Vestibulocochlear Nerve Diseases: Pathological processes of the VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE, including the branches of COCHLEAR NERVE and VESTIBULAR NERVE. Common examples are VESTIBULAR NEURITIS, cochlear neuritis, and ACOUSTIC NEUROMA. Clinical signs are varying degree of HEARING LOSS; VERTIGO; and TINNITUS.Vestibulocochlear Nerve: The 8th cranial nerve. The vestibulocochlear nerve has a cochlear part (COCHLEAR NERVE) which is concerned with hearing and a vestibular part (VESTIBULAR NERVE) which mediates the sense of balance and head position. The fibers of the cochlear nerve originate from neurons of the SPIRAL GANGLION and project to the cochlear nuclei (COCHLEAR NUCLEUS). The fibers of the vestibular nerve arise from neurons of Scarpa's ganglion and project to the VESTIBULAR NUCLEI.Facial Nerve: The 7th cranial nerve. The facial nerve has two parts, the larger motor root which may be called the facial nerve proper, and the smaller intermediate or sensory root. Together they provide efferent innervation to the muscles of facial expression and to the lacrimal and SALIVARY GLANDS, and convey afferent information for TASTE from the anterior two-thirds of the TONGUE and for TOUCH from the EXTERNAL EAR.Vestibulocochlear Nerve Injuries: Traumatic injuries to the VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE.Facial Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the facial nerve or nuclei. Pontine disorders may affect the facial nuclei or nerve fascicle. The nerve may be involved intracranially, along its course through the petrous portion of the temporal bone, or along its extracranial course. Clinical manifestations include facial muscle weakness, loss of taste from the anterior tongue, hyperacusis, and decreased lacrimation.Vestibular Nerve: The vestibular part of the 8th cranial nerve (VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE). The vestibular nerve fibers arise from neurons of Scarpa's ganglion and project peripherally to vestibular hair cells and centrally to the VESTIBULAR NUCLEI of the BRAIN STEM. These fibers mediate the sense of balance and head position.Cranial Nerves: Twelve pairs of nerves that carry general afferent, visceral afferent, special afferent, somatic efferent, and autonomic efferent fibers.Cranial Nerve Diseases: Disorders of one or more of the twelve cranial nerves. With the exception of the optic and olfactory nerves, this includes disorders of the brain stem nuclei from which the cranial nerves originate or terminate.Ear, Inner: The essential part of the hearing organ consists of two labyrinthine compartments: the bony labyrinthine and the membranous labyrinth. The bony labyrinth is a complex of three interconnecting cavities or spaces (COCHLEA; VESTIBULAR LABYRINTH; and SEMICIRCULAR CANALS) in the TEMPORAL BONE. Within the bony labyrinth lies the membranous labyrinth which is a complex of sacs and tubules (COCHLEAR DUCT; SACCULE AND UTRICLE; and SEMICIRCULAR DUCTS) forming a continuous space enclosed by EPITHELIUM and connective tissue. These spaces are filled with LABYRINTHINE FLUIDS of various compositions.Subarachnoid Space: The space between the arachnoid membrane and PIA MATER, filled with CEREBROSPINAL FLUID. It contains large blood vessels that supply the BRAIN and SPINAL CORD.Labyrinth Diseases: Pathological processes of the inner ear (LABYRINTH) which contains the essential apparatus of hearing (COCHLEA) and balance (SEMICIRCULAR CANALS).Optic Nerve Diseases: Conditions which produce injury or dysfunction of the second cranial or optic nerve, which is generally considered a component of the central nervous system. Damage to optic nerve fibers may occur at or near their origin in the retina, at the optic disk, or in the nerve, optic chiasm, optic tract, or lateral geniculate nuclei. Clinical manifestations may include decreased visual acuity and contrast sensitivity, impaired color vision, and an afferent pupillary defect.Olfactory Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the first cranial (olfactory) nerve, which usually feature anosmia or other alterations in the sense of smell and taste. Anosmia may be associated with NEOPLASMS; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM INFECTIONS; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; inherited conditions; toxins; METABOLIC DISEASES; tobacco abuse; and other conditions. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp229-31)Vagus Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the tenth cranial nerve, including brain stem lesions involving its nuclei (solitary, ambiguus, and dorsal motor), nerve fascicles, and intracranial and extracranial course. Clinical manifestations may include dysphagia, vocal cord weakness, and alterations of parasympathetic tone in the thorax and abdomen.Cranial Nerve Injuries: Dysfunction of one or more cranial nerves causally related to a traumatic injury. Penetrating and nonpenetrating CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; NECK INJURIES; and trauma to the facial region are conditions associated with cranial nerve injuries.Nerve Compression Syndromes: Mechanical compression of nerves or nerve roots from internal or external causes. These may result in a conduction block to nerve impulses (due to MYELIN SHEATH dysfunction) or axonal loss. The nerve and nerve sheath injuries may be caused by ISCHEMIA; INFLAMMATION; or a direct mechanical effect.Abducens Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the sixth cranial (abducens) nerve or its nucleus in the pons. The nerve may be injured along its course in the pons, intracranially as it travels along the base of the brain, in the cavernous sinus, or at the level of superior orbital fissure or orbit. Dysfunction of the nerve causes lateral rectus muscle weakness, resulting in horizontal diplopia that is maximal when the affected eye is abducted and ESOTROPIA. Common conditions associated with nerve injury include INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; ISCHEMIA; and INFRATENTORIAL NEOPLASMS.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Health Facility Planning: Areawide planning for health care institutions on the basis of projected consumer need.Trigeminal Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the trigeminal nerve or its nuclei, which are located in the pons and medulla. The nerve is composed of three divisions: ophthalmic, maxillary, and mandibular, which provide sensory innervation to structures of the face, sinuses, and portions of the cranial vault. The mandibular nerve also innervates muscles of mastication. Clinical features include loss of facial and intra-oral sensation and weakness of jaw closure. Common conditions affecting the nerve include brain stem ischemia, INFRATENTORIAL NEOPLASMS, and TRIGEMINAL NEURALGIA.Glossopharyngeal Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the ninth cranial (glossopharyngeal) nerve or its nuclei in the medulla. The nerve may be injured by diseases affecting the lower brain stem, floor of the posterior fossa, jugular foramen, or the nerve's extracranial course. Clinical manifestations include loss of sensation from the pharynx, decreased salivation, and syncope. Glossopharyngeal neuralgia refers to a condition that features recurrent unilateral sharp pain in the tongue, angle of the jaw, external auditory meatus and throat that may be associated with SYNCOPE. Episodes may be triggered by cough, sneeze, swallowing, or pressure on the tragus of the ear. