyme tests: These can identify genetic mutations that cause deficiencies in specific enzymes, leading to inherited metabolic disorders like phenylketonuria (PKU) or Gaucher's disease.

It is important to note that the interpretation of clinical enzyme test results should be done by a healthcare professional, taking into account the patient's medical history, symptoms, and other diagnostic tests.

Phosphocreatine (PCr) is a high-energy phosphate compound found in the skeletal muscles, cardiac muscle, and brain. It plays a crucial role in energy metabolism and storage within cells. Phosphocreatine serves as an immediate energy reserve that helps regenerate ATP (adenosine triphosphate), the primary source of cellular energy, during short bursts of intense activity or stress. This process is facilitated by the enzyme creatine kinase, which catalyzes the transfer of a phosphate group from phosphocreatine to ADP (adenosine diphosphate) to form ATP.

In a medical context, phosphocreatine levels may be assessed in muscle biopsies or magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) imaging to evaluate muscle energy metabolism and potential mitochondrial dysfunction in conditions such as muscular dystrophies, mitochondrial disorders, and neuromuscular diseases. Additionally, phosphocreatine depletion has been implicated in various pathological processes, including ischemia-reperfusion injury, neurodegenerative disorders, and heart failure.

Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling system is a crucial pathway for the transmission and regulation of various cellular responses in eukaryotic cells. It plays a significant role in several biological processes, including proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, inflammation, and stress response. The MAPK cascade consists of three main components: MAP kinase kinase kinase (MAP3K or MEKK), MAP kinase kinase (MAP2K or MEK), and MAP kinase (MAPK).

The signaling system is activated by various extracellular stimuli, such as growth factors, cytokines, hormones, and stress signals. These stimuli initiate a phosphorylation cascade that ultimately leads to the activation of MAPKs. The activated MAPKs then translocate into the nucleus and regulate gene expression by phosphorylating various transcription factors and other regulatory proteins.

There are four major MAPK families: extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2), c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK1/2/3), p38 MAPKs (p38α/β/γ/δ), and ERK5. Each family has distinct functions, substrates, and upstream activators. Dysregulation of the MAPK signaling system can lead to various diseases, including cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and neurological disorders. Therefore, understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying this pathway is crucial for developing novel therapeutic strategies.

Protein kinases are a group of enzymes that play a crucial role in many cellular processes by adding phosphate groups to other proteins, a process known as phosphorylation. This modification can activate or deactivate the target protein's function, thereby regulating various signaling pathways within the cell. Protein kinases are essential for numerous biological functions, including metabolism, signal transduction, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis (programmed cell death). Abnormal regulation of protein kinases has been implicated in several diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases (PSTKs) are a type of protein kinase that catalyzes the transfer of a phosphate group from ATP to the hydroxyl side chains of serine or threonine residues on target proteins. This phosphorylation process plays a crucial role in various cellular signaling pathways, including regulation of metabolism, gene expression, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis. PSTKs are involved in many physiological and pathological processes, and their dysregulation has been implicated in several diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative disorders.

Arginine kinase is an enzyme that catalyzes the phosphorylation of arginine, a basic amino acid, to form phosphoarginine. This reaction plays a crucial role in energy metabolism in various organisms, including invertebrates and microorganisms. Phosphoarginine serves as an energy storage molecule, similar to how phosphocreatine is used in vertebrate muscle tissue. Arginine kinase is not typically found in mammals, but it is present in other animals such as insects, crustaceans, and mollusks. The enzyme helps facilitate rapid energy transfer during high-intensity activities, supporting the organism's physiological functions.

A muscle is a soft tissue in our body that contracts to produce force and motion. It is composed mainly of specialized cells called muscle fibers, which are bound together by connective tissue. There are three types of muscles: skeletal (voluntary), smooth (involuntary), and cardiac. Skeletal muscles attach to bones and help in movement, while smooth muscles are found within the walls of organs and blood vessels, helping with functions like digestion and circulation. Cardiac muscle is the specific type that makes up the heart, allowing it to pump blood throughout the body.

Protein kinase inhibitors (PKIs) are a class of drugs that work by interfering with the function of protein kinases. Protein kinases are enzymes that play a crucial role in many cellular processes by adding a phosphate group to specific proteins, thereby modifying their activity, localization, or interaction with other molecules. This process of adding a phosphate group is known as phosphorylation and is a key mechanism for regulating various cellular functions, including signal transduction, metabolism, and cell division.

In some diseases, such as cancer, protein kinases can become overactive or mutated, leading to uncontrolled cell growth and division. Protein kinase inhibitors are designed to block the activity of these dysregulated kinases, thereby preventing or slowing down the progression of the disease. These drugs can be highly specific, targeting individual protein kinases or families of kinases, making them valuable tools for targeted therapy in cancer and other diseases.

Protein kinase inhibitors can work in various ways to block the activity of protein kinases. Some bind directly to the active site of the enzyme, preventing it from interacting with its substrates. Others bind to allosteric sites, changing the conformation of the enzyme and making it inactive. Still, others target upstream regulators of protein kinases or interfere with their ability to form functional complexes.

Examples of protein kinase inhibitors include imatinib (Gleevec), which targets the BCR-ABL kinase in chronic myeloid leukemia, and gefitinib (Iressa), which inhibits the EGFR kinase in non-small cell lung cancer. These drugs have shown significant clinical benefits in treating these diseases and have become important components of modern cancer therapy.

Calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CAMKs) are a family of enzymes that play a crucial role in intracellular signaling pathways. They are activated by the binding of calcium ions and calmodulin, a ubiquitous calcium-binding protein, to their regulatory domain.

Once activated, CAMKs phosphorylate specific serine or threonine residues on target proteins, thereby modulating their activity, localization, or stability. This post-translational modification is essential for various cellular processes, including synaptic plasticity, gene expression, metabolism, and cell cycle regulation.

There are several subfamilies of CAMKs, including CaMKI, CaMKII, CaMKIII (also known as CaMKIV), and CaMK kinase (CaMKK). Each subfamily has distinct structural features, substrate specificity, and regulatory mechanisms. Dysregulation of CAMK signaling has been implicated in various pathological conditions, such as neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, and cardiovascular disorders.

SRC-family kinases (SFKs) are a group of non-receptor tyrosine kinases that play important roles in various cellular processes, including cell proliferation, differentiation, survival, and migration. They are named after the founding member, SRC, which was first identified as an oncogene in Rous sarcoma virus.

SFKs share a common structure, consisting of an N-terminal unique domain, a SH3 domain, a SH2 domain, a catalytic kinase domain, and a C-terminal regulatory tail with a negative regulatory tyrosine residue (Y527 in human SRC). In their inactive state, SFKs are maintained in a closed conformation through intramolecular interactions between the SH3 domain, SH2 domain, and the phosphorylated C-terminal tyrosine.

Upon activation by various signals, such as growth factors, cytokines, or integrin engagement, SFKs are activated through a series of events that involve dephosphorylation of the regulatory tyrosine residue, recruitment to membrane receptors via their SH2 and SH3 domains, and trans-autophosphorylation of the activation loop in the kinase domain.

Once activated, SFKs can phosphorylate a wide range of downstream substrates, including other protein kinases, adaptor proteins, and cytoskeletal components, thereby regulating various signaling pathways that control cell behavior. Dysregulation of SFK activity has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer, inflammation, and neurological disorders.

L-Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) is an enzyme found in various tissues within the body, including the heart, liver, kidneys, muscles, and brain. It plays a crucial role in the process of energy production, particularly during anaerobic conditions when oxygen levels are low.

In the presence of the coenzyme NADH, LDH catalyzes the conversion of pyruvate to lactate, generating NAD+ as a byproduct. Conversely, in the presence of NAD+, LDH can convert lactate back to pyruvate using NADH. This reversible reaction is essential for maintaining the balance between lactate and pyruvate levels within cells.

Elevated blood levels of LDH may indicate tissue damage or injury, as this enzyme can be released into the circulation following cellular breakdown. As a result, LDH is often used as a nonspecific biomarker for various medical conditions, such as myocardial infarction (heart attack), liver disease, muscle damage, and certain types of cancer. However, it's important to note that an isolated increase in LDH does not necessarily pinpoint the exact location or cause of tissue damage, and further diagnostic tests are usually required for confirmation.

The myocardium is the middle layer of the heart wall, composed of specialized cardiac muscle cells that are responsible for pumping blood throughout the body. It forms the thickest part of the heart wall and is divided into two sections: the left ventricle, which pumps oxygenated blood to the rest of the body, and the right ventricle, which pumps deoxygenated blood to the lungs.

The myocardium contains several types of cells, including cardiac muscle fibers, connective tissue, nerves, and blood vessels. The muscle fibers are arranged in a highly organized pattern that allows them to contract in a coordinated manner, generating the force necessary to pump blood through the heart and circulatory system.

Damage to the myocardium can occur due to various factors such as ischemia (reduced blood flow), infection, inflammation, or genetic disorders. This damage can lead to several cardiac conditions, including heart failure, arrhythmias, and cardiomyopathy.

Protein Kinase C (PKC) is a family of serine-threonine kinases that play crucial roles in various cellular signaling pathways. These enzymes are activated by second messengers such as diacylglycerol (DAG) and calcium ions (Ca2+), which result from the activation of cell surface receptors like G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs).

Once activated, PKC proteins phosphorylate downstream target proteins, thereby modulating their activities. This regulation is involved in numerous cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis, and membrane trafficking. There are at least 10 isoforms of PKC, classified into three subfamilies based on their second messenger requirements and structural features: conventional (cPKC; α, βI, βII, and γ), novel (nPKC; δ, ε, η, and θ), and atypical (aPKC; ζ and ι/λ). Dysregulation of PKC signaling has been implicated in several diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

Rhabdomyolysis is a medical condition characterized by the breakdown and degeneration of skeletal muscle fibers, leading to the release of their intracellular contents into the bloodstream. This can result in various complications, including electrolyte imbalances, kidney injury or failure, and potentially life-threatening conditions if not promptly diagnosed and treated.

The process of rhabdomyolysis typically involves three key components:

1. Muscle injury: Direct trauma, excessive exertion, prolonged immobilization, infections, metabolic disorders, toxins, or medications can cause muscle damage, leading to the release of intracellular components into the bloodstream.
2. Release of muscle contents: When muscle fibers break down, they release various substances, such as myoglobin, creatine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), aldolase, and potassium ions. Myoglobin is a protein that can cause kidney damage when present in high concentrations in the bloodstream, particularly when it is filtered through the kidneys and deposits in the renal tubules.
3. Systemic effects: The release of muscle contents into the bloodstream can lead to various systemic complications, such as electrolyte imbalances (particularly hyperkalemia), acidosis, hypocalcemia, and kidney injury or failure due to myoglobin-induced tubular damage.

Symptoms of rhabdomyolysis can vary widely depending on the severity and extent of muscle damage but may include muscle pain, weakness, swelling, stiffness, dark urine, and tea-colored or cola-colored urine due to myoglobinuria. In severe cases, patients may experience symptoms related to kidney failure, such as nausea, vomiting, fatigue, and decreased urine output.

Diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis typically involves measuring blood levels of muscle enzymes (such as CK and LDH) and evaluating renal function through blood tests and urinalysis. Treatment generally focuses on addressing the underlying cause of muscle damage, maintaining fluid balance, correcting electrolyte imbalances, and preventing or managing kidney injury.

p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases (p38 MAPKs) are a family of conserved serine-threonine protein kinases that play crucial roles in various cellular processes, including inflammation, immune response, differentiation, apoptosis, and stress responses. They are activated by diverse stimuli such as cytokines, ultraviolet radiation, heat shock, osmotic stress, and lipopolysaccharides (LPS).

Once activated, p38 MAPKs phosphorylate and regulate several downstream targets, including transcription factors and other protein kinases. This regulation leads to the expression of genes involved in inflammation, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis. Dysregulation of p38 MAPK signaling has been implicated in various diseases, such as cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and autoimmune diseases. Therefore, p38 MAPKs are considered promising targets for developing new therapeutic strategies to treat these conditions.

Skeletal muscle, also known as striated or voluntary muscle, is a type of muscle that is attached to bones by tendons or aponeuroses and functions to produce movements and support the posture of the body. It is composed of long, multinucleated fibers that are arranged in parallel bundles and are characterized by alternating light and dark bands, giving them a striped appearance under a microscope. Skeletal muscle is under voluntary control, meaning that it is consciously activated through signals from the nervous system. It is responsible for activities such as walking, running, jumping, and lifting objects.

Electrophoresis, cellulose acetate is a laboratory technique used to separate and analyze proteins or other charged molecules based on their size and charge. The sample is applied to a sheet of cellulose acetate, a type of porous plastic film, and an electric field is applied. The proteins migrate through the film towards the electrode with the opposite charge, with smaller and more negatively charged molecules moving faster than larger and less negatively charged ones. This allows for the separation and identification of different protein components in a mixture. It is a simple and rapid method for routine protein separations and is commonly used in biochemistry and molecular biology research.

Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) is a high-energy molecule that stores and transports energy within cells. It is the main source of energy for most cellular processes, including muscle contraction, nerve impulse transmission, and protein synthesis. ATP is composed of a base (adenine), a sugar (ribose), and three phosphate groups. The bonds between these phosphate groups contain a significant amount of energy, which can be released when the bond between the second and third phosphate group is broken, resulting in the formation of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and inorganic phosphate. This process is known as hydrolysis and can be catalyzed by various enzymes to drive a wide range of cellular functions. ATP can also be regenerated from ADP through various metabolic pathways, such as oxidative phosphorylation or substrate-level phosphorylation, allowing for the continuous supply of energy to cells.

Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinases, also known as protein kinase A (PKA), are a family of enzymes that play a crucial role in intracellular signaling pathways. These enzymes are responsible for the regulation of various cellular processes, including metabolism, gene expression, and cell growth and differentiation.

PKA is composed of two regulatory subunits and two catalytic subunits. When cAMP binds to the regulatory subunits, it causes a conformational change that leads to the dissociation of the catalytic subunits. The freed catalytic subunits then phosphorylate specific serine and threonine residues on target proteins, thereby modulating their activity.

The cAMP-dependent protein kinases are activated in response to a variety of extracellular signals, such as hormones and neurotransmitters, that bind to G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) or receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). These signals lead to the activation of adenylyl cyclase, which catalyzes the conversion of ATP to cAMP. The resulting increase in intracellular cAMP levels triggers the activation of PKA and the downstream phosphorylation of target proteins.

Overall, cAMP-dependent protein kinases are essential regulators of many fundamental cellular processes and play a critical role in maintaining normal physiology and homeostasis. Dysregulation of these enzymes has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

In the context of medicine and pharmacology, "kinetics" refers to the study of how a drug moves throughout the body, including its absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (often abbreviated as ADME). This field is called "pharmacokinetics."

1. Absorption: This is the process of a drug moving from its site of administration into the bloodstream. Factors such as the route of administration (e.g., oral, intravenous, etc.), formulation, and individual physiological differences can affect absorption.

2. Distribution: Once a drug is in the bloodstream, it gets distributed throughout the body to various tissues and organs. This process is influenced by factors like blood flow, protein binding, and lipid solubility of the drug.

3. Metabolism: Drugs are often chemically modified in the body, typically in the liver, through processes known as metabolism. These changes can lead to the formation of active or inactive metabolites, which may then be further distributed, excreted, or undergo additional metabolic transformations.

4. Excretion: This is the process by which drugs and their metabolites are eliminated from the body, primarily through the kidneys (urine) and the liver (bile).

Understanding the kinetics of a drug is crucial for determining its optimal dosing regimen, potential interactions with other medications or foods, and any necessary adjustments for special populations like pediatric or geriatric patients, or those with impaired renal or hepatic function.

Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 1 (MAPK1), also known as Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase 2 (ERK2), is a protein kinase that plays a crucial role in intracellular signal transduction pathways. It is a member of the MAPK family, which regulates various cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and stress response.

MAPK1 is activated by a cascade of phosphorylation events initiated by upstream activators like MAPKK (Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase) in response to various extracellular signals such as growth factors, hormones, and mitogens. Once activated, MAPK1 phosphorylates downstream targets, including transcription factors and other protein kinases, thereby modulating their activities and ultimately influencing gene expression and cellular responses.

MAPK1 is widely expressed in various tissues and cells, and its dysregulation has been implicated in several pathological conditions, including cancer, inflammation, and neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, understanding the regulation and function of MAPK1 signaling pathways has important implications for developing therapeutic strategies to treat these disorders.

Pyruvate kinase is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the final step of glycolysis, a process by which glucose is broken down to produce energy in the form of ATP (adenosine triphosphate). Specifically, pyruvate kinase catalyzes the transfer of a phosphate group from phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) to adenosine diphosphate (ADP), resulting in the formation of pyruvate and ATP.

There are several isoforms of pyruvate kinase found in different tissues, including the liver, muscle, and brain. The type found in red blood cells is known as PK-RBC or PK-M2. Deficiencies in pyruvate kinase can lead to a genetic disorder called pyruvate kinase deficiency, which can result in hemolytic anemia due to the premature destruction of red blood cells.

Adenylate kinase is an enzyme (EC 2.7.4.3) that catalyzes the reversible transfer of a phosphate group between adenine nucleotides, specifically between ATP and AMP to form two ADP molecules. This reaction plays a crucial role in maintaining the energy charge of the cell by interconverting these important energy currency molecules.

The general reaction catalyzed by adenylate kinase is:

AMP + ATP ↔ 2ADP

This enzyme is widely distributed in various organisms and tissues, including mammalian cells. In humans, there are several isoforms of adenylate kinase, located in different cellular compartments such as the cytosol, mitochondria, and nucleus. These isoforms have distinct roles in maintaining energy homeostasis and protecting cells under stress conditions. Dysregulation of adenylate kinase activity has been implicated in several pathological processes, including neurodegenerative diseases, ischemia-reperfusion injury, and cancer.

P21-activated kinases (PAKs) are a family of serine/threonine protein kinases that play crucial roles in various cellular processes, including cytoskeletal reorganization, cell motility, and gene transcription. They are activated by binding to small GTPases of the Rho family, such as Cdc42 and Rac, which become active upon stimulation of various extracellular signals. Once activated, PAKs phosphorylate a range of downstream targets, leading to changes in cell behavior and function. Aberrant regulation of PAKs has been implicated in several human diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders.

Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) is a chemical compound that plays a crucial role in energy transfer within cells. It is a nucleotide, which consists of a adenosine molecule (a sugar molecule called ribose attached to a nitrogenous base called adenine) and two phosphate groups.

In the cell, ADP functions as an intermediate in the conversion of energy from one form to another. When a high-energy phosphate bond in ADP is broken, energy is released and ADP is converted to adenosine triphosphate (ATP), which serves as the main energy currency of the cell. Conversely, when ATP donates a phosphate group to another molecule, it is converted back to ADP, releasing energy for the cell to use.

ADP also plays a role in blood clotting and other physiological processes. In the coagulation cascade, ADP released from damaged red blood cells can help activate platelets and initiate the formation of a blood clot.

Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinases (MAP2K or MEK) are a group of protein kinases that play a crucial role in intracellular signal transduction pathways. They are so named because they are activated by mitogens, which are substances that stimulate cell division, and other extracellular signals.

MAP2Ks are positioned upstream of the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases (MAPK) in a three-tiered kinase cascade. Once activated, MAP2Ks phosphorylate and activate MAPKs, which then go on to regulate various cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, survival, and apoptosis.

There are several subfamilies of MAP2Ks, including MEK1/2, MEK3/6 (also known as MKK3/6), MEK4/7 (also known as MKK4/7), and MEK5. Each MAP2K is specific to activating a particular MAPK, and they are activated by different MAP3Ks (MAP kinase kinase kinases) in response to various extracellular signals.

Dysregulation of the MAPK/MAP2K signaling pathways has been implicated in numerous diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and neurological disorders. Therefore, targeting these pathways with therapeutic agents has emerged as a promising strategy for treating various diseases.

JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase) Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases are a subgroup of the Ser/Thr protein kinases that are activated by stress stimuli and play important roles in various cellular processes, including inflammation, apoptosis, and differentiation. They are involved in the regulation of gene expression through phosphorylation of transcription factors such as c-Jun. JNKs are activated by a variety of upstream kinases, including MAP2Ks (MKK4/SEK1 and MKK7), which are in turn activated by MAP3Ks (such as ASK1, MEKK1, MLKs, and TAK1). JNK signaling pathways have been implicated in various diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and inflammatory diseases.

Guanidinoacetate N-Methyltransferase (GAMT) is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the biosynthesis of creatine, a nitrogenous organic acid that occurs naturally in vertebrates and helps to supply energy to all cells in the body, primarily muscle.

The GAMT enzyme catalyzes the reaction of guanidinoacetate and a methyl group donor (S-adenosylmethionine) to produce creatine, as well as S-adenosylhomocysteine. A deficiency in this enzyme leads to a rare genetic disorder called Guanidinoacetate Methyltransferase Deficiency (GAMT deficiency), which is characterized by an accumulation of guanidinoacetate in the body and low levels of creatine, resulting in neurological symptoms such as developmental delay, seizures, and movement disorders.

Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 3 (MAPK3), also known as extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 (ERK1), is a serine/threonine protein kinase that plays a crucial role in intracellular signal transduction pathways. It is involved in the regulation of various cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation, and survival, in response to extracellular stimuli such as growth factors, hormones, and stress.

MAPK3 is activated through a phosphorylation cascade that involves the activation of upstream MAPK kinases (MKK or MEK). Once activated, MAPK3 can phosphorylate and activate various downstream targets, including transcription factors, to regulate gene expression. Dysregulation of MAPK3 signaling has been implicated in several diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders.

Muscular diseases, also known as myopathies, refer to a group of conditions that affect the functionality and health of muscle tissue. These diseases can be inherited or acquired and may result from inflammation, infection, injury, or degenerative processes. They can cause symptoms such as weakness, stiffness, cramping, spasms, wasting, and loss of muscle function.

Examples of muscular diseases include:

1. Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD): A genetic disorder that results in progressive muscle weakness and degeneration due to a lack of dystrophin protein.
2. Myasthenia Gravis: An autoimmune disease that causes muscle weakness and fatigue, typically affecting the eyes and face, throat, and limbs.
3. Inclusion Body Myositis (IBM): A progressive muscle disorder characterized by muscle inflammation and wasting, typically affecting older adults.
4. Polymyositis: An inflammatory myopathy that causes muscle weakness and inflammation throughout the body.
5. Metabolic Myopathies: A group of inherited disorders that affect muscle metabolism, leading to exercise intolerance, muscle weakness, and other symptoms.
6. Muscular Dystonias: Involuntary muscle contractions and spasms that can cause abnormal postures or movements.

It is important to note that muscular diseases can have a significant impact on an individual's quality of life, mobility, and overall health. Proper diagnosis and treatment are crucial for managing symptoms and improving outcomes.

Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) is a non-invasive diagnostic technique that provides information about the biochemical composition of tissues, including their metabolic state. It is often used in conjunction with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to analyze various metabolites within body tissues, such as the brain, heart, liver, and muscles.

