Craniocerebral Trauma: Traumatic injuries involving the cranium and intracranial structures (i.e., BRAIN; CRANIAL NERVES; MENINGES; and other structures). Injuries may be classified by whether or not the skull is penetrated (i.e., penetrating vs. nonpenetrating) or whether there is an associated hemorrhage.Head Injuries, Penetrating: Head injuries which feature compromise of the skull and dura mater. These may result from gunshot wounds (WOUNDS, GUNSHOT), stab wounds (WOUNDS, STAB), and other forms of trauma.Bombs: A weapon designed to explode when deployed. It frequently refers to a hollow case filled with EXPLOSIVE AGENTS.Wounds, Gunshot: Disruption of structural continuity of the body as a result of the discharge of firearms.Foreign Bodies: Inanimate objects that become enclosed in the body.Skull Fractures: Fractures of the skull which may result from penetrating or nonpenetrating head injuries or rarely BONE DISEASES (see also FRACTURES, SPONTANEOUS). Skull fractures may be classified by location (e.g., SKULL FRACTURE, BASILAR), radiographic appearance (e.g., linear), or based upon cranial integrity (e.g., SKULL FRACTURE, DEPRESSED).Glasgow Outcome Scale: A scale that assesses the outcome of serious craniocerebral injuries, based on the level of regained social functioning.Glasgow Coma Scale: A scale that assesses the response to stimuli in patients with craniocerebral injuries. The parameters are eye opening, motor response, and verbal response.Debridement: The removal of foreign material and devitalized or contaminated tissue from or adjacent to a traumatic or infected lesion until surrounding healthy tissue is exposed. (Dorland, 27th ed)Brain Injuries: Acute and chronic (see also BRAIN INJURIES, CHRONIC) injuries to the brain, including the cerebral hemispheres, CEREBELLUM, and BRAIN STEM. Clinical manifestations depend on the nature of injury. Diffuse trauma to the brain is frequently associated with DIFFUSE AXONAL INJURY or COMA, POST-TRAUMATIC. Localized injuries may be associated with NEUROBEHAVIORAL MANIFESTATIONS; HEMIPARESIS, or other focal neurologic deficits.Skull: The SKELETON of the HEAD including the FACIAL BONES and the bones enclosing the BRAIN.Trauma Centers: Specialized hospital facilities which provide diagnostic and therapeutic services for trauma patients.Multiple Trauma: Multiple physical insults or injuries occurring simultaneously.Wounds, Nonpenetrating: Injuries caused by impact with a blunt object where there is no penetration of the skin.Meninges: The three membranes that cover the BRAIN and the SPINAL CORD. They are the dura mater, the arachnoid, and the pia mater.Sulfanilic Acids: Aminobenzenesulfonic acids. Organic acids that are used in the manufacture of dyes and organic chemicals and as reagents.Petrous Bone: The dense rock-like part of temporal bone that contains the INNER EAR. Petrous bone is located at the base of the skull. Sometimes it is combined with the MASTOID PROCESS and called petromastoid part of temporal bone.Hematoma, Epidural, Cranial: Accumulation of blood in the EPIDURAL SPACE between the SKULL and the DURA MATER, often as a result of bleeding from the MENINGEAL ARTERIES associated with a temporal or parietal bone fracture. Epidural hematoma tends to expand rapidly, compressing the dura and underlying brain. Clinical features may include HEADACHE; VOMITING; HEMIPARESIS; and impaired mental function.Sphenoid Sinus: One of the paired air spaces located in the body of the SPHENOID BONE behind the ETHMOID BONE in the middle of the skull. Sphenoid sinus communicates with the posterosuperior part of NASAL CAVITY on the same side.Pulmonary Edema: Excessive accumulation of extravascular fluid in the lung, an indication of a serious underlying disease or disorder. Pulmonary edema prevents efficient PULMONARY GAS EXCHANGE in the PULMONARY ALVEOLI, and can be life-threatening.Hematoma: A collection of blood outside the BLOOD VESSELS. Hematoma can be localized in an organ, space, or tissue.Sphenoid Bone: An irregular unpaired bone situated at the SKULL BASE and wedged between the frontal, temporal, and occipital bones (FRONTAL BONE; TEMPORAL BONE; OCCIPITAL BONE). Sphenoid bone consists of a median body and three pairs of processes resembling a bat with spread wings. The body is hollowed out in its inferior to form two large cavities (SPHENOID SINUS).Privacy: The state of being free from intrusion or disturbance in one's private life or affairs. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, 1993)Confidentiality: The privacy of information and its protection against unauthorized disclosure.Computer Security: Protective measures against unauthorized access to or interference with computer operating systems, telecommunications, or data structures, especially the modification, deletion, destruction, or release of data in computers. It includes methods of forestalling interference by computer viruses or so-called computer hackers aiming to compromise stored data.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Journal Impact Factor: A quantitative measure of the frequency on average with which articles in a journal have been cited in a given period of time.Informed Consent: Voluntary authorization, by a patient or research subject, with full comprehension of the risks involved, for diagnostic or investigative procedures, and for medical and surgical treatment.Publishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.Atlases as Topic: Collections of illustrative plates, charts, etc., usually with explanatory captions.BooksCervical Atlas: The first cervical vertebra.Book SelectionBook Reviews as Topic: Critical analyses of books or other monographic works.Brain Chemistry: Changes in the amounts of various chemicals (neurotransmitters, receptors, enzymes, and other metabolites) specific to the area of the central nervous system contained within the head. These are monitored over time, during sensory stimulation, or under different disease states.History, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.MedlinePlus: NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE service for health professionals and consumers. It links extensive information from the National Institutes of Health and other reviewed sources of information on specific diseases and conditions.Brain Concussion: A nonspecific term used to describe transient alterations or loss of consciousness following closed head injuries. The duration of UNCONSCIOUSNESS generally lasts a few seconds, but may persist for several hours. Concussions may be classified as mild, intermediate, and severe. Prolonged periods of unconsciousness (often defined as greater than 6 hours in duration) may be referred to as post-traumatic coma (COMA, POST-HEAD INJURY). (From Rowland, Merritt's Textbook of Neurology, 9th ed, p418)Athletic Injuries: Injuries incurred during participation in competitive or non-competitive sports.Hockey: A game in which two parties of players provided with curved or hooked sticks seek to drive a ball or puck through opposite goals. This applies to either ice hockey or field hockey.Gross Domestic Product: Value of all final goods and services produced in a country in one year.Football: A competitive team sport played on a rectangular field. This is the American or Canadian version of the game and also includes the form known as rugby. It does not include non-North American football (= SOCCER).National Library of Medicine (U.S.): An agency of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH concerned with overall planning, promoting, and administering programs pertaining to advancement of medical and related sciences. Major activities of this institute include the collection, dissemination, and exchange of information important to the progress of medicine and health, research in medical informatics and support for medical library development.Exercise Therapy: A regimen or plan of physical activities designed and prescribed for specific therapeutic goals. Its purpose is to restore normal musculoskeletal function or to reduce pain caused by diseases or injuries.Chronic Pain: Aching sensation that persists for more than a few months. It may or may not be associated with trauma or disease, and may persist after the initial injury has healed. Its localization, character, and timing are more vague than with acute pain.Exercise Test: Controlled physical activity which is performed in order to allow assessment of physiological functions, particularly cardiovascular and pulmonary, but also aerobic capacity. Maximal (most intense) exercise is usually required but submaximal exercise is also used.Exercise: Physical activity which is usually regular and done with the intention of improving or maintaining PHYSICAL FITNESS or HEALTH. Contrast with PHYSICAL EXERTION which is concerned largely with the physiologic and metabolic response to energy expenditure.Pregnanolone: A pregnane found in the urine of pregnant women and sows. It has anesthetic, hypnotic, and sedative properties.Exercise Tolerance: The exercise capacity of an individual as measured by endurance (maximal exercise duration and/or maximal attained work load) during an EXERCISE TEST.Pain: An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.Optic Nerve Injuries: Injuries to the optic nerve induced by a trauma to the face or head. These may occur with closed or penetrating injuries. Relatively minor compression of the superior aspect of orbit may also result in trauma to the optic nerve. Clinical manifestations may include visual loss, PAPILLEDEMA, and an afferent pupillary defect.Optic Nerve: The 2nd cranial nerve which conveys visual information from the RETINA to the brain. The nerve carries the axons of the RETINAL GANGLION CELLS which sort at the OPTIC CHIASM and continue via the OPTIC TRACTS to the brain. The largest projection is to the lateral geniculate nuclei; other targets include the SUPERIOR COLLICULI and the SUPRACHIASMATIC NUCLEI. Though known as the second cranial nerve, it is considered part of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Frontal Bone: The bone that forms the frontal aspect of the skull. Its flat part forms the forehead, articulating inferiorly with the NASAL BONE and the CHEEK BONE on each side of the face.Head Injuries, Closed: Traumatic injuries to the cranium where the integrity of the skull is not compromised and no bone fragments or other objects penetrate the skull and dura mater. This frequently results in mechanical injury being transmitted to intracranial structures which may produce traumatic brain injuries, hemorrhage, or cranial nerve injury. (From Rowland, Merritt's Textbook of Neurology, 9th ed, p417)Optic Neuropathy, Ischemic: Ischemic injury to the OPTIC NERVE which usually affects the OPTIC DISK (optic neuropathy, anterior ischemic) and less frequently the retrobulbar portion of the nerve (optic neuropathy, posterior ischemic). The injury results from occlusion of arterial blood supply which may result from TEMPORAL ARTERITIS; ATHEROSCLEROSIS; COLLAGEN DISEASES; EMBOLISM; DIABETES MELLITUS; and other conditions. The disease primarily occurs in the sixth decade or later and presents with the sudden onset of painless and usually severe monocular visual loss. Anterior ischemic optic neuropathy also features optic disk edema with microhemorrhages. The optic disk appears normal in posterior ischemic optic neuropathy. (Glaser, Neuro-Ophthalmology, 2nd ed, p135)Evoked Potentials, Visual: The electric response evoked in the cerebral cortex by visual stimulation or stimulation of the visual pathways.Retinal Ganglion Cells: Neurons of the innermost layer of the retina, the internal plexiform layer. They are of variable sizes and shapes, and their axons project via the OPTIC NERVE to the brain. A small subset of these cells act as photoreceptors with projections to the SUPRACHIASMATIC NUCLEUS, the center for regulating CIRCADIAN RHYTHM.