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1390)Cranial Nerve Neoplasms: Benign and malignant neoplasms that arise from one or more of the twelve cranial nerves.Oculomotor Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the oculomotor nerve or nucleus that result in weakness or paralysis of the superior rectus, inferior rectus, medial rectus, inferior oblique, or levator palpebrae muscles, or impaired parasympathetic innervation to the pupil. With a complete oculomotor palsy, the eyelid will be paralyzed, the eye will be in an abducted and inferior position, and the pupil will be markedly dilated. Commonly associated conditions include neoplasms, CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA, ischemia (especially in association with DIABETES MELLITUS), and aneurysmal compression. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p270)Sciatic Nerve: A nerve which originates in the lumbar and sacral spinal cord (L4 to S3) and supplies motor and sensory innervation to the lower extremity. The sciatic nerve, which is the main continuation of the sacral plexus, is the largest nerve in the body. It has two major branches, the TIBIAL NERVE and the PERONEAL NERVE.Onchocerciasis, Ocular: Filarial infection of the eyes transmitted from person to person by bites of Onchocerca volvulus-infected black flies. The microfilariae of Onchocerca are thus deposited beneath the skin. They migrate through various tissues including the eye. Those persons infected have impaired vision and up to 20% are blind. The incidence of eye lesions has been reported to be as high as 30% in Central America and parts of Africa.Accessory Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the eleventh cranial (spinal accessory) nerve. This nerve originates from motor neurons in the lower medulla (accessory portion of nerve) and upper spinal cord (spinal portion of nerve). The two components of the nerve join and exit the skull via the jugular foramen, innervating the sternocleidomastoid and trapezius muscles, which become weak or paralyzed if the nerve is injured. The nerve is commonly involved in MOTOR NEURON DISEASE, and may be injured by trauma to the posterior triangle of the neck.Peripheral Nerves: The nerves outside of the brain and spinal cord, including the autonomic, cranial, and spinal nerves. Peripheral nerves contain non-neuronal cells and connective tissue as well as axons. The connective tissue layers include, from the outside to the inside, the epineurium, the perineurium, and the endoneurium.Trochlear Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the fourth cranial (trochlear) nerve or its nucleus in the midbrain. The nerve crosses as it exits the midbrain dorsally and may be injured along its course through the intracranial space, cavernous sinus, superior orbital fissure, or orbit. Clinical manifestations include weakness of the superior oblique muscle which causes vertical DIPLOPIA that is maximal when the affected eye is adducted and directed inferiorly. Head tilt may be seen as a compensatory mechanism for diplopia and rotation of the visual axis. Common etiologies include CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA and INFRATENTORIAL NEOPLASMS.Optic Nerve: The 2nd cranial nerve which conveys visual information from the RETINA to the brain. The nerve carries the axons of the RETINAL GANGLION CELLS which sort at the OPTIC CHIASM and continue via the OPTIC TRACTS to the brain. The largest projection is to the lateral geniculate nuclei; other targets include the SUPERIOR COLLICULI and the SUPRACHIASMATIC NUCLEI. Though known as the second cranial nerve, it is considered part of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Nerve Fibers: Slender processes of NEURONS, including the AXONS and their glial envelopes (MYELIN SHEATH). Nerve fibers conduct nerve impulses to and from the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Optic Neuritis: Inflammation of the optic nerve. Commonly associated conditions include autoimmune disorders such as MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, infections, and granulomatous diseases. Clinical features include retro-orbital pain that is aggravated by eye movement, loss of color vision, and contrast sensitivity that may progress to severe visual loss, an afferent pupillary defect (Marcus-Gunn pupil), and in some instances optic disc hyperemia and swelling. Inflammation may occur in the portion of the nerve within the globe (neuropapillitis or anterior optic neuritis) or the portion behind the globe (retrobulbar neuritis or posterior optic neuritis).Neuroma, Acoustic: A benign SCHWANNOMA of the eighth cranial nerve (VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE), mostly arising from the vestibular branch (VESTIBULAR NERVE) during the fifth or sixth decade of life. Clinical manifestations include HEARING LOSS; HEADACHE; VERTIGO; TINNITUS; and FACIAL PAIN. Bilateral acoustic neuromas are associated with NEUROFIBROMATOSIS 2. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p673)Neurofibromatosis 2: An autosomal dominant disorder characterized by a high incidence of bilateral acoustic neuromas as well as schwannomas (NEURILEMMOMA) of other cranial and peripheral nerves, and other benign intracranial tumors including meningiomas, ependymomas, spinal neurofibromas, and gliomas. The disease has been linked to mutations of the NF2 gene (GENES, NEUROFIBROMATOSIS 2) on chromosome 22 (22q12) and usually presents clinically in the first or second decade of life.Meningioma: A relatively common neoplasm of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that arises from arachnoidal cells. The majority are well differentiated vascular tumors which grow slowly and have a low potential to be invasive, although malignant subtypes occur. Meningiomas have a predilection to arise from the parasagittal region, cerebral convexity, sphenoidal ridge, olfactory groove, and SPINAL CANAL. (From DeVita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp2056-7)Neurilemmoma: A neoplasm that arises from SCHWANN CELLS of the cranial, peripheral, and autonomic nerves. Clinically, these tumors may present as a cranial neuropathy, abdominal or soft tissue mass, intracranial lesion, or with spinal cord compression. Histologically, these tumors are encapsulated, highly vascular, and composed of a homogenous pattern of biphasic fusiform-shaped cells that may have a palisaded appearance. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp964-5)Meningeal Neoplasms: Benign and malignant neoplastic processes that arise from or secondarily involve the meningeal coverings of the brain and spinal cord.Genes, Neurofibromatosis 2: Tumor suppressor genes located on the long arm of human chromosome 22. Mutation or loss of these genes causes NEUROFIBROMATOSIS 2.Neurofibromin 2: A membrane protein homologous to the ERM (Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin) family of cytoskeleton-associated proteins which regulate physical properties of membranes. Alterations in neurofibromin 2 are the cause of NEUROFIBROMATOSIS 2.Bell Palsy: A syndrome characterized by the acute onset of unilateral FACIAL PARALYSIS which progresses over a 2-5 day period. Weakness of the orbicularis oculi muscle and resulting incomplete eye closure may be associated with corneal injury. Pain behind the ear often precedes the onset of paralysis. This condition may be associated with HERPESVIRUS 1, HUMAN infection of the facial nerve. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1376)Trigeminal Neuralgia: A syndrome characterized by recurrent episodes of excruciating pain lasting several seconds or longer in the sensory distribution of the TRIGEMINAL NERVE. Pain may be initiated by stimulation of trigger points on the face, lips, or gums or by movement of facial muscles or chewing. Associated conditions include MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, vascular anomalies, ANEURYSMS, and neoplasms. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p187)Meniere Disease: A disease of the inner ear (LABYRINTH) that is characterized by fluctuating SENSORINEURAL HEARING LOSS; TINNITUS; episodic VERTIGO; and aural fullness. It is the most common form of endolymphatic hydrops.Trigeminal Nerve: The 5th and largest cranial nerve. The trigeminal nerve is a mixed motor and sensory nerve. The larger sensory part forms the ophthalmic, mandibular, and maxillary nerves which carry afferents sensitive to external or internal stimuli from the skin, muscles, and joints of the face and mouth and from the teeth. Most of these fibers originate from cells of the TRIGEMINAL GANGLION and project to the TRIGEMINAL NUCLEUS of the brain stem. The smaller motor part arises from the brain stem trigeminal motor nucleus and innervates the muscles of mastication.Neuralgia, Postherpetic: Pain in nerves, frequently involving facial SKIN, resulting from the activation the latent varicella-zoster virus (HERPESVIRUS 3, HUMAN). The two forms of the condition preceding the pain are HERPES ZOSTER OTICUS; and HERPES ZOSTER OPHTHALMICUS. Following the healing of the rashes and blisters, the pain sometimes persists.Facial Paralysis: Severe or complete loss of facial muscle motor function. This condition may result from central or peripheral lesions. Damage to CNS motor pathways from the cerebral cortex to the facial nuclei in the pons leads to facial weakness that generally spares the forehead muscles. FACIAL NERVE DISEASES generally results in generalized hemifacial weakness. NEUROMUSCULAR JUNCTION DISEASES and MUSCULAR DISEASES may also cause facial paralysis or paresis.Cochlear Nucleus: The brain stem nucleus that receives the central input from the cochlear nerve. The cochlear nucleus is located lateral and dorsolateral to the inferior cerebellar peduncles and is functionally divided into dorsal and ventral parts. It is tonotopically organized, performs the first stage of central auditory processing, and projects (directly or indirectly) to higher auditory areas including the superior olivary nuclei, the medial geniculi, the inferior colliculi, and the auditory cortex.Semicircular Canals: Three long canals (anterior, posterior, and lateral) of the bony labyrinth. They are set at right angles to each other and are situated posterosuperior to the vestibule of the bony labyrinth (VESTIBULAR LABYRINTH). The semicircular canals have five openings into the vestibule with one shared by the anterior and the posterior canals. Within the canals are the SEMICIRCULAR DUCTS.Vertigo: An illusion of movement, either of the external world revolving around the individual or of the individual revolving in space. Vertigo may be associated with disorders of the inner ear (EAR, INNER); VESTIBULAR NERVE; BRAINSTEM; or CEREBRAL CORTEX. Lesions in the TEMPORAL LOBE and PARIETAL LOBE may be associated with FOCAL SEIZURES that may feature vertigo as an ictal manifestation. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp300-1)Vestibule, Labyrinth: An oval, bony chamber of the inner ear, part of the bony labyrinth. It is continuous with bony COCHLEA anteriorly, and SEMICIRCULAR CANALS posteriorly. The vestibule contains two communicating sacs (utricle and saccule) of the balancing apparatus. The oval window on its lateral wall is occupied by the base of the STAPES of the MIDDLE EAR.Hearing Loss, Sensorineural: Hearing loss resulting from damage to the COCHLEA and the sensorineural elements which lie internally beyond the oval and round windows. These elements include the AUDITORY NERVE and its connections in the BRAINSTEM.Apocynaceae: The dogbane family of the order Gentianales. Members of the family have milky, often poisonous juice, smooth-margined leaves, and flowers in clusters. Asclepiadacea (formerly the milkweed family) has been included since 1999 and before 1810.Hearing Loss: A general term for the complete or partial loss of the ability to hear from one or both ears.Root Cause Analysis: Multi-step systematic review process used for improving safety by investigation of incidents to find what happened, why it happened, and to determine what can be done to prevent it from happening again.
... vestibulocochlear nuclei (vestibular nuclei and cochlear nuclei) (VIII) The functions of these four cranial nerves (V-VIII) ... Central pontine myelinolysis is a demyelination disease that causes difficulty with sense of balance, walking, sense of touch, ... A number of cranial nerve nuclei are present in the pons: mid-pons: the 'chief' or 'pontine' nucleus of the trigeminal nerve ... fibers of the vestibulocochlear nerve, the spinal and principal trigeminal nerve nuclei, which form the general somatic ...
... a tumor of the vestibulocochlear nerve that may lead to tinnitus and hearing loss on the affected side. Outside the cranial ... Diseases of the Skin: Clinical Dermatology. (10th ed.). Saunders. ISBN 0-7216-2921-0. Rapini, Ronald P.; Bolognia, Jean L.; ... The tumor cells always stay on the outside of the nerve, but the tumor itself may either push the nerve aside and/or up against ... A schwannoma is a usually-benign nerve sheath tumor composed of Schwann cells, which normally produce the insulating myelin ...
Cranial nerve crossover, this is most commonly seen following nerve sacrifice. Regional muscle transposition using temporalis ... Lyme disease, caused by chronic Borrelia burgdorferi infection, is a common cause of facial nerve paralysis in endemic areas. ... the latter two symptoms due to damage to vestibulocochlear nerve and the inner ear. Longitudinal fracture in the vertical plane ... Moebius syndrome is a bilateral facial paralysis resulting from the underdevelopment of the VII cranial nerve (facial nerve), ...
To nuclei of cranial nerves III, IV, and VI. Signals sent to these nerves cause the vestibulo-ocular reflex. They allow for the ... In addition, the function of the vestibular system can be affected by tumors on the vestibulocochlear nerve, an infarct in the ... Diseases of the vestibular system can take different forms, and usually induce vertigo[citation needed] and instability or loss ... A common vestibular pathology of dogs and cats is colloquially known as "old dog vestibular disease", or more formally ...
... or the vestibulocochlear nerve (cranial nerve VIII) or neural part. SNHL accounts for about 90% of hearing loss reported. SNHL ... Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease an inherited neurological disorder with delayed onset that can affect the ears as well as other ... Neural hearing impairments are consequent upon damage to the eighth cranial nerve (the vestibulocochlear nerve) or the auditory ... may affect the initiation of the nerve impulse in the cochlear nerve or the transmission of the nerve impulse along the nerve ...