During MRS, a strong magnetic field, radio waves, and a computer are used to produce detailed images and data about the concentration of specific metabolites in the targeted tissue or organ. This technique can help detect abnormalities related to energy metabolism, neurotransmitter levels, pH balance, and other biochemical processes, which can be useful for diagnosing and monitoring various medical conditions, including cancer, neurological disorders, and metabolic diseases.

There are different types of MRS, such as Proton (^1^H) MRS, Phosphorus-31 (^31^P) MRS, and Carbon-13 (^13^C) MRS, each focusing on specific elements or metabolites within the body. The choice of MRS technique depends on the clinical question being addressed and the type of information needed for diagnosis or monitoring purposes.

Amidinotransferases are a group of enzymes that play a role in the metabolism of amino acids and other biologically active compounds. These enzymes catalyze the transfer of an amidino group (-NH-C=NH) from one molecule to another, typically from an amino acid or related compound donor to an acceptor molecule.

The amidinotransferases are classified as a subgroup of the larger family of enzymes known as transferases, which catalyze the transfer of various functional groups between molecules. Within this family, the amidinotransferases are further divided into several subfamilies based on their specific functions and the types of donor and acceptor molecules they act upon.

One example of an amidinotransferase is arginine:glycine amidinotransferase (AGAT), which plays a role in the biosynthesis of creatine, a compound that is important for energy metabolism in muscles and other tissues. AGAT transfers an amidino group from arginine to glycine, forming guanidinoacetate and ornithine as products.

Abnormalities in the activity of amidinotransferases have been implicated in various diseases, including neurological disorders and certain genetic conditions. For example, mutations in the gene encoding AGAT have been associated with a rare inherited disorder called cerebral creatine deficiency syndrome type 1 (CCDS1), which is characterized by developmental delay, intellectual disability, and other neurological symptoms.

Protein-Tyrosine Kinases (PTKs) are a type of enzyme that plays a crucial role in various cellular functions, including signal transduction, cell growth, differentiation, and metabolism. They catalyze the transfer of a phosphate group from ATP to the tyrosine residues of proteins, thereby modifying their activity, localization, or interaction with other molecules.

PTKs can be divided into two main categories: receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and non-receptor tyrosine kinases (NRTKs). RTKs are transmembrane proteins that become activated upon binding to specific ligands, such as growth factors or hormones. NRTKs, on the other hand, are intracellular enzymes that can be activated by various signals, including receptor-mediated signaling and intracellular messengers.

Dysregulation of PTK activity has been implicated in several diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, and inflammatory disorders. Therefore, PTKs are important targets for drug development and therapy.

I believe there may be some confusion in your question. "Rabbits" is a common name used to refer to the Lagomorpha species, particularly members of the family Leporidae. They are small mammals known for their long ears, strong legs, and quick reproduction.

However, if you're referring to "rabbits" in a medical context, there is a term called "rabbit syndrome," which is a rare movement disorder characterized by repetitive, involuntary movements of the fingers, resembling those of a rabbit chewing. It is also known as "finger-chewing chorea." This condition is usually associated with certain medications, particularly antipsychotics, and typically resolves when the medication is stopped or adjusted.

Myoglobin is a protein found in the muscle tissue, particularly in red or skeletal muscles. It belongs to the globin family and has a similar structure to hemoglobin, another oxygen-binding protein found in red blood cells. Myoglobin's primary function is to store oxygen within the muscle cells, making it readily available for use during periods of increased oxygen demand, such as during physical exertion.

Myoglobin contains heme groups that bind to and release oxygen molecules. The protein has a higher affinity for oxygen than hemoglobin, allowing it to maintain its bound oxygen even in low-oxygen environments. When muscle cells are damaged or undergo necrosis (cell death), myoglobin is released into the bloodstream and can be detected in serum or urine samples. Elevated levels of myoglobin in the blood or urine may indicate muscle injury, trauma, or diseases affecting muscle integrity, such as rhabdomyolysis or muscular dystrophies.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

CDC2 protein kinase, also known as cell division cycle 2 or CDK1, is a type of enzyme that plays a crucial role in the regulation of the cell cycle. The cell cycle is the series of events that cells undergo as they grow, replicate their DNA, and divide into two daughter cells.

CDC2 protein kinase is a member of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) family, which are serine/threonine protein kinases that are activated by binding to regulatory subunits called cyclins. CDC2 protein kinase is primarily associated with the regulation of the G2 phase and the entry into mitosis, the stage of the cell cycle where nuclear and cytoplasmic division occur.

CDC2 protein kinase functions by phosphorylating various target proteins, which alters their activity and contributes to the coordination of the different events that occur during the cell cycle. The activity of CDC2 protein kinase is tightly regulated through a variety of mechanisms, including phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, as well as the binding and destruction of cyclin subunits.

Dysregulation of CDC2 protein kinase has been implicated in various human diseases, including cancer, where uncontrolled cell division can lead to the formation of tumors. Therefore, understanding the regulation and function of CDC2 protein kinase is an important area of research in molecular biology and medicine.

Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are a family of serine/threonine protein kinases that play crucial roles in regulating the cell cycle, transcription, and other cellular processes. They are activated by binding to cyclin proteins, which accumulate and degrade at specific stages of the cell cycle. The activation of CDKs leads to phosphorylation of various downstream target proteins, resulting in the promotion or inhibition of different cell cycle events. Dysregulation of CDKs has been implicated in several human diseases, including cancer, and they are considered important targets for drug development.

Phosphorylation is the process of adding a phosphate group (a molecule consisting of one phosphorus atom and four oxygen atoms) to a protein or other organic molecule, which is usually done by enzymes called kinases. This post-translational modification can change the function, localization, or activity of the target molecule, playing a crucial role in various cellular processes such as signal transduction, metabolism, and regulation of gene expression. Phosphorylation is reversible, and the removal of the phosphate group is facilitated by enzymes called phosphatases.

MAP (Mitogen-Activated Protein) Kinase Kinase Kinases (MAP3K or MAPKKK) are a group of protein kinases that play a crucial role in intracellular signal transduction pathways, which regulate various cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, survival, and apoptosis. They are called "kinases" because they catalyze the transfer of a phosphate group from ATP to specific serine or threonine residues on their target proteins.

MAP3Ks function upstream of MAP Kinase Kinases (MKKs or MAP2K) and MAP Kinases (MPKs or MAPK) in the MAP kinase cascade. Upon activation by various extracellular signals, such as growth factors, cytokines, stress, and hormones, MAP3Ks phosphorylate and activate MKKs, which subsequently phosphorylate and activate MPKs. Activated MPKs then regulate the activity of downstream transcription factors and other target proteins to elicit appropriate cellular responses.

There are several subfamilies of MAP3Ks, including ASK, DLK, TAK, MEKK, MLK, and ZAK, among others. Each subfamily has distinct structural features and functions in different signaling pathways. Dysregulation of MAP kinase cascades, including MAP3Ks, has been implicated in various human diseases, such as cancer, inflammation, and neurodegenerative disorders.

Myocardial infarction (MI), also known as a heart attack, is a medical condition characterized by the death of a segment of heart muscle (myocardium) due to the interruption of its blood supply. This interruption is most commonly caused by the blockage of a coronary artery by a blood clot formed on the top of an atherosclerotic plaque, which is a buildup of cholesterol and other substances in the inner lining of the artery.

The lack of oxygen and nutrients supply to the heart muscle tissue results in damage or death of the cardiac cells, causing the affected area to become necrotic. The extent and severity of the MI depend on the size of the affected area, the duration of the occlusion, and the presence of collateral circulation.

Symptoms of a myocardial infarction may include chest pain or discomfort, shortness of breath, nausea, lightheadedness, and sweating. Immediate medical attention is necessary to restore blood flow to the affected area and prevent further damage to the heart muscle. Treatment options for MI include medications, such as thrombolytics, antiplatelet agents, and pain relievers, as well as procedures such as percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG).

eIF-2 kinase is a type of protein kinase that phosphorylates the alpha subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor-2 (eIF-2) at serine 51. This phosphorylation event inhibits the guanine nucleotide exchange factor eIF-2B, thereby preventing the recycling of eIF-2 and reducing global protein synthesis.

There are four main subtypes of eIF-2 kinases:

1. HRI (heme-regulated inhibitor) - responds to heme deficiency and oxidative stress
2. PERK (PKR-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase) - activated by ER stress and misfolded proteins in the ER
3. GCN2 (general control non-derepressible 2) - responds to amino acid starvation
4. PKR (double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase) - activated by double-stranded RNA during viral infections

These eIF-2 kinases play crucial roles in regulating cellular responses to various stress conditions, such as the integrated stress response (ISR), which helps maintain cellular homeostasis and promote survival under adverse conditions.

Casein Kinase II (CK2) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is widely expressed in eukaryotic cells and is involved in the regulation of various cellular processes. It is a heterotetrameric enzyme, consisting of two catalytic subunits (alpha and alpha') and two regulatory subunits (beta).

CK2 phosphorylates a wide range of substrates, including transcription factors, signaling proteins, and other kinases. It is known to play roles in cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, DNA damage response, and protein stability, among others. CK2 activity is often found to be elevated in various types of cancer, making it a potential target for cancer therapy.

Casein kinases are a family of protein kinases that play important roles in various cellular processes, including signal transduction, cell cycle regulation, and DNA damage repair. These enzymes phosphorylate serine and threonine residues on their target proteins by transferring a phosphate group from ATP to the hydroxyl side chain of these amino acids.

There are several isoforms of casein kinases, including Casein Kinase 1 (CK1) and Casein Kinase 2 (CK2), which differ in their structure, substrate specificity, and cellular functions. CK1 is involved in various signaling pathways, such as the Wnt signaling pathway, and regulates processes such as gene transcription, DNA repair, and circadian rhythm. CK2, on the other hand, is a highly conserved serine/threonine protein kinase that plays a role in many cellular processes, including cell division, apoptosis, and transcriptional regulation.

Dysregulation of casein kinases has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and cardiovascular disease. Therefore, these enzymes are considered important targets for the development of new therapeutic strategies.

I'm happy to help! However, it seems like there are two terms combined into one request: "Mitochondria" and "Heart." I will provide separate definitions for each.

Mitochondrion (singular) or Mitochondria (plural): These are specialized structures found in the cytoplasm of most eukaryotic cells (cells with a true nucleus), including human cells. They are often referred to as the "powerhouse" of the cell because they generate energy in the form of ATP (adenosine triphosphate) through a process called oxidative phosphorylation. Mitochondria contain their own DNA, which is distinct from the nuclear DNA, and are believed to have originated from ancient bacteria that established a symbiotic relationship with primitive eukaryotic cells.

Heart: In human anatomy, the heart is a muscular organ responsible for pumping blood throughout the body. It is located in the thoracic cavity, slightly left of the center, and is enclosed by the pericardium, a double-walled sac that provides protection and lubrication for the heart's movement. The human heart is divided into four chambers: two atria on the top and two ventricles on the bottom. The right side of the heart receives deoxygenated blood from the body and pumps it to the lungs, while the left side receives oxygenated blood from the lungs and pumps it to the rest of the body. The heart's pumping action is regulated by electrical signals that originate in a group of specialized cardiac muscle cells called the sinoatrial node (SA node).

Ribosomal Protein S6 Kinases (RSKs) are a family of serine/threonine protein kinases that play a crucial role in the regulation of cell growth, proliferation, and survival. They are so named because they phosphorylate and regulate the function of the ribosomal protein S6, which is a component of the 40S ribosomal subunit involved in protein synthesis.

RSKs are activated by various signals, including growth factors, hormones, and mitogens, through a cascade of phosphorylation events involving several upstream kinases such as MAPK/ERK kinase (MEK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Once activated, RSKs phosphorylate a wide range of downstream targets, including transcription factors, regulators of translation, and cytoskeletal proteins, thereby modulating their activities and functions.

There are four isoforms of RSKs in humans, namely RSK1, RSK2, RSK3, and RSK4, which share a common structural organization and functional domains, including an N-terminal kinase domain, a C-terminal kinase domain, and a linker region that contains several regulatory motifs. Dysregulation of RSKs has been implicated in various pathological conditions, including cancer, cardiovascular diseases, neurological disorders, and diabetes, making them attractive targets for therapeutic intervention.

MAPKKK1 or Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase 1 is a serine/threonine protein kinase that belongs to the MAP3K family. It plays a crucial role in intracellular signal transduction pathways, particularly in the MAPK/ERK cascade, which is involved in various cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, and survival.

MAPKKK1 activates MAPKKs (Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinases) through phosphorylation of specific serine and threonine residues. In turn, activated MAPKKs phosphorylate and activate MAPKs (Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases), which then regulate the activity of various transcription factors and other downstream targets to elicit appropriate cellular responses.

Mutations in MAPKKK1 have been implicated in several human diseases, including cancer and developmental disorders. Therefore, understanding its function and regulation is essential for developing novel therapeutic strategies to treat these conditions.

Myositis is a medical term that refers to inflammation of the muscle tissue. This condition can cause various symptoms, including muscle weakness, pain, swelling, and stiffness. There are several types of myositis, such as polymyositis, dermatomyositis, and inclusion body myositis, which have different causes and characteristics.

Polymyositis is a type of myositis that affects multiple muscle groups, particularly those close to the trunk of the body. Dermatomyositis is characterized by muscle inflammation as well as a skin rash. Inclusion body myositis is a less common form of myositis that typically affects older adults and can cause both muscle weakness and wasting.

The causes of myositis vary depending on the type, but they can include autoimmune disorders, infections, medications, and other medical conditions. Treatment for myositis may involve medication to reduce inflammation, physical therapy to maintain muscle strength and flexibility, and lifestyle changes to manage symptoms and prevent complications.

Energy metabolism is the process by which living organisms produce and consume energy to maintain life. It involves a series of chemical reactions that convert nutrients from food, such as carbohydrates, fats, and proteins, into energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP).

The process of energy metabolism can be divided into two main categories: catabolism and anabolism. Catabolism is the breakdown of nutrients to release energy, while anabolism is the synthesis of complex molecules from simpler ones using energy.

There are three main stages of energy metabolism: glycolysis, the citric acid cycle (also known as the Krebs cycle), and oxidative phosphorylation. Glycolysis occurs in the cytoplasm of the cell and involves the breakdown of glucose into pyruvate, producing a small amount of ATP and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH). The citric acid cycle takes place in the mitochondria and involves the further breakdown of pyruvate to produce more ATP, NADH, and carbon dioxide. Oxidative phosphorylation is the final stage of energy metabolism and occurs in the inner mitochondrial membrane. It involves the transfer of electrons from NADH and other electron carriers to oxygen, which generates a proton gradient across the membrane. This gradient drives the synthesis of ATP, producing the majority of the cell's energy.

Overall, energy metabolism is a complex and essential process that allows organisms to grow, reproduce, and maintain their bodily functions. Disruptions in energy metabolism can lead to various diseases, including diabetes, obesity, and neurodegenerative disorders.

Aspartate aminotransferases (ASTs) are a group of enzymes found in various tissues throughout the body, including the heart, liver, and muscles. They play a crucial role in the metabolic process of transferring amino groups between different molecules.

In medical terms, AST is often used as a blood test to measure the level of this enzyme in the serum. Elevated levels of AST can indicate damage or injury to tissues that contain this enzyme, such as the liver or heart. For example, liver disease, including hepatitis and cirrhosis, can cause elevated AST levels due to damage to liver cells. Similarly, heart attacks can also result in increased AST levels due to damage to heart muscle tissue.

It is important to note that an AST test alone cannot diagnose a specific medical condition, but it can provide valuable information when used in conjunction with other diagnostic tests and clinical evaluation.

Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases (RTKs) are a type of transmembrane receptors found on the cell surface that play a crucial role in signal transduction and regulation of various cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, metabolism, and survival. They are called "tyrosine kinases" because they possess an intrinsic enzymatic activity that catalyzes the transfer of a phosphate group from ATP to tyrosine residues on target proteins, thereby modulating their function.

RTKs are composed of three main domains: an extracellular domain that binds to specific ligands (growth factors, hormones, or cytokines), a transmembrane domain that spans the cell membrane, and an intracellular domain with tyrosine kinase activity. Upon ligand binding, RTKs undergo conformational changes that lead to their dimerization or oligomerization, which in turn activates their tyrosine kinase activity. Activated RTKs then phosphorylate specific tyrosine residues on downstream signaling proteins, initiating a cascade of intracellular signaling events that ultimately result in the appropriate cellular response.

Dysregulation of RTK signaling has been implicated in various human diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and developmental disorders. As such, RTKs are important targets for therapeutic intervention in these conditions.

Thymidine kinase (TK) is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the synthesis of thymidine triphosphate (dTMP), a nucleotide required for DNA replication and repair. It catalyzes the phosphorylation of thymidine to thymidine monophosphate (dTMP) by transferring a phosphate group from adenosine triphosphate (ATP).

There are two major isoforms of thymidine kinase in humans: TK1 and TK2. TK1 is primarily found in the cytoplasm of proliferating cells, such as those involved in the cell cycle, while TK2 is located mainly in the mitochondria and is responsible for maintaining the dNTP pool required for mtDNA replication and repair.

Thymidine kinase activity has been used as a marker for cell proliferation, particularly in cancer cells, which often exhibit elevated levels of TK1 due to their high turnover rates. Additionally, measuring TK1 levels can help monitor the effectiveness of certain anticancer therapies that target DNA replication.

Electrophoresis, Agar Gel is a laboratory technique used to separate and analyze DNA, RNA, or proteins based on their size and electrical charge. In this method, the sample is mixed with agarose gel, a gelatinous substance derived from seaweed, and then solidified in a horizontal slab-like format. An electric field is applied to the gel, causing the negatively charged DNA or RNA molecules to migrate towards the positive electrode. The smaller molecules move faster through the gel than the larger ones, resulting in their separation based on size. This technique is widely used in molecular biology and genetics research, as well as in diagnostic testing for various genetic disorders.

Protein binding, in the context of medical and biological sciences, refers to the interaction between a protein and another molecule (known as the ligand) that results in a stable complex. This process is often reversible and can be influenced by various factors such as pH, temperature, and concentration of the involved molecules.

In clinical chemistry, protein binding is particularly important when it comes to drugs, as many of them bind to proteins (especially albumin) in the bloodstream. The degree of protein binding can affect a drug's distribution, metabolism, and excretion, which in turn influence its therapeutic effectiveness and potential side effects.

Protein-bound drugs may be less available for interaction with their target tissues, as only the unbound or "free" fraction of the drug is active. Therefore, understanding protein binding can help optimize dosing regimens and minimize adverse reactions.

Extracellular signal-regulated mitogen-activated protein kinases (ERKs or Extracellular signal-regulated kinases) are a subfamily of the MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) family, which are serine/threonine protein kinases that regulate various cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, migration, and survival in response to extracellular signals.

ERKs are activated by a cascade of phosphorylation events initiated by the binding of growth factors, hormones, or other extracellular molecules to their respective receptors. This activation results in the formation of a complex signaling pathway that involves the sequential activation of several protein kinases, including Ras, Raf, MEK (MAPK/ERK kinase), and ERK.

Once activated, ERKs translocate to the nucleus where they phosphorylate and activate various transcription factors, leading to changes in gene expression that ultimately result in the appropriate cellular response. Dysregulation of the ERK signaling pathway has been implicated in a variety of diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

MAP Kinase Kinase 4 (MAP2K4 or MKK4) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that plays a crucial role in intracellular signal transduction pathways, particularly the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades. These cascades are involved in various cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, survival, and apoptosis in response to extracellular stimuli like cytokines, growth factors, and stress signals.

MAP2K4 specifically activates the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway by phosphorylating and activating JNK proteins. The activation of JNK leads to the phosphorylation and regulation of various transcription factors, ultimately influencing gene expression and cellular responses. Dysregulation of MAP2K4 has been implicated in several diseases, including cancer and inflammatory disorders.

The brain is the central organ of the nervous system, responsible for receiving and processing sensory information, regulating vital functions, and controlling behavior, movement, and cognition. It is divided into several distinct regions, each with specific functions:

1. Cerebrum: The largest part of the brain, responsible for higher cognitive functions such as thinking, learning, memory, language, and perception. It is divided into two hemispheres, each controlling the opposite side of the body.
2. Cerebellum: Located at the back of the brain, it is responsible for coordinating muscle movements, maintaining balance, and fine-tuning motor skills.
3. Brainstem: Connects the cerebrum and cerebellum to the spinal cord, controlling vital functions such as breathing, heart rate, and blood pressure. It also serves as a relay center for sensory information and motor commands between the brain and the rest of the body.
4. Diencephalon: A region that includes the thalamus (a major sensory relay station) and hypothalamus (regulates hormones, temperature, hunger, thirst, and sleep).
5. Limbic system: A group of structures involved in emotional processing, memory formation, and motivation, including the hippocampus, amygdala, and cingulate gyrus.

The brain is composed of billions of interconnected neurons that communicate through electrical and chemical signals. It is protected by the skull and surrounded by three layers of membranes called meninges, as well as cerebrospinal fluid that provides cushioning and nutrients.

Troponin T is a subunit of the troponin complex, which is a protein complex that plays a crucial role in muscle contraction. In particular, Troponin T is responsible for binding the troponin complex to tropomyosin, another protein that helps regulate muscle contraction.

In the context of medical diagnostics, Troponin T is often measured as a biomarker for heart damage. When heart muscle cells are damaged or die, such as in a myocardial infarction (heart attack), troponin T is released into the bloodstream. Therefore, measuring the levels of Troponin T in the blood can help diagnose and assess the severity of heart damage.

It's important to note that Troponin T is specific to cardiac muscle cells, which makes it a more reliable biomarker for heart damage than other markers that may also be found in skeletal muscle cells. However, it's worth noting that Troponin T levels can also be elevated in conditions other than heart attacks, such as heart failure, myocarditis, and pulmonary embolism, so clinical context is important when interpreting test results.

Troponin I is a protein that is found in the cardiac muscle cells (myocytes) of the heart. It is a component of the troponin complex, which also includes troponin C and troponin T, that regulates the calcium-mediated interaction between actin and myosin filaments during muscle contraction.

Troponin I is specific to the cardiac muscle tissue, making it a useful biomarker for detecting damage to the heart muscle. When there is injury or damage to the heart muscle cells, such as during a heart attack (myocardial infarction), troponin I is released into the bloodstream.

Measurement of cardiac troponin I levels in the blood is used in the diagnosis and management of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and other conditions that cause damage to the heart muscle. Elevated levels of troponin I in the blood are indicative of myocardial injury, and the degree of elevation can help determine the severity of the injury.

Signal transduction is the process by which a cell converts an extracellular signal, such as a hormone or neurotransmitter, into an intracellular response. This involves a series of molecular events that transmit the signal from the cell surface to the interior of the cell, ultimately resulting in changes in gene expression, protein activity, or metabolism.

The process typically begins with the binding of the extracellular signal to a receptor located on the cell membrane. This binding event activates the receptor, which then triggers a cascade of intracellular signaling molecules, such as second messengers, protein kinases, and ion channels. These molecules amplify and propagate the signal, ultimately leading to the activation or inhibition of specific cellular responses.