Non-fatal injuries sustained by seatbelt wearers: a comparative study. (1/1137)

The injuries sustained by 969 drivers and front-seat passengers in road-traffic accidents were studied. Altogether 196 (20-2%) of the drivers and passengers were wearing seat belts and 773 (79-8%) were not. The injuries among the two groups differed greatly in both severity and distribution. A total of 54 (27-6%) of the seatbelt wearers sustained one or more fractures compared with 300 (38-8%) of the non-wearers, and 18 (9-2%) of the seatbelt wearers were severely injured compared with 300 (38-8%) of the non-wearers. Soft-tissue injuries to the face were sustained by only 29 (14-8%) of the seatbelt wearers compared with 425 (55%) of the non-wearers. Since wearing seatbelts may become compulsory, the type and pattern of injuries to be expected in wearers should be appreciated.  (+info)

Evaluating cost-effectiveness of diagnostic equipment: the brain scanner case. (2/1137)

An approach to evaluating the cost-effectiveness of high-technology diagnostic equipment has been devised, using the introduction of computerised axial tomography (CAT) as a model. With the advent of CAT scanning, angiography and air encephalography have a reduced, though important, role in investigating intracranial disease, and the efficient use of conventional equipment requires the centralisation of neuroradiological services, which would result in major cash savings. In contrast, the pattern of demand for CAT scanning, in addition to the acknowledged clinical efficiency of the scanner and its unique role in the head-injured patient, ephasies the need for improved access to scanners. In the interest of the patients the pattern of service must change.  (+info)

Post-traumatic epilepsy: its complications and impact on occupational rehabilitation--an epidemiological study from India. (3/1137)

The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of seizure disorder, neuropsychiatric disorders and reproductive outcome of employees with post-traumatic epilepsy (PTE) and their effect on occupational rehabilitation. A case-comparison group study design was used to compare 30 subjects with PTE with (1) 129 non-PTE and (2) 55 non-PTE matched control employees. The 55 non-PTE matched controls were selected from the 129 non-PTE employees on the basis of age, age at onset of seizure, age at marriage and length of employment. The PTE group had a lower fertility rate than the controls and more neuropsychiatric disorders and seizure disability. PTE employees were more occupationally rehabilitated than non-PTE employees (p = 0.033). Of the 30 PTE subjects, thirteen who were rehabilitated by placement had more seizure disability (p = 0.007) and a higher fertility rate (p = 0.018). High prevalence of seizure disability and increased fertility rate among the placed PTE employees suggested that there might be some association between severity of seizures and increased production of live offspring and work placement. Work suitability or placement should not be judged on clinical assessment only but psychosocial seizure assessment, disability evaluation and other psychometric tests which are of equal importance.  (+info)

Cognitive recovery after severe head injury. 3. WAIS verbal and performance IQs as a function of post-traumatic amnesia duration and time from injury. (4/1137)

Two studies are reported are reported in which severely head-injured patients were followed up and Verbal (VIQ) and Performance (PIQ) IQs obtained on the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale at four intervals after injury. In the first study 51 patients were systematically followed, and results were based upon serial testing. In the second study results were based on the earliest data available from an additional 98 patients who had not been followed so systematically, in order to introduce a control for the effects of practice. Patients in both studies were categorised into four groups of the severity of head injury based upon duration of post-traumatic amnesia (PTA). In both studies, VIQ level was found to be related to PTA duration at three months after injury, while PIQ was related to PTA duration at both three and six months. No such relationships were found at 12 and 30 months after injury. Results are discussed in the context of previous studies relating the outcome of head injury to the duration of PTA.  (+info)

Post-traumatic pituitary apoplexy--two case reports. (5/1137)

A 60-year-old female and a 66-year-old male presented with post-traumatic pituitary apoplexy associated with clinically asymptomatic pituitary macroadenoma manifesting as severe visual disturbance that had not developed immediately after the head injury. Skull radiography showed a unilateral linear occipital fracture. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed pituitary tumor with dumbbell-shaped suprasellar extension and fresh intratumoral hemorrhage. Transsphenoidal surgery was performed in the first patient, and the visual disturbance subsided. Decompressive craniectomy was performed in the second patient to treat brain contusion and part of the tumor was removed to decompress the optic nerves. The mechanism of post-traumatic pituitary apoplexy may occur as follows. The intrasellar part of the tumor is fixed by the bony structure forming the sella, and the suprasellar part is free to move, so a rotational force acting on the occipital region on one side will create a shearing strain between the intra- and suprasellar part of the tumor, resulting in pituitary apoplexy. Recovery of visual function, no matter how severely impaired, can be expected if an emergency operation is performed to decompress the optic nerves. Transsphenoidal surgery is the most advantageous procedure, as even partial removal of the tumor may be adequate to decompress the optic nerves in the acute stage. Staged transsphenoidal surgery is indicated to achieve total removal later.  (+info)

Aphasic disorder in patients with closed head injury. (6/1137)

Quantitative assessment of 50 patients with closed head injury disclosed that anomic errors and word finding difficulty were prominent sequelae as nearly half of the series had defective scores on tests of naming and/or word association. Aphasic disturbance was associated with severity of brain injury as reflected by prolonged coma and injury of the brain stem.  (+info)

An audit of distribution and use of guidelines for management of head injury. (7/1137)

Ensuring effective distribution of guidelines is an important step towards their implementation. To examine the effectiveness of dissemination of a guidelines card on management of head injury and determine its usefulness to senior house officers (SHOs), a questionnaire survey was performed in May 1990, after distribution of the cards in induction packs for new doctors and at postgraduate lectures and displaying the guidelines in accident and emergency departments and wards. A further survey, in March 1992, assessed the impact of modifying the distribution. All (175) SHOs working in general surgery, accident and emergency medicine, orthopaedics, and neurosciences on 1 February 1990 in 19 hospitals including two neurosurgical units in Northern region were sent self completion questionnaires about awareness, receipt, use, and perceived usefulness of the guidelines. 131 of 163(80%) SHOs in post responded (median response from hospitals 83% (range 50%-100%)). Over three quarters (103, 79%) of SHOs were aware of the guidelines and 82(63%) had ever possessed a guidelines card. Only 36(44%) acquired the card in the induction pack. 92%(98/107) found them useful and 81% (89/110) referred to them to some extent. Owning and carrying the card and referring to guidelines were associated with departmental encouragement to use the guidelines. Increasing the displays of guidelines in wards and departments and the supply of cards to consultants in accident and emergency medicine as a result of this survey did not increase the number of SHOs who received cards (52/83, 63%), but more (71/83, 86%) were aware of the guidelines. The guidelines were welcomed by SHOs and used in treating patients with head injury, but their distribution requires improvement. Increased use of the guidelines may be achieved by introducing other distribution methods and as a result of encouragement by senior staff.  (+info)

Effect of guidelines on management of head injury on record keeping and decision making in accident and emergency departments. (8/1137)

OBJECTIVE: To compare record keeping and decision making in accident and emergency departments before and after distribution of guidelines on head injury management as indices of implementation. DESIGN: Before (1987) and after (1990) study of accident and emergency medical records. SETTING: Two accident and emergency departments in England. PATIENTS: 1144 adult patients with head injury in department 1 (533 in 1987, 613 in 1990) and 734 in department 2 (370, 364 respectively). MAIN MEASURES: Recording of relevant symptoms and signs as determined in the guidelines; presence of, indications for, and rates and appropriateness of skull x ray examination and admission. RESULTS: The median number of guidelines variables recorded for all study periods ranged from 7 to 9 out of a possible maximum of 27. For key decision making variables the presence or absence of penetrating injury was least likely to be recorded (< or = 1%) and that of loss of consciousness most likely (> or = 75%). Altogether, the proportion of patients receiving skull x ray examination or admitted varied from 25%-60% and 7%-23% respectively; overall, 69% (1280/1856) and 64% (1177/1851) of patients were managed appropriately. However, no consistent change occurred in the departments between the study periods. For instance, in department 1 the proportion of appropriate x ray examinations rose significantly after distribution of the guidelines (from 61% (202/330) to 73% (305/417)) and appropriate decisions on whether to x ray or not also rose (from 65% (340/522) to 72% (435/608)). There was no significant change in department 2, although the proportion of appropriate admissions fell (from 33% (55/166) to 15% (19/130)). CONCLUSIONS: Recording practice and decision making were variable and had not consistently improved after dissemination of the guidelines. Strategies are required to ensure effective implementation of guidelines.  (+info)