... while persons with 8th cranial nerve (vestibulocochlear nerve) deficits fail auditory brainstem response testing. As part of ... This may include a blood or other sera test for inflammatory markers such as those for autoinflammatory diseases. A hearing ... The electrodes of the implant are designed to stimulate the array of nerve fibers that previously responded to different ... which then send information to the brain via the auditory nerve. The cochlea is tonotopically mapped in a spiral fashion, with ...
... which are known as the facial nerve and vestibulocochlear nerve, respectively. Electroneuronography is typically concerned with ... The ENoG test is the only objective measure of facial nerve integrity. In the human body there are twelve pairs of cranial ... Electroneuronography is used as a basis for a physician's course of action in managing disease. A doctor may opt for continued ... while the term nerve conduction study is employed for other nerves. It consists of a brief electrical stimulation of the nerve ...
... oculomotor nerve (III), trochlear nerve (IV), trigeminal nerve (V), abducens nerve (VI), facial nerve (VII), vestibulocochlear ... Trauma to the skull, disease of bone such as Paget's disease, and injury to nerves during neurosurgery (such as tumor removal) ... accessory nerve (XI), and hypoglossal nerve (XII). (There may be a thirteenth cranial nerve, the terminal nerve (nerve O or N ... vagus nerve (X), accessory nerve (XI) and hypoglossal nerve (XII). The fibers of these cranial nerves exit the brainstem from ...
... vestibulocochlear nerve) emerge. At the level of the midpons, CN V (the trigeminal nerve) emerges. Cranial nerve III (the ... Diseases of the brainstem can result in abnormalities in the function of cranial nerves that may lead to visual disturbances, ... Oculomotor nerve nucleus: This is the third cranial nerve nucleus. Trochlear nerve nucleus: This is the fourth cranial nerve. ... The nuclei of the trigeminal nerve (V), abducens nerve (VI), facial nerve (VII) and vestibulocochlear nerve (VIII) are located ...
"Cranial Nerve VIII. Vestibulocochlear Nerve". Meddean. Loyola University Chicago. Retrieved 2008-06-04. Edge AS, Chen ZY (2008 ... of regrowing the cells of the inner ear that convert sound into neural signals when those cells are damaged by age or disease. ... Neurons of the auditory or vestibulocochlear nerve (the eighth cranial nerve) innervate cochlear and vestibular hair cells. The ... Inner hair cell nerve fibers are also very heavily myelinated, which is in contrast to the unmyelinated outer hair cell nerve ...
The olfactory nerve is typically considered the first cranial nerve, or simply CN I, that contains sensory nerve fibers ... Patients with Alzheimer's disease almost always have an abnormal sense of smell when tested.[2] ... The olfactory nerve is the shortest of the twelve cranial nerves and, similar to the optic nerve, does not emanate from the ... Vilensky, Joel; Robertson, Wendy; Suarez-Quian, Carlos (2015). The Clinical Anatomy of the Cranial Nerves: The Nerves of "On ...
... which is most likely due to damage to the vestibulocochlear nerve (cranial nerve VIII) and not the cochlea itself. Some people ... This disease was first discovered in 1908 by R.C. Hamill after performing an autopsy. Detection of this disease was largely ... and cranial nerve VIII. Iron deposition is also present in cranial nerves I & II, but this damage less frequently presents ... symptoms when compared to cranial nerve VIII, which can be explained by cranial nerve VIII's notable segment of glial cells, ...
The optic nerve, also known as cranial nerve II, or simply as CN II, is a paired nerve that transmits visual information from ... Disease[edit]. Main article: List of eye diseases and disorders. Damage to the optic nerve typically causes permanent and ... Cranial nerve. References[edit]. *^ a b c d e Vilensky, Joel; Robertson, Wendy; Suarez-Quian, Carlos (2015). The Clinical ... The optic nerve has been classified as the second of twelve paired cranial nerves but is technically part of the central ...
These cells have the ability to penetrate the pial membrane and invade the spinal cord and cranial nerves. Infiltration from ... Parenchymal Disease occurs in 30-40% of those diagnosed with NM. The disease associated with the main functioning body of an ... Bilateral sensorineural hearing loss caused by complications with the vestibulocochlear nerves from onset of NM Subacute ... Malignant cells can migrate along spinal or cranial nerve epineurium-perineurium, invade the subpial space, and travel along ...
... vestibulocochlear nerve), swallowing problems (glossopharyngeal nerve) and weakness of the shoulder muscles (accessory nerve) ... Abnormalities of the cranial nerves are present 50-70% of cases. The most common abnormality is involvement of the facial nerve ... The disease is most prevalent in Northern European countries and the highest annual incidence of 60/100,000 is found in Sweden ... Rarer symptoms are double vision (oculomotor nerve, trochlear nerve or abducens nerve), decreased sensation of the face ( ...
Cranial nerve VIII, is the least affected component of the ear when ototoxicity arises, but if the nerve is affected, the ... vestibulocochlear nerve. The damaged structure then produces the symptoms the patient presents with. Ototoxicity in the cochlea ... Renal:An integrated approach to disease. McGraw Hill, New York NY 2012, pg 123 Rademaker-Lakhai JM, Crul M, Zuur L, et al. ( ... The time frames for progress of the disease vary greatly and symptoms of hearing loss may be temporary or permanent. The ...
A decay of more than 25 decibels is indicative of damage to the vestibulocochlear nerve. A tone at the frequency of 4000 Hz is ... The actual value of any tone decay procedure in accurately identifying 8 cranial nerve pathology has not been extensively ... investigated[citation needed] Dhingra, L. and Dhingra, Shruti (2014). Diseases of Ear, Nose and Throat & Head and Neck Surgery ... TD is a powerful diagnostic procedure for RetroCochlearPathology (damage to the auditory nerve). However, It is only one of the ...
... including cranial nerve V (trigeminal), cranial nerve VII (facial), and cranial nerve VIII (vestibulocochlear). The most common ... Chapter 10, "Cerebellar Disease." Elsevier. Nedzelski JM (October 1983). "Cerebellopontine angle tumors: bilateral flocculus ... Delays of one side relative to the other suggest a lesion in cranial nerve VIII between the ear and brainstem or in the ... Lesions in the area of cerebellopontine angle cause signs and symptoms secondary to compression of nearby cranial nerves, ...
Since the vestibulocochlear nerve is in proximity to the geniculate ganglion, it may also be affected, and patients may also ... drtbalu otolaryngology on line Ramsay Hunt Syndrome Causes, Symptoms, Diagnoses Vaccine at Centers for Disease Control and ... "Prognosis of Ramsay Hunt syndrome presenting as cranial polyneuropathy". Laryngoscope. 120 (11): 2270-2276. doi:10.1002/lary. ... a nerve cell bundle of the facial nerve. Ramsay Hunt syndrome type 2 typically presents with inability to move many facial ...