Signal transduction pathways are highly regulated and can be modulated by various factors, including other signaling molecules, post-translational modifications, and feedback mechanisms. Dysregulation of these pathways has been implicated in a variety of diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

1-Phosphatidylinositol 4-Kinase (PI4K) is a type of enzyme that belongs to the family of kinases, which are enzymes that transfer phosphate groups from high-energy donor molecules to specific target proteins or lipids in the cell. PI4K specifically phosphorylates the 4th position on the inositol ring of phosphatidylinositol (PI), a type of phospholipid found in the cell membrane, converting it to phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI4P).

PI4K has several isoforms, including PI4K alpha, beta, gamma, and delta, which are located in different cellular compartments and play distinct roles. For example, PI4K alpha and beta are primarily involved in vesicle trafficking and Golgi function, while PI4K gamma and delta are associated with the plasma membrane and regulate ion channels and other signaling pathways.

PI4P, the product of PI4K activity, is an important signaling molecule that regulates various cellular processes, including membrane trafficking, cytoskeleton organization, and protein sorting. Dysregulation of PI4K and its downstream pathways has been implicated in several human diseases, such as cancer, neurodegeneration, and viral infection.

Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases (MAPKs) are a family of serine/threonine protein kinases that play crucial roles in various cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation, transformation, and apoptosis, in response to diverse stimuli such as mitogens, growth factors, hormones, cytokines, and environmental stresses. They are highly conserved across eukaryotes and consist of a three-tiered kinase module composed of MAPK kinase kinases (MAP3Ks), MAPK kinases (MKKs or MAP2Ks), and MAPKs.

Activation of MAPKs occurs through a sequential phosphorylation and activation cascade, where MAP3Ks phosphorylate and activate MKKs, which in turn phosphorylate and activate MAPKs at specific residues (Thr-X-Tyr or Ser-Pro motifs). Once activated, MAPKs can further phosphorylate and regulate various downstream targets, including transcription factors and other protein kinases.

There are four major groups of MAPKs in mammals: extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2), c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK1/2/3), p38 MAPKs (p38α/β/γ/δ), and ERK5/BMK1. Each group of MAPKs has distinct upstream activators, downstream targets, and cellular functions, allowing for a high degree of specificity in signal transduction and cellular responses. Dysregulation of MAPK signaling pathways has been implicated in various human diseases, including cancer, diabetes, neurodegenerative disorders, and inflammatory diseases.

CDC2 and CDC28 are members of the Serine/Threonine protein kinase family, which play crucial roles in the regulation of the cell cycle. These kinases were originally identified in yeast (CDC28) and humans (CDC2), but they are highly conserved across eukaryotes.

CDC2-CDC28 Kinases function as a part of larger complexes, often associated with cyclins, to control different phases of the cell cycle by phosphorylating specific substrates at key regulatory points. The activity of CDC2-CDC28 Kinases is tightly regulated through various mechanisms, including phosphorylation, dephosphorylation, and protein binding interactions.

During the G2 phase of the cell cycle, CDC2-CDC28 Kinases are inactivated by phosphorylation at specific residues (Tyr15 and Thr14). As the cell approaches mitosis, a family of phosphatases called Cdc25 removes these inhibitory phosphates, leading to activation of the kinase. Activated CDC2-CDC28 Kinases then initiate mitotic processes such as chromosome condensation and nuclear envelope breakdown.

In summary, CDC2-CDC28 Kinases are essential regulators of the eukaryotic cell cycle, controlling various aspects of cell division through phosphorylation of specific substrates. Their activity is tightly regulated to ensure proper progression through the cell cycle and prevent uncontrolled cell growth, which can lead to diseases such as cancer.

Enzyme activation refers to the process by which an enzyme becomes biologically active and capable of carrying out its specific chemical or biological reaction. This is often achieved through various post-translational modifications, such as proteolytic cleavage, phosphorylation, or addition of cofactors or prosthetic groups to the enzyme molecule. These modifications can change the conformation or structure of the enzyme, exposing or creating a binding site for the substrate and allowing the enzymatic reaction to occur.

For example, in the case of proteolytic cleavage, an inactive precursor enzyme, known as a zymogen, is cleaved into its active form by a specific protease. This is seen in enzymes such as trypsin and chymotrypsin, which are initially produced in the pancreas as inactive precursors called trypsinogen and chymotrypsinogen, respectively. Once they reach the small intestine, they are activated by enteropeptidase, a protease that cleaves a specific peptide bond, releasing the active enzyme.

Phosphorylation is another common mechanism of enzyme activation, where a phosphate group is added to a specific serine, threonine, or tyrosine residue on the enzyme by a protein kinase. This modification can alter the conformation of the enzyme and create a binding site for the substrate, allowing the enzymatic reaction to occur.

Enzyme activation is a crucial process in many biological pathways, as it allows for precise control over when and where specific reactions take place. It also provides a mechanism for regulating enzyme activity in response to various signals and stimuli, such as hormones, neurotransmitters, or changes in the intracellular environment.

Muscular dystrophies are a group of genetic disorders that primarily affect skeletal muscles, causing progressive weakness and degeneration. They are characterized by the lack or deficiency of a protein called dystrophin, which is essential for maintaining the integrity of muscle fibers. The most common form is Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), but there are many other types with varying symptoms and severity. Over time, muscle wasting and weakness can lead to disability and shortened lifespan, depending on the type and progression of the disease. Treatment typically focuses on managing symptoms, maintaining mobility, and supporting quality of life.

Western blotting is a laboratory technique used in molecular biology to detect and quantify specific proteins in a mixture of many different proteins. This technique is commonly used to confirm the expression of a protein of interest, determine its size, and investigate its post-translational modifications. The name "Western" blotting distinguishes this technique from Southern blotting (for DNA) and Northern blotting (for RNA).

The Western blotting procedure involves several steps:

1. Protein extraction: The sample containing the proteins of interest is first extracted, often by breaking open cells or tissues and using a buffer to extract the proteins.
2. Separation of proteins by electrophoresis: The extracted proteins are then separated based on their size by loading them onto a polyacrylamide gel and running an electric current through the gel (a process called sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis or SDS-PAGE). This separates the proteins according to their molecular weight, with smaller proteins migrating faster than larger ones.
3. Transfer of proteins to a membrane: After separation, the proteins are transferred from the gel onto a nitrocellulose or polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane using an electric current in a process called blotting. This creates a replica of the protein pattern on the gel but now immobilized on the membrane for further analysis.
4. Blocking: The membrane is then blocked with a blocking agent, such as non-fat dry milk or bovine serum albumin (BSA), to prevent non-specific binding of antibodies in subsequent steps.
5. Primary antibody incubation: A primary antibody that specifically recognizes the protein of interest is added and allowed to bind to its target protein on the membrane. This step may be performed at room temperature or 4°C overnight, depending on the antibody's properties.
6. Washing: The membrane is washed with a buffer to remove unbound primary antibodies.
7. Secondary antibody incubation: A secondary antibody that recognizes the primary antibody (often coupled to an enzyme or fluorophore) is added and allowed to bind to the primary antibody. This step may involve using a horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated or alkaline phosphatase (AP)-conjugated secondary antibody, depending on the detection method used later.
8. Washing: The membrane is washed again to remove unbound secondary antibodies.
9. Detection: A detection reagent is added to visualize the protein of interest by detecting the signal generated from the enzyme-conjugated or fluorophore-conjugated secondary antibody. This can be done using chemiluminescent, colorimetric, or fluorescent methods.
10. Analysis: The resulting image is analyzed to determine the presence and quantity of the protein of interest in the sample.

Western blotting is a powerful technique for identifying and quantifying specific proteins within complex mixtures. It can be used to study protein expression, post-translational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and more. However, it requires careful optimization and validation to ensure accurate and reproducible results.

I-kappa B kinase (IKK) is a protein complex that plays a crucial role in the activation of NF-kB (nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells), a transcription factor involved in the regulation of immune response, inflammation, cell survival, and proliferation.

The IKK complex is composed of two catalytic subunits, IKKα and IKKβ, and a regulatory subunit, IKKγ (also known as NEMO). Upon stimulation by various signals such as cytokines, pathogens, or stress, the IKK complex becomes activated and phosphorylates I-kappa B (IkB), an inhibitor protein that keeps NF-kB in an inactive state in the cytoplasm.

Once IkB is phosphorylated by the IKK complex, it undergoes ubiquitination and degradation, leading to the release and nuclear translocation of NF-kB, where it can bind to specific DNA sequences and regulate gene expression. Dysregulation of IKK activity has been implicated in various pathological conditions, including chronic inflammation, autoimmune diseases, and cancer.

Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 (GSK-3) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that plays a crucial role in the regulation of several cellular processes, including glycogen metabolism, cell signaling, gene transcription, and apoptosis. It was initially discovered as a key enzyme involved in glycogen metabolism due to its ability to phosphorylate and inhibit glycogen synthase, an enzyme responsible for the synthesis of glycogen from glucose.

GSK-3 exists in two isoforms, GSK-3α and GSK-3β, which share a high degree of sequence similarity and are widely expressed in various tissues. Both isoforms are constitutively active under normal conditions and are regulated through inhibitory phosphorylation by several upstream signaling pathways, such as insulin, Wnt, and Hedgehog signaling.

Dysregulation of GSK-3 has been implicated in the pathogenesis of various diseases, including diabetes, neurodegenerative disorders, and cancer. In recent years, GSK-3 has emerged as an attractive therapeutic target for the development of novel drugs to treat these conditions.

Aurora kinases are a family of serine/threonine protein kinases that play crucial roles in the regulation of cell division. There are three members of the Aurora kinase family, designated as Aurora A, Aurora B, and Aurora C. These kinases are involved in the proper separation of chromosomes during mitosis and meiosis, and their dysregulation has been implicated in various types of cancer.

Aurora A is primarily located at the centrosomes and spindle poles during cell division, where it regulates centrosome maturation, bipolar spindle formation, and chromosome segregation. Aurora B, on the other hand, is a component of the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC) that localizes to the centromeres during prophase and moves to the spindle midzone during anaphase. It plays essential roles in kinetochore-microtubule attachment, chromosome alignment, and cytokinesis. Aurora C is most similar to Aurora B and appears to have overlapping functions with it, although its specific roles are less well understood.

Dysregulation of Aurora kinases has been associated with various types of cancer, including breast, ovarian, colon, and lung cancers. Overexpression or amplification of Aurora A is observed in many cancers, leading to chromosomal instability and aneuploidy. Inhibition of Aurora kinases has emerged as a potential therapeutic strategy for cancer treatment, with several small molecule inhibitors currently under investigation in clinical trials.

Rho-associated kinases (ROCKs) are serine/threonine kinases that are involved in the regulation of various cellular processes, including actin cytoskeleton organization, cell migration, and gene expression. They are named after their association with the small GTPase RhoA, which activates them upon binding.

ROCKs exist as two isoforms, ROCK1 and ROCK2, which share a high degree of sequence homology and have similar functions. They contain several functional domains, including a kinase domain, a coiled-coil region that mediates protein-protein interactions, and a Rho-binding domain (RBD) that binds to active RhoA.

Once activated by RhoA, ROCKs phosphorylate a variety of downstream targets, including myosin light chain (MLC), LIM kinase (LIMK), and moesin, leading to the regulation of actomyosin contractility, stress fiber formation, and focal adhesion turnover. Dysregulation of ROCK signaling has been implicated in various pathological conditions, such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases, neurological disorders, and fibrosis. Therefore, ROCKs have emerged as promising therapeutic targets for the treatment of these diseases.

Transfection is a term used in molecular biology that refers to the process of deliberately introducing foreign genetic material (DNA, RNA or artificial gene constructs) into cells. This is typically done using chemical or physical methods, such as lipofection or electroporation. Transfection is widely used in research and medical settings for various purposes, including studying gene function, producing proteins, developing gene therapies, and creating genetically modified organisms. It's important to note that transfection is different from transduction, which is the process of introducing genetic material into cells using viruses as vectors.

A mutation is a permanent change in the DNA sequence of an organism's genome. Mutations can occur spontaneously or be caused by environmental factors such as exposure to radiation, chemicals, or viruses. They may have various effects on the organism, ranging from benign to harmful, depending on where they occur and whether they alter the function of essential proteins. In some cases, mutations can increase an individual's susceptibility to certain diseases or disorders, while in others, they may confer a survival advantage. Mutations are the driving force behind evolution, as they introduce new genetic variability into populations, which can then be acted upon by natural selection.

In the context of medical and biological sciences, a "binding site" refers to a specific location on a protein, molecule, or cell where another molecule can attach or bind. This binding interaction can lead to various functional changes in the original protein or molecule. The other molecule that binds to the binding site is often referred to as a ligand, which can be a small molecule, ion, or even another protein.

The binding between a ligand and its target binding site can be specific and selective, meaning that only certain ligands can bind to particular binding sites with high affinity. This specificity plays a crucial role in various biological processes, such as signal transduction, enzyme catalysis, or drug action.

In the case of drug development, understanding the location and properties of binding sites on target proteins is essential for designing drugs that can selectively bind to these sites and modulate protein function. This knowledge can help create more effective and safer therapeutic options for various diseases.

Protein Kinase C-delta (PKC-δ) is a specific isoform of the Protein Kinase C (PKC) family, which are serine/threonine protein kinases that play crucial roles in various cellular signaling pathways. PKC-δ is involved in several cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and motility. It is activated by second messengers like diacylglycerol (DAG) and calcium ions (Ca2+), and its activation leads to the phosphorylation of specific target proteins, thereby modulating their functions. Aberrant regulation of PKC-δ has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer and neurodegenerative disorders.

Protein Kinase C-alpha (PKC-α) is a specific isoform of the Protein Kinase C (PKC) family, which are serine/threonine protein kinases that play crucial roles in various cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. PKC-α is activated by diacylglycerol (DAG) and calcium ions (Ca2+). It is involved in signal transduction pathways related to cell growth, differentiation, and oncogenic transformation. Mutations or dysregulation of PKC-alpha have been implicated in several diseases including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

A biological marker, often referred to as a biomarker, is a measurable indicator that reflects the presence or severity of a disease state, or a response to a therapeutic intervention. Biomarkers can be found in various materials such as blood, tissues, or bodily fluids, and they can take many forms, including molecular, histologic, radiographic, or physiological measurements.

In the context of medical research and clinical practice, biomarkers are used for a variety of purposes, such as:

1. Diagnosis: Biomarkers can help diagnose a disease by indicating the presence or absence of a particular condition. For example, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a biomarker used to detect prostate cancer.
2. Monitoring: Biomarkers can be used to monitor the progression or regression of a disease over time. For instance, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels are monitored in diabetes patients to assess long-term blood glucose control.
3. Predicting: Biomarkers can help predict the likelihood of developing a particular disease or the risk of a negative outcome. For example, the presence of certain genetic mutations can indicate an increased risk for breast cancer.
4. Response to treatment: Biomarkers can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of a specific treatment by measuring changes in the biomarker levels before and after the intervention. This is particularly useful in personalized medicine, where treatments are tailored to individual patients based on their unique biomarker profiles.

It's important to note that for a biomarker to be considered clinically valid and useful, it must undergo rigorous validation through well-designed studies, including demonstrating sensitivity, specificity, reproducibility, and clinical relevance.

A cell line is a culture of cells that are grown in a laboratory for use in research. These cells are usually taken from a single cell or group of cells, and they are able to divide and grow continuously in the lab. Cell lines can come from many different sources, including animals, plants, and humans. They are often used in scientific research to study cellular processes, disease mechanisms, and to test new drugs or treatments. Some common types of human cell lines include HeLa cells (which come from a cancer patient named Henrietta Lacks), HEK293 cells (which come from embryonic kidney cells), and HUVEC cells (which come from umbilical vein endothelial cells). It is important to note that cell lines are not the same as primary cells, which are cells that are taken directly from a living organism and have not been grown in the lab.

AMP-activated protein kinases (AMPK) are a group of heterotrimeric enzymes that play a crucial role in cellular energy homeostasis. They are composed of a catalytic subunit (α) and two regulatory subunits (β and γ). AMPK is activated under conditions of low energy charge, such as ATP depletion, hypoxia, or exercise, through an increase in the AMP:ATP ratio.

Once activated, AMPK phosphorylates and regulates various downstream targets involved in metabolic pathways, including glycolysis, fatty acid oxidation, and protein synthesis. This results in the inhibition of energy-consuming processes and the promotion of energy-producing processes, ultimately helping to restore cellular energy balance.

AMPK has been implicated in a variety of physiological processes, including glucose and lipid metabolism, autophagy, mitochondrial biogenesis, and inflammation. Dysregulation of AMPK activity has been linked to several diseases, such as diabetes, obesity, cancer, and neurodegenerative disorders. Therefore, AMPK is an attractive target for therapeutic interventions in these conditions.

Substrate specificity in the context of medical biochemistry and enzymology refers to the ability of an enzyme to selectively bind and catalyze a chemical reaction with a particular substrate (or a group of similar substrates) while discriminating against other molecules that are not substrates. This specificity arises from the three-dimensional structure of the enzyme, which has evolved to match the shape, charge distribution, and functional groups of its physiological substrate(s).

Substrate specificity is a fundamental property of enzymes that enables them to carry out highly selective chemical transformations in the complex cellular environment. The active site of an enzyme, where the catalysis takes place, has a unique conformation that complements the shape and charge distribution of its substrate(s). This ensures efficient recognition, binding, and conversion of the substrate into the desired product while minimizing unwanted side reactions with other molecules.

Substrate specificity can be categorized as:

1. Absolute specificity: An enzyme that can only act on a single substrate or a very narrow group of structurally related substrates, showing no activity towards any other molecule.
2. Group specificity: An enzyme that prefers to act on a particular functional group or class of compounds but can still accommodate minor structural variations within the substrate.
3. Broad or promiscuous specificity: An enzyme that can act on a wide range of structurally diverse substrates, albeit with varying catalytic efficiencies.

Understanding substrate specificity is crucial for elucidating enzymatic mechanisms, designing drugs that target specific enzymes or pathways, and developing biotechnological applications that rely on the controlled manipulation of enzyme activities.

Proto-oncogene proteins are normal cellular proteins that play crucial roles in various cellular processes, such as signal transduction, cell cycle regulation, and apoptosis (programmed cell death). They are involved in the regulation of cell growth, differentiation, and survival under physiological conditions.

When proto-oncogene proteins undergo mutations or aberrations in their expression levels, they can transform into oncogenic forms, leading to uncontrolled cell growth and division. These altered proteins are then referred to as oncogene products or oncoproteins. Oncogenic mutations can occur due to various factors, including genetic predisposition, environmental exposures, and aging.

Examples of proto-oncogene proteins include:

1. Ras proteins: Involved in signal transduction pathways that regulate cell growth and differentiation. Activating mutations in Ras genes are found in various human cancers.
2. Myc proteins: Regulate gene expression related to cell cycle progression, apoptosis, and metabolism. Overexpression of Myc proteins is associated with several types of cancer.
3. EGFR (Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor): A transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase that regulates cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation. Mutations or overexpression of EGFR are linked to various malignancies, such as lung cancer and glioblastoma.
4. Src family kinases: Intracellular tyrosine kinases that regulate signal transduction pathways involved in cell proliferation, survival, and migration. Dysregulation of Src family kinases is implicated in several types of cancer.
5. Abl kinases: Cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases that regulate various cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, and stress responses. Aberrant activation of Abl kinases, as seen in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), leads to uncontrolled cell proliferation.

Understanding the roles of proto-oncogene proteins and their dysregulation in cancer development is essential for developing targeted cancer therapies that aim to inhibit or modulate these aberrant signaling pathways.

Myocardial reperfusion injury is a pathological process that occurs when blood flow is restored to the heart muscle (myocardium) after a period of ischemia or reduced oxygen supply, such as during a myocardial infarction (heart attack). The restoration of blood flow, although necessary to salvage the dying tissue, can itself cause further damage to the heart muscle. This paradoxical phenomenon is known as myocardial reperfusion injury.

The mechanisms behind myocardial reperfusion injury are complex and involve several processes, including:

1. Oxidative stress: The sudden influx of oxygen into the previously ischemic tissue leads to an overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which can damage cellular structures, such as proteins, lipids, and DNA.
2. Calcium overload: During reperfusion, there is an increase in calcium influx into the cardiomyocytes (heart muscle cells). This elevated intracellular calcium level can disrupt normal cellular functions, leading to further damage.
3. Inflammation: Reperfusion triggers an immune response, with the recruitment of inflammatory cells, such as neutrophils and monocytes, to the site of injury. These cells release cytokines and other mediators that can exacerbate tissue damage.
4. Mitochondrial dysfunction: The restoration of blood flow can cause mitochondria, the powerhouses of the cell, to malfunction, leading to the release of pro-apoptotic factors and contributing to cell death.
5. Vasoconstriction and microvascular obstruction: During reperfusion, there may be vasoconstriction of the small blood vessels (microvasculature) in the heart, which can further limit blood flow and contribute to tissue damage.

Myocardial reperfusion injury is a significant concern because it can negate some of the benefits of early reperfusion therapy, such as thrombolysis or primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), used to treat acute myocardial infarction. Strategies to minimize myocardial reperfusion injury are an area of active research and include pharmacological interventions, ischemic preconditioning, and remote ischemic conditioning.

In medical terms, the heart is a muscular organ located in the thoracic cavity that functions as a pump to circulate blood throughout the body. It's responsible for delivering oxygen and nutrients to the tissues and removing carbon dioxide and other wastes. The human heart is divided into four chambers: two atria on the top and two ventricles on the bottom. The right side of the heart receives deoxygenated blood from the body and pumps it to the lungs, while the left side receives oxygenated blood from the lungs and pumps it out to the rest of the body. The heart's rhythmic contractions and relaxations are regulated by a complex electrical conduction system.

Calcium is an essential mineral that is vital for various physiological processes in the human body. The medical definition of calcium is as follows:

Calcium (Ca2+) is a crucial cation and the most abundant mineral in the human body, with approximately 99% of it found in bones and teeth. It plays a vital role in maintaining structural integrity, nerve impulse transmission, muscle contraction, hormonal secretion, blood coagulation, and enzyme activation.

Calcium homeostasis is tightly regulated through the interplay of several hormones, including parathyroid hormone (PTH), calcitonin, and vitamin D. Dietary calcium intake, absorption, and excretion are also critical factors in maintaining optimal calcium levels in the body.

Hypocalcemia refers to low serum calcium levels, while hypercalcemia indicates high serum calcium levels. Both conditions can have detrimental effects on various organ systems and require medical intervention to correct.

Messenger RNA (mRNA) is a type of RNA (ribonucleic acid) that carries genetic information copied from DNA in the form of a series of three-base code "words," each of which specifies a particular amino acid. This information is used by the cell's machinery to construct proteins, a process known as translation. After being transcribed from DNA, mRNA travels out of the nucleus to the ribosomes in the cytoplasm where protein synthesis occurs. Once the protein has been synthesized, the mRNA may be degraded and recycled. Post-transcriptional modifications can also occur to mRNA, such as alternative splicing and addition of a 5' cap and a poly(A) tail, which can affect its stability, localization, and translation efficiency.

Diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) is an enzyme that plays a role in regulating cell signaling pathways. It catalyzes the conversion of diacylglycerol (DAG), a lipid second messenger, to phosphatidic acid (PA). This reaction helps to terminate DAG-mediated signals and initiate PA-mediated signals, which are involved in various cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, and survival. There are several isoforms of DGK that differ in their regulation, subcellular localization, and substrate specificity. Inhibition or genetic deletion of DGK has been shown to affect a variety of physiological and pathological processes, including inflammation, immunity, cancer, and neurological disorders.

Muscle proteins are a type of protein that are found in muscle tissue and are responsible for providing structure, strength, and functionality to muscles. The two major types of muscle proteins are:

1. Contractile proteins: These include actin and myosin, which are responsible for the contraction and relaxation of muscles. They work together to cause muscle movement by sliding along each other and shortening the muscle fibers.
2. Structural proteins: These include titin, nebulin, and desmin, which provide structural support and stability to muscle fibers. Titin is the largest protein in the human body and acts as a molecular spring that helps maintain the integrity of the sarcomere (the basic unit of muscle contraction). Nebulin helps regulate the length of the sarcomere, while desmin forms a network of filaments that connects adjacent muscle fibers together.

Overall, muscle proteins play a critical role in maintaining muscle health and function, and their dysregulation can lead to various muscle-related disorders such as muscular dystrophy, myopathies, and sarcopenia.

"Cells, cultured" is a medical term that refers to cells that have been removed from an organism and grown in controlled laboratory conditions outside of the body. This process is called cell culture and it allows scientists to study cells in a more controlled and accessible environment than they would have inside the body. Cultured cells can be derived from a variety of sources, including tissues, organs, or fluids from humans, animals, or cell lines that have been previously established in the laboratory.

Cell culture involves several steps, including isolation of the cells from the tissue, purification and characterization of the cells, and maintenance of the cells in appropriate growth conditions. The cells are typically grown in specialized media that contain nutrients, growth factors, and other components necessary for their survival and proliferation. Cultured cells can be used for a variety of purposes, including basic research, drug development and testing, and production of biological products such as vaccines and gene therapies.

It is important to note that cultured cells may behave differently than they do in the body, and results obtained from cell culture studies may not always translate directly to human physiology or disease. Therefore, it is essential to validate findings from cell culture experiments using additional models and ultimately in clinical trials involving human subjects.

Myofibrils are the basic contractile units of muscle fibers, composed of highly organized arrays of thick and thin filaments. They are responsible for generating the force necessary for muscle contraction. The thick filaments are primarily made up of the protein myosin, while the thin filaments are mainly composed of actin. Myofibrils are surrounded by a membrane called the sarcolemma and are organized into repeating sections called sarcomeres, which are the functional units of muscle contraction.

Myoglobinuria is a medical condition characterized by the presence of myoglobin in the urine. Myoglobin is a protein found in muscle cells that is released into the bloodstream when muscle tissue is damaged or broken down, such as during intense exercise, trauma, or muscle diseases like muscular dystrophy and rhabdomyolysis.

When myoglobin is present in high concentrations in the blood, it can damage the kidneys by causing direct tubular injury, cast formation, and obstruction, which can lead to acute kidney injury (AKI) or even renal failure if left untreated. Symptoms of myoglobinuria may include dark-colored urine, muscle pain, weakness, and swelling, as well as symptoms related to AKI such as nausea, vomiting, and decreased urine output.

Diagnosis of myoglobinuria is typically made by detecting myoglobin in the urine using a dipstick test or more specific tests like immunoassays or mass spectrometry. Treatment may involve aggressive fluid resuscitation, alkalization of the urine to prevent myoglobin precipitation, and management of any underlying conditions causing muscle damage.

Tyrosine is an non-essential amino acid, which means that it can be synthesized by the human body from another amino acid called phenylalanine. Its name is derived from the Greek word "tyros," which means cheese, as it was first isolated from casein, a protein found in cheese.

Tyrosine plays a crucial role in the production of several important substances in the body, including neurotransmitters such as dopamine, norepinephrine, and epinephrine, which are involved in various physiological processes, including mood regulation, stress response, and cognitive functions. It also serves as a precursor to melanin, the pigment responsible for skin, hair, and eye color.

In addition, tyrosine is involved in the structure of proteins and is essential for normal growth and development. Some individuals may require tyrosine supplementation if they have a genetic disorder that affects tyrosine metabolism or if they are phenylketonurics (PKU), who cannot metabolize phenylalanine, which can lead to elevated tyrosine levels in the blood. However, it is important to consult with a healthcare professional before starting any supplementation regimen.

Sprague-Dawley rats are a strain of albino laboratory rats that are widely used in scientific research. They were first developed by researchers H.H. Sprague and R.C. Dawley in the early 20th century, and have since become one of the most commonly used rat strains in biomedical research due to their relatively large size, ease of handling, and consistent genetic background.

Sprague-Dawley rats are outbred, which means that they are genetically diverse and do not suffer from the same limitations as inbred strains, which can have reduced fertility and increased susceptibility to certain diseases. They are also characterized by their docile nature and low levels of aggression, making them easier to handle and study than some other rat strains.

These rats are used in a wide variety of research areas, including toxicology, pharmacology, nutrition, cancer, and behavioral studies. Because they are genetically diverse, Sprague-Dawley rats can be used to model a range of human diseases and conditions, making them an important tool in the development of new drugs and therapies.

Protein-kinase B, also known as AKT, is a group of intracellular proteins that play a crucial role in various cellular processes such as glucose metabolism, apoptosis, cell proliferation, transcription, and cell migration. The AKT family includes three isoforms: AKT1, AKT2, and AKT3, which are encoded by the genes PKBalpha, PKBbeta, and PKBgamma, respectively.

Proto-oncogene proteins c-AKT refer to the normal, non-mutated forms of these proteins that are involved in the regulation of cell growth and survival under physiological conditions. However, when these genes are mutated or overexpressed, they can become oncogenes, leading to uncontrolled cell growth and cancer development.

Activation of c-AKT occurs through a signaling cascade that begins with the binding of extracellular ligands such as insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) or epidermal growth factor (EGF) to their respective receptors on the cell surface. This triggers a series of phosphorylation events that ultimately lead to the activation of c-AKT, which then phosphorylates downstream targets involved in various cellular processes.

In summary, proto-oncogene proteins c-AKT are normal intracellular proteins that play essential roles in regulating cell growth and survival under physiological conditions. However, their dysregulation can contribute to cancer development and progression.

Focal Adhesion Kinase 1 (FAK1), also known as Protein Tyrosine Kinase 2 (PTK2), is a cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase that plays a crucial role in cellular processes such as cell adhesion, migration, and survival. It is recruited to focal adhesions, which are specialized structures that form at the sites of integrin-mediated attachment of the cell to the extracellular matrix (ECM).

FAK1 becomes activated through autophosphorylation upon integrin clustering and ECM binding. Once activated, FAK1 can phosphorylate various downstream substrates, leading to the activation of several signaling pathways that regulate cell behavior. These pathways include the Ras/MAPK, PI3K/AKT, and JNK signaling cascades, which are involved in cell proliferation, survival, and motility.

FAK1 has been implicated in various physiological and pathological processes, including embryonic development, wound healing, angiogenesis, and tumorigenesis. Dysregulation of FAK1 signaling has been associated with several diseases, such as cancer, fibrosis, and neurological disorders. Therefore, FAK1 is considered a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of these conditions.

"Wistar rats" are a strain of albino rats that are widely used in laboratory research. They were developed at the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia, USA, and were first introduced in 1906. Wistar rats are outbred, which means that they are genetically diverse and do not have a fixed set of genetic characteristics like inbred strains.

Wistar rats are commonly used as animal models in biomedical research because of their size, ease of handling, and relatively low cost. They are used in a wide range of research areas, including toxicology, pharmacology, nutrition, cancer, cardiovascular disease, and behavioral studies. Wistar rats are also used in safety testing of drugs, medical devices, and other products.

Wistar rats are typically larger than many other rat strains, with males weighing between 500-700 grams and females weighing between 250-350 grams. They have a lifespan of approximately 2-3 years. Wistar rats are also known for their docile and friendly nature, making them easy to handle and work with in the laboratory setting.

Recombinant proteins are artificially created proteins produced through the use of recombinant DNA technology. This process involves combining DNA molecules from different sources to create a new set of genes that encode for a specific protein. The resulting recombinant protein can then be expressed, purified, and used for various applications in research, medicine, and industry.

Recombinant proteins are widely used in biomedical research to study protein function, structure, and interactions. They are also used in the development of diagnostic tests, vaccines, and therapeutic drugs. For example, recombinant insulin is a common treatment for diabetes, while recombinant human growth hormone is used to treat growth disorders.

The production of recombinant proteins typically involves the use of host cells, such as bacteria, yeast, or mammalian cells, which are engineered to express the desired protein. The host cells are transformed with a plasmid vector containing the gene of interest, along with regulatory elements that control its expression. Once the host cells are cultured and the protein is expressed, it can be purified using various chromatography techniques.

Overall, recombinant proteins have revolutionized many areas of biology and medicine, enabling researchers to study and manipulate proteins in ways that were previously impossible.

Electrophoresis, polyacrylamide gel (EPG) is a laboratory technique used to separate and analyze complex mixtures of proteins or nucleic acids (DNA or RNA) based on their size and electrical charge. This technique utilizes a matrix made of cross-linked polyacrylamide, a type of gel, which provides a stable and uniform environment for the separation of molecules.

In this process:

1. The polyacrylamide gel is prepared by mixing acrylamide monomers with a cross-linking agent (bis-acrylamide) and a catalyst (ammonium persulfate) in the presence of a buffer solution.
2. The gel is then poured into a mold and allowed to polymerize, forming a solid matrix with uniform pore sizes that depend on the concentration of acrylamide used. Higher concentrations result in smaller pores, providing better resolution for separating smaller molecules.
3. Once the gel has set, it is placed in an electrophoresis apparatus containing a buffer solution. Samples containing the mixture of proteins or nucleic acids are loaded into wells on the top of the gel.
4. An electric field is applied across the gel, causing the negatively charged molecules to migrate towards the positive electrode (anode) while positively charged molecules move toward the negative electrode (cathode). The rate of migration depends on the size, charge, and shape of the molecules.
5. Smaller molecules move faster through the gel matrix and will migrate farther from the origin compared to larger molecules, resulting in separation based on size. Proteins and nucleic acids can be selectively stained after electrophoresis to visualize the separated bands.

EPG is widely used in various research fields, including molecular biology, genetics, proteomics, and forensic science, for applications such as protein characterization, DNA fragment analysis, cloning, mutation detection, and quality control of nucleic acid or protein samples.

Myosin-Light-Chain Kinase (MLCK) is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in muscle contraction. It phosphorylates the regulatory light chains of myosin, a protein involved in muscle contraction, leading to the activation of myosin and the initiation of the contractile process. MLCK is activated by calcium ions and calmodulin, and its activity is essential for various cellular processes, including cytokinesis, cell motility, and maintenance of cell shape. In addition to its role in muscle contraction, MLCK has been implicated in several pathological conditions, such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, and cancer.

Myocardial reperfusion is the restoration of blood flow to the heart muscle (myocardium), usually after a period of ischemia or reduced oxygen supply, such as during a myocardial infarction (heart attack). This can be achieved through various medical interventions, including thrombolytic therapy, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), or coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG). The goal of myocardial reperfusion is to salvage the jeopardized myocardium, preserve cardiac function, and reduce the risk of complications like heart failure or arrhythmias. However, it's important to note that while reperfusion is crucial for treating ischemic heart disease, it can also lead to additional injury to the heart muscle, known as reperfusion injury.

"Chickens" is a common term used to refer to the domesticated bird, Gallus gallus domesticus, which is widely raised for its eggs and meat. However, in medical terms, "chickens" is not a standard term with a specific definition. If you have any specific medical concern or question related to chickens, such as food safety or allergies, please provide more details so I can give a more accurate answer.

Enzyme reactivators are substances or compounds that restore the activity of an enzyme that has been inhibited or inactivated. This can occur due to various reasons such as exposure to certain chemicals, oxidation, or heavy metal ions. Enzyme reactivators work by binding to the enzyme and reversing the effects of the inhibitor or promoting the repair of any damage caused.

One example of an enzyme reactivator is methionine sulfoxide reductase (Msr), which can reduce oxidized methionine residues in proteins, thereby restoring their function. Another example is 2-phenylethynesulfonamide (PESNA), which has been shown to reactivate the enzyme parkinsonism-associated deglycase (DJ-1) that is mutated in some cases of familial Parkinson's disease.

It is important to note that not all enzyme inhibitors can be reversed by reactivators, and the development of specific reactivators for particular enzymes is an active area of research with potential therapeutic applications.

Janus Kinase 2 (JAK2) is a tyrosine kinase enzyme that plays a crucial role in intracellular signal transduction. It is named after the Roman god Janus, who is depicted with two faces, as JAK2 has two similar phosphate-transferring domains. JAK2 is involved in various cytokine receptor-mediated signaling pathways and contributes to hematopoiesis, immune function, and cell growth.

Mutations in the JAK2 gene have been associated with several myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), including polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and primary myelofibrosis. The most common mutation is JAK2 V617F, which results in a constitutively active enzyme that promotes uncontrolled cell proliferation and survival, contributing to the development of these MPNs.

A dose-response relationship in the context of drugs refers to the changes in the effects or symptoms that occur as the dose of a drug is increased or decreased. Generally, as the dose of a drug is increased, the severity or intensity of its effects also increases. Conversely, as the dose is decreased, the effects of the drug become less severe or may disappear altogether.

The dose-response relationship is an important concept in pharmacology and toxicology because it helps to establish the safe and effective dosage range for a drug. By understanding how changes in the dose of a drug affect its therapeutic and adverse effects, healthcare providers can optimize treatment plans for their patients while minimizing the risk of harm.

The dose-response relationship is typically depicted as a curve that shows the relationship between the dose of a drug and its effect. The shape of the curve may vary depending on the drug and the specific effect being measured. Some drugs may have a steep dose-response curve, meaning that small changes in the dose can result in large differences in the effect. Other drugs may have a more gradual dose-response curve, where larger changes in the dose are needed to produce significant effects.

In addition to helping establish safe and effective dosages, the dose-response relationship is also used to evaluate the potential therapeutic benefits and risks of new drugs during clinical trials. By systematically testing different doses of a drug in controlled studies, researchers can identify the optimal dosage range for the drug and assess its safety and efficacy.

Focal adhesion protein-tyrosine kinases (FAKs) are a group of non-receptor tyrosine kinases that play crucial roles in the regulation of various cellular processes, including cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, and survival. They are primarily localized at focal adhesions, which are specialized structures formed at the sites of integrin-mediated attachment of cells to the extracellular matrix (ECM).

FAKs consist of two major domains: an N-terminal FERM (4.1 protein, ezrin, radixin, moesin) domain and a C-terminal kinase domain. The FERM domain is responsible for the interaction with various proteins, including integrins, growth factor receptors, and cytoskeletal components, while the kinase domain possesses enzymatic activity that phosphorylates tyrosine residues on target proteins.

FAKs are activated in response to various extracellular signals, such as ECM stiffness, growth factors, and integrin engagement. Once activated, FAKs initiate a cascade of intracellular signaling events that ultimately regulate cell behavior. Dysregulation of FAK signaling has been implicated in several pathological conditions, including cancer, fibrosis, and cardiovascular diseases.

In summary, focal adhesion protein-tyrosine kinases are essential regulators of cellular processes that localize to focal adhesions and modulate intracellular signaling pathways in response to extracellular cues.

Biological models, also known as physiological models or organismal models, are simplified representations of biological systems, processes, or mechanisms that are used to understand and explain the underlying principles and relationships. These models can be theoretical (conceptual or mathematical) or physical (such as anatomical models, cell cultures, or animal models). They are widely used in biomedical research to study various phenomena, including disease pathophysiology, drug action, and therapeutic interventions.

Examples of biological models include:

1. Mathematical models: These use mathematical equations and formulas to describe complex biological systems or processes, such as population dynamics, metabolic pathways, or gene regulation networks. They can help predict the behavior of these systems under different conditions and test hypotheses about their underlying mechanisms.
2. Cell cultures: These are collections of cells grown in a controlled environment, typically in a laboratory dish or flask. They can be used to study cellular processes, such as signal transduction, gene expression, or metabolism, and to test the effects of drugs or other treatments on these processes.
3. Animal models: These are living organisms, usually vertebrates like mice, rats, or non-human primates, that are used to study various aspects of human biology and disease. They can provide valuable insights into the pathophysiology of diseases, the mechanisms of drug action, and the safety and efficacy of new therapies.
4. Anatomical models: These are physical representations of biological structures or systems, such as plastic models of organs or tissues, that can be used for educational purposes or to plan surgical procedures. They can also serve as a basis for developing more sophisticated models, such as computer simulations or 3D-printed replicas.

Overall, biological models play a crucial role in advancing our understanding of biology and medicine, helping to identify new targets for therapeutic intervention, develop novel drugs and treatments, and improve human health.

Recombinant fusion proteins are artificially created biomolecules that combine the functional domains or properties of two or more different proteins into a single protein entity. They are generated through recombinant DNA technology, where the genes encoding the desired protein domains are linked together and expressed as a single, chimeric gene in a host organism, such as bacteria, yeast, or mammalian cells.

The resulting fusion protein retains the functional properties of its individual constituent proteins, allowing for novel applications in research, diagnostics, and therapeutics. For instance, recombinant fusion proteins can be designed to enhance protein stability, solubility, or immunogenicity, making them valuable tools for studying protein-protein interactions, developing targeted therapies, or generating vaccines against infectious diseases or cancer.

Examples of recombinant fusion proteins include:

1. Etaglunatide (ABT-523): A soluble Fc fusion protein that combines the heavy chain fragment crystallizable region (Fc) of an immunoglobulin with the extracellular domain of the human interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R). This fusion protein functions as a decoy receptor, neutralizing IL-6 and its downstream signaling pathways in rheumatoid arthritis.
2. Etanercept (Enbrel): A soluble TNF receptor p75 Fc fusion protein that binds to tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and inhibits its proinflammatory activity, making it a valuable therapeutic option for treating autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and psoriasis.
3. Abatacept (Orencia): A fusion protein consisting of the extracellular domain of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) linked to the Fc region of an immunoglobulin, which downregulates T-cell activation and proliferation in autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis.
4. Belimumab (Benlysta): A monoclonal antibody that targets B-lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) protein, preventing its interaction with the B-cell surface receptor and inhibiting B-cell activation in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).
5. Romiplostim (Nplate): A fusion protein consisting of a thrombopoietin receptor agonist peptide linked to an immunoglobulin Fc region, which stimulates platelet production in patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenia (ITP).
6. Darbepoetin alfa (Aranesp): A hyperglycosylated erythropoiesis-stimulating protein that functions as a longer-acting form of recombinant human erythropoietin, used to treat anemia in patients with chronic kidney disease or cancer.
7. Palivizumab (Synagis): A monoclonal antibody directed against the F protein of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), which prevents RSV infection and is administered prophylactically to high-risk infants during the RSV season.
8. Ranibizumab (Lucentis): A recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody fragment that binds and inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), used in the treatment of age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and other ocular disorders.
9. Cetuximab (Erbitux): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that binds to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), used in the treatment of colorectal cancer and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.
10. Adalimumab (Humira): A fully humanized monoclonal antibody that targets tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), used in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and Crohn's disease.
11. Bevacizumab (Avastin): A recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to VEGF-A, used in the treatment of various cancers, including colorectal, lung, breast, and kidney cancer.
12. Trastuzumab (Herceptin): A humanized monoclonal antibody that targets HER2/neu receptor, used in the treatment of breast cancer.
13. Rituximab (Rituxan): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that binds to CD20 antigen on B cells, used in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and rheumatoid arthritis.
14. Palivizumab (Synagis): A humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to the F protein of respiratory syncytial virus, used in the prevention of respiratory syncytial virus infection in high-risk infants.
15. Infliximab (Remicade): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases, including Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis.
16. Natalizumab (Tysabri): A humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to α4β1 integrin, used in the treatment of multiple sclerosis and Crohn's disease.
17. Adalimumab (Humira): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, Crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis.
18. Golimumab (Simponi): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and ulcerative colitis.
19. Certolizumab pegol (Cimzia): A PEGylated Fab' fragment of a humanized monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and Crohn's disease.
20. Ustekinumab (Stelara): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-12 and IL-23, used in the treatment of psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and Crohn's disease.
21. Secukinumab (Cosentyx): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-17A, used in the treatment of psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis.
22. Ixekizumab (Taltz): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-17A, used in the treatment of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.
23. Brodalumab (Siliq): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-17 receptor A, used in the treatment of psoriasis.
24. Sarilumab (Kevzara): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets the IL-6 receptor, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.
25. Tocilizumab (Actemra): A humanized monoclonal antibody that targets the IL-6 receptor, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis, polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis, giant cell arteritis, and chimeric antigen receptor T-cell-induced cytokine release syndrome.
26. Siltuximab (Sylvant): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that targets IL-6, used in the treatment of multicentric Castleman disease.
27. Satralizumab (Enspryng): A humanized monoclonal antibody that targets IL-6 receptor alpha, used in the treatment of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder.
28. Sirukumab (Plivensia): A human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-6, used in the treatment

Ribosomal Protein S6 Kinases, 90-kDa (RSKs) are a group of serine/threonine protein kinases that play a crucial role in signal transduction pathways linked to cell growth, proliferation, and survival. They are so named because they were initially discovered as protein kinases that phosphorylate the 40S ribosomal protein S6, a component of the ribosome involved in translation regulation.

RSKs consist of four isoforms (RSK1-4) encoded by separate genes but sharing similar structures and functions. They have an N-terminal kinase domain, a C-terminal kinase domain, and a linker region containing several regulatory phosphorylation sites. RSKs are activated through the Ras/MAPK (Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase) signaling cascade, where Ras activates Raf, which in turn activates MEK, ultimately leading to the activation of ERK. Activated ERK then phosphorylates and activates RSKs by promoting a conformational change that allows for autophosphorylation and full kinase activity.

Once activated, RSKs can phosphorylate various substrates involved in transcriptional regulation, cytoskeletal reorganization, protein synthesis, and cell cycle progression. Dysregulation of RSK signaling has been implicated in several diseases, including cancer, where they contribute to tumor growth, metastasis, and drug resistance. Therefore, RSKs are considered potential therapeutic targets for cancer treatment.

Apoptosis is a programmed and controlled cell death process that occurs in multicellular organisms. It is a natural process that helps maintain tissue homeostasis by eliminating damaged, infected, or unwanted cells. During apoptosis, the cell undergoes a series of morphological changes, including cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation, and fragmentation into membrane-bound vesicles called apoptotic bodies. These bodies are then recognized and engulfed by neighboring cells or phagocytic cells, preventing an inflammatory response. Apoptosis is regulated by a complex network of intracellular signaling pathways that involve proteins such as caspases, Bcl-2 family members, and inhibitors of apoptosis (IAPs).