If you have had a severe head injury and theres a chance you may have a brain injury, youll have a CT scan to assess the seriousness of the injury.. The Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) is often used to assess head injuries. This is a scale from 3 to 15 that identifies how serious your head injury is, based on your symptoms and whether the brain has been damaged (with 3 being most severe and 15 the least severe).. A GCS score of 13 or above would indicate a minor head injury. A score of 9 to 12 would be a moderate head injury. If a person has a severe head injury, theyll have a score of 8 or less.. Some people with significant head injuries have a high GCS score initially, but their score decreases when theyre reassessed at a later stage.. If you have a severe head injury, youll be closely monitored and frequently reassessed to check your condition.. Find out how severe head injuries are diagnosed. ...
Visit our Pediatric Community Pediatric head trauma, whether it involves high-velocity impact, self-inflicted causes, or nonaccidental trauma, is a major ca...
A multicenter external validation study in 7 Tunisian teaching and non teaching hospitals including patients with MHI defined as a blunt trauma to the head within 24 hours with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 13 to 15 and at least one of the following: history of loss of consciousness, short-term memory deficit, amnesia for the traumatic event, post-traumatic seizure, vomiting, headache, external evidence of injury above the clavicles, confusion, and neurologic deficit. Primary outcome was need for neurosurgical intervention defined as either death or craniotomy, or the need of endotracheal intubation within 30 days of the traumatic event. Secondary outcome was the presence of traumatic lesions on head CT scan. Comparaision of both decision rules using sensitivity specifications, positive and negative predictive value ...
Minor head injuries are a common presenting complaint in the pediatric emergency department. Skull x-rays are a useful tool in the evaluation of paediatric patients with a history of minor head trauma. However, there exists ongoing controversy regarding the ideal number of views that should be obtained in a skull series. This study aims to determine if there is a significant difference in the diagnostic accuracy of skull x-rays in the diagnosis of fracture in paediatric minor head trauma patients when a 2-film series as opposed to a 4-film series is provided to participating pediatric emergency physicians.. This will be a prospective, crossover experimental study evaluating the equivalency in sensitivity and specificity of a 2-film series versus a 4-film series in the diagnosis of skull fracture associated with minor head injuries in children.. The study will involve 10 pediatric emergency physicians who will evaluate two modules of 100 series of radiography.. In order to do so, he or she will ...
The emotional characteristics of head injury patients referred for neuropsychological testing were examined as a function of the time since injury. Patients referred more than 6 months from injury were more emotionally distressed on the MMPI and Katz Adjustment Scale (relatives form) compared to those tested 6 months or earlier. The more chronic head trauma patients were more anxious and depressed, more confused in their thinking, and more socially withdrawn compared to the acute patient group. These differences in emotional functioning appeared to be independent of level of neuropsychological impairment and the initial length of coma. Premorbid personality and increased awareness of impaired functioning with the passage of time are discussed as possible mediators of enhanced emotional distress in some chronic head injury patients.. ...
Objective: To determine the statistical characteristics of blood pressure (BP) readings from a large number of head-injured patients.. Methods: The BrainIT group has collected high time-resolution physiological and clinical data from head-injured patients who require intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring. The statistical features of this dataset of BP measurements with time resolution of 1 min from 200 patients is examined. The distributions of BP measurements and their relationship with simultaneous ICP measurements are described.. Results: The distributions of mean, systolic and diastolic readings are close to normal with modest skewing towards higher values. There is a trend towards an increase in blood pressure with advancing age, but this is not significant. Simultaneous blood pressure and ICP values suggest a triphasic relationship with a BP rising at 0.28 mm Hg/mm Hg of ICP, for ICP up to 32 mm Hg, and 0.9 mm Hg/mm Hg of ICP for ICP from 33 to 55 mm Hg, and falling sharply with rising ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Pattern of fatal head injuries due to vehicular accidents in Mangalore. AU - Menon, Anand. AU - Pai, Vishwas K.. AU - Rajeev, A.. PY - 2008/2/1. Y1 - 2008/2/1. N2 - Head injury is an important cause of mortality worldwide as the head is the most vulnerable part of the body involved in fatal road traffic accidents. The present study was undertaken on 682 victims of road traffic accidents who died due to injuries sustained to the head, which were autopsied at District Wenlock Hospital, Mangalore over a period of 5 years between January 1999 and December 2003. Most of the accidents had taken place during the afternoon and evening hours (1400-2200h). There was a marked male preponderance (84.6%). The most vulnerable age group was found to be between 21 and 30 years. Two wheeler occupants were most commonly involved. Skull fractures were present in 88.88% of the cases. Fractures of the vault were found in 88%, base of the skull in 35.97% and a combination of both in 35% of cases. In ...
A Rare Fatal Head Injury and Crush Injury to Leg by an Improperly Assembled Chaff Cutter - a farm Machinery-Related Injury in North-West India: a Case Report
A rare case is described of acute disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) following isolated mild head injury with acute subdural haematoma, coagulopathy onset preceding craniotomy. Surgical treatment of the cause followed by swift diagnosis and treatment soon after surgery enabled a good outcome. Post-operative recollection of subdural and extadural blood was treated by further surgery. DIC following isolated mild head injury without axonal damage is rare, but fatal if missed. Thrombocytopaenia in head injured patients should be investigated expediently. Post-operative interim imaging (if not standard practice) should also be considered to exclude haemorrhagic recollection requiring further surgery.
Paediatric head injury is common. Our numbers estimates an annual incidence of 3378 head injuries/100 000, which is similar to previously published figures.8 Past studies have shown a significant male predominance and almost half those presenting to A&E departments are less than 5 years old.2, 8, 9 Our population demonstrated similar age and sex demographics. Younger children may present more readily because of parental anxiety rather than them having a higher incidence of head injury. Studies from the United States tend to describe more severe head injuries reflecting issues of access to hospital care.1, 2 In Edinburgh most patients have relatively easy access to free health care and we subsequently see a wide spectrum of head injuries, including children who are possibly managed by primary care facilities elsewhere.. Vomiting occurred in 15.8% of our analysed population, an incidence similar to previously published figures of 10-17%.2, 4, 10 Studies that exclude the most minor injuries quote ...
Your child has suspicious tumor on neck? ➤ Pediatric head and neck tumor treatment. Contact us ☎ 440.352.1474 - Concord, Madison, Willoughby
Minor Head Trauma in Pediatric Patients. Ayalin, Tyler; Kiang, Charlene; Gharabaghian, Laleh; Wang, N. Ewen; Haines, Christopher J. // Pediatric Emergency Medicine Reports;Feb2011, Vol. 16 Issue 2, p17 This article provides information on minor head trauma in pediatric patients. Minor head injuries are the one of the common injuries in children in emergency departments. Computed tomography is the modality of choice for the diagnosis of brain injuries and diseases, but this poses risk of... ...
Floating Hospital for Children is recognized as a Level 1 Trauma Center. We provide the best possible care for all head related pediatric trauma patients. Learn more.
TY - JOUR. T1 - Does acute hyperventilation cause cerebral ischemia in severely head-injured patients?. AU - Zornow, Mark H.. AU - Prough, Donald. PY - 2002/12/1. Y1 - 2002/12/1. KW - Cerebral blood flow. KW - Cerebral ischemia. KW - Hyperventilation. KW - Intracranial pressure. KW - Intraoperative monitoring. KW - Traumatic brain injury. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0036884497&partnerID=8YFLogxK. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0036884497&partnerID=8YFLogxK. M3 - Article. C2 - 12483073. AN - SCOPUS:0036884497. VL - 30. SP - 2774. EP - 2775. JO - Critical Care Medicine. JF - Critical Care Medicine. SN - 0090-3493. IS - 12. ER - ...
Traumatic injuries involving the cranium and intracranial structures (i.e., BRAIN; CRANIAL NERVES; MENINGES; and other structures). Injuries may be classified by whether or not the skull is penetrated (i.e., penetrating vs. nonpenetrating) or whether there is an associated hemorrhage ...
Head injuries can often cause damage to the pituitary gland leading to hormonal problems. Here, Caroline Churchill gives her account of her sons head injury as a child, and the problems he suffered as an adult including sexual dysfunction and depression, leading eventually to suicide. Brain injury is already recognized as quadrupling suicide risk, and…
WEDNESDAY, July 5, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A severe head injury, especially during middle age, could dramatically boost the risk for developing dementia later in life, new research from Finland suggests.. The investigation tracked dementia risk among people who had suffered a traumatic brain injury [TBI] at 65 or younger. Ultimately, the researchers determined that not only did the risk go up for those who had a TBI, but the worse the initial head injury, the greater the risk of dementia.. "The study showed that 3.5 percent of persons with moderate-to-severe TBI [were] diagnosed with a neurodegenerative disease [such as dementia] later in life," said study lead author Dr. Rahul Raj. Hes an associate professor of experimental neurosurgery at Helsinki University Hospital.. "This is substantially higher compared to age-matched peers with no history of brain injury," he noted.. By comparison, "only 1.6 percent of persons with mild TBI were diagnosed with a neurodegenerative disease," Raj added, ...
Plaintiff wiper was carrying a bucket of scrap iron up a ladder in the engine room of the vessel when a blower fell from a higher deck and struck the wiper on top of the head. Plaintiff was diagnosed with chronic cervicalgia, psychological sequela and a mild closed head injury (concussion). Plaintiff settled for $900,000, but recovered over a million dollars total, including medical and maintenance payments.. $900,000. ...
Ischemia of the basal ganglia as an immediate consequence of minor head injury in children is rare (| 2% of all ischemic stroke in childhood) and is due to vasospasm of the lenticulostriate arteries. The clinical history of these lesions is particularly favourable because they are usually small, and also because the facial-brachial-crural hemiparesis typical of this pathology usually regresses after a period ranging from several weeks to several months, despite the persistence of an ischemic area on MRI. This is due to the well known neuronal plasticity of the CNS, in particular, of the primary motor cortex. The most effective therapeutic approach appears to be the conservative one, although the best treatment regimen is still not well defined. Young patients should be closely monitored and treated conservatively with osmotic diuretics to reduce perilesional edema. At the same time, however, it is very important to exclude, by means of instrumental and laboratory studies, conditions that could favour
Ischemia of the basal ganglia as an immediate consequence of minor head injury in children is rare (| 2% of all ischemic stroke in childhood) and is due to vasospasm of the lenticulostriate arteries. The clinical history of these lesions is particularly favourable because they are usually small, and also because the facial-brachial-crural hemiparesis typical of this pathology usually regresses after a period ranging from several weeks to several months, despite the persistence of an ischemic area on MRI. This is due to the well known neuronal plasticity of the CNS, in particular, of the primary motor cortex. The most effective therapeutic approach appears to be the conservative one, although the best treatment regimen is still not well defined. Young patients should be closely monitored and treated conservatively with osmotic diuretics to reduce perilesional edema. At the same time, however, it is very important to exclude, by means of instrumental and laboratory studies, conditions that could favour