... trigeminal nerve - polymodal pathways, olfactory nerve, optic nerve and vestibulocochlear nerve - monomodal pathways). These ... Out from this area spring the cranial nerves, including the very important vagus nerve. The lateral RF is known for its ... Parkinson's disease: REM sleep disturbances are common in Parkinson's. It is mainly a dopaminergic disease, but cholinergic ... The lateral RF is close to the motor nuclei of the cranial nerves, and mostly mediates their function. ...
... which in turn joins the vestibular nerve to form the vestibulocochlear nerve, or cranial nerve number VIII. The region of the ... "A PET Study of the Functional Neuroanatomy of Writing Impairment in Alzheimer's Disease The Role of the Left Supramarginal and ... Vestibulocochlear Nerve Middlebrooks, J.C. (2009). "Auditory System: Central Pathways". In Squire. Encyclopedia of Neuroscience ... Its hair cells transform the fluid waves into nerve signals. The journey of countless nerves begins with this first step; from ...
It is thought to result from the virus spreading from the facial nerve to the vestibulocochlear nerve. Symptoms include hearing ... Clinical Infectious Diseases, the Infectious Diseases Society of America. 2008. Pollak, L; Dovrat, S; Book, M; Mendelson, E; ... This condition may involve complications that affect several levels of the nervous system and cause many cranial neuropathies, ... The trigeminal nerve is the most commonly involved nerve, of which the ophthalmic division is the most commonly involved branch ...
Sensory cranial and spinal nerves. *Optic (II). *Vestibulocochlear (VIII). *Olfactory (I). *Facial (VII) ... In Parkinson's Disease and Alzheimers, an olfactory deficit is present in 85 to 90% of the early onset cases. [5]There is ... These neurons are part of the facial and glossopharyngeal cranial nerves, as well as a component within the vagus nerve ... Cranial nerve(s) Cerebral cortex Primary associated perception(s) Name Light Eyes Photoreceptor Visual system Optic (II) Visual ...
... and vestibulocochlear nerves (CN VIII). Obstruction of the AICA can cause paresis, paralysis, and loss of sensation in the face ... supplying blood to several cranial nerve nuclei. In the cerebellum, the PICA supplies blood to the posterior inferior portion ... stems from careful documentation of the effects of focal lesions in human patients who have suffered from injury or disease or ... Underneath the gray matter of the cortex lies white matter, made up largely of myelinated nerve fibers running to and from the ...
Sensory cranial and spinal nerves. *Optic (II). *Vestibulocochlear (VIII). *Olfactory (I). *Facial (VII) ... Syed, Z (2015). "Chemical ecology and olfaction in arthropod vectors of diseases". Current Opinion in Insect Science. 10: 83-89 ... Olfactory sensory neurons project axons to the brain within the olfactory nerve, (cranial nerve I). These nerve fibers, lacking ... Some causes include upper respiratory infections, traumatic brain injury, and neurodegenerative disease.[5][6] ...
Winding around the inferior cerebellar peduncle in the lower part of the fourth ventricle, and crossing the area acustica and the medial eminence are a number of white strands, the medullary striae, which form a portion of the cochlear division of the vestibulocochlear nerve and disappear into the median sulcus.. ...
In terms of anatomy, an auditory nerve fiber is either bipolar or unipolar, with its distal projection being called the peripheral process, and its central projection being called the axon; these two projections are also known as the "peripheral axon" and the "central axon", respectively. The peripheral process is sometimes referred to as a dendrite, although that term is somewhat inaccurate. Unlike the typical dendrite, the peripheral process generates and conducts action potentials, which then "jump" across the cell body (or soma) and continue to propagate along the central axon. In this respect, auditory nerve fibers are somewhat unusual in that action potentials pass through the soma. Both the peripheral process and the axon are myelinated. In humans, there are on average 30,000 nerve fibers within the cochlear nerve.[1] The number of fibers varies significantly across ...
The following is a list of nerves in the human body: Structure of the nervous system Development of the nervous system The spinal cord or medulla spinalis The brain or encephalon The hindbrain or rhombencephalon The midbrain or mesencephalon The forebrain or prosencephalon Composition and central connections of the spinal nerves Pathways from the brain to the spinal cord The meninges of the brain and medulla spinalis The cerebrospinal fluid The cranial nerves The olfactory nerves The optic nerve The oculomotor nerve The trochlear nerve The trigeminal nerve The abducent nerve The facial nerve The vestibulocochlear ...
Winding around the inferior cerebellar peduncle in the lower part of the fourth ventricle, and crossing the area acustica and the medial eminence are a number of white strands, the medullary striae, which form a portion of the cochlear division of the vestibulocochlear nerve and disappear into the median sulcus.. ...
In terms of anatomy, an auditory nerve fiber is either bipolar or unipolar, with its distal projection being called the peripheral process, and its central projection being called the axon; these two projections are also known as the "peripheral axon" and the "central axon", respectively. The peripheral process is sometimes referred to as a dendrite, although that term is somewhat inaccurate. Unlike the typical dendrite, the peripheral process generates and conducts action potentials, which then "jump" across the cell body (or soma) and continue to propagate along the central axon. In this respect, auditory nerve fibers are somewhat unusual in that action potentials pass through the soma. Both the peripheral process and the axon are myelinated. In humans, there are on average 30,000 nerve fibers within the cochlear nerve.[1] The number of fibers varies significantly across ...
Often, on a small network system, there are many mobile units and one main base station. This would be typical for police or taxi services for example. To help direct messages to the correct recipients and avoid irrelevant traffic on the network's being a distraction to other units, a variety of means have been devised to create addressing systems. The crudest and oldest of these is called CTCSS, or Continuous Tone-Controlled Squelch System. This consists of superimposing a precise very low frequency tone on the audio signal. Only the receiver tuned to this specific tone is able to receive the signal: this receiver shuts off the audio when the tone is not present or is a different frequency. By assigning a unique frequency to each mobile, private channels can be imposed on a public network. However this is only a convenience feature-it does not guarantee privacy. A more commonly used system is called selective calling or Selcall. This also uses audio tones, but these are not restricted to ...
若一個神經元其性質(位置、神經傳導物質、基因表达模式及連結性等)已被充份確認,可以和同一種動物的所有其他神經元區分,且同一種的所有生物都有相同功能的神經元,則此神經元就是已鑑定(identified)的神經元[16]。在脊椎动物中,很少的神经元是此定義下的已鑑定神經元。研究者認為人類的神经元可能都不是已鑑定神經元,至於一些神經較簡單的生物,可能部份或是所有神經元都已被鑑定[17]。 脊椎动物中最廣為人知的已鑑定神經元是魚體內的毛特纳氏细胞(英语:Mauthner ...