Intracellular signaling peptides and proteins are molecules that play a crucial role in transmitting signals within cells, which ultimately lead to changes in cell behavior or function. These signals can originate from outside the cell (extracellular) or within the cell itself. Intracellular signaling molecules include various types of peptides and proteins, such as:

1. G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs): These are seven-transmembrane domain receptors that bind to extracellular signaling molecules like hormones, neurotransmitters, or chemokines. Upon activation, they initiate a cascade of intracellular signals through G proteins and secondary messengers.
2. Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs): These are transmembrane receptors that bind to growth factors, cytokines, or hormones. Activation of RTKs leads to autophosphorylation of specific tyrosine residues, creating binding sites for intracellular signaling proteins such as adapter proteins, phosphatases, and enzymes like Ras, PI3K, and Src family kinases.
3. Second messenger systems: Intracellular second messengers are small molecules that amplify and propagate signals within the cell. Examples include cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), diacylglycerol (DAG), inositol triphosphate (IP3), calcium ions (Ca2+), and nitric oxide (NO). These second messengers activate or inhibit various downstream effectors, leading to changes in cellular responses.
4. Signal transduction cascades: Intracellular signaling proteins often form complex networks of interacting molecules that relay signals from the plasma membrane to the nucleus. These cascades involve kinases (protein kinases A, B, C, etc.), phosphatases, and adapter proteins, which ultimately regulate gene expression, cell cycle progression, metabolism, and other cellular processes.
5. Ubiquitination and proteasome degradation: Intracellular signaling pathways can also control protein stability by modulating ubiquitin-proteasome degradation. E3 ubiquitin ligases recognize specific substrates and conjugate them with ubiquitin molecules, targeting them for proteasomal degradation. This process regulates the abundance of key signaling proteins and contributes to signal termination or amplification.

In summary, intracellular signaling pathways involve a complex network of interacting proteins that relay signals from the plasma membrane to various cellular compartments, ultimately regulating gene expression, metabolism, and other cellular processes. Dysregulation of these pathways can contribute to disease development and progression, making them attractive targets for therapeutic intervention.

Phosphoproteins are proteins that have been post-translationally modified by the addition of a phosphate group (-PO3H2) onto specific amino acid residues, most commonly serine, threonine, or tyrosine. This process is known as phosphorylation and is mediated by enzymes called kinases. Phosphoproteins play crucial roles in various cellular processes such as signal transduction, cell cycle regulation, metabolism, and gene expression. The addition or removal of a phosphate group can activate or inhibit the function of a protein, thereby serving as a switch to control its activity. Phosphoproteins can be detected and quantified using techniques such as Western blotting, mass spectrometry, and immunofluorescence.

Protein Kinase C-epsilon (PKCε) is a serine-threonine protein kinase that belongs to the family of Protein Kinase C (PKC) enzymes. These enzymes play crucial roles in various cellular processes, including signal transduction, cell survival, differentiation, and apoptosis.

PKCε is specifically involved in regulating several signaling pathways related to inflammation, proliferation, and carcinogenesis. It can be activated by different stimuli such as diacylglycerol (DAG) and phorbol esters, which lead to its translocation from the cytosol to the plasma membrane, where it phosphorylates and modulates the activity of various target proteins.

Abnormal regulation or expression of PKCε has been implicated in several diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and neurodegenerative disorders. Therefore, PKCε is considered a potential therapeutic target for these conditions, and inhibitors of this enzyme are being developed and tested in preclinical and clinical studies.

Tertiary protein structure refers to the three-dimensional arrangement of all the elements (polypeptide chains) of a single protein molecule. It is the highest level of structural organization and results from interactions between various side chains (R groups) of the amino acids that make up the protein. These interactions, which include hydrogen bonds, ionic bonds, van der Waals forces, and disulfide bridges, give the protein its unique shape and stability, which in turn determines its function. The tertiary structure of a protein can be stabilized by various factors such as temperature, pH, and the presence of certain ions. Any changes in these factors can lead to denaturation, where the protein loses its tertiary structure and thus its function.

Gene expression regulation, enzymologic refers to the biochemical processes and mechanisms that control the transcription and translation of specific genes into functional proteins or enzymes. This regulation is achieved through various enzymatic activities that can either activate or repress gene expression at different levels, such as chromatin remodeling, transcription factor activation, mRNA processing, and protein degradation.

Enzymologic regulation of gene expression involves the action of specific enzymes that catalyze chemical reactions involved in these processes. For example, histone-modifying enzymes can alter the structure of chromatin to make genes more or less accessible for transcription, while RNA polymerase and its associated factors are responsible for transcribing DNA into mRNA. Additionally, various enzymes are involved in post-transcriptional modifications of mRNA, such as splicing, capping, and tailing, which can affect the stability and translation of the transcript.

Overall, the enzymologic regulation of gene expression is a complex and dynamic process that allows cells to respond to changes in their environment and maintain proper physiological function.

Troponin is a protein complex found in cardiac and skeletal muscle cells that plays a critical role in muscle contraction. It consists of three subunits: troponin C, which binds calcium ions; troponin I, which inhibits the interaction between actin and myosin in the absence of calcium; and troponin T, which binds to tropomyosin and helps anchor the complex to the muscle filament.

In clinical medicine, "troponin" usually refers to cardiac-specific isoforms of these proteins (cTnI and cTnT) that are released into the bloodstream following damage to the heart muscle, such as occurs in myocardial infarction (heart attack). Measurement of troponin levels in the blood is a sensitive and specific biomarker for the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction.

MAP Kinase Kinase Kinase 1 (MAP3K1) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that belongs to the MAPKKK family. It plays a crucial role in intracellular signaling pathways, particularly the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades. These cascades are involved in various cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis.

MAP3K1 activates MAPKKs (MAP Kinase Kinases) by phosphorylating them on specific serine and threonine residues. In turn, activated MAPKKs phosphorylate and activate MAPKs, which then regulate the activity of various transcription factors and other downstream targets.

Mutations in MAP3K1 have been implicated in several human diseases, including cancer and developmental disorders. For example, gain-of-function mutations in MAP3K1 can lead to aberrant activation of MAPK signaling pathways, promoting tumor growth and progression. On the other hand, loss-of-function mutations in MAP3K1 have been associated with developmental defects such as craniofacial anomalies and skeletal malformations.

"Autoanalysis" is not a term that is widely used in the medical field. However, in psychology and psychotherapy, "autoanalysis" refers to the process of self-analysis or self-examination, where an individual analyzes their own thoughts, feelings, behaviors, and experiences to gain insight into their unconscious mind and understand their motivations, conflicts, and emotional patterns.

Self-analysis can involve various techniques such as introspection, journaling, meditation, dream analysis, and reflection on past experiences. While autoanalysis can be a useful tool for personal growth and self-awareness, it is generally considered less reliable and comprehensive than professional psychotherapy or psychoanalysis, which involves a trained therapist or analyst who can provide objective feedback, interpretation, and guidance.

Mitochondria in muscle, also known as the "powerhouses" of the cell, are organelles that play a crucial role in generating energy for muscle cells through a process called cellular respiration. They convert the chemical energy found in glucose and oxygen into ATP (adenosine triphosphate), which is the main source of energy used by cells.

Muscle cells contain a high number of mitochondria due to their high energy demands for muscle contraction and relaxation. The number and size of mitochondria in muscle fibers can vary depending on the type of muscle fiber, with slow-twitch, aerobic fibers having more numerous and larger mitochondria than fast-twitch, anaerobic fibers.

Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to various muscle disorders, including mitochondrial myopathies, which are characterized by muscle weakness, exercise intolerance, and other symptoms related to impaired energy production in the muscle cells.

Calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type 2 (CAMK2) is a type of serine/threonine protein kinase that plays a crucial role in signal transduction pathways related to synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory. It is composed of four subunits, each with a catalytic domain and a regulatory domain that contains an autoinhibitory region and a calmodulin-binding site.

The activation of CAMK2 requires the binding of calcium ions (Ca^2+^) to calmodulin, which then binds to the regulatory domain of CAMK2, relieving the autoinhibition and allowing the kinase to phosphorylate its substrates. Once activated, CAMK2 can also undergo a process called autophosphorylation, which results in a persistent activation state that can last for hours or even days.

CAMK2 has many downstream targets, including ion channels, transcription factors, and other protein kinases. Dysregulation of CAMK2 signaling has been implicated in various neurological disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and epilepsy.

Sequence homology, amino acid, refers to the similarity in the order of amino acids in a protein or a portion of a protein between two or more species. This similarity can be used to infer evolutionary relationships and functional similarities between proteins. The higher the degree of sequence homology, the more likely it is that the proteins are related and have similar functions. Sequence homology can be determined through various methods such as pairwise alignment or multiple sequence alignment, which compare the sequences and calculate a score based on the number and type of matching amino acids.

Enzyme inhibitors are substances that bind to an enzyme and decrease its activity, preventing it from catalyzing a chemical reaction in the body. They can work by several mechanisms, including blocking the active site where the substrate binds, or binding to another site on the enzyme to change its shape and prevent substrate binding. Enzyme inhibitors are often used as drugs to treat various medical conditions, such as high blood pressure, abnormal heart rhythms, and bacterial infections. They can also be found naturally in some foods and plants, and can be used in research to understand enzyme function and regulation.

Iodoacetamide is not typically defined in a medical context, but it is a chemical compound with the formula CH3C(=NH)COI. It is used in laboratory settings as a reagent for various chemical reactions. In a biochemical context, iodoacetamide is an alkylating agent that can react with cysteine residues in proteins, modifying their structure and function. This property has made it useful in research applications such as the study of protein function and enzyme kinetics.

However, it's important to note that iodoacetamide is not used as a therapeutic agent in medicine due to its potential toxicity and reactivity with various biological molecules. Therefore, there is no medical definition for this compound.

Protein Kinase C beta (PKCβ) is a serine-threonine protein kinase that belongs to the family of Protein Kinase C (PKC) enzymes. It plays a crucial role in various cellular processes, including signal transduction, cell survival, differentiation, and apoptosis. PKCβ is activated by diacylglycerol (DAG) and calcium ions (Ca2+), which results in its translocation from the cytosol to the plasma membrane, where it phosphorylates downstream target proteins.

There are two isoforms of PKCβ, PKCβI and PKCβII, which differ in their regulatory domains but have similar catalytic domains. PKCβ has been implicated in several diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and inflammatory disorders, making it a potential therapeutic target for drug development.

'Gene expression regulation' refers to the processes that control whether, when, and where a particular gene is expressed, meaning the production of a specific protein or functional RNA encoded by that gene. This complex mechanism can be influenced by various factors such as transcription factors, chromatin remodeling, DNA methylation, non-coding RNAs, and post-transcriptional modifications, among others. Proper regulation of gene expression is crucial for normal cellular function, development, and maintaining homeostasis in living organisms. Dysregulation of gene expression can lead to various diseases, including cancer and genetic disorders.

Molecular cloning is a laboratory technique used to create multiple copies of a specific DNA sequence. This process involves several steps:

1. Isolation: The first step in molecular cloning is to isolate the DNA sequence of interest from the rest of the genomic DNA. This can be done using various methods such as PCR (polymerase chain reaction), restriction enzymes, or hybridization.
2. Vector construction: Once the DNA sequence of interest has been isolated, it must be inserted into a vector, which is a small circular DNA molecule that can replicate independently in a host cell. Common vectors used in molecular cloning include plasmids and phages.
3. Transformation: The constructed vector is then introduced into a host cell, usually a bacterial or yeast cell, through a process called transformation. This can be done using various methods such as electroporation or chemical transformation.
4. Selection: After transformation, the host cells are grown in selective media that allow only those cells containing the vector to grow. This ensures that the DNA sequence of interest has been successfully cloned into the vector.
5. Amplification: Once the host cells have been selected, they can be grown in large quantities to amplify the number of copies of the cloned DNA sequence.

Molecular cloning is a powerful tool in molecular biology and has numerous applications, including the production of recombinant proteins, gene therapy, functional analysis of genes, and genetic engineering.

Electrocardiography (ECG or EKG) is a medical procedure that records the electrical activity of the heart. It provides a graphic representation of the electrical changes that occur during each heartbeat. The resulting tracing, called an electrocardiogram, can reveal information about the heart's rate and rhythm, as well as any damage to its cells or abnormalities in its conduction system.

During an ECG, small electrodes are placed on the skin of the chest, arms, and legs. These electrodes detect the electrical signals produced by the heart and transmit them to a machine that amplifies and records them. The procedure is non-invasive, painless, and quick, usually taking only a few minutes.

ECGs are commonly used to diagnose and monitor various heart conditions, including arrhythmias, coronary artery disease, heart attacks, and electrolyte imbalances. They can also be used to evaluate the effectiveness of certain medications or treatments.

Phosphoglycerate Kinase (PGK) is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the glycolytic pathway, which is a series of reactions that convert glucose into pyruvate, producing ATP and NADH as energy-rich compounds. PGK catalyzes the conversion of 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate (1,3-BPG) to 3-phosphoglycerate (3-PG), concomitantly transferring a phosphate group to ADP to form ATP. This reaction is the fourth step in the glycolytic pathway and is reversible under certain conditions.

In humans, there are two isoforms of PGK: PGK1 and PGK2. PGK1 is widely expressed in various tissues, while PGK2 is primarily found in sperm cells. Deficiencies or mutations in the PGK1 gene can lead to a rare metabolic disorder called Phosphoglycerate Kinase Deficiency (PGKD), which can present with hemolytic anemia and neurological symptoms.

Tetradecanoylphorbol acetate (TPA) is defined as a pharmacological agent that is a derivative of the phorbol ester family. It is a potent tumor promoter and activator of protein kinase C (PKC), a group of enzymes that play a role in various cellular processes such as signal transduction, proliferation, and differentiation. TPA has been widely used in research to study PKC-mediated signaling pathways and its role in cancer development and progression. It is also used in topical treatments for skin conditions such as psoriasis.

Reference values, also known as reference ranges or reference intervals, are the set of values that are considered normal or typical for a particular population or group of people. These values are often used in laboratory tests to help interpret test results and determine whether a patient's value falls within the expected range.

The process of establishing reference values typically involves measuring a particular biomarker or parameter in a large, healthy population and then calculating the mean and standard deviation of the measurements. Based on these statistics, a range is established that includes a certain percentage of the population (often 95%) and excludes extreme outliers.

It's important to note that reference values can vary depending on factors such as age, sex, race, and other demographic characteristics. Therefore, it's essential to use reference values that are specific to the relevant population when interpreting laboratory test results. Additionally, reference values may change over time due to advances in measurement technology or changes in the population being studied.

MAP Kinase Kinase 2 (MKK2 or MAP2K2) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that plays a crucial role in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signal transduction pathways. These pathways are involved in various cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation, and stress responses. MKK2 is specifically a part of the JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase) signaling module, where it acts as an upstream kinase that activates JNK by phosphorylating its activation loop at threonine and tyrosine residues.

MKK2 is activated in response to various stimuli such as cytokines, growth factors, and environmental stresses. Once activated, MKK2 phosphorylates and activates JNK, which then regulates the activity of several transcription factors leading to changes in gene expression and ultimately modulating cellular responses.

In summary, MAP Kinase Kinase 2 is a protein kinase involved in the activation of the JNK signaling pathway, which plays essential roles in regulating various cellular processes, including stress response, inflammation, and programmed cell death (apoptosis).

Myocardial ischemia is a condition in which the blood supply to the heart muscle (myocardium) is reduced or blocked, leading to insufficient oxygen delivery and potential damage to the heart tissue. This reduction in blood flow typically results from the buildup of fatty deposits, called plaques, in the coronary arteries that supply the heart with oxygen-rich blood. The plaques can rupture or become unstable, causing the formation of blood clots that obstruct the artery and limit blood flow.

Myocardial ischemia may manifest as chest pain (angina pectoris), shortness of breath, fatigue, or irregular heartbeats (arrhythmias). In severe cases, it can lead to myocardial infarction (heart attack) if the oxygen supply is significantly reduced or cut off completely, causing permanent damage or death of the heart muscle. Early diagnosis and treatment of myocardial ischemia are crucial for preventing further complications and improving patient outcomes.

TOR (Target Of Rapamycin) Serine-Threonine Kinases are a family of conserved protein kinases that play crucial roles in the regulation of cell growth, proliferation, and metabolism in response to various environmental cues such as nutrients, growth factors, and energy status. They are named after their ability to phosphorylate serine and threonine residues on target proteins.

Mammalian cells express two distinct TOR kinases, mTORC1 and mTORC2, which have different protein compositions and functions. mTORC1 is rapamycin-sensitive and regulates cell growth, proliferation, and metabolism by phosphorylating downstream targets such as p70S6 kinase and 4E-BP1, thereby controlling protein synthesis, autophagy, and lysosome biogenesis. mTORC2 is rapamycin-insensitive and regulates cell survival, cytoskeleton organization, and metabolism by phosphorylating AGC kinases such as AKT and PKCα.

Dysregulation of TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases has been implicated in various human diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders. Therefore, targeting TOR kinases has emerged as a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of these diseases.

Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 2 (CDK2) is a type of enzyme that plays a crucial role in the regulation of the cell cycle, which is the process by which cells grow and divide. CDK2 is activated when it binds to a regulatory subunit called a cyclin.

During the cell cycle, CDK2 helps to control the progression from the G1 phase to the S phase, where DNA replication occurs. Specifically, CDK2 phosphorylates various target proteins that are involved in the regulation of DNA replication and the initiation of mitosis, which is the process of cell division.

CDK2 activity is tightly regulated through a variety of mechanisms, including phosphorylation, dephosphorylation, and protein degradation. Dysregulation of CDK2 activity has been implicated in various human diseases, including cancer. Therefore, CDK2 is an important target for the development of therapies aimed at treating these diseases.

Serine is an amino acid, which is a building block of proteins. More specifically, it is a non-essential amino acid, meaning that the body can produce it from other compounds, and it does not need to be obtained through diet. Serine plays important roles in the body, such as contributing to the formation of the protective covering of nerve fibers (myelin sheath), helping to synthesize another amino acid called tryptophan, and taking part in the metabolism of fatty acids. It is also involved in the production of muscle tissues, the immune system, and the forming of cell structures. Serine can be found in various foods such as soy, eggs, cheese, meat, peanuts, lentils, and many others.

Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent protein kinases (PKGs) are a type of enzyme that add phosphate groups to other proteins, thereby modifying their function. These kinases are activated by cGMP, which is a second messenger molecule that helps transmit signals within cells. PKGs play important roles in various cellular processes, including smooth muscle relaxation, platelet aggregation, and cardiac contractility. They have been implicated in the regulation of a number of physiological functions, such as blood flow, inflammation, and learning and memory. There are two main isoforms of cGMP-dependent protein kinases, PKG I and PKG II, which differ in their tissue distribution, regulatory properties, and substrate specificity.

Androstadienes are a class of steroid hormones that are derived from androstenedione, which is a weak male sex hormone. Androstadienes include various compounds such as androstadiene-3,17-dione and androstanedione, which are intermediate products in the biosynthesis of more potent androgens like testosterone and dihydrotestosterone.

Androstadienes are present in both males and females but are found in higher concentrations in men. They can be detected in various bodily fluids, including blood, urine, sweat, and semen. In addition to their role in steroid hormone synthesis, androstadienes have been studied for their potential use as biomarkers of physiological processes and disease states.

It's worth noting that androstadienes are sometimes referred to as "androstenes" in the literature, although this term can also refer to other related compounds.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Muscular Dystrophy, Animal" is not a standard medical term. Muscular Dystrophy is a group of genetic disorders that cause progressive weakness and loss of muscle mass. They are primarily human diseases and there are no known animal models of muscular dystrophy that directly correspond to any type of muscular dystrophy in humans.

However, scientists often use animals (like mice, dogs, and cats) as models for human diseases, including various types of muscular dystrophies. These animal models are used to study the disease process and to test potential treatments. For example, the mdx mouse is a well-known model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), which is caused by a mutation in the dystrophin gene. This mouse lacks the muscle protein dystrophin, similar to humans with DMD, and shows many of the same symptoms, making it a valuable tool for research.

Phosphates, in a medical context, refer to the salts or esters of phosphoric acid. Phosphates play crucial roles in various biological processes within the human body. They are essential components of bones and teeth, where they combine with calcium to form hydroxyapatite crystals. Phosphates also participate in energy transfer reactions as phosphate groups attached to adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Additionally, they contribute to buffer systems that help maintain normal pH levels in the body.

Abnormal levels of phosphates in the blood can indicate certain medical conditions. High phosphate levels (hyperphosphatemia) may be associated with kidney dysfunction, hyperparathyroidism, or excessive intake of phosphate-containing products. Low phosphate levels (hypophosphatemia) might result from malnutrition, vitamin D deficiency, or certain diseases affecting the small intestine or kidneys. Both hypophosphatemia and hyperphosphatemia can have significant impacts on various organ systems and may require medical intervention.

Guanidines are organic compounds that contain a guanidino group, which is a functional group with the formula -NH-C(=NH)-NH2. Guanidines can be found in various natural sources, including some animals, plants, and microorganisms. They also occur as byproducts of certain metabolic processes in the body.

In a medical context, guanidines are most commonly associated with the treatment of muscle weakness and neuromuscular disorders. The most well-known guanidine compound is probably guanidine hydrochloride, which has been used as a medication to treat conditions such as myasthenia gravis and Eaton-Lambert syndrome.

However, the use of guanidines as medications has declined in recent years due to their potential for toxicity and the development of safer and more effective treatments. Today, guanidines are mainly used in research settings to study various biological processes, including protein folding and aggregation, enzyme inhibition, and cell signaling.

Magnesium is an essential mineral that plays a crucial role in various biological processes in the human body. It is the fourth most abundant cation in the body and is involved in over 300 enzymatic reactions, including protein synthesis, muscle and nerve function, blood glucose control, and blood pressure regulation. Magnesium also contributes to the structural development of bones and teeth.

In medical terms, magnesium deficiency can lead to several health issues, such as muscle cramps, weakness, heart arrhythmias, and seizures. On the other hand, excessive magnesium levels can cause symptoms like diarrhea, nausea, and muscle weakness. Magnesium supplements or magnesium-rich foods are often recommended to maintain optimal magnesium levels in the body.

Some common dietary sources of magnesium include leafy green vegetables, nuts, seeds, legumes, whole grains, and dairy products. Magnesium is also available in various forms as a dietary supplement, including magnesium oxide, magnesium citrate, magnesium chloride, and magnesium glycinate.

Phosphorylase Kinase (PhK) is a key enzyme in the regulation of glycogen metabolism, primarily involved in the breakdown of glycogen to glucose-1-phosphate. It is a serine/threonine protein kinase that catalyzes the phosphorylation of glycogen phosphorylase b, an isoform of glycogen phosphorylase, converting it into its active form, glycogen phosphorylase a.

PhK is composed of four different subunits: α, β, γ, and δ. The γ subunit contains the catalytic site, while the other subunits play regulatory roles. PhK itself can be activated by calcium ions (Ca2+) and protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation.

Phosphorylase Kinase is primarily located in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle cells, where it plays a crucial role in regulating energy production during muscle contraction and relaxation. Dysregulation or mutations in PhK have been implicated in several genetic disorders, such as Debré-akaki syndrome, which is characterized by muscle weakness and cardiac abnormalities.