Head trauma due to a car accident is extremely serious, especially for young children. If your child has suffered head trauma, call Moseley Collins now.
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The use of CT scan in minor head injuries is a difficult subject. Another reason why calling us first when your child has a minor head injury is the way to go.. "Nigrovic said many children show up in ERs with minor head trauma, but very few have significant traumatic brain injuries, identified as a condition resulting in death, brain surgery, use of oxygen tubes for more than 24 hours, or hospital admission for more than two days. She said monitoring symptoms is an effective strategy to reduce CT scans for children considered in the low- to intermediate-risk category.. "We use CT scans for high-risk cases because we dont want to miss a brain injury," said Nigrovic. "But if a 3-year-old girl with a headache or vomiting can stay in the ER and be monitored, and if after four hours the symptoms are gone, thats great. She can go home.". Childs head injury doesnt always need CT scan. ...
VAERS ID 209245-1: "This subject is a three month old female, who suffered a fatal head injury while enrolled in a comparative post marketing safety study of Daptacel (diptheria and tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis vaccine absorbed) administered with other recommended vaccines according to the US standard of care. The subject received one dose of study vaccine: the last dose prior to the event was given on 01/14/2003. The subject ""expired instantly due to blunt head injuries in motor vehicle accident described as ""auto vs. fixed object, ejected,"" 18 days post immunization and expired the same day. No other information was reported. Death Certificate has been received. Autopsy has been performed but report not yet received. The event of fatal head injury was reported by the investigator as unrelated to the study product. The autopsy report states accident automobile, death. Follow up on 09/30/2003: ""Autopsy Report received by medical affairs on 09/16/2003. This three-month-old female ...
VAERS ID 209245-1: "This subject is a three month old female, who suffered a fatal head injury while enrolled in a comparative post marketing safety study of Daptacel (diptheria and tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis vaccine absorbed) administered with other recommended vaccines according to the US standard of care. The subject received one dose of study vaccine: the last dose prior to the event was given on 01/14/2003. The subject ""expired instantly due to blunt head injuries in motor vehicle accident described as ""auto vs. fixed object, ejected,"" 18 days post immunization and expired the same day. No other information was reported. Death Certificate has been received. Autopsy has been performed but report not yet received. The event of fatal head injury was reported by the investigator as unrelated to the study product. The autopsy report states accident automobile, death. Follow up on 09/30/2003: ""Autopsy Report received by medical affairs on 09/16/2003. This three-month-old female ...
Lalenoh, Diana Christine and Bisri, Tatang and Yusuf, Irawan Brain Protection Effect of Lidocaine Measured By Interleukin-6 and Phospholipase A2 Concentration in Epidural Haematoma with Moderate Head Injury Patient. Journal of Anesthesia & Clinical Research. ISSN 2155-6148. ...
We dont know what to do. My dad is 72 years old--VERY healthy, but fell from a ladder 10 days ago and has many broken ribs, still on ventilator, moderate head injury (hes starting to wake up and respond to commands), and C2 & T6 fractures (probably no cord involvement) and an exploded T12/L1 (almost certain cord involvement).... He has a right shoulder (scapula) fracture and for some unknown reason, is not moving his right arm much. He seems to wince to pain in his upper legs, but no leg
The accident caused Mack to have severe traumatic head injury, among other serious injuries. Severe traumatic head injury occurs when there is direct damage or the threat of damage to the brain. An example of direct damage to the brain would be a gunshot wound. A threat of damage would be a severe contusion which may result in a hemotoma or increased intracranial pressure. The right frontal lobe (sub-dural) of Macks brain was injured causing hemotoma and increased intracranial pressure. This is why they placed drain tubes in his head at the onset. The most recent CAT scan shows that the brain swelling has gone down, which is an improvement. The doctor said that the drain tubes in his head will most likely be removed today since they have done their job. However, there are still scattered patches of blood and fluid in the brain. The doctor stated that there has been some cellular death of brain cells due to low blood pressure and the brain being without oxygen for a period of time right after ...
ABSTRACTObjectiveTo externally validate four commonly used rules in computed tomography (CT) for minor head injury.DesignProspective, multicentre cohort study.SettingThree university and six non-university hospitals in the Netherlands.ParticipantsConsecutive adult patients aged 16 years and over who
Background and objective Expectations and beliefs are important predictors of outcome following minor head injury. In this paper, the primary purpose is to develop a simple symptom expectation...
Our results show there is no reduction in mortality with methylprednisolone in the 2 weeks after head injury. The cause of the rise in risk of death within 2 weeks is unclear.
3Gaziosmanpa a University, School of Medicine, Department of Biostatistics, Tokat, Turkey DOI : 10.5137/1019-5149.JTN.12668-14.3 AIM: Because of the need for effective method to determine the severity of head trauma, the importance of biomarkers is recognized recently. This study aims to analyze the values of sera levels of some biomarkers and the relation with their tissue levels in acute head injury.. MATERIAL and METHODS: In this study, rats were divided into three groups (mild head trauma, severe head trauma and control group). All rats were anaesthetized. Weightdrop method was used as trauma method. Blood samples were obtained five minutes after trauma when the acute effects of trauma occurred. Then whole brains of rats were excised. Levels of biomarkers were investigated in the sera samples and homogenized brain tissues biochemically.. RESULTS: Significant differences in the sera GFAP (p=0.015) and insulin (p=0.011) levels were observed. Very significant difference in the sera nNOS level ...
The evidence from observational epidemiologic studies provide some support for a harmful effect of head injuries, with risk especially elevated among those whose head injuries occur later in life or are more severe. However, few prospective studies have been conducted on head injury and AD, and they have significant methodological limitations. More importantly, the diagnosis of dementia in all prior studies has been based on clinical features rather than modern biomarker assays to identify the dementia subtype, and there have been no studies where the clinical diagnosis of AD was confirmed in pathologic studies. Thus, while head injury likely increases the risk of developing dementia, epidemiologic evidence linking head injury to AD dementia is less clear. There is much greater support for moderate to severe head injury in total dementia, and some support for mild head injury with loss of consciousness and total dementia. Of course, as there are many other harmful effects from head injury, there ...
The influence of vehicle deformation on the risks of head injury for the drivers involved in frontal crashes is studied using real world crash data. There are three types of vehicle damage distribution considered in this paper, namely, wide distribution, moderate offset, and small offset. The adjusted odds ratios (OR) along with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the head injuries are estimated by logistic regression, controlling for a wide variety of confounders. Results show that occupants head injuries are highly related to damage distribution.
Question - Visible bump after a head injury on the back of head. Ask a Doctor about diagnosis, treatment and medication for Loss of consciousness, Ask a Critical Care Specialist
People who have experienced a head injury can be subject to various symptoms. Some symptoms can be mild, while others can be very serious. Symptoms may occur immediately after the injury, while others occur after some time has passed. Symptoms can last briefly. Some of the less serious symptoms of head injuries include mild headaches, nausea, and brief loss consciousness. Others, including seizures, are much more serious and can last for days, weeks, and even years in some cases. Head trauma victims are 12 times more likely than people who have not suffered from head injuries to have seizures. Head injuries occur all the time. People who have acute intracranial hematomas can also have a high rate of epilepsy. The severity of the head injury is typically reflected in the severity of the symptoms that follow. Seizures are considered to be more serious than most symptoms relating to head injuries. Seizures do occur in people who have never had a head injury, but people who have experienced a head ...
Objective: To describe the impact of implementing clinical practice guidelines (CPG) for head injury in a trauma referral system in Songkla province, Thailand.. Methods: The CPG was developed by a local multidisciplinary team and implemented using multi-faceted methods. The outcome of patients with head injury from three community hospitals and a university hospital (Songklanagarind Hospital) was reported in terms of "talk and deteriorate" patients and a "poor" outcome for patients with severe head injury. Changes to clinical practice were observed where the guidelines were implemented.. Results: 1000 patients with head injury were enrolled from 1st August 2005 to 15th January 2006. The incidence of "talk and deteriorate" patients was 10.5% and a poor outcome was noted in 35.5% of patients with severe head injury, similar to the results of a previous study in Songklanagarind Hospital (p,0.05). Following implementation of the guidelines, 19.8% of patients underwent CT scanning with similar ...
Very serious head wounds can result in spinal injuries, breathing problems, a fractured skull or bleeding in and around the brain and can sometimes be fatal. Most serious head injuries on the slopes are caused by collisions with other skiers or static objects such as rocks, pylons or trees. Skiers can reach speeds of 40mph even on fairly moderate slopes, so the force of the impact will be high. Colliding with static objects tends to cause more damage than colliding with other skiers and most fatal head wounds sustained during skiing are caused by colliding with trees. ...
This interview was inspired by a question from KUOW listener Patricia Boiko.. Has the rising popularity of bike sharing led to more head injuries? Rivara: We recently looked at about 80 people who were treated for bike injuries at Harborview Medical Center. We found that of those 80, only three were bike-share related.. Why do you think that is?. First of all, I dont want to leave your listeners with the idea that they shouldnt wear helmets. Helmets prevent 85 percent of head injuries.. But with bike shares, its a combination of factors. I think the bikes are a bit clunky, and theyre slower than the typical 18-speed bike that most of us have at home. And I think the people riding them dont want to go fast.. Is that reassuring to you in some way?. Well, there arent that many people who are being injured on bikes to begin with. So it is reassuring that theres not an increased number of head injuries.. But were still in the early stages of bike sharing. I think were going to see more and ...
Pediatric patients with head and neck cancer can be treated with proton beam therapy (PBT) instead of traditional photon radiation, and it will result in similar outcomes with less impact on quality of life.