若一個神經元其性質(位置、神經傳導物質、基因表達模式及連結性等)已被充份確認,可以和同一種動物的所有其他神經元區分,且同一種的所有生物都有相同功能的神經元,則此神經元就是已鑑定(identified)的神經元[15]。在脊椎動物中,很少的神經元是此定義下的已鑑定神經元。研究者認為人類的神經元可能都不是已鑑定神經元,至於一些神經較簡單的生物,可能部份或是所有神經元都已被鑑定[16]。. 脊椎動物中最廣為人知的已鑑定神經元是魚體內的毛特納氏細胞(英語:Mauthner ...
The facial nerve is the seventh cranial nerve, or simply cranial nerve VII. It emerges from the brainstem between the pons and the medulla, controls the muscles of facial expression, and functions in the conveyance of taste sensations from the anterior two-thirds of the tongue and oral cavity. It also supplies preganglionic parasympathetic fibers to several head and neck ganglia. The facial and intermediate nerves can be collectively referred to as the nervus intermediofacialis. The path of the facial nerve can be divided into six segments. intracranial (cisternal) segment meatal segment (brainstem to internal auditory canal) labyrinthine segment (internal auditory canal to geniculate ganglion) tympanic segment (from geniculate ganglion to pyramidal eminence) mastoid segment (from pyramidal ...
The lesser petrosal nerve (also known as the small superficial petrosal nerve) is the General visceral efferent (GVE) component of the glossopharyngeal nerve (CN IX), carrying parasympathetic pre-ganglionic fibers from the tympanic plexus to the parotid gland. It synapses in the Otic ganglion, from where the post-ganglionic fibers emerge. After arising in the tympanic plexus, the lesser petrosal nerve passes forward and then through the hiatus for lesser petrosal nerve on the anterior surface of the petrous part of the temporal bone into the middle cranial fossa. It travels across the floor of the middle cranial fossa, then exits the skull via foramen ovale to reach the infratemporal fossa. The fibres synapse in the otic ganglion, and post-ganglionic fibres then travel briefly with the auriculotemporal ...
The developing auricle is first noticeable around the sixth week of gestation in the human fetus, developing from the auricular hillocks, which are derived from the first and second pharyngeal arches. These hillocks develop into the folds of the auricle and gradually shift upwards and backwards to their final position on the head. En route accessory auricles (also known as preauricular tags) may be left behind. The first three hillocks are derived from the 1st branchial arch and form the tragus, crus of the helix, and helix, respectively. Cutaneous sensation to these areas is via the trigeminal nerve, the attendant nerve of the 1st branchial arch. The final three hillocks are derived from the second branchial arch and form the antihelix, antitragus, and lobule, respectively. These portions of the ear are supplied by the cervical plexus and a small portion by the facial nerve. This explains why vesicles are ...
The levator anguli oris (caninus) is a facial muscle of the mouth arising from the canine fossa, immediately below the infraorbital foramen. It elevates angle of mouth medially. Its fibers are inserted into the angle of the mouth, intermingling with those of the zygomaticus, triangularis, and orbicularis oris. Specifically, the levator anguli oris is innervated by the buccal branches of the facial nerve. ...
The corneal reflex, also known as the blink reflex, is an involuntary blinking of the eyelids elicited by stimulation of the cornea (such as by touching or by a foreign body), though could result from any peripheral stimulus. Stimulation should elicit both a direct and consensual response (response of the opposite eye). The reflex occurs at a rapid rate of 0.1 seconds. The purpose of this reflex is to protect the eyes from foreign bodies and bright lights (the latter known as the optical reflex). The blink reflex also occurs when sounds greater than 40-60 dB are made. The reflex is mediated by: the nasociliary branch of the ophthalmic branch (V1) of the 5th cranial nerve (trigeminal nerve) sensing the stimulus on the cornea only (afferent fiber). the temporal and zygomatic branches of the 7th cranial nerve (Facial nerve) initiating the motor ...
Vestibulocochlear nerve, nerve in the human ear, serving the organs of equilibrium and of hearing. It consists of two ... anatomically and functionally distinct parts: the cochlear nerve, distributed to the hearing organ, and the vestibular nerve, ... In prenatal development: Cranial nerves. *nerve disorders* In nervous system disease: Vestibulocochlear nerve ... eighth cranial nerve. Vestibulocochlear nerve, also called Auditory Nerve, Acoustic Nerve, or Eighth Cranial Nerve, nerve in ...
Cranial Nerve Neoplasms. Vestibulocochlear Nerve Diseases. To Top. *For Patients and Families ... Neurodegenerative Diseases. Genetic Diseases, Inborn. Peripheral Nervous System Neoplasms. Peripheral Nervous System Diseases. ... Nervous System Diseases. Nerve Sheath Neoplasms. Neoplastic Syndromes, Hereditary. Neurocutaneous Syndromes. Heredodegenerative ... Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Neurofibromatosis Type 2 Vestibular Schwannomas Meningiomas Drug: RAD001 ...
Cranial Nerve Neoplasms. Vestibulocochlear Nerve Diseases. To Top. *For Patients and Families ... Neurodegenerative Diseases. Genetic Diseases, Inborn. Peripheral Nervous System Neoplasms. Peripheral Nervous System Diseases. ... Nervous System Diseases. Nerve Sheath Neoplasms. Neoplastic Syndromes, Hereditary. Neurocutaneous Syndromes. Heredodegenerative ... Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center resources: Neurofibromatosis Neurofibroma Meningioma Acoustic Neuroma Schwannoma ...
Ear Diseases. Otorhinolaryngologic Diseases. Otorhinolaryngologic Neoplasms. Cranial Nerve Diseases. Nervous System Diseases. ... Cranial Nerve Neoplasms. Nervous System Neoplasms. Neoplasms by Site. Peripheral Nervous System Neoplasms. Vestibulocochlear ... Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Vestibular Schwannoma Cochlear Implantation Device: Cochlear implant Not ... Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center resources: Acoustic Neuroma Schwannoma Neuroendocrine Tumor Neuroepithelioma ...
Vestibulocochlear nerve. - sensation of hearing.. - balance and equilibrium.. *Glossopharyngeal nerve. - muscles that assist ... Cranial Nerve Function, Testing and Disease Symptoms. Posted by Dr. Chris. The Cranial Nerves. The brain is the central ... Functions of Cranial Nerves. In order to understand that nature of the symptoms in cranial nerve damage or disease, it is ... Names of the Cranial Nerves. Each pair of cranial nerves is numbered from one to twelve Roman numerals) and designated as CN. ...