Immunoblotting, also known as western blotting, is a laboratory technique used in molecular biology and immunogenetics to detect and quantify specific proteins in a complex mixture. This technique combines the electrophoretic separation of proteins by gel electrophoresis with their detection using antibodies that recognize specific epitopes (protein fragments) on the target protein.

The process involves several steps: first, the protein sample is separated based on size through sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Next, the separated proteins are transferred onto a nitrocellulose or polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane using an electric field. The membrane is then blocked with a blocking agent to prevent non-specific binding of antibodies.

After blocking, the membrane is incubated with a primary antibody that specifically recognizes the target protein. Following this, the membrane is washed to remove unbound primary antibodies and then incubated with a secondary antibody conjugated to an enzyme such as horseradish peroxidase (HRP) or alkaline phosphatase (AP). The enzyme catalyzes a colorimetric or chemiluminescent reaction that allows for the detection of the target protein.

Immunoblotting is widely used in research and clinical settings to study protein expression, post-translational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and disease biomarkers. It provides high specificity and sensitivity, making it a valuable tool for identifying and quantifying proteins in various biological samples.

Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 5 (CDK5) is a type of protein kinase that plays crucial roles in the regulation of various cellular processes, particularly in neurons. Unlike other cyclin-dependent kinases, CDK5 is activated by associating with regulatory subunits called cyclins, specifically cyclin I and cyclin D1, but not during the cell cycle.

CDK5 activity is primarily involved in the development and functioning of the nervous system, where it regulates neuronal migration, differentiation, and synaptic plasticity. It has been implicated in several neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and various neurodevelopmental conditions.

CDK5 activity is tightly regulated by phosphorylation and interacting partners. Dysregulation of CDK5 can lead to abnormal neuronal function and contribute to the pathogenesis of neurological disorders.

Iodoacetates are salts or esters of iodoacetic acid, an organic compound containing iodine. In medicine, iodoacetates have been used as topical antiseptics and anti-inflammatory agents. However, their use is limited due to potential skin irritation and the availability of safer alternatives.

In a broader context, iodoacetates are also known for their chemical properties. They can act as alkylating agents, which means they can react with proteins and enzymes in living organisms, disrupting their function. This property has been exploited in research to study various cellular processes.

'Tumor cells, cultured' refers to the process of removing cancerous cells from a tumor and growing them in controlled laboratory conditions. This is typically done by isolating the tumor cells from a patient's tissue sample, then placing them in a nutrient-rich environment that promotes their growth and multiplication.

The resulting cultured tumor cells can be used for various research purposes, including the study of cancer biology, drug development, and toxicity testing. They provide a valuable tool for researchers to better understand the behavior and characteristics of cancer cells outside of the human body, which can lead to the development of more effective cancer treatments.

It is important to note that cultured tumor cells may not always behave exactly the same way as they do in the human body, so findings from cell culture studies must be validated through further research, such as animal models or clinical trials.

A cell line that is derived from tumor cells and has been adapted to grow in culture. These cell lines are often used in research to study the characteristics of cancer cells, including their growth patterns, genetic changes, and responses to various treatments. They can be established from many different types of tumors, such as carcinomas, sarcomas, and leukemias. Once established, these cell lines can be grown and maintained indefinitely in the laboratory, allowing researchers to conduct experiments and studies that would not be feasible using primary tumor cells. It is important to note that tumor cell lines may not always accurately represent the behavior of the original tumor, as they can undergo genetic changes during their time in culture.

Hydrogen-ion concentration, also known as pH, is a measure of the acidity or basicity of a solution. It is defined as the negative logarithm (to the base 10) of the hydrogen ion activity in a solution. The standard unit of measurement is the pH unit. A pH of 7 is neutral, less than 7 is acidic, and greater than 7 is basic.

In medical terms, hydrogen-ion concentration is important for maintaining homeostasis within the body. For example, in the stomach, a high hydrogen-ion concentration (low pH) is necessary for the digestion of food. However, in other parts of the body such as blood, a high hydrogen-ion concentration can be harmful and lead to acidosis. Conversely, a low hydrogen-ion concentration (high pH) in the blood can lead to alkalosis. Both acidosis and alkalosis can have serious consequences on various organ systems if not corrected.

Oxidative phosphorylation is the metabolic process by which cells use enzymes to generate energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from the oxidation of nutrients, such as glucose or fatty acids. This process occurs in the inner mitochondrial membrane of eukaryotic cells and is facilitated by the electron transport chain, which consists of a series of protein complexes that transfer electrons from donor molecules to acceptor molecules. As the electrons are passed along the chain, they release energy that is used to pump protons across the membrane, creating a gradient. The ATP synthase enzyme then uses the flow of protons back across the membrane to generate ATP, which serves as the main energy currency for cellular processes.

Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA) is a technique used in thermoanalysis to study the physical and chemical changes that occur in a material as it is heated or cooled. It measures the difference in temperature between a sample and a reference material, both of which are subjected to the same temperature program.

In DTA, the sample and reference material are placed in separate but identical holders, and the temperature of the reference material is kept constant while the temperature of the sample is increased or decreased at a controlled rate. As the sample undergoes physical or chemical changes, such as phase transitions or chemical reactions, it absorbs or releases heat, causing its temperature to change relative to the reference material.

The DTA curve plots the temperature difference between the sample and the reference material against time or temperature. The resulting curve provides information about the thermal behavior of the sample, including any endothermic or exothermic reactions that occur as it is heated or cooled. Endothermic reactions, which require heat input, are indicated by a negative deflection in the DTA curve, while exothermic reactions, which release heat, are indicated by a positive deflection.

DTA is widely used in materials science, chemistry, and physics to study the thermal properties of materials, including their phase transitions, melting points, crystallization behavior, and chemical stability. It can also be used to identify unknown materials or to characterize the purity of a sample.

Molecular weight, also known as molecular mass, is the mass of a molecule. It is expressed in units of atomic mass units (amu) or daltons (Da). Molecular weight is calculated by adding up the atomic weights of each atom in a molecule. It is a useful property in chemistry and biology, as it can be used to determine the concentration of a substance in a solution, or to calculate the amount of a substance that will react with another in a chemical reaction.

Chromones are a type of chemical compound that contain a benzopyran ring, which is a structural component made up of a benzene ring fused to a pyran ring. They can be found in various plants and have been used in medicine for their anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and antitussive (cough suppressant) properties. Some chromones are also known to have estrogenic activity and have been studied for their potential use in hormone replacement therapy. Additionally, some synthetic chromones have been developed as drugs for the treatment of asthma and other respiratory disorders.

Cell division is the process by which a single eukaryotic cell (a cell with a true nucleus) divides into two identical daughter cells. This complex process involves several stages, including replication of DNA, separation of chromosomes, and division of the cytoplasm. There are two main types of cell division: mitosis and meiosis.

Mitosis is the type of cell division that results in two genetically identical daughter cells. It is a fundamental process for growth, development, and tissue repair in multicellular organisms. The stages of mitosis include prophase, prometaphase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase, followed by cytokinesis, which divides the cytoplasm.

Meiosis, on the other hand, is a type of cell division that occurs in the gonads (ovaries and testes) during the production of gametes (sex cells). Meiosis results in four genetically unique daughter cells, each with half the number of chromosomes as the parent cell. This process is essential for sexual reproduction and genetic diversity. The stages of meiosis include meiosis I and meiosis II, which are further divided into prophase, prometaphase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase.

In summary, cell division is the process by which a single cell divides into two daughter cells, either through mitosis or meiosis. This process is critical for growth, development, tissue repair, and sexual reproduction in multicellular organisms.

Cell differentiation is the process by which a less specialized cell, or stem cell, becomes a more specialized cell type with specific functions and structures. This process involves changes in gene expression, which are regulated by various intracellular signaling pathways and transcription factors. Differentiation results in the development of distinct cell types that make up tissues and organs in multicellular organisms. It is a crucial aspect of embryonic development, tissue repair, and maintenance of homeostasis in the body.

Electrophoresis is a laboratory technique used in the field of molecular biology and chemistry to separate charged particles, such as DNA, RNA, or proteins, based on their size and charge. This technique uses an electric field to drive the movement of these charged particles through a medium, such as gel or liquid.

In electrophoresis, the sample containing the particles to be separated is placed in a matrix, such as a gel or a capillary tube, and an electric current is applied. The particles in the sample have a net charge, either positive or negative, which causes them to move through the matrix towards the oppositely charged electrode.

The rate at which the particles move through the matrix depends on their size and charge. Larger particles move more slowly than smaller ones, and particles with a higher charge-to-mass ratio move faster than those with a lower charge-to-mass ratio. By comparing the distance that each particle travels in the matrix, researchers can identify and quantify the different components of a mixture.

Electrophoresis has many applications in molecular biology and medicine, including DNA sequencing, genetic fingerprinting, protein analysis, and diagnosis of genetic disorders.

Ion exchange chromatography is a type of chromatography technique used to separate and analyze charged molecules (ions) based on their ability to exchange bound ions in a solid resin or gel with ions of similar charge in the mobile phase. The stationary phase, often called an ion exchanger, contains fixed ated functional groups that can attract counter-ions of opposite charge from the sample mixture.

In this technique, the sample is loaded onto an ion exchange column containing the charged resin or gel. As the sample moves through the column, ions in the sample compete for binding sites on the stationary phase with ions already present in the column. The ions that bind most strongly to the stationary phase will elute (come off) slower than those that bind more weakly.

Ion exchange chromatography can be performed using either cation exchangers, which exchange positive ions (cations), or anion exchangers, which exchange negative ions (anions). The pH and ionic strength of the mobile phase can be adjusted to control the binding and elution of specific ions.

Ion exchange chromatography is widely used in various applications such as water treatment, protein purification, and chemical analysis.

I couldn't find a specific medical definition for "running" as an exercise or physical activity. However, in a medical or clinical context, running usually refers to the act of moving at a steady speed by lifting and setting down each foot in turn, allowing for a faster motion than walking. It is often used as a form of exercise, recreation, or transportation.

Running can be described medically in terms of its biomechanics, physiological effects, and potential health benefits or risks. For instance, running involves the repetitive movement of the lower extremities, which can lead to increased heart rate, respiratory rate, and metabolic demand, ultimately improving cardiovascular fitness and burning calories. However, it is also associated with potential injuries such as runner's knee, shin splints, or plantar fasciitis, especially if proper precautions are not taken.

It is important to note that before starting any new exercise regimen, including running, individuals should consult their healthcare provider, particularly those with pre-existing medical conditions or concerns about their ability to engage in physical activity safely.

Activation analysis is a technique used in medical and scientific research to analyze the composition of materials by measuring the radiation emitted from a sample that has been exposed to an intense source of radiation, such as a nuclear reactor or a particle accelerator. This process causes some of the atoms in the sample to become "activated," meaning they transform into unstable isotopes that emit gamma rays or other subatomic particles as they decay back to a stable state.

By measuring the energy and intensity of these emissions, researchers can identify the elements present in the sample and determine their relative abundances. Activation analysis can be used to analyze a wide range of materials, including biological tissues, environmental samples, and archaeological artifacts, and it has applications in fields such as forensics, geology, and nuclear medicine.

It is important to note that activation analysis involves handling radioactive materials and requires specialized training and equipment to ensure safety and accuracy.

A "knockout" mouse is a genetically engineered mouse in which one or more genes have been deleted or "knocked out" using molecular biology techniques. This allows researchers to study the function of specific genes and their role in various biological processes, as well as potential associations with human diseases. The mice are generated by introducing targeted DNA modifications into embryonic stem cells, which are then used to create a live animal. Knockout mice have been widely used in biomedical research to investigate gene function, disease mechanisms, and potential therapeutic targets.

A precipitin test is a type of immunodiagnostic test used to detect and measure the presence of specific antibodies or antigens in a patient's serum. The test is based on the principle of antigen-antibody interaction, where the addition of an antigen to a solution containing its corresponding antibody results in the formation of an insoluble immune complex known as a precipitin.

In this test, a small amount of the patient's serum is added to a solution containing a known antigen or antibody. If the patient has antibodies or antigens that correspond to the added reagent, they will bind and form a visible precipitate. The size and density of the precipitate can be used to quantify the amount of antibody or antigen present in the sample.

Precipitin tests are commonly used in the diagnosis of various infectious diseases, autoimmune disorders, and allergies. They can also be used in forensic science to identify biological samples. However, they have largely been replaced by more modern immunological techniques such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and radioimmunoassays (RIAs).

Succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase, also known as hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.16), is an enzyme involved in the metabolism of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). This enzyme catalyzes the oxidation of succinic semialdehyde to succinate, which is a key step in the GABA degradation pathway.

Deficiency in this enzyme can lead to an accumulation of succinic semialdehyde and its downstream metabolite, gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB), resulting in neurological symptoms such as developmental delay, hypotonia, seizures, and movement disorders. GHB is a naturally occurring neurotransmitter and also a recreational drug known as "Grievous Bodily Harm" or "Liquid Ecstasy."

The gene that encodes for succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase is located on chromosome 6 (6p22.3) and has been identified as ALDH5A1. Mutations in this gene can lead to succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency, which is an autosomal recessive disorder.

Cell cycle proteins are a group of regulatory proteins that control the progression of the cell cycle, which is the series of events that take place in a eukaryotic cell leading to its division and duplication. These proteins can be classified into several categories based on their functions during different stages of the cell cycle.

The major groups of cell cycle proteins include:

1. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs): CDKs are serine/threonine protein kinases that regulate key transitions in the cell cycle. They require binding to a regulatory subunit called cyclin to become active. Different CDK-cyclin complexes are activated at different stages of the cell cycle.
2. Cyclins: Cyclins are a family of regulatory proteins that bind and activate CDKs. Their levels fluctuate throughout the cell cycle, with specific cyclins expressed during particular phases. For example, cyclin D is important for the G1 to S phase transition, while cyclin B is required for the G2 to M phase transition.
3. CDK inhibitors (CKIs): CKIs are regulatory proteins that bind to and inhibit CDKs, thereby preventing their activation. CKIs can be divided into two main families: the INK4 family and the Cip/Kip family. INK4 family members specifically inhibit CDK4 and CDK6, while Cip/Kip family members inhibit a broader range of CDKs.
4. Anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C): APC/C is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets specific proteins for degradation by the 26S proteasome. During the cell cycle, APC/C regulates the metaphase to anaphase transition and the exit from mitosis by targeting securin and cyclin B for degradation.
5. Other regulatory proteins: Several other proteins play crucial roles in regulating the cell cycle, such as p53, a transcription factor that responds to DNA damage and arrests the cell cycle, and the polo-like kinases (PLKs), which are involved in various aspects of mitosis.

Overall, cell cycle proteins work together to ensure the proper progression of the cell cycle, maintain genomic stability, and prevent uncontrolled cell growth, which can lead to cancer.

Nucleoside-phosphate kinase (NPK) is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the synthesis and metabolism of nucleotides, which are the building blocks of DNA and RNA. NPK catalyzes the transfer of a phosphate group from a donor molecule, typically ATP, to a nucleoside or deoxynucleoside, forming a nucleoside monophosphate (NMP) or deoxynucleoside monophosphate (dNMP).

There are several isoforms of NPK found in different cellular compartments and tissues, each with distinct substrate specificities. These enzymes play essential roles in maintaining the balance of nucleotides required for various cellular processes, including DNA replication, repair, and transcription, as well as RNA synthesis and metabolism.

Abnormalities in NPK activity or expression have been implicated in several human diseases, such as cancer, viral infections, and neurological disorders. Therefore, understanding the function and regulation of NPK is crucial for developing novel therapeutic strategies to target these conditions.

Macromolecular substances, also known as macromolecules, are large, complex molecules made up of repeating subunits called monomers. These substances are formed through polymerization, a process in which many small molecules combine to form a larger one. Macromolecular substances can be naturally occurring, such as proteins, DNA, and carbohydrates, or synthetic, such as plastics and synthetic fibers.

In the context of medicine, macromolecular substances are often used in the development of drugs and medical devices. For example, some drugs are designed to bind to specific macromolecules in the body, such as proteins or DNA, in order to alter their function and produce a therapeutic effect. Additionally, macromolecular substances may be used in the creation of medical implants, such as artificial joints and heart valves, due to their strength and durability.

It is important for healthcare professionals to have an understanding of macromolecular substances and how they function in the body, as this knowledge can inform the development and use of medical treatments.

MAP Kinase Kinase 6 (MAP2K6) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that plays a crucial role in intracellular signaling transduction pathways. It is also known as MKK6 or MITogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase 6. This enzyme is a member of the MAPK kinase family, which activates mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) by phosphorylating their activation loop residues.

MAP2K6 specifically activates p38 MAPK, another serine/threonine protein kinase involved in various cellular responses to stress stimuli, cytokines, and hormones. The MAP2K6-p38 MAPK signaling pathway is essential for regulating processes such as inflammation, differentiation, apoptosis, and autophagy. Dysregulation of this pathway has been implicated in several diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and neurodegenerative disorders.

Oxygen consumption, also known as oxygen uptake, is the amount of oxygen that is consumed or utilized by the body during a specific period of time, usually measured in liters per minute (L/min). It is a common measurement used in exercise physiology and critical care medicine to assess an individual's aerobic metabolism and overall health status.

In clinical settings, oxygen consumption is often measured during cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) to evaluate cardiovascular function, pulmonary function, and exercise capacity in patients with various medical conditions such as heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and other respiratory or cardiac disorders.

During exercise, oxygen is consumed by the muscles to generate energy through a process called oxidative phosphorylation. The amount of oxygen consumed during exercise can provide important information about an individual's fitness level, exercise capacity, and overall health status. Additionally, measuring oxygen consumption can help healthcare providers assess the effectiveness of treatments and rehabilitation programs in patients with various medical conditions.

DNA-binding proteins are a type of protein that have the ability to bind to DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid), the genetic material of organisms. These proteins play crucial roles in various biological processes, such as regulation of gene expression, DNA replication, repair and recombination.

The binding of DNA-binding proteins to specific DNA sequences is mediated by non-covalent interactions, including electrostatic, hydrogen bonding, and van der Waals forces. The specificity of binding is determined by the recognition of particular nucleotide sequences or structural features of the DNA molecule.

DNA-binding proteins can be classified into several categories based on their structure and function, such as transcription factors, histones, and restriction enzymes. Transcription factors are a major class of DNA-binding proteins that regulate gene expression by binding to specific DNA sequences in the promoter region of genes and recruiting other proteins to modulate transcription. Histones are DNA-binding proteins that package DNA into nucleosomes, the basic unit of chromatin structure. Restriction enzymes are DNA-binding proteins that recognize and cleave specific DNA sequences, and are widely used in molecular biology research and biotechnology applications.

C57BL/6 (C57 Black 6) is an inbred strain of laboratory mouse that is widely used in biomedical research. The term "inbred" refers to a strain of animals where matings have been carried out between siblings or other closely related individuals for many generations, resulting in a population that is highly homozygous at most genetic loci.

The C57BL/6 strain was established in 1920 by crossing a female mouse from the dilute brown (DBA) strain with a male mouse from the black strain. The resulting offspring were then interbred for many generations to create the inbred C57BL/6 strain.

C57BL/6 mice are known for their robust health, longevity, and ease of handling, making them a popular choice for researchers. They have been used in a wide range of biomedical research areas, including studies of cancer, immunology, neuroscience, cardiovascular disease, and metabolism.

One of the most notable features of the C57BL/6 strain is its sensitivity to certain genetic modifications, such as the introduction of mutations that lead to obesity or impaired glucose tolerance. This has made it a valuable tool for studying the genetic basis of complex diseases and traits.

Overall, the C57BL/6 inbred mouse strain is an important model organism in biomedical research, providing a valuable resource for understanding the genetic and molecular mechanisms underlying human health and disease.

Blood chemical analysis, also known as clinical chemistry or chemistry panel, is a series of tests that measure the levels of various chemicals in the blood. These tests can help evaluate the function of organs such as the kidneys and liver, and can also detect conditions such as diabetes and heart disease.

The tests typically include:

* Glucose: to check for diabetes
* Electrolytes (such as sodium, potassium, chloride, and bicarbonate): to check the body's fluid and electrolyte balance
* Calcium: to check for problems with bones, nerves, or kidneys
* Creatinine: to check for kidney function
* Urea Nitrogen (BUN): to check for kidney function
* Albumin: to check for liver function and nutrition status
* ALT (Alanine Transaminase) and AST (Aspartate Transaminase): to check for liver function
* Alkaline Phosphatase: to check for liver or bone disease
* Total Bilirubin: to check for liver function and gallbladder function
* Cholesterol: to check for heart disease risk
* Triglycerides: to check for heart disease risk

These tests are usually ordered by a doctor as part of a routine check-up, or to help diagnose and monitor specific medical conditions. The results of the blood chemical analysis are compared to reference ranges provided by the laboratory performing the test, which take into account factors such as age, sex, and race.

Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is a key secondary messenger in many biological processes, including the regulation of metabolism, gene expression, and cellular excitability. It is synthesized from adenosine triphosphate (ATP) by the enzyme adenylyl cyclase and is degraded by the enzyme phosphodiesterase.

In the body, cAMP plays a crucial role in mediating the effects of hormones and neurotransmitters on target cells. For example, when a hormone binds to its receptor on the surface of a cell, it can activate a G protein, which in turn activates adenylyl cyclase to produce cAMP. The increased levels of cAMP then activate various effector proteins, such as protein kinases, which go on to regulate various cellular processes.

Overall, the regulation of cAMP levels is critical for maintaining proper cellular function and homeostasis, and abnormalities in cAMP signaling have been implicated in a variety of diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

A salt gland is a type of exocrine gland found in certain animals, including birds and reptiles, that helps regulate the balance of salt and water in their bodies. These glands are capable of excreting a highly concentrated solution of sodium chloride, or salt, which allows these animals to drink seawater and still maintain the proper osmotic balance in their tissues.

In birds, salt glands are typically located near the eyes and are responsible for producing tears that contain high levels of salt. These tears then drain into the nasal passages and are eventually expelled from the body. In reptiles, salt glands can be found in various locations, depending on the species, but they serve the same function of helping to regulate salt and water balance.

It's worth noting that mammals do not have salt glands and must rely on other mechanisms to regulate their salt and water balance, such as through the kidneys and the production of sweat.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Morpholines" is not a medical term. It is a chemical term that refers to a class of heterocyclic organic compounds containing one nitrogen atom and one oxygen atom in the ring. They are widely used as intermediates in the synthesis of various pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and dyes. If you have any questions about a medical issue or term, I'd be happy to try to help answer those for you!

Casein Kinase 1 (CK1) is a type of serine/threonine protein kinase that plays a crucial role in various cellular processes, including the regulation of circadian rhythms, signal transduction, and DNA damage response. CK1 phosphorylates specific serine or threonine residues on its target proteins, thereby modulating their activity, localization, or stability.

There are several isoforms of CK1, including CK1α, CK1δ, CK1ε, and CK1γ, which exhibit distinct subcellular distributions and functions. Dysregulation of CK1 has been implicated in several human diseases, such as cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and metabolic syndromes. Therefore, understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying CK1 function is essential for developing novel therapeutic strategies to treat these conditions.

Dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB) is a chemical compound that is often used in laboratory settings for research purposes. It is an aromatic organic compound that contains two nitro groups and a fluorine atom attached to a benzene ring. Dinitrofluorobenzene is primarily known for its ability to act as a hapten, which means it can bind to proteins in the body and stimulate an immune response.

In medical research, DNFB has been used as a contact sensitizer to study the mechanisms of allergic contact dermatitis, a type of skin reaction that occurs when the immune system becomes sensitized to a particular substance and then reacts to it upon subsequent exposure. When applied to the skin, DNFB can cause a red, itchy, and painful rash in individuals who have been previously sensitized to the compound. By studying this reaction, researchers can gain insights into the immune responses that underlie allergic reactions more broadly.

It is important to note that dinitrofluorobenzene is not used as a therapeutic agent in clinical medicine and should only be handled by trained professionals in a controlled laboratory setting due to its potential hazards, including skin and eye irritation, respiratory problems, and potential long-term health effects.

MAP Kinase Kinase 3 (MKK3) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that plays a crucial role in intracellular signaling pathways, particularly in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades. MAPK cascades are evolutionarily conserved signal transduction modules that regulate various cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation, survival, and stress responses.

MKK3 is specifically involved in the p38 MAPK signaling pathway, which responds to diverse stimuli such as cytokines, environmental stresses, and inflammatory mediators. Upon activation, MKK3 phosphorylates and activates p38 MAPK, leading to the regulation of downstream targets that mediate various cellular responses.

In summary, MAP Kinase Kinase 3 (MKK3) is a protein kinase involved in the p38 MAPK signaling pathway, which regulates essential cellular processes in response to extracellular signals and stresses.

Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 8 (MAPK8), also known as JNK1 (c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1), is a serine/threonine protein kinase that plays a crucial role in signal transduction pathways involved in various cellular processes, including inflammation, differentiation, apoptosis, and stress response. It is activated by dual phosphorylation on its threonine and tyrosine residues in the activation loop by upstream MAP2Ks (MKK4/SEK1 and MKK7). Once activated, MAPK8 can phosphorylate and regulate the activity of various transcription factors, such as c-Jun, ATF-2, and ELK1, thereby modulating gene expression. Dysregulation of this kinase has been implicated in several pathological conditions, including cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and inflammatory disorders.

An immunoassay is a biochemical test that measures the presence or concentration of a specific protein, antibody, or antigen in a sample using the principles of antibody-antigen reactions. It is commonly used in clinical laboratories to diagnose and monitor various medical conditions such as infections, hormonal disorders, allergies, and cancer.

Immunoassays typically involve the use of labeled reagents, such as enzymes, radioisotopes, or fluorescent dyes, that bind specifically to the target molecule. The amount of label detected is proportional to the concentration of the target molecule in the sample, allowing for quantitative analysis.

There are several types of immunoassays, including enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), radioimmunoassay (RIA), fluorescence immunoassay (FIA), and chemiluminescent immunoassay (CLIA). Each type has its own advantages and limitations, depending on the sensitivity, specificity, and throughput required for a particular application.

Skeletal muscle fibers, also known as striated muscle fibers, are the type of muscle cells that make up skeletal muscles, which are responsible for voluntary movements of the body. These muscle fibers are long, cylindrical, and multinucleated, meaning they contain multiple nuclei. They are surrounded by a connective tissue layer called the endomysium, and many fibers are bundled together into fascicles, which are then surrounded by another layer of connective tissue called the perimysium.

Skeletal muscle fibers are composed of myofibrils, which are long, thread-like structures that run the length of the fiber. Myofibrils contain repeating units called sarcomeres, which are responsible for the striated appearance of skeletal muscle fibers. Sarcomeres are composed of thick and thin filaments, which slide past each other during muscle contraction to shorten the sarcomere and generate force.

Skeletal muscle fibers can be further classified into two main types based on their contractile properties: slow-twitch (type I) and fast-twitch (type II). Slow-twitch fibers have a high endurance capacity and are used for sustained, low-intensity activities such as maintaining posture. Fast-twitch fibers, on the other hand, have a higher contractile speed and force generation capacity but fatigue more quickly and are used for powerful, explosive movements.

Aurora Kinase A is a type of serine/threonine kinase that plays a crucial role in the regulation of cell division and mitosis. It is encoded by the AURKA gene in humans. This enzyme is responsible for proper chromosome alignment and segregation during mitosis, and its dysregulation has been implicated in various types of cancer. Aurora Kinase A is often overexpressed in cancer cells, leading to chromosomal instability and aneuploidy, which contribute to tumor growth and progression. Inhibitors of Aurora Kinase A are being investigated as potential cancer therapeutics.

3-Phosphoinositide-Dependent Protein Kinases (PDPKs) are a family of serine/threonine protein kinases that play crucial roles in regulating various cellular processes, including cell survival, proliferation, and metabolism. They are named after their ability to phosphorylate and activate downstream targets in response to the binding of 3-phosphoinositides, which are lipid second messengers generated by the activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3Ks).

PDPKs consist of two main isoforms: PDPK1 and PDK2. PDPK1 is also known as the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2) associated protein, mSin1 kinase, or Rictor-binding protein. It primarily phosphorylates and activates AGC kinases, such as Akt/PKB, p70 S6 kinase, and protein kinase C (PKC). PDK2, on the other hand, is also known as ILK-associated kinase (ILKAP) or PDPK2. It primarily phosphorylates and activates PKC isoforms.

PDPKs are often deregulated in various human diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders. Therefore, they represent potential therapeutic targets for the development of novel drugs to treat these conditions.

Focal Adhesion Kinase 2 (FAK2), also known as Protein Tyrosine Kinase 2 beta (PTK2B), is a cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase that plays a crucial role in various cellular processes, including cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, and survival. FAK2 is structurally similar to Focal Adhesion Kinase 1 (FAK1 or PTK2A) but has distinct functions and expression patterns.

FAK2 contains several functional domains, such as an N-terminal FERM domain, a central kinase domain, a C-terminal focal adhesion targeting (FAT) domain, and proline-rich regions that interact with various signaling proteins. FAK2 is activated by autophosphorylation at the Y397 residue upon integrin clustering or growth factor receptor activation, which leads to the recruitment of downstream effectors and the initiation of intracellular signaling cascades.

FAK2 has been implicated in several pathological conditions, such as cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and cardiovascular disorders. In cancer, FAK2 overexpression or hyperactivation promotes tumor cell survival, invasion, and metastasis, making it an attractive therapeutic target for anticancer therapy. However, the role of FAK2 in physiological processes is still not fully understood and requires further investigation.

Genetic transcription is the process by which the information in a strand of DNA is used to create a complementary RNA molecule. This process is the first step in gene expression, where the genetic code in DNA is converted into a form that can be used to produce proteins or functional RNAs.

During transcription, an enzyme called RNA polymerase binds to the DNA template strand and reads the sequence of nucleotide bases. As it moves along the template, it adds complementary RNA nucleotides to the growing RNA chain, creating a single-stranded RNA molecule that is complementary to the DNA template strand. Once transcription is complete, the RNA molecule may undergo further processing before it can be translated into protein or perform its functional role in the cell.

Transcription can be either "constitutive" or "regulated." Constitutive transcription occurs at a relatively constant rate and produces essential proteins that are required for basic cellular functions. Regulated transcription, on the other hand, is subject to control by various intracellular and extracellular signals, allowing cells to respond to changing environmental conditions or developmental cues.