By Genevra PittmanNEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Observing some kids after a head injury may help doctors decide which ones need a head x-ray, according to a new study published in Pediatrics.Thats important because researchers still arent sure whether too many of those x-rays, called computed tomography, or CT scans, might trigger cancer years later.CT scans can help doctors recognize more serious head injuries that need treatment. But observation is probably a good strategy for kids who have some risk of a serious brain injury, but arent showing serious symptoms, said Dr. Lise Nigrovic of Childrens Hospital Boston, who worked on the study.If a kids shows up at the ER very soon after a head injury, you may just not have had enough time for symptoms to develop, she told Reuters Health. Or, a kid may have some symptoms that make you a little concerned, but you just want some time before making a decision about doing an x-ray.We all want to make sure that we use CT scanning in the cases where its
Dr. Randall Kertz, DC has released an all-new, second edition of his popular book, The Bassists Guide to Injury Management, Prevention and Better Health. The second edition features expanded content and a new cover. The Bassists Guide is written specifically for bassists, dealing with the common, and not-so-common issues bass players encounter when practicing and...
Guidelines for the management of severe head injury in adults as evolved by the European Brain Injury Consortium are presented and discussed. The importance of preventing and treating secondary...
PubMed comprises more than 30 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.
TY - JOUR. T1 - Intensive care monitoring of severe head injury. AU - Rafferty, C.. AU - Hansen, S.. AU - Bullock, Ross. AU - Teasdale, G. M.. AU - Fitch, W.. AU - Jamal, G. A.. PY - 1992/1/1. Y1 - 1992/1/1. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0026696761&partnerID=8YFLogxK. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0026696761&partnerID=8YFLogxK. M3 - Article. AN - SCOPUS:0026696761. VL - 3. JO - Clinical Intensive Care. JF - Clinical Intensive Care. SN - 0956-3075. IS - 2 SUPPL.. ER - ...
Tramadol (Ultram) belongs to the category of opioid analgesic (analgesic) drugs and is a strong central acting analgesic. Tramadol is a medication for relieving the pain syndrome of moderate and severe intensity of various etiology, including pain in patients with cancer, pain in case of trauma and in the postoperative period.. When using the drug, it is necessary to avoid driving the car and practicing potentially dangerous activities that require an increased concentration of attention and speed of psychomotor reactions. Dizziness or severe drowsiness may lead to falls or other accidents.. This medication should be used with special care in case of various disorders of consciousness, craniocerebral trauma, seizure of intracranial hypertension, epileptic syndrome and other conditions, accompanied by a loss of control over oneself and the functions of the respiratory system.. Avoid drinking alcohol. When alcohol is combined with tramadol, dangerous adverse effects or even death can occur. Check ...
Disorders of the centrally located thalamus, which integrates a wide range of cortical and subcortical information. Manifestations include sensory loss, MOVEMENT DISORDERS; ATAXIA, pain syndromes, visual disorders, a variety of neuropsychological conditions, and COMA. Relatively common etiologies include CEREBROVASCULAR DISORDERS; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; BRAIN NEOPLASMS; BRAIN HYPOXIA; INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES; and infectious processes ...
Disorders of the centrally located thalamus, which integrates a wide range of cortical and subcortical information. Manifestations include sensory loss, MOVEMENT DISORDERS; ATAXIA, pain syndromes, visual disorders, a variety of neuropsychological conditions, and COMA. Relatively common etiologies include CEREBROVASCULAR DISORDERS; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; BRAIN NEOPLASMS; BRAIN HYPOXIA; INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES; and infectious processes ...
Norbert Hosten and Thomas Liebig. Thieme, 2002. Price, $129.00; 426 pages, 420 illustrations, 21 tables.. Although it is difficult to develop enthusiasm for a book that deals exclusively with CT scanning of the head and spine, this compendium of illustrations and brief discussions of many pathologic processes will be of some use for those who are not in the primary practice of neuroradiology. It can also serve as a review of CT of the CNS.. Drs. Hosten and Liebig have divided this 426-page book into two main sections: CT of the head and CT of the spine. The expected subdivisions for the first section include craniocerebral trauma, cerebrovascular disease, inflammatory disease, tumors, degenerative and demyeling disease, congenital brain disease, postoperative, facial skeletal, and skull base. The subdivisions for the second section include a variety of functional and structural diseases of the spinal column, intraspinal masses, and inflammatory disease. The foreword of the book indicates that a ...
The diagnosis and treatment of patients with a head injury whilst on anticoagulants. Challenges in emergency medicine. Diagnosis intracranial injury
A head injury is a broad term that describes many injuries that occur to the scalp, skull, brain, and underlying tissue and blood vessels in the head. Head injuries are also commonly referred to as brain injury, or traumatic brain injury (TBI), depending on the extent of the head trauma.
A head injury is a broad term that describes many injuries that occur to the scalp, skull, brain, and underlying tissue and blood vessels in the head. Head injuries are also commonly referred to as brain injury, or traumatic brain injury (TBI), depending on the extent of the head trauma.
A head injury is a broad term that describes many injuries that occur to the scalp, skull, brain, and underlying tissue and blood vessels in the head. Head injuries are also commonly referred to as brain injury, or traumatic brain injury (TBI), depending on the extent of the head trauma.
... Step by step, we are improving the care of the head injured patient Up to 1 million people a year in the United Kingdom attend an accident and emergency department because of a head injury. Of these 90% are classified as minor (with a Glasgow coma score of 15) or mild (13 or 14), 5% as moderate (9-12), and 5% as severe (3-8).1 Road traffic accidents cause most of the severe head injuries and are likely to become the third most common cause of death and disability
Neuropsychologists often assess individuals involved in litigation, and who may be in a position to obtain significant financial compensation. Malingering measures are often employed in these assessments, however, the accuracy of these measures may be less than satisfactory. Most malingering measures are not targeted to mild head injury, a very common type of claim. The goal of this research was to begin the development and validation of a measure specifically designed to detect malingering of mild head injury symptoms. More accurate assessment can help identify false claims, and also establish the merit of genuine claims. A 472-item questionnaire was developed by three writers based on knowledge of head injury sequelae and malingering detection techniques. This questionnaire contained both common, plausible symptoms following injury, and implausible symptoms. Malingering individuals may not only overendorse true symptoms, but may identify implausible symptoms or deny positive attributes in an attempt
NEOPLASMS. Russell Blaylock, who is an SNI Associate Editor-in-Chief and expert in natural supplemental molecular agents and inflammation, and whose papers in SNI have been read by thousands across the world, has written two major papers on cancer. One covers the fallacies in methodological studies on cancer treatment, and the second proposes a hypothesis for a new treatment paradigm in cancer control. His paper on immunoexcitotoxicity, written in 2011 as an explanation for the cascade of events leading from head injury to Alzheimers and Parkinsons, has become a standard in the field for explaining the problems following head injury and other injuries to the CNS. Both of these papers take time to read. I advise downloading them and reading them at your leisure. The essence of each paper is in my introduction in the first paper and in the second in the summary below. These papers will change our way of thinking about cancer and its treatment. Papacci et al from Italy report on the use of ...
Tiny particles secreted in response to head injury in the brains of mice could help explain how inflammation spreads and ultimately boosts the risk of developing dementia. Head injuries are increasingly being linked to cognitive problems and degenerative brain disease in later life. Mysterious particles a micrometre in diameter have previously been found in the spinal fluid of people with traumatic brain injury, but their function has remained unknown. Now Alan Faden at the University of
After enduring a head injury, many people-myself included-find they have a problem with all aspects of language, from the mechanics of speaking to volume control and even when its appropriate to use more
PubMed comprises more than 30 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.
Measurement of osmolality aids interpretation of electrolyte disturbance in the context of SIADH (especially following head injury/surgery), diabetes insipidus, confirmation of laboratory-derived electrolyte findings, and diagnosis of alcohol/ethylene glycol abuse via determination of the osmolar gap. Measurement of serum osmolality is best performed in conjunction with that of urine osmolality to assess the appropriateness of the renal response.. ...
More than 144,000 Texans suffer a traumatic head injury each year due to negligence. Get the help you need with Roberts and Roberts.
I am a normal person, who lives in my house. I was in the hospital for a traumatic head injury, I went to high school. At graduation day I was set up for a gun scare, this kid said I got molested , I didnt know. In Underground he says " the Anti-Christ is back" , but its all an illusion. I am a normal person. I go to work, and not prince of Darkness. I think thats why the Freemasons needed me, to try and set up Revelations. They were religious and probably curious about the prophecy. Would he come back. I am not evil, very nice person. I hold the door for people always say Thank you and very polite. I think they created this empire , to see if anyone was watching, or anything.......I mean God. William Cooper said this was an old idea they shouldnt of went through with. The Freemasons have been around for centuries maybe even a thousand years. What if they thought we can make the prophecy of Revelations happen ...
Patients with traumatic head injuries should be cooled down to improve their chances of survival, but this could prove fatal if attempted in children, rese
distress syndrome, (d) corticosteroids in traumatic head injury, (e) tirilazad in acute ischaemic stroke, (f) antifibrinolytics in haemorrage.. The authors conclude that in cases (a), (b), (c) there ...
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Looks at common causes of minor and serious head injuries. Discusses possible head injury emergencies. Offers tool to help you check symptoms and decide when to call a doctor. Offers home treatment and prevention tips.
Compliance with NICE head injury management guidelines in a busy district general hospital - is it asking too much? A Spence, S Finnegan, J Harty, T Flannery ...
Head Injury in Children What is a head injury? Head injuries are one of the most common causes of disability and death in children. The injury can be as mild as a bump, bruise (contusion), or cut on the head, or can be moderate to severe in nature due to a concussion, deep cut or open wound, fractured skull bone(s), or from internal bleeding and damage to the brain. A head injury is a broad term that describes a vast array of injuries that occur to the scalp, skull, brain, and underlying tissue and bloo... ...
Brain injuries, including concussions in childhood, can increase the risk of mental illness, poor school attainment as well as premature death, finds a study.
To maintain adequate cerebral perfusion, it is important to maintain normovolemia. The practice of keeping neurological patients dehydrated to minimize cerebral edema is outdated, and in head-injured patients is associated with poor outcome [15]. Fluid balance tallying total input and output should be monitored daily, and insensible loss of 500-800 ml per day should be allowed. Patients with head injury often suffer multiple injuries that may result in significant blood loss, contributing to hypovolemia and hypotension. On the other hand, patients who suffer SAH can develop acute decrease in circulating blood volume unrelated to blood loss. Patients with hemorrhagic or ischemic stroke may also be hypovolemic, and the volume status cannot be assessed by the presence or absence of systemic hypertension. A thorough history and clinical examination is crucial to the establishment of the correct diagnosis. To ensure normovolemia, isotonic fluids or normal saline should be given, although the latter, ...