Acoustic neuroma is a disease in the eighth cranial nerve called the vestibulocochlear nerve. Because the nerve controls both ... Later on, when the tumor enlarges, other cranial nerves become affected as well. Among such nerves are cranial nerves 5, 7, 9, ... The body is made up of twelve cranial nerves (CN) directly arising from the brain, controlling specific body parts and bringing ... Like other diseases, the naming of such disease is actually based on its etiology. Acoustic denotes hearing while neuroma ...
The most common tumor associated with the disease is the vest ... VIII cranial nerve), and as many as 10% of patients with this ... The most common tumor associated with the disease is the vestibulocochlear schwannoma ( ... reported cranial MR of 11 patients. In their series, all patients had acoustic schwannomas, 8 had other cranial nerve tumors (5 ... Cranial and whole spine magnetic resonance imaging showed bilateral vestibulocochlear schwannoma, multiple meningiomas, and one ...
Sensorineural hearing loss can also result from problems affecting the eighth cranial nerve (vestibulocochlear nerve) such as ... Pagets disease, and cerebrovascular disease; and immunosuppressive diseases. Because the balance centers within the inner ear ... within the inner ear and/or damage to the eighth cranial nerve (vestibulocochlear nerve). Sensorineural hearing loss can be ... Sensorineural hearing loss (sensory organ or nerve-related hearing loss) is the poor transmission of sound waves as a result of ...
MeSH-major] Cranial Nerve Neoplasms. Neurilemmoma. Trigeminal Nerve. Trigeminal Nerve Diseases. *[MeSH-minor] Disease ... Vestibulocochlear Nerve / surgery. Vestibulocochlear Nerve Diseases / surgery. *[MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Disease Progression. ... MeSH-major] Cranial Nerve Neoplasms / surgery. Facial Nerve Diseases / surgery. *Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Schwannoma ... Among the cranial nerves, the vestibular division of the vestibulocochlear nerve is the site most commonly affected by these ...
Find out information about Cranial nerve diseases. the 12 pairs of nerves that branch off from the anterior surface of the ... brain stem in succession from front to back through special openings in the skull.... Explanation of Cranial nerve diseases ... The eighth pair, the vestibulocochlear nerves, evolved from the facial nerves. These nerves are purely sensory: They are ... Cranial Nerves. (redirected from Cranial nerve diseases). Also found in: Dictionary, Medical. Cranial Nerves. the 12 pairs of ...
... two parkinsons disease, two trigeminal neuralgia and two bells palsy patients under my care. they all have one thing in ... pressure on the nuclei of cranial nerves V (trigeminal) and VIII (vestibulocochlear); nerve-root irritation of cranial nerve ... Parkinsons disease is the fourth-most-common neurodegenerative disease afflicting the elderly: It affects about 1 percent of ... Parkinsons disease: upper cervical chiropractic management of Parkinsons disease patients, Todays Chiropractic, July-August ...
Vestibulocochlear Nerve Diseases Ethylene Glycols Facial Nerve Diseases Cranial Nerve Diseases Trigeminal Nerve ... Cranial nerve deficit: A clue to the diagnosis of ethylene glycol poisoning. The American journal of medicine. 1989;87(1):91-92 ... Cranial nerve deficit : A clue to the diagnosis of ethylene glycol poisoning. / Palmer, Biff F.; Eigenbrodt, Edwin H.; Henrich ... Palmer, B. F., Eigenbrodt, E. H., & Henrich, W. L. (1989). Cranial nerve deficit: A clue to the diagnosis of ethylene glycol ...
From there the vestibulocochlear (eighth cranial) nerve transmits the vibrations, translated into nerve impulses, to the ... Diseases of the Ear. Infections and inflammations of the ear include otomycosis, a fungal infection of the outer ear; otitis ... The inner ear (or labyrinth) contains the cochlea, as well as the nerves that transmit sound to the brain. It also contains the ... Menières disease, believed to result from dilatation of the lymphatic channels in the cochlea, may also cause disturbances in ...
From there the vestibulocochlear (eighth cranial) nerve transmits the vibrations, translated into nerve impulses, to the ... Diseases of the Ear. Infections and inflammations of the ear include otomycosis, a fungal infection of the outer ear; otitis ... From there the vestibulocochlear (eighth cranial) nerve transmits the vibrations, translated into nerve impulses, to the ... Internal:The vestibulocochlear nerve (eighth cranial).. outer ear. External ear.. pierced ear. An earlobe that has been pierced ...
The vestibulocochlear nerves, cranial nerve VIII, are the eighth pair of cranial nerves and are numbered with the Roman numeral ... Cranial Nerve IV - Trochlear Nerve. *Cranial Nerve IX - Glossopharyngeal Nerve. *Cranial Nerve V - Trigeminal Mandibular Nerve ... Cranial Nerve VIII - Vestibulocochlear Nerve. *Cranial Nerve X - Vagus Nerve. *Cranial Nerve XI - Accessory Nerve ... They are sensory nerves that run from the brain stem between the base of the brain (pons) and the spinal cord in an area known ...
Hyperacusis can occur when an injury or disease affects the brainstem or the vestibulocochlear nerve (also called the eighth ... cranial nerve). All of these structures work together to control hearing and balance. In MS, hyperacusis can occur when the ... Multiple sclerosis is a demyelinating disease in which the protective myelin coating on nerve cells in the brain, spinal cord, ... and optic nerve (which detects visual input) are diminished. This causes the nerves to function abnormally. ...
... the auditory nerve, the acoustic nerve, and the eighth cranial nerve. This... ... The ear nerve is known by several names including the vestibulocochlear nerve, ... "vestibular nerve damage,acoustic nerve damage,vestibulocochlear nerve damage,8th cranial nerve,ear nerve ... She is also an author and editor, and was formerly a senior medical officer with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and ...
Vestibulocochlear nerve (CN VIII or 8): Auditory receptors of the cochlear division are located in the organ of Corti and ... Other articles where Cochlear nerve is discussed: human nervous system: ... In nervous system disease: Cranial nerves. To examine the cochlear nerve, hearing tests are used to determine the patients ... part of vestibulocochlear nerve. * In vestibulocochlear nerve. …and functionally distinct parts: the cochlear nerve, ...
Signals for hearing and balance from the inner ear are carried by the 8th cranial nerve, also called the vestibulocochlear ... The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always ... Neuroanatomy, Cranial Nerve 8 (Vestibulocochlear) - (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK537359/) ... BERA is generally used to identify any pathology in the vestibulocochlear nerve or the brainstem. The test is recommended for ...