Macro-CK type 2 is formed from mitochondrial CK polymer. Macro-CK type 1 has been associated with autoimmune and other chronic ... Macro-CK type 1 is a complex formed by one of the creatine kinase isoenzyme types, typically CK-BB, and antibodies; typically ... Macro-creatine kinase (macro-CK) is a macroenzyme, an enzyme of high molecular weight and prolonged half-life found in human ... Zhang, L; Han, F; Liu, X; Xie, C; Tian, K; Bi, Q; Hao, M; Mu, X (6 August 2020). "Macro creatine kinase in an asymptomatic ...
Fritz-Wolf K, Schnyder T, Wallimann T, Kabsch W (May 1996). "Structure of mitochondrial creatine kinase". Nature. 381 (6580): ... There are at least four different, but very closely related, forms of CK. Two isozymes, M (muscle) and B (brain), are cytosolic ... Creatine kinase (EC 2.7.3.2) (CK), which catalyses the reversible transfer of high energy phosphate from ATP to creatine, ... "Separate nuclear genes encode sarcomere-specific and ubiquitous human mitochondrial creatine kinase isoenzymes". J. Biol. Chem ...
Mitochondrial creatine kinase occurs in two different oligomeric forms: dimers and octamers, in contrast to the exclusively ... Ubiquitous mitochondrial creatine kinase has 80% homology with the coding exons of sarcomeric mitochondrial creatine kinase. ... Creatine kinase, mitochondrial 1B also known as CKMT1B is one of two genes which encode the ubiquitous mitochondrial creatine ... Schlattner U, Dolder M, Wallimann T, Tokarska-Schlattner M (2002). "Mitochondrial creatine kinase and mitochondrial outer ...
Creatine+Kinase,+Mitochondrial+Form at the U.S. National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) This article ... Creatine kinase U-type, mitochondrial, also called ubiquitous mitochondrial creatine kinase (uMtCK), is in humans encoded by ... "ASB9 interacts with ubiquitous mitochondrial creatine kinase and inhibits mitochondrial function". BMC Biology. 8: 23. doi: ... Schlattner U, Tokarska-Schlattner M, Wallimann T (February 2006). "Mitochondrial creatine kinase in human health and disease". ...
Mitochondrial creatine kinase occurs in two different oligomeric forms: dimers and octamers, in contrast to the exclusively ... Creatine kinase S-type, mitochondrial is an enzyme that in humans is encoded by the CKMT2 gene. Mitochondrial creatine kinase ( ... Sarcomeric mitochondrial creatine kinase has 80% homology with the coding exons of ubiquitous mitochondrial creatine kinase. ... "Entrez Gene: CKMT2 creatine kinase, mitochondrial 2 (sarcomeric)". Human CKMT2 genome location and CKMT2 gene details page in ...
... there are two mitochondrial creatine kinase isoenzymes, the ubiquitous form and the sarcomeric form. The functional entity of ... While mitochondrial creatine kinase is directly involved in the formation of phosphocreatine from mitochondrial ATP, cytosolic ... Mitochondrial creatine kinase (CKm) is present in the mitochondrial intermembrane space, where it regenerates phosphocreatine ( ... Creatine kinase in the blood may be high in health and disease. Exercise increases the outflow of creatine kinase to the blood ...
"In vitro complex formation between the octamer of mitochondrial creatine kinase and porin". The Journal of Biological Chemistry ... VDACs can also oligomerize to form part of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) and, thus, facilitate ... It forms an ion channel in the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) and also the outer cell membrane. In the OMM, it allows ATP ... "Glycogen synthase kinase 3-mediated voltage-dependent anion channel phosphorylation controls outer mitochondrial membrane ...
Schlattner U, Tokarska-Schlattner M, Wallimann T (2006). "Mitochondrial creatine kinase in human health and disease". ... A 70 kg man contains around 120 g of creatine, with 40% being the unphosphorylated form and 60% as creatine phosphate. Of that ... is catalyzed by several creatine kinases. The presence of creatine kinase (CK-MB, creatine kinase myocardial band) in blood ... Phosphocreatine, also known as creatine phosphate (CP) or PCr (Pcr), is a phosphorylated form of creatine that serves as a ...
The ATP-dependent cytosolic enzymes hexokinase, glucokinase, and glycerol kinase, as well as the mitochondrial enzyme creatine ... This protein contains about 280 amino acids and forms a beta barrel which spans the mitochondrial outer membrane. Since its ... This major protein of the outer mitochondrial membrane of eukaryotes forms a voltage-dependent anion-selective channel (VDAC) ... Voltage-dependent anion channels, or mitochondrial porins, are a class of porin ion channel located on the outer mitochondrial ...
... and high levels of lactate and creatine kinase. The parents were found to be heterozygous carriers for the mutation. A third ... Mutations in NDUFAF1 can result in mitochondrial deficiencies and associated disorders. A disorder of the mitochondrial ... and some forms of Parkinson disease. In a patient with missense mutations in NDUFAF1, fatal infantile hypertrophic ... Wu L, Peng J, Ma Y, He F, Deng X, Wang G, Lifen Y, Yin F (2016). "Leukodystrophy associated with mitochondrial complex I ...
The reactions catalyzed by cytosolic (soluble) and mitochondrial GPDH are as follows: There are two forms of GPDH: The ... substrate pages: glycerol 3-phosphate, dihydroxyacetone phosphate related topics: glycerol phosphate shuttle, creatine kinase, ... In conjunction, Mitochondrial GPDH, or GPD2, is embedded on the outer surface of the inner mitochondrial membrane, overlooking ... The mitochondrial isoform of G3P dehydrogenase is thought to be inhibited by metformin, a first line drug for type 2 diabetes. ...
EMG is either normal or may show myopathic low amplitude and short motor unit's potential (MUAPS). The enzymes creatine kinase ... The adult-onset form of this syndrome is Hoffmann syndrome. Some sources claim that two of the differentiating symptoms between ... This may occur as a result of reduction in muscle mitochondrial oxidative capacity and beta-adrenergic receptors, as well as ... clinical and histopathological features of the major forms". Acta Myologica. 39 (3): 130-135. doi:10.36185/2532-1900-017. ISSN ...
A blood test for creatine kinase (CK) can be done under normal circumstances to test for signs of tissue breakdown, or with an ... Mitochondrial myopathy-defect in mitochondrial enzymes or transport proteins for oxidative phosphorylation (including citric ... Those who do not develop a form of a metabolic myopathy until they are in their young adult or adult life tend to have more ... Occurs in the mitochondrial membrane or within the mitochondrion of the muscle cell. The symptoms of a metabolic myopathy can ...
... releasing intracellular muscle content into the blood as reflected by elevated blood levels of creatine kinase. Exercise ... The mitochondrial respiratory chain complex III catalyses electron transfer to cytochrome c. Complex III is embedded in the ... Chronic pain that makes a person unwilling to undertake physical activity is not, by itself, a form of exercise intolerance. ... Barel, Ortal (2008). "Mitochondrial Complex III Deficiency Associated with a Homozygous Mutation in UQCRQ". The American ...
Creatine kinase (CK) blood level is often ordered when muscle damage is suspected. CK is an enzyme found in muscle, leaking ... Another form of operative scapular fixation is scapulopexy. "Scapulo-" refers to the scapula bone, and "-pexy" is derived from ... mitochondrial myopathy, Pompe disease, and polymyositis. Calpainopathy and scapuloperoneal myopathy, like FSHD, present with ... Casein kinase 1 (CK1) inhibition has been identified by Facio Therapies, a Dutch pharmaceutical company, to repress DUX4 ...
... additionally also serum creatine kinase may be mildly above normal. Other exams/methods to ascertain if the individual has ... Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD) is a form of congenital muscular dystrophy. There are two forms: UCMD1 and UCMD2. ... Bernardi, Paolo; Bonaldo, Paolo (May 2013). "Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Defective Autophagy in the Pathogenesis of Collagen ... a cellular study of mitochondrial dysfunction and its rescue" (PDF). Brain. 132 (1): 147-155. doi:10.1093/brain/awn289. PMID ...
After creation of the dTMP molecule, another kinase, thymidylate kinase, can act upon dTMP to create the diphosphate form, dTDP ... Patients with mutations in the thymidine kinase gene may have a certain type of mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome, a disease ... Other small molecules that are substrates of kinases include creatine, phosphoglycerate, riboflavin, dihydroxyacetone, ... Kinases are classified into broad groups by the substrate they act upon: protein kinases, lipid kinases, carbohydrate kinases. ...
... resource is short lasting because oxygen is required for the resynthesis of phosphocreatine via mitochondrial creatine kinase. ... lifestyle intervention and specific forms of exercise to rehabilitate and manage acute and chronic injuries and conditions. ... but the most readily depleted of the above sources is the PCr system which utilizes the enzyme creatine kinase. This enzyme ... The quick energy sources consist of the phosphocreatine (PCr) system, fast glycolysis, and adenylate kinase. All of these ...
Blood tests show a creatine kinase activity greater than 1,000 U/L, with severe disease being above 5,000-15,000 U/L. The ... Milder forms may not cause any muscle symptoms, and the diagnosis is based on abnormal blood tests in the context of other ... For instance, mitochondrial diseases are characterized by ragged red fibers. Biopsy sites may be identified by medical imaging ... The most reliable test in the diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis is the level of creatine kinase (CK) in the blood. This enzyme is ...
... itself can be phosphorylated by creatine kinase to form phosphocreatine, which is used as an energy buffer in skeletal ... Creatine's impact on mitochondrial function has led to research on its efficacy and safety for slowing Parkinson's disease. As ... A cyclic form of creatine, called creatinine, exists in equilibrium with its tautomer and with creatine. Creatine is ... Persky AM, Rawson ES (2007). "Safety of creatine supplementation". Creatine and Creatine Kinase in Health and Disease. ...
... creatine kinase and two 14-3-3 isoforms. Chloride channel GRCh38: Ensembl release 89: ENSG00000169504 - Ensembl, May 2017 ... Singh H, Ashley RH (2007). "CLIC4 (p64H1) and its putative transmembrane domain form poorly selective, redox-regulated ion ... 2006). "Quantitative proteomic analysis of myc-induced apoptosis: a direct role for Myc induction of the mitochondrial chloride ... Qian Z, Okuhara D, Abe MK, Rosner MR (1999). "Molecular cloning and characterization of a mitogen-activated protein kinase- ...
Tests can be run to check creatine kinase in the blood, which is often normal or mildly elevated in congenital myopathies. ... In its severest form, affected babies often die from respiratory failure. To date, 9 gene mutations have been found to cause ... Cylindrical spirals have also been shown to react with the mitochondrial enzyme succinate dehydrogenase, which suggests that ... Diagnosis usually relies on this method, as creatine kinase levels and electromyography can be unreliable and non-specific. ...
... note that the reaction catalyzed by creatine kinase is not considered as "substrate-level phosphorylation"). This process uses ... This combination results in either an ADP-forming succinate-CoA ligase (A-SUCL, EC 6.2.1.5) or a GDP-forming succinate-CoA ... Chinopoulos, C (2011). "Mitochondrial consumption of cytosolic ATP: not so fast". FEBS Lett. 585 (9): 1255-9. doi:10.1016/j. ... This gradient is exploited by ATP synthase acting as a pore, allowing H+ from the mitochondrial intermembrane space to move ...
... creatine kinase), kidney damage (uric acid), and stress damage (cortisol). Their findings suggested that high levels of plasma ... They found evidence that the supplementation positively affects mitochondrial deficiency syndrome and the symptoms of aging. ... the reduced form of Coenzyme Q10, produced favorable responses in children with autism. Professors Crane, Navas, and ... a 2-year treatment with Coenzyme Q10 in the ubiquinone form (3 times 100 mg/day) demonstrated significant improvement in the ...
... creatine kinase, mb form MeSH D08.811.913.696.640.150.750 - creatine kinase, mitochondrial form MeSH D08.811.913.696.640.150. ... arginine kinase MeSH D08.811.913.696.640.150 - creatine kinase MeSH D08.811.913.696.640.150.500 - creatine kinase, bb form MeSH ... map kinase kinase kinase 1 MeSH D08.811.913.696.620.682.700.559.200 - map kinase kinase kinase 2 MeSH D08.811.913.696.620.682. ... map kinase kinase kinase 3 MeSH D08.811.913.696.620.682.700.559.400 - map kinase kinase kinase 4 MeSH D08.811.913.696.620.682. ...
In fact, there is evidence that VDAC binding by the anti-apoptotic HK1 and by the pro-apoptotic creatine kinase are mutually ... As one of two mitochondrial isoforms of hexokinase and a member of the sugar kinase family, HK1 catalyzes the rate-limiting and ... In the prefrontal cortex, HK1 putatively forms a protein complex with EAAT2, Na+/K+ ATPase, and aconitase, which functions to ... Activation of Akt kinase is mediated by HK1-VDAC1 coupling as part of the growth factor-mediated phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase ...
... a serine/threonine-specific protein kinase. The free acid (HMB-FA) and monohydrated calcium salt (HMB-Ca) forms of HMB have ... muscle enzymes such as creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase) in humans following intense exercise may be due to a ... α-KIC is mostly metabolized by the mitochondrial enzyme branched-chain α-ketoacid dehydrogenase, which converts it to ... HMB is sold as an over-the-counter dietary supplement in the free acid form, β-hydroxy β-methylbutyric acid (HMB-FA), and as a ...
It is possible that aberrant immune activity during critical periods of neurodevelopment is part of the mechanism of some forms ... Mitochondrial DNA Mutations Nuclear DNA mutations Biotinidase deficiency Urea cycle defects Epigenetic mechanisms may increase ... glycine amidinotransferase deficiency Guanidinoacetate methyltransferase deficiency X-linked creatine transporter defect 6-N- ... Homocystinuria Branched-chain ketoacid dehydrogenase kinase deficiency Succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency Smith- ...
Adult patients often have serum and/or urine screen positive for the presence of myoglobin and serum creatine kinase and ... Severe forms may have continual pain from general life activity. The adult form has a variable age of onset. The first ... It has been proposed that this segment mediates the association of CPT II with the inner mitochondrial membrane. Moreover, the ... This is noteworthy in light of the fact that this mutation is associated with the exercise-induced adult form (i.e., rising ...
Zong H, Ren JM, Young LH, Pypaert M, Mu J, Birnbaum MJ, Shulman GI (December 2002). "AMP kinase is required for mitochondrial ... protein kinase A). AMPK is a heterotrimeric protein complex that is formed by α, β, and γ subunits. Each of these three ... expression in skeletal muscle in response to creatine depletion. PGC-1α is a transcriptional regulator for genes involved in ... liver kinase B1 (LKB1), which works in a complex with STRAD and MO25, Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase II-( ...
Macro-CK type 2 is formed from mitochondrial CK polymer. Macro-CK type 1 has been associated with autoimmune and other chronic ... Macro-CK type 1 is a complex formed by one of the creatine kinase isoenzyme types, typically CK-BB, and antibodies; typically ... Macro-creatine kinase (macro-CK) is a macroenzyme, an enzyme of high molecular weight and prolonged half-life found in human ... Zhang, L; Han, F; Liu, X; Xie, C; Tian, K; Bi, Q; Hao, M; Mu, X (6 August 2020). "Macro creatine kinase in an asymptomatic ...
Creatine kinase levels were mildly increased. EMG and brain MRI were normal. Left quadriceps skeletal muscle biopsy showed a ... CHKB gene variants lead to loss-of-function of choline kinase b and lipid metabolism defects and mitochondrial structural ... The progression of muscle weakness was variable, with two patients having a milder phenotype and three having a severe form. ... Human choline kinase α2 was found to absolutely require Mg2+, while choline kinase ß differentially recognized choline and ...
E5.200.812.735.645.350.350.150 Creatine Kinase, Mitochondrial Form D12.776.575.186 Crossing Over, Genetic G5.355.760.210 G5.355 ... A-Form G2.111.570.790.486.128 G5.360.580.114 DNA, C-Form G2.111.570.790.486.156 G5.360.580.128 DNA, Catenated G2.111.570.790. ... D9.408.477.500 Mitochondrial ADP, ATP Translocases D12.776.543.585.475.500 Mitochondrial Proton-Translocating ATPases D12.776. ... D12.776.476.150.299.300 Casein Kinase II D12.644.360.150.600 Casein Kinases D12.644.360.150 CD4 Lymphocyte Count E1.450.375.107 ...
E5.200.812.735.645.350.350.150 Creatine Kinase, Mitochondrial Form D12.776.575.186 Crossing Over, Genetic G5.355.760.210 G5.355 ... A-Form G2.111.570.790.486.128 G5.360.580.114 DNA, C-Form G2.111.570.790.486.156 G5.360.580.128 DNA, Catenated G2.111.570.790. ... D9.408.477.500 Mitochondrial ADP, ATP Translocases D12.776.543.585.475.500 Mitochondrial Proton-Translocating ATPases D12.776. ... D12.776.476.150.299.300 Casein Kinase II D12.644.360.150.600 Casein Kinases D12.644.360.150 CD4 Lymphocyte Count E1.450.375.107 ...
E5.200.812.735.645.350.350.150 Creatine Kinase, Mitochondrial Form D12.776.575.186 Crossing Over, Genetic G5.355.760.210 G5.355 ... A-Form G2.111.570.790.486.128 G5.360.580.114 DNA, C-Form G2.111.570.790.486.156 G5.360.580.128 DNA, Catenated G2.111.570.790. ... D9.408.477.500 Mitochondrial ADP, ATP Translocases D12.776.543.585.475.500 Mitochondrial Proton-Translocating ATPases D12.776. ... D12.776.476.150.299.300 Casein Kinase II D12.644.360.150.600 Casein Kinases D12.644.360.150 CD4 Lymphocyte Count E1.450.375.107 ...
E5.200.812.735.645.350.350.150 Creatine Kinase, Mitochondrial Form D12.776.575.186 Crossing Over, Genetic G5.355.760.210 G5.355 ... A-Form G2.111.570.790.486.128 G5.360.580.114 DNA, C-Form G2.111.570.790.486.156 G5.360.580.128 DNA, Catenated G2.111.570.790. ... D9.408.477.500 Mitochondrial ADP, ATP Translocases D12.776.543.585.475.500 Mitochondrial Proton-Translocating ATPases D12.776. ... D12.776.476.150.299.300 Casein Kinase II D12.644.360.150.600 Casein Kinases D12.644.360.150 CD4 Lymphocyte Count E1.450.375.107 ...
E5.200.812.735.645.350.350.150 Creatine Kinase, Mitochondrial Form D12.776.575.186 Crossing Over, Genetic G5.355.760.210 G5.355 ... A-Form G2.111.570.790.486.128 G5.360.580.114 DNA, C-Form G2.111.570.790.486.156 G5.360.580.128 DNA, Catenated G2.111.570.790. ... D9.408.477.500 Mitochondrial ADP, ATP Translocases D12.776.543.585.475.500 Mitochondrial Proton-Translocating ATPases D12.776. ... D12.776.476.150.299.300 Casein Kinase II D12.644.360.150.600 Casein Kinases D12.644.360.150 CD4 Lymphocyte Count E1.450.375.107 ...
E5.200.812.735.645.350.350.150 Creatine Kinase, Mitochondrial Form D12.776.575.186 Crossing Over, Genetic G5.355.760.210 G5.355 ... A-Form G2.111.570.790.486.128 G5.360.580.114 DNA, C-Form G2.111.570.790.486.156 G5.360.580.128 DNA, Catenated G2.111.570.790. ... D9.408.477.500 Mitochondrial ADP, ATP Translocases D12.776.543.585.475.500 Mitochondrial Proton-Translocating ATPases D12.776. ... D12.776.476.150.299.300 Casein Kinase II D12.644.360.150.600 Casein Kinases D12.644.360.150 CD4 Lymphocyte Count E1.450.375.107 ...
E5.200.812.735.645.350.350.150 Creatine Kinase, Mitochondrial Form D12.776.575.186 Crossing Over, Genetic G5.355.760.210 G5.355 ... A-Form G2.111.570.790.486.128 G5.360.580.114 DNA, C-Form G2.111.570.790.486.156 G5.360.580.128 DNA, Catenated G2.111.570.790. ... D9.408.477.500 Mitochondrial ADP, ATP Translocases D12.776.543.585.475.500 Mitochondrial Proton-Translocating ATPases D12.776. ... D12.776.476.150.299.300 Casein Kinase II D12.644.360.150.600 Casein Kinases D12.644.360.150 CD4 Lymphocyte Count E1.450.375.107 ...
E5.200.812.735.645.350.350.150 Creatine Kinase, Mitochondrial Form D12.776.575.186 Crossing Over, Genetic G5.355.760.210 G5.355 ... A-Form G2.111.570.790.486.128 G5.360.580.114 DNA, C-Form G2.111.570.790.486.156 G5.360.580.128 DNA, Catenated G2.111.570.790. ... D9.408.477.500 Mitochondrial ADP, ATP Translocases D12.776.543.585.475.500 Mitochondrial Proton-Translocating ATPases D12.776. ... D12.776.476.150.299.300 Casein Kinase II D12.644.360.150.600 Casein Kinases D12.644.360.150 CD4 Lymphocyte Count E1.450.375.107 ...
E5.200.812.735.645.350.350.150 Creatine Kinase, Mitochondrial Form D12.776.575.186 Crossing Over, Genetic G5.355.760.210 G5.355 ... A-Form G2.111.570.790.486.128 G5.360.580.114 DNA, C-Form G2.111.570.790.486.156 G5.360.580.128 DNA, Catenated G2.111.570.790. ... D9.408.477.500 Mitochondrial ADP, ATP Translocases D12.776.543.585.475.500 Mitochondrial Proton-Translocating ATPases D12.776. ... D12.776.476.150.299.300 Casein Kinase II D12.644.360.150.600 Casein Kinases D12.644.360.150 CD4 Lymphocyte Count E1.450.375.107 ...
The distinct isoenzyme-specific localization of creatine kinase (CK) isoenzymes found recently in brain suggests an important ... No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, ... In addition, the developmentally late appearance of mitochondrial CK (Mi-CK) during brain development indicates an important ... Functional Aspects of Creatine Kinase in Brain Subject Area: Further Areas , Neurology and Neuroscience , Womens and ...
Ethoxyquin also suppressed serum lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase activities, decreased the levels of lipid peroxides ... Recently, ferroptosis, a form of regulated cell death induced by the accumulation of lipid peroxides, has been recognized as a ... Ethoxyquin also prevented DOX-induced cell death, accompanied by the suppression of malondialdehyde (MDA) and mitochondrial ... Ethoxyquin also suppressed serum lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase activities, decreased the levels of lipid peroxides ...
Serum creatine kinase (CK) is elevated in several cases but not all. Appropriate muscle biopsy studies are crucial for accurate ... Several rare forms of congenital muscular dystrophy are not discussed in this article because of the lack of precise molecular ... A congenital muscular dystrophy with mitochondrial structural abnormalities caused by defective de novo phosphatidylcholine ... Absence of integrin alpha 7 causes a novel form of muscular dystrophy. Nat Genet. 1997 Nov. 17(3):318-23. [QxMD MEDLINE Link]. ...
It serves as a mechanism for transport of long-chain fatty acids from the cytoplasm across the inner mitochondrial membrane and ... into the mitochondrial matrix, the site of b-oxidation of fatty acids for energy generation. ... creatine kinase (CK), liver enzymes, and long-chain acylcarnitines in the blood; and dicarboxylic aciduria in urinary organic ... The infantile form presents between ages 6 and 24 months as episodes of encephalopathy, liver failure, seizures, hypoketotic ...
Comparison of cardiac troponin I, creatine kinase-MB and myoglobin for detection of acute ischemic myocardial injury in a swine ... Metabolic changes and mitochondrial dysfunction early following transthoracic countershock in dogs. Pacing Clin Electrophysiol ... Together they form a unique fingerprint. ... Comparison of cardiac troponin I, creatine kinase-MB and ... Comparison of cardiac troponin I, creatine kinase-MB and myoglobin for detection of acute ischemic myocardial injury in a swine ...
Levels of irisin do not correlate with serum levels of creatine kinase. ... Help us make reference on Medscape the best clinical resource possible. Please use this form to submit your questions or ... Mitochondrial antioxidants reverse the effects of simvastatin-induced reduction of cell viability and irisin release. ... Pleasedo not use this form to submit personal or patient medical information or to report adverse drug events. You are ...
... and total creatine kinase were all highly increased above reference values (Table 1). Urinalysis showed a 2+ protein level, and ... Please use the form below to submit correspondence to the authors or contact them at the following address:. Tom G. Schwan, ... A skin punch biopsy was taken from 1 external ear for DNA extraction and determination of the mitochondrial cytB gene sequence ... Various forms of uveitis have been described with other spirochetal diseases, including Lyme disease (23), syphilis (24), and ...
Idiopathic persistent elevation of serum creatine kinase, see Isolated hyperCKemia. *Idiopathic proctocolitis, see Ulcerative ... Isolated CoQ-cytochrome c reductase deficiency, see Mitochondrial complex III deficiency. *Isolated deafness, see Nonsyndromic ... Idiopathic fibrosing alveolitis, chronic form, see Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. *Idiopathic hyperCKemia, see Isolated ... Interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 4 deficiency, see IRAK-4 deficiency. *Intermittent ataxia with pyruvate dehydrogenase ...
The heterogeneous nature and different forms of inheritance of the condition were soon recognized. ... creatine kinase, and HIV antibodies, were noncontributory, but hepatitis C serology was positive. His 65-year-old mother ... Autosomal recessive forms can be also divided into demyelinating (CMT4 or AR-CMT1) and axonal forms (AR-CMT2). Subtypes with ... which appears to be a motor protein involved in anterograde mitochondrial transport. ...
The latter were created by crossbreeding floxed-p38β mice (p38β f/f) in C57BL/6 background [30] with muscle creatine kinase-Cre ... Received originally: 22/06/2018 Received in revised form: 10/09/2018. Accepted: 24/10/2018 Published: 10/10/2018. ... p38γ MAPK regulates the expansion of myogenic precursor cells [48], endurance exercise-induced mitochondrial biogenesis and ... Activated ULK1 forms a complex with p38β MAPK in myocytes, which is markedly increased by a tumor burden. Overexpression of a ...
Mcleod syndrome (hemolysis, acanthocytosis, and increased serum creatine kinase): potential confusion with polymyositis. ... In the classic form of the disorder, central nervous system pathologic features include atrophy of the caudate and putamen and ... Mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes with acanthocytosis: a clinicopathological ... 15] published a report that indicated erythrocyte membrane changes of NA patients are the result of altered Lyn kinase (LYN) ...
Figure 2 Forest plot of the effect of vitamin E supplementation on creatine kinase subgrouped by follow up times after exercise ... PubMed CAS Google Scholar Boveris A, Cadenas E and Stoppani AOK Role of ubiquinone in mitochondrial generation of hydrogen ... PureWay-C® provides an advanced form of Vitamin C thanks to its patented composition containing lipid metabolites and citrus ... Its protective effect became apparent when creatine kinase CK and esercise-induced MDA levels were measured immediately after ...
All biochemical and enzymatic components including, creatine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), C-reactive protein (CRP ... Endurance training and detraining in mitochondrial myopathies due to single large-scale mtDNA deletions. Brain 2006;129(pt12): ... Author(s) Declaration Form. *Author(s) Contribution Form. *Reviewer Application Form. * Close ... Effects of aerobic training in patients with mitochondrial myopathies. Neurology 1998;50(4): 1055-1060. ...
  • Ethoxyquin also suppressed serum lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase activities, decreased the levels of lipid peroxides such as MDA and acrolein, inhibited cardiac fibrosis, and reduced TUNEL-positive cells in the hearts of DIC mice. (elsevierpure.com)
  • All biochemical and enzymatic components including, creatine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), C-reactive protein (CRP) and lactate were determined using standardized methods and commercial kits on Hitachi 912 (Roche Diagnostics, Basil) and Borengier Manheim photometer 1010. (edu.pk)
  • Choline kinase (CK) is reportedly overexpressed in various malignancies. (bvsalud.org)
  • Choline kinase beta, lipid transport enzyme, catalyzes the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine, two major components of the mitochondrial membrane, on which respiratory enzyme activities are dependent. (bvsalud.org)
  • CHKB gene variants lead to loss-of-function of choline kinase b and lipid metabolism defects and mitochondrial structural changes. (bvsalud.org)
  • Recently, ferroptosis, a form of regulated cell death induced by the accumulation of lipid peroxides, has been recognized as a major pathophysiology of DIC. (elsevierpure.com)
  • Ethoxyquin also prevented DOX-induced cell death, accompanied by the suppression of malondialdehyde (MDA) and mitochondrial lipid peroxides, which were induced by DOX. (elsevierpure.com)
  • Not only are cases known in which neurologic features of classic adult and childhood acanthocytosis syndromes overlap, but adult forms have been well described in which lipid profiles more closely resemble those of Bassen-Kornzweig syndrome, as have adult forms that begin in childhood. (medscape.com)
  • Since that year, rarer autosomal dominant disease forms with variable penetrance with or without chromosome 9 abnormalities have also been described. (medscape.com)
  • Serum creatine kinase (CK) is elevated in several cases but not all. (medscape.com)
  • In EDMD serum creatine of elbow flexors was 3/5, shoulder abducc kinase (CK) level is normal or moderately tors 3/5 and other muscles 4/5. (who.int)
  • It serves as a mechanism for transport of long-chain fatty acids from the cytoplasm across the inner mitochondrial membrane and into the mitochondrial matrix, the site of b-oxidation of fatty acids for energy generation. (medscape.com)
  • Carnitine is an important small water-soluble molecule that binds to long-chain fatty acids and facilitates their transport across the inner mitochondrial membrane and into the mitochondrial matrix to undergo fatty acid oxidation (metabolism). (medscape.com)
  • Carnitine-acylcarnitine translocase deficiency (CACT) typically presents in an autosomal-recessive fashion with seizures, apnea, and an irregular heart beat in the neonatal period (although presentation can occur as late as age 15 months) and results from mutations in the CACT protein (SLC25A20 gene), a carnitine-acylcarnitine exchanger on the inner mitochondrial membrane. (medscape.com)
  • Several rare forms of congenital muscular dystrophy are not discussed in this article because of the lack of precise molecular and/or genetic information. (medscape.com)
  • [ 6 ] However, the gene mutations responsible for the different forms of CMT1 are clearly myelin genes. (medscape.com)
  • Acanthocytosis has also been associated with the rare hypobetalipoproteinemia, acanthocytosis, retinitis pigmentosa, and pallidal degeneration (HARP) syndrome, a disease of childhood akin to Hallervorden-Spatz disease and a defect in the gene for pantothenate kinase. (medscape.com)
  • In 2001, a deletion mutation in the gene (now known as VPS13A) localized to chromosome band 9q21 was identified as the site for the defect generating the autosomal recessive form of NA. (medscape.com)
  • Macro-creatine kinase (macro-CK) is a macroenzyme, an enzyme of high molecular weight and prolonged half-life found in human serum. (wikipedia.org)
  • Autosomal recessive forms can be also divided into demyelinating (CMT4 or AR-CMT1) and axonal forms (AR-CMT2). (medscape.com)
  • In 2005, based upon research involving several large French-Canadian families that presented with temporal lobe epilepsy, an expanded conceptualization of the molecular genetics of the autosomal recessive form NA was attained. (medscape.com)
  • The distinct isoenzyme-specific localization of creatine kinase (CK) isoenzymes found recently in brain suggests an important function for CK in brain energetics and points to adaptation of the CK system to the special energy requirements of different neuronal and glial cell types. (karger.com)
  • In addition, the developmentally late appearance of mitochondrial CK (Mi-CK) during brain development indicates an important function for Mi-CK in the oxidative energy metabolism of the brain. (karger.com)
  • Levels of irisin do not correlate with serum levels of creatine kinase. (medscape.com)
  • Myelinating Schwann cells form a myelin sheath around a single axon and express high levels of myelin-related proteins and messenger RNA (mRNA). (medscape.com)
  • Please do not use this form to submit personal or patient medical information or to report adverse drug events. (medscape.com)
  • Activated ULK1 forms a complex with p38β MAPK in myocytes, which is markedly increased by a tumor burden. (cell-stress.com)
  • The heterogeneous nature and different forms of inheritance of the condition were soon recognized. (medscape.com)
  • d) comparison of different forms of açai supplementation in exercise protocols. (bvsalud.org)
  • Comparison of cardiac troponin I, creatine kinase-MB and myoglobin for detection of acute ischemic myocardial injury in a swine model. (ulster.ac.uk)
  • Mitochondrial creatine kinase occurs in two different oligomeric forms: dimers and octamers, in contrast to the exclusively dimeric cytosolic creatine kinase isoenzymes. (nih.gov)
  • Ubiquitous mitochondrial creatine kinase (uMtCK), a key enzyme in energy metabolism, was identified by differential display PCR to be specifically overexpressed in L1236, the first cell line of definite Hodgkin origin. (bvsalud.org)
  • shuttle `high-energy' phosphates formed in mitochondria, to the To elucidate a possible structural role of MtCK in MIM/MOM cytosol, where they are utilized [1,2]. (nih.gov)
  • MtCK (mitochondrial contact site formation and in stabilizing mitochondrial ultra- creatine kinase), located in the inter-membrane compartment [3] structure, we used a transgenic mouse line where uMtCK is uses ATP, supplied by the ANT (adenine nucleotide translocase), expressed under the control of a liver-specific promoter [21]. (nih.gov)
  • Respiration measurements have demonstrated that ADP, formed conclude that octameric uMtCK induces the formation of MCSs, by MtCK during mitochondrial PCr synthesis, is shuttled directly which, apart from playing an important role in energy metabolism, into the mitochondrial matrix via ANT for re-phosphorylation also stabilize the mitochondrial membrane architecture. (nih.gov)
  • Mitochondrial creatine (MtCK) kinase is responsible for the transfer of high energy phosphate from mitochondria to the cytosolic carrier, creatine. (nih.gov)
  • Using liver mitochondria mation of mitochondrial contact sites, leading to membrane isolated from transgenic mice, which, unlike control animals, ex- cross-linking and to an increased stability of the mitochondrial press uMtCK in the liver, we found that the enzyme was associated membrane architecture. (nih.gov)
  • Furthermore, uMtCK-containing mitochondria were chondrial creatine kinase, outer membrane pore. (nih.gov)
  • Anthracyclines, such as doxorubicin, Cells with high or fluctuating energy demands express cytosolic can compete with uMtCK for binding to cardiolipin and thereby and mitochondrial creatine kinases (EC 2.7.3.2). (nih.gov)
  • A form of creatine kinase found in the MITOCHONDRIA . (bvsalud.org)
  • Phosphocreatine (PCr) is another major energy carrier in muscle * cells, in fact the majority of the energy-carrying phosphate * groups leave the mitochondria in the form of PCr, not ATP. (nih.gov)
  • [ 109 ] Several of the proteins identified (n = 912) imply mitochondrial dysfunction and a cellular response to excessive oxidative stress, misregulated protein degradation, increased apoptosis and eventual cell death. (medscape.com)
  • [ 109 ] The majority of the proteins identified in this study functionally associate with apoptosis, which is likely to be due to mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage. (medscape.com)
  • Because the anti-proliferative effect of cCr was not due to induction of apoptosis, in contrast to most other anticancer agents, treatment with the creatine analogue cCr may represent an advantageous therapeutic approach for cells resistant to programmed cell death. (bvsalud.org)
  • Reversibly catalyzes the transfer of phosphate between ATP and various phosphogens (e.g. creatine phosphate). (nih.gov)
  • The horizontal arrows represent reactions, * namely ATP synthesis (OxPhos), ATP hydrolysis (ATPase), mitochondrial * and myofibrillar kinases (MiCK and MMCK). (nih.gov)
  • The creatine/phosphocreatine pathway plays a conserved and central role in energy metabolism. (springeropen.com)
  • Specific etiology is unknown but appears to be secondary to multiple synergistic factors causing acute mitochondrial injury from significant inhibition of fatty acid oxidation limiting gluconeogenesis causing hypoglycemia, elevated ammonia, acute transaminitis, and hepatic fatty infiltration ( 1 ). (unboundmedicine.com)
  • She looks no different to one of his cases of severe autism secondary to mitochondrial disease (AMD). (epiphanyasd.com)
  • Noninflammatory etiologies and associations include alcoholism, anthracycline drugs, ingestion of metals, autoimmune and systemic disorders, and mitochondrial disorders. (medscape.com)
  • However, the lack of coherence between results from different animal models of PD that make use of mitochondrial targeting toxins and PD patient post-mortem sample analyses has led to increasing acknowledgement that Co-I inhibition as a sufficient mechanism for inducing the selective dopaminergic cell death seen in PD, offers an oversimplified view of PD. (medscape.com)
  • This inhibition by cCr was partially reversed by competition with creatine, which by itself had no effect on proliferation of the L1236 cell line. (bvsalud.org)
  • It serves as a mechanism for transport of long-chain fatty acids from the cytoplasm across the inner mitochondrial membrane and into the mitochondrial matrix, the site of b-oxidation of fatty acids for energy generation. (medscape.com)
  • Carnitine is an important, small water-soluble molecule that binds to long-chain fatty acids and facilitates their transport across the inner mitochondrial membrane and into the mitochondrial matrix to undergo fatty acid oxidation (metabolism). (medscape.com)
  • Creatine Kinase in Energy Metabolic Signalling in Muscle * * Model Status * * This CellML model is known to run on both OpenCell and COR. (nih.gov)
  • The original paper reference is cited below: * * Creatine kinase in energy metabolic signaling in muscle, Olav * Kongas and Johannes H. G. M. van Beek, 2001, ICSB2001: The 2nd * International Conference on Systems Biology * * [[Image file: kongas_2001b.png]] * * Figure 2. (nih.gov)
  • Creatine kinase isoenzymes play a central role in energy transduction in tissues with large, fluctuating energy demands, such as skeletal muscle, heart, brain and spermatozoa. (nih.gov)
  • Compartmentalization of specific creatine kinase enzymes permits buffering of local high energy phosphates in a the. (springeropen.com)
  • When we exercise, our muscles break down glucose to produce energy in the form of ATP. (coloringfolder.com)
  • The combination of proteomics (high-density liquid chromatography [LC] coupled to MS) with microarray analysis of the pooled left and right striata from mice previously exposed to MPTP compared with METH exposure, culminated in a large descriptive data set on proteomic changes induced by these mitochondrial poisons. (medscape.com)
  • with the mitochondrial membranes and, in addition, was located in membrane-coated matrix inclusions. (nih.gov)
  • Cyclocreatine (cCr), whose phosphorylated form is a very poor substrate for CK, inhibited proliferation of the L1236 cell line nearly entirely. (bvsalud.org)