Most of the things Im passionate about are near and dear to my heart for reasons... Head injuries are this way because my oldest brother was almost killed after a horrific accident involving a car. J is a little different. This injury occurred when he was under 5 and as my mom who feels guilty about the accident though it was not her fault and her ex husband have both said that J is not the same as he was before the accident. I never knew him before the accident (hes 14 years older than me) so once I became a nurse and started working with head injured patients I thought - hmm these guys are acting just like my brother does. J has some common sense issues, short term memory issues, reading issues, and a very short fuse. J is a great man, great brother, and I love him, but he drives me batty at times. I say this because he does... he calls and leaves messages for my mom that start with... "Hi Mom its your son J... Im sorry I havent called, just checking blah blah blah blah, Im sorry etc" ...
The ear contains several membranes and nerves that are prone to infection, obstruction and trauma. Even minor head injuries may damage the structures that comprise the auditory pathway. When hearing is disrupted, external electronic devices Read More ...
All studies were under 200 patients in size and most were under 100 patients. The studies find sensitivities from 27% 95% and specificities from 70% to 97%. The reasons for this great variation in findings may in large part be due to the small sample sizes. The specificities seem to perform better than the sensitivities and thus the finding of a high S-100 may indicate that your patient is at high risk of long term disability. The cut-points for a significant S-100 level differ between studies also and are generally much higher when applied to patients after a severe head injury. Most studies agree that S-100 levels must be taken within 6 hours of head injury ...
In a more severe head injury, symptoms usually take longer to develop. two or more of the danger signs are often present at the same time. the individual remains lethargic and isnt easily aroused. a pupil may enlarge. vomiting is usually forceful, repeated, and progressive worse. if in doubt, call your doctor. because most of the accidents occur in the evening hours, the injury person will generally be asleep several hours after the accident. you can look in on the person periodically to check pulse, pupils, and arousability if you are concerned. with minor head bumps and no signs of brain injury, nighttime checking is usually not necessary ...
Head and neck surgery specialists in Richmond Virginia. We specialize in treating head and neck cancer, salivary and thyroid diseases, pediatric head and neck
Serious head injuries occur in many industries and can be caused by everything from a fall or car accident to being struck by a falling object.
Why do some people experience persistent dizziness after a concussion? Good question, and while we are continuing to learn more about who is most likely to experience persistent dizziness post-injury, we do know that some people experience persistent symptoms associated with vestibular system dysfunction that will not improve without intervention - specifically, vestibular therapy.. The vestibular system is the sensory system that contributes the most to our sense of balance and spatial orientation for the purpose of coordinating movement with balance. This system includes the eyes, senses, and vestibular centers in the ears.. From the Vestibular Disorders Association: "Trauma to the brain can result in abnormal vestibular system functioning, and the brain can receive abnormal signals regarding the position and movement of the head in space. When vestibular information is inaccurate, the brain most often relies on visual input to stabilize the head on the body. This means that the visual system ...
Status: Ongoing. The 1946 birth cohort consists of over 3000 individuals, all born in the UK in the same week in 1946, who have been studied over their life course. Detailed information on cognition and head injury is available for the cohort and this study looks to use this information to investigate whether people who reported having a head injury with loss of consciousness at some point in their life have lower cognitive function and accelerated cognitive decline at age 69.. This study will give researchers a unique opportunity to evaluate hypotheses regarding the relationships between head injury and brain health.. News and Links: ...
The NFL expanding its regular season to eighteen games seems unjustifiable outside of money. Essentially, there is no expansion of the schedule at all. The plan is this: take the last two preseason games (there are four total) and make them count...
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dropcap]H[/dropcap]orse riding is a popular sport throughout the world both recreationally and professionally. As with every sport, injuries develop; some minor- others serious. Current literature shows head injuries are the most prevalent (24%) with upper extremity second (17%) and third lower extremity (15%) (1,2). Most injuries are related from direct falls from the horse (2). This article is not intended to educate or train riders on proper techniques but to discuss common injuries and recognition. For prevention and guidance on technique in riding and transitions, please refer to the master perfumer Jean Paul Guerlain (3,4) in Desert Mirage. Horse riding is a dangerous sport with horses weighing up to 500 kg, traveling as fast as 65 km/hr, and with the saddle roughly 2 m from the ground (5). Horse-related traumas are common in children and can cause severe injuries resulting in death and long-term disability (6). Interestingly, the most common population to get injured are women between the ...
If I may weigh in on the menses topic…. Often, (yet not always the case) many eds are spurred by a disruption in the pituitary gland… Ie, if u had a head Injury of some sort, they r finding that there are some links to developing an ED. The pituitary is the master gland and pretty much runs the whole endocrine system. If that gets disturbed, it can cause a whole host of issues, from personality changes, hormonal imbalances (thyroid, which runs the metabolism… Adrenals, which are key for stress and sodium/fluid balance… Parathyroid, which helps balance calcium and hone health, etc). Many of these also affect mood, thought, behavior, appetite, etc. If ur endocrine system isnt working correctly, neither will ur nervous system, ability to produce and balance neurotransmitters, gut, etc. Also, depending on where the injury was, different areas of the brain could be affected too. Head injuries are so common and most people dont even realize the severity of it til years down the road, or when ...
Head bruising is an injury that does not damage the skin. There is no open wound, there is no blood; nevertheless, this injury can be very serious and cause severe and long-lasting consequences, even death.. With a head injury, two options are possible: 1) a brain contusion is the most serious injury and 2) soft tissue contusion is a less dangerous injury. Head injury may be accompanied by hemorrhage, compression of the brain, fracture of the bones of the skull.. Manifestations of head injury Continue reading →. ...
Dr Neha Pujara is an efficient homoeopathic consultant in healing severe head injury. She has done her homoeopathic graduation from Pune University in 1996. After her graduation she has started her consultation practice in Ahmedabad - Gujarat state, India. She has a vast experience of 15 years in homoeopathic consultation and practice.
The mother of a seven-week-old boy who died from severe head injuries has been charged with his murder. Officers arrested the babys mother, Katarzyna Gacek, 24, from Oldham, on Saturday...
Glascow Coma Scale - A 15 point scale that assesses eye opening, verbal ability and movement that is used to describe and follow a patients level of consciousness. Originally developed to evaluate head injury patients in the field, it is now used widely for inpatient and outpatient assessment.. ...
From the period August 2008 to August 2013, we performed open intramedullary nailing on 57 patients with long bone injuries using the Fixion expandable nail. The breakdown of the AO classification identified A2, A3, B2, B3, C1, and C3 subtypes (Table 1). The femoral shaft was the commonest site of injury for the acute traumatic fractures. Nonunion accounted for 6% of all injuries (Figure 1). Males outnumbered females to a ratio of 46:11. The age ranged from 18-90 years, with a mean age of 38 years. Motor vehicle accidents accounted for majority of the cases (Figure 2). Nineteen patients had concomitant injuries, the commonest of which was mild head injury. Ninety-eight percent of all injuries were closed. The time of surgery varied, with the time between injury and surgery being 2-213 days (average 17.8 days). The patient who waited 213 days for surgery had defaulted from the outpatient department and subsequently presented again. Surgery time also varied, with femoral cases accounting for 102 ...
If anyone who reads this can say a little prayer for my cousin and her family right now, Id really appreciate it. About 2 weeks ago, she was in a terrible car accident and her head injuries were so severe they are giving very little hope of coming out of the coma she is in now. Her one and only daughter, age 4 months is doing okay now, only a minor head injury and some cuts and scrapes from flying glass. It was my cousin that bore the impact the passenger side of the car crushed into her, and by some miracle her baby behind her was okay. My cousins husband who came upon the scene of the accident is still distraught ...
Clinical neuropsychologist Dr. Glen Johnsons Traumatic Brain Injury Survival Guide was written to explain head injuries in clear, easy to understand language for patients of head injuries. The goal of this online book is to better prepare the head injured person and family for the long road of recovery ahead.
Question - Bled after hitting head. Head injury. What does it sound like?. Ask a Doctor about diagnosis, treatment and medication for Head injury, Ask a Neurologist
P gina 237 - ... easy motion. This is most happily provided for, by the cartilages and mucus of the joints. The interstices of all these parts must be filled up with some soft and ductile matter, which shall keep them in their places, unite them, and at the same time allow them to move a little upon one another ; these purposes are answered by the cellular membrane, or adipose substance. ...
A head injury is an injury to your brain, skull, or scalp. All head injuries should be treated seriously and assessed by a doctor. Get the facts about 6 major types.
Another name for Head Injury is Head Injury. The American Academy of Pediatrics has published guidelines regarding when athletes can return to sports ...
(2001) Mueller. Journal of Athletic Training. OBJECTIVE: To describe the incidence of catastrophic head injuries in a variety of high school and college sports. DESIGN AND SETTING: Data on catastrophic head injuries were compiled in a national...
A mother who couldnt explain the severe head trauma that preceded her daughters death has been arrested on suspicion of causing the childs injuries
The NFLs concussion protocol is laughable. Its a guessing game in which team trainers and doctors roll the dice on head injuries. The coaches? They have their own agendas on game days. They are
Continuous monitoring of brain interstitial gas concentrations allows direct regional evaluation of the pathophysiology of cerebral tissues. We have incorporated the Paratrend 7 (P7) multiparameter sensor into our established multimodal monitoring of head injured patients, to investigate the relationship between brain and arterial pO2, pCO2, and pH, as well as defining thresholds for cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP). A P7 sensor was inserted into the brain tissue of 40 adult head injured patients via a modified Camino bolt or triple lumen bolt. A second sensor was placed in the femoral artery for continuous monitoring of blood gases. Data signals from 19 monitored parameters were collected onto computer at the bedside for up to 14 days. No complications were seen. For individual patients the changes in brain tissue parameters showed large variations over 24 hours and the relationship between parameters varied considerably both between patients and during the period of monitoring any one individual.
Questions often arise immediately after an injury. Dos & donts of effective injury management can be confusing to say the least. HPFY provides products & answers to the early treatment of injuries.
Objective : To describe the long-term outcome 5 years after injury of young adults who were 15 to 19 years old at the time of their head injuries. Design : A retrospective cohort. The health records of 62 consecutive eligible subjects were abstracted for baseline sociodemographic. health, and injury variables. A telephone interview was...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Delayed and isolated oculomotor nerve palsy following minor head trauma. AU - Nakagawa, Yu. AU - Toda, Masahiro. AU - Shibao, Shunsuke. AU - Yoshida, Kazunari. PY - 2017. Y1 - 2017. N2 - Background: The purpose of this study was to consider the mechanism of isolated oculomotor nerve palsy after minor head trauma. Case Description: We report a rare case of delayed and isolated oculomotor nerve palsy following minor head trauma. A 19-year-old boy complained of double vision 1 day after a minor head trauma. Neuro-ophthalmic examination showed isolated left oculomotor nerve palsy. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging examination revealed no abnormal findings and steroid therapy was administered for a week. Three months after the injury, the ptosis and extraocular movements had fully resolved, although the pupillary light reflex was still abnormal. Conclusions: Delayed and isolated oculomotor nerve palsy may be caused by an injury at the point where the oculomotor nerve ...
Objective: To examine the incidence of spinal pathology in infants with non-accidental head injury.. Methods: 18 infants with non-accidental head injury were investigated between 2000 and 2007 with dedicated MRI of the brain and spine. During the earlier years, the spine was imaged only when there were suspicious features on other imaging to suggest a spinal injury (seven cases). After 2005, all suspected cases of non-accidental head injury were routinely investigated with MRI of the whole spine in addition to the brain. The spinal imaging at initial investigation and at follow-up was reviewed.. Results: There was a high incidence (8/18 cases, 44%) of subdural collections in the spine. They were all clinically occult and in six cases large. All eight cases were associated with subdural haematomas in the supratentorial and infratentorial compartment. The signal characteristics were analysed and compared with those of the intracranial collections. One had a small epidural haematoma. Other depicted ...
Post-traumatic amnesia (PTA) is a state of confusion that occurs immediately following a traumatic brain injury in which the injured person is disoriented and unable to remember events that occur after the injury. The person may be unable to state his or her name, where he or she is, and what time it is. When continuous memory returns, PTA is considered to have resolved. While PTA lasts, new events cannot be stored in the memory. About a third of patients with mild head injury are reported to have "islands of memory", in which the patient can recall only some events. During PTA, the patients consciousness is "clouded". Because PTA involves confusion in addition to the memory loss typical of amnesia, the term "post-traumatic confusional state" has been proposed as an alternative. There are two types of amnesia: retrograde amnesia (loss of memories that were formed shortly before the injury) and anterograde amnesia (problems with creating new memories after the injury has taken place). Both ...
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This prospective consecutive double-blinded randomized study investigated the effect of prostacyclin on pressure reactivity (PR) in severe traumatic brain injured patients. Other aims were to describe PR over time and its relation to outcome. Blunt head trauma patients, Glasgow coma scale a parts per thousand currency sign8, age 15-70 years were included and randomized to prostacyclin treatment (n = 23) or placebo (n = 25). Outcome was assessed using the extended Glasgow outcome scale (GOSE) at 3 months. PR was calculated as the regression coefficient between the hourly mean values of ICP versus MAP. Pressure active/stable was defined as PR a parts per thousand currency sign0. Mean PR over 96 h (PRtot) was 0.077 +/- A 0.168, in the prostacyclin group 0.030 +/- A 0.153 and in the placebo group 0.120 +/- A 0.173 (p , 0.02). There was a larger portion of pressure-active/stable patients in the prostacyclin group than in the placebo group (p , 0.05). Intra-individual changes over time were common. ...
Child abuse prevention efforts are of 3 general types, ie, primary, secondary, and tertiary.21 Primary prevention efforts, of which this program is an example, address a broad segment of the population (such as all new parents). Secondary prevention efforts, such as the home visitation (or nurse-family partnership) program developed by Olds et al,22,23 target a specific subset of the population considered to be at higher risk for child maltreatment. Tertiary prevention efforts target perpetrators of child maltreatment and seek primarily to prevent recidivism.. Secondary prevention programs such as home visitation programs have had the greatest demonstrated success in reducing child maltreatment22,23 but require considerable resources and are impractical for an entire population. Moreover, their effectiveness in specifically preventing abusive infant head injuries has not been assessed. Primary prevention programs designed to educate the public about the dangers of violent infant shaking have ...
According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, head traumas in young children are common. Children suffering from trauma-induced head injuries present with headaches, cognitive impairments, changes in personality, and sleep disturbances. Dizziness/vertigo is also a common diagnosis for a significant portion of children presenting with trauma (Faul et al., 2010). Head traumas are frequently subdivided into blunt head traumas and penetrating head traumas. Blunt head injuries, including whiplash injuries, can result in dizziness from fracture of the temporal bone or labyrinthine concussion. In cases of a fracture or concussion in which the labyrinth or vestibular nerve is affected, children can experience severe vertigo with nystagmus and nausea, indicating unilateral impairment in the peripheral vestibular system (i.e., end-organ or vestibular nerve). Penetrating head injuries have been reported to cause vertigo secondary to perilymphatic fistula. As in adults, pediatric benign ...
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... refers to the sudden development of a blood clot on the surface of the brain, as a result of a head injury. In some patients, for example those on warfarin or who have poor blood clotting, the head injury may be relatively minor.. ...
Detlav IE (1976). "[Anti-brain antibodies in serum and cerebrospinal fluid following cranio-cerebral trauma]". Zhurnal ...
Dykan was diagnosed with multiple facial bones fractures, craniocerebral trauma and brain concussion. He went on to miss the ...
Pešić had to have his kidney removed, and Šešum suffered severe craniocerebral trauma from the kick to the head. The murder was ...
Subject of scientific works: brain tumors, craniocerebral traumas, herniated intervertebral discs, neurosurgical aspects of ...
... with a serious craniocerebral trauma and fracture of the back; he was taken to the intensive care unit of the 1469th Naval ...
An emergency doctor gave the cause of death as "open, cranio-cerebral trauma following traffic accident," injuries that he said ...
... "supportive treatment of sequelae of craniocerebral trauma" in various European countries, including Austria, Germany, France, ...
... on ECT have evolved from an early suggestion that the biochemical basis of ECT is similar to that of craniocerebral trauma ...
... craniocerebral trauma MeSH C21.866.915.300.200 --- brain injuries MeSH C21.866.915.300.200.150 --- brain concussion MeSH ... cumulative trauma disorders MeSH C21.866.844.150.206 --- carpal tunnel syndrome MeSH C21.866.844.150.957 --- ulnar nerve ... cerebrovascular trauma MeSH C21.866.915.200.200 --- carotid artery injuries MeSH C21.866.915.200.200.500 --- carotid artery, ...
2002). "The effect of severe traumatic brain injury on the family". Journal of Trauma. 52 (6): 1121-4. doi:10.1097/00005373- ... 1992). "Psychological counseling of the family of patients with craniocerebral injuries (psychological family counseling of ... Problems after delivery can include severe prematurity, severe lung or heart disease, serious infections, trauma to the brain ...
J Trauma. 2007 Jan;62(1):80-8. Long-term cognitive, emotional, and functional outcomes in trauma intensive care unit survivors ... PMID 9401652 Ersahin Y, Gülmen V, Palali I, Mutluer S. Growing skull fractures (craniocerebral erosion). Neurosurg Rev. 2000 ... CT in Head Trauma" Head Trauma at Emedicine.com Skull Fractures at MedPix After the Injury- Children's Hospital Of Philadelphia ... "Head Trauma." Emedicine.com. Retrieved on January 26, 2007. Paterson CR, Burns J, McAllion SJ. Am J Med Genet. 1993 Jan 15;45(2 ...
Kopshev, SN (1982). "Craniocerebral hypothermia in the prevention and combined therapy of cerebral pathology in infants with ... Hypothermia reduces vasogenic oedema, haemorrhage and neutrophil infiltration after trauma. The release of excitatory ...
Learn more about Craniocerebral Trauma from related diseases, pathways, genes and PTMs with the Novus Bioinformatics Tool. ... Craniocerebral Trauma is also known as Trauma, Craniocerebral, Trauma, Head, Craniocerebral Injuries, Craniocerebral Injury, ... Craniocerebral Trauma: Disease Bioinformatics. Research of Craniocerebral Trauma has been linked to Brain Injuries, Comatose, ... Explore more on Craniocerebral Trauma below! For more information on how to use Laverne, please read the How to Guide.. ...
... the number of elderly people with craniocerebral injury (CCT) who are referred for... ... Karimi-Nejad A., Tritz W. (1984) Sequelae and Prognosis of Craniocerebral Trauma in Elderly People. In: Piotrowski W., Brock M ... the number of elderly people with craniocerebral injury (CCT) who are referred for neurosurgical treatment will continue to ...
The effect of permissive hypercapnia on cerebral oxygen metabolism and brain function in patients with craniocerebral trauma ... Permissive hypercapnia, Craniocerebral trauma, Cerebral oxygen metabolism, Brain function.. Introduction. Craniocerebral trauma ... For anesthesia of patients with severe craniocerebral trauma, CMRO2 of the brain tissue is an important parameter [14]. By ... In anesthesia for neurosurgical patients with severe craniocerebral trauma, in the premise of not affecting the oxygen uptake ...
Craniocerebral trauma. The concussive and shearing stresses of head injury may cause concussion, contusion of the brain (most ... Trauma. Damage to the spinal cord may result from spinal fractures or dislocations. The severity of damage varies with the ... Trauma. Traumatic and mechanical injuries can affect all levels of the nervous system. Serious head injuries can lead to ... The most common disorders affecting the spine are degenerative, most often following trauma such as hard labour or whiplash. In ...
"Craniocerebral Trauma" by people in this website by year, and whether "Craniocerebral Trauma" was a major or minor topic of ... "Craniocerebral Trauma" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicines controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical ... Below are the most recent publications written about "Craniocerebral Trauma" by people in Profiles. ... Below are MeSH descriptors whose meaning is more general than "Craniocerebral Trauma". ...
Craniocerebral trauma, Pulmonary edema, Renal injury Методы медицинской визуализации при неотложных состояниях: общий канал для ...
Craniocerebral trauma, Pulmonary edema, Renal injury Medical imaging in emergency: collaborative channel of Imaios members All ...
Book; Format: print ; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: Geneva : World Health Organization, 2006Title translated: Casques : manuel de sécurité routière à l intention des décideurs et des praticiens.; Cascos : manual de seguridad vial para decisores y profesionales..Online access: Full text now in IRIS , Full text now in IRIS , Full text now in IRIS , Full text now in IRIS , Full text now in IRIS , Full text now in IRIS Availability: Items available for loan: WHO HQ [Call number: WL 354 2006HE POR] (3). Items available for reference: WHO HQ [Call number: WL 354 2006HE IND] (1). ...
Cranio-cerebral injury in multiple system trauma. Frowein, R. A. Frowein, R. A. Less ... Complete Disruption of Axillary Artery Caused by Severe Atherosclerosis and Trivial Nonpenetrating Trauma. CLEVELAND, JOSEPH C ... The Journal of Trauma: Injury, Infection, and Critical Care. 19(8):551-555, August 1979. ... The Journal of Trauma: Injury, Infection, and Critical Care. 19(8):556-558, August 1979. ...
Craniocerebral trauma; Diffuse axonal injury; Magnetic resonance imaging; Motivation; Psychology; Psychosocial aspects ...
... the 9th China craniocerebral trauma forum was held in Xi an. The forum awarded the teams and individuals that had made ... former Chairman of world neurosurgery trauma, chief scientist of EUs Global Craniocerebral Trauma Cooperation Plan ANDREW MASS ... The neurosurgery team of the First Affiliated Hospital was awarded EUs Global Craniocerebral Trauma Cooperation Plan. ... Recently, the 9th China craniocerebral trauma forum was held in Xi an. The forum awarded the teams and individuals that had ...
Cranio-cerebral trauma. DS021x, DS061, DS062x, DS063x, DS064x, DS065x, DS066x, DS067x, DS068x, DS071x ... Preventability of trauma deaths in a Dutch Level-1 trauma Centre. Injury. 2011;42(9):870-3.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar ... Prehospital trauma systems reduce mortality in developing countries: a systematic review and meta-analysis. J Trauma Acute Care ... Trauma was defined as ICD-10 trauma diagnoses with an inhospital survival probability ≤0.941 based on pooled data from nearly 4 ...
X. Craniocerebral trauma. General principles of craniocerebral trauma and traumatic hematomas / Jack Jallo and Raj K. Narayan ... X. Craniocerebral trauma. General principles of craniocerebral trauma and traumatic hematomas / Jack Jallo and Raj K. Narayan ... Surgical management of cranial trauma / Karin S. Bierbrauer --. Venous sinus repair during the treatment of meningiomas / Marc ... trauma, infections, and more."@en ;. schema:description "Endoscopic third ventriculostomy / Kerry Crone -- Sect. XII. Central ...
... trauma in the pregnant patient; imaging pediatric craniocerebral trauma; and penetrating trauma to the torso and chest. ... Divides the contents of the book into two sections-trauma and non-trauma-to mirror the way you practice. Organizes the material ... Lecture Notes: Radiology contains new and updated images and illustrations, an expansion of the skeletal trauma section, Key ... including radiation concerns when using total body CT for trauma assessment; ...
ClinicalTrials.gov: Craniocerebral Trauma (National Institutes of Health) Journal Articles References and abstracts from ...
Stippler M. Craniocerebral trauma. In: Daroff RB, Jankovic J, Mazziotta JC, Pomeroy SL, eds. Bradleys Neurology in Clinical ... Head trauma. In: Walls RM, Hockberger RS, Gausche-Hill M, eds. Rosens Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 9th ...
Craniocerebral Trauma. Trauma, Nervous System. Wounds and Injuries. Pain. Neurologic Manifestations. Signs and Symptoms. Stress ... Those who are trauma exposed and do not meet criteria for Chronic Pain and PTSD will be assigned to the trauma-exposed control ... Finally, healthy, trauma-exposed control participants with a maximum of one major depressive episode in their past will be ... Active Comparator: Trauma-exposed healthy control group This group will receive baseline and endpoint maximum load exercise ...
Craniocerebral Trauma. Trauma, Nervous System. Wounds and Injuries. Methylprednisolone. Epoetin Alfa. Anti-Inflammatory Agents ... Having indirect traumatic optic neuropathy, not more than 3 weeks between trauma and treatment, normal fundoscopy ... known and used as a valuable agent to promote hematopoiesis has been protective in experimental models of mechanical trauma, ...
Craniocerebral Trauma. Trauma, Nervous System. Wounds and Injuries. Child Development Disorders, Pervasive. Neurodevelopmental ...
Craniocerebral Trauma. Trauma, Nervous System. Wounds and Injuries. Obstetric Labor, Premature. Obstetric Labor Complications. ...
Craniocerebral Trauma:complications, Humans, Meningitis, Bacte. Citation : Craniocerebral trauma is one of major risk factors ... Bacterial meningitis after craniocerebral trauma in the community.. Holeckova K, Kolenova A, Lesnakova A, Steno J, Streharova A ... Bacterial meningitis after craniocerebral trauma in the community. Neuro Endocrinol Lett. 2007 Nov; 28(Suppl 3): 12-13 ...
... were assayed in children with recent craniocerebral trauma (CCT)... ... craniocerebral trauma autoantibodies to glutamate receptors nitric oxide Translated from Zhurnal Nevrologii i Psikhiatrii imeni ... were assayed in children with recent craniocerebral trauma (CCT) of different levels of severity. All the children showed ... to Glutamate Receptors and Products of Nitric Oxide Metabolism in Serum in Children in the Acute Phase of Craniocerebral Trauma ...
Disturbances in respiration commonly accompany severe craniocerebral injuries. Abnormal respiratory patterns such as hyperpnea ... Severe Craniocerebral Trauma and Respiratory Abnormalities: I. Physiological Studies With Specific Reference to Effect of ... Severe Craniocerebral Trauma and Respiratory Abnormalities: I. Physiological Studies With Specific Reference to Effect of ... infection and pulmonary edema are common findings at autopsy in patients who succumb from severe cranio-cerebral trauma. ...
Craniocerebral trauma is frequent, particularly in fatal falls.15,17 Abdominal and chest injuries are relatively uncommon in ... 1993) An analysis of accidental free falls from a height: the "spring break" syndrome. J Trauma 34:123-126. ... 1991) Injuries in infants and small children resulting from witnessed and corroborated free falls. J Trauma 31:1350-1352. ... 1975) Injuries in children sustained in free falls: an analysis of 66 cases. J Trauma 15:987-991. ...
  • 5. The method as claimed in claim 4 wherein the neuronal damage is caused by ischemia, trauma or massive bleeding. (google.com)
  • As life expectancy increases together with motorisation and the danger of accidents, and as medicine improves, the number of elderly people with craniocerebral injury (CCT) who are referred for neurosurgical treatment will continue to increase. (springer.com)
  • The Journal of Trauma: Injury, Infection, and Critical Care. (lww.com)
  • Traumatic axonal injury is a primary brain abnormality in head trauma and is characterized by reduction of fractional anisotropy (FA) on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). (ajnr.org)
  • Cervical spine imaging is indicated for patients with head injury who have signs, symptoms, or a mechanism of injury that might result in spinal injury, and in those who are neurologically impaired (see the ACR Appropriateness Criteria for Spine Trauma). (ajnr.org)
  • 11 , 13 - 15 In the minor head injury setting with a GCS score of 15, the New Orleans Criteria 2 found 100% sensitivity for CT identification of an acute trauma lesion by using risk factors of headache, vomiting, drug or alcohol intoxication, older than age 60, short-term memory deficit, physical findings of supraclavicular trauma, and/or seizure. (ajnr.org)
  • The physics of the injury indicate a low velocity/high pressure trauma. (websleuths.com)
  • Craniocerebral Trauma" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicine's controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) . (wakehealth.edu)
  • craniocerebral trauma;spinal activity and funiculus substance examinationequipmentassociated with unfavourable sequelae. (bga.org.uk)
  • METHODS: According to the International Classification of Diseases-10, 396 subjects with craniocerebral trauma caused by traffic accidents were diagnosed, and the degrees of craniocerebral trauma were graded. (bireme.br)
  • A 56-year-old man developed subdural effusion after mild head trauma, which remained unchanged in volume and density on computed tomography during a follow-up period of 7 months. (biomedsearch.com)
  • 1 At least 80% of traumatic head injuries consist of mild head trauma. (ajnr.org)
  • With severe head trauma, blood pressure autoregulation can be lost focally or globally as well as partially or completely. (vetstream.com)
  • An initial hyperdynamic cardiovascular response to severe head trauma, leads to elevations in blood pressure, heart rate, and cardiac output which is sympathetically mediated. (vetstream.com)
  • Hypoxemia Hypoxemia is usually associated with hyperventilation and may be due in part to the abnormal breathing patterns seen after head trauma. (vetstream.com)
  • Increases in intracranial pressure Intracranial pressure measurement are often responsible for clinical decline in many animals after head trauma. (vetstream.com)
  • After head trauma, the volume of the brain tissue compartment increases usually due to edema or hemorrhage. (vetstream.com)
  • Emergency management of the head trauma patient. (vetstream.com)
  • To the Editor: We would like to report our experience in New Hampshire with a hitherto unreported phenomenon: head trauma secondary to moose-motorcycle collisions. (elsevier.com)
  • Masters et al 7 developed and tested a management strategy that shifted the focus of neuroimaging of head trauma away from skull radiography and toward CT scanning. (ajnr.org)
  • Hi Madeleine, I want to clarify that I didn't mean JonBenet's head trauma was caused by some sort of pressure (although pressure is involved). (websleuths.com)
  • Someone who is pushed or shoved whose head contacts an object is a low velocity/high pressure trauma, for example. (websleuths.com)
  • Background: Abusive head trauma (AHT) in young children usually has a severe outcome when associated with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), which is best characterized by MRI in the acute or subacute phase utilizing diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). (elsevier.com)
  • Over a 5-year period, the medical records and images were reviewed of the 53 children ≤3 years of age who presented with acute head trauma according to the hospital registry. (elsevier.com)
  • Results: In 11 of the 53 children, the etiology of the head trauma was highly suspicious for abuse. (elsevier.com)
  • In 38 the head trauma was accidental and in 4 the trauma was of unknown etiology and at the time of this report was unresolved legally. (elsevier.com)
  • Head trauma with post-traumatic coma and convulsions A CT was performed. (eurorad.org)
  • Zee CS, Go JL (1998) CT of head trauma. (eurorad.org)
  • Levels of serum autoantibodies (aAb) to glutamate receptors and products of nitric oxide (NO) metabolism, i.e., nitrates and nitrites, were assayed in children with recent craniocerebral trauma (CCT) of different levels of severity. (springer.com)
  • CONCLUSIONS: The severity of craniocerebral trauma is closely related to the incidence of organic personality disorder, and it also affects the clinical features of the latter, which provides a certain significance and help for forensic psychiatric assessment. (bireme.br)
  • Thought you might appreciate this item(s) I saw at Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery. (lww.com)
  • OBJECTIVES: To explore the occurrence and the differences of clinical manifestations of organic personality disorder with varying degrees of craniocerebral trauma. (bireme.br)
  • However, the modern day forensic pathologist, along with his or her clinical trauma service colleagues, plays a related role in identifying patterns of injuries and mechanisms of death that can aid in understanding the circumstances of a motor vehicle collision event. (medscape.com)
  • The forum awarded the teams and individuals that had made outstanding contributions in the EU's Global Craniocerebral Trauma Cooperation Plan, neurosurgery team of the First Affiliated Hospital led by our school Vice Principal and the First Affiliated Hospital President Xu Yinghui was awarded, former Chairman of world neurosurgery trauma, chief scientist of EU's Global Craniocerebral Trauma Cooperation Plan ANDREW MASS awarded for the winning team of our school. (acasc.cn)
  • Craniocerebral injuries are a common cause of hospital admission following trauma, and are associated with significant long-term morbidity and mortality. (ajnr.org)
  • Forensic Psychiatric Assessment for Organic Personality Disorders after Craniocerebral Trauma]. (bireme.br)
  • Common trauma injuries include bleeding, burns, brain or other internal injuries, shock and loss of limbs. (vitals.com)
  • Below are the most recent publications written about "Craniocerebral Trauma" by people in Profiles. (wakehealth.edu)
  • The wars in Iraq and Afghanistan are creating a new generation of Veterans, including an increasing number of women Veterans, who present with comorbid PTSD and chronic pain conditions from recent deployment-related physical injuries and exposure to psychological trauma. (clinicaltrials.gov)