... diseases, symptoms, treatments, and other medical and health issues. ... Cranial Nerve VIII *Eighth Cranial Nerve Source - MeSH 2007 More specific terms for Vestibulocochlear nerve:. *Cochlear Nerve * ... Vestibulocochlear *Nerve *Nerve symptoms (9132 causes) *Nerve disease *Nerve disorder *Nerve problem (9132 causes) *Nerve pain ... Vestibulocochlear nerve as an Organ. Vestibulocochlear nerve (organ): The vestibulocochlear nerve is one of 12 pairs of cranial ...
... cranial nerve [CN] VIII) schwannoma, and as many as 10% of patients with this tumor have NF2. ... The most common tumor associated with the syndrome is the vestibulocochlear ( ... 1, 2, 3, 4] The most common tumor associated with the syndrome is the vestibulocochlear (cranial nerve [CN] VIII) schwannoma, ... Although it shares a name with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1; von Recklinghausen disease), the 2 diseases are separate entities ...
There are also very unusual sensorineural hearing impairments that involve the VIIIth cranial nerve, the Vestibulocochlear ... Meningitis may damage the auditory nerve or the cochlea. *Autoimmune disease has only recently been recognized as a potential ... Disease or illness. *Measles may result in auditory nerve damage. * ... all the way from the physical characteristics of the ear to the nerves and tracts that convey the nerve impulses of the ...
Find details on Cranial nerve neuropathy in cats including diagnosis and symptoms, pathogenesis, prevention, treatment, ... Cranial nerve IX and X disease. *Disease of cranial nerves IX and X result primarily in dysphagia and laryngeal/pharyngeal ... Vestibulocochlear nerve. *Young to middle aged cats are most commonly affected. Cats in the northeast are commonly affected in ... Central causes are rarer, but disease involving these cranial nerve nuclei may result in dysphagia or pain when swallowing. ...
English dictionary definition of Facial nerve diseases. n. Either of the seventh pair of cranial nerves that control facial ... Facial nerve diseases synonyms, Facial nerve diseases pronunciation, Facial nerve diseases translation, ... Vestibulocochlear nerve diseases, Vagus nerve diseases. facial nerve. n.. Either of the seventh pair of cranial nerves that ... facial nerve - cranial nerve that supplies facial muscles. facial, nervus facialis, seventh cranial nerve ...
Tinnitus involves the labyrinth and the stereocila and cochlear division of the 8th cranial (vestibulo-cochlear nerve), the ... Is tinnitus ever cured? What is the basis of this "disease"? How do you approach it? With his competent book Eberhard J. Wormer ... Healy, " Vaccine and Nerve Deafness", Am J Disorder Child, 1972 Jun; 123(6):612. Hulbert TV, et al. Bilateral hearing loss ... Although the ears are mostly "only" a symptom the ringing can often represent other diseases. These symptoms affect in the long ...
  • Damage to the ear nerve is one of many causes of tinnitus. (livestrong.com)
  • Tinnitus can also be related to the general impairment of the hearing nerve that occurs with aging, known as presbycusis. (vestibular.org)
  • 7 Don't order imaging studies in patients with non- pulsatile bilateral tinnitus [choosingwisely.org] The invasive process may lead to skull base osteomyelitis with progressive cranial nerve palsies and can result in irreversible hearing and neurological impairment . (symptoma.com)
  • Oculomotor nerve - eyelid movements, most eyeball movements, constricts pupils and changes the shape of lens (accommodation for visual acuity). (healthhype.com)
  • Upon review, it is noted that recurrent painful ophthalmoplegic neuropathy (RPON) is a rare neurological syndrome characterized by recurrent unilateral headaches and painful ophthalmoplegia of the ipsilateral oculomotor nerve. (bvsalud.org)
  • As seen on brain MRI, thickening and enhancement of the oculomotor cranial nerve can be observed in these cases. (bvsalud.org)
  • We experienced a case of RPON in an adult patient who showed thickening and enhancement of the oculomotor nerve on gadolinium-enhanced 3D-FLAIR image. (bvsalud.org)
  • Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed enhancement and thickening of the right oculomotor nerve, implying inflammation. (j-nn.org)
  • Considering the potential for neurosarcoidosis in right oculomotor nerve, we administered high-dose corticosteroid therapy and the patient's clinical symptom and neuroimaging finding improved. (j-nn.org)
  • Isolated oculomotor nerve palsy in neurosarcoidosis is rare, and this is the first documented case of oculomotor nerve palsy involving the pupil in Korea. (j-nn.org)
  • We suggest that it is important to recognize inflammatory causes of oculomotor nerve palsy, such as neurosarcoidosis, even in cases that involve the pupil. (j-nn.org)
  • Here, we present a case of neurosarcoidosis that presented with isolated oculomotor nerve palsy. (j-nn.org)
  • The body is made up of twelve cranial nerves (CN) directly arising from the brain, controlling specific body parts and bringing about various bodily functions. (medical-wiki.com)
  • The twelve cranial nerves are typically covered in introductory anatomy courses, and memorizing their names is facilitated by numerous mnemonics developed by students over the years of this practice. (philschatz.com)
  • The twelve cranial nerves serve the head and neck. (philschatz.com)
  • Abducens nerve - moves eyeball to the outer side (laterally). (healthhype.com)
  • PURPOSE: We report a patient with delayed-onset abducens nerve palsy and Horner syndrome after endovascular treatment of traumatic carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF). (bvsalud.org)
  • CONCLUSIONS: Delayed-onset abducens nerve palsy and Horner syndrome can develop even after successful endovascular treatment of CCF. (bvsalud.org)
  • Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a 2.3-cm cholesterol granuloma located in the left petrous apex that caused deviation of the left abducens nerve. (bvsalud.org)
  • Additionally, duplication of the abducens nerve along its course to the lateral rectus muscle is a known, although uncommon anatomical variant. (bvsalud.org)
  • Möbius syndrome is a rare congenital condition, characterized by abducens and facial nerve palsy, resulting in limitation of lateral gaze movement and facial diplegia. (bvsalud.org)
  • the 12 pairs of nerves that branch off from the anterior (lower) surface of the brain stem in succession from front to back through special openings in the skull. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • In MS, hyperacusis can occur when the disease affects the brain stem . (verywellhealth.com)
  • The cranial nerve exam allows directed tests of forebrain and brain stem structures. (philschatz.com)
  • What we have found though, is the vestibulocochlear nerve is a cranial nerve that comes directly off the brain stem and goes back up and innervates the ear. (theneckjoint.com)
  • is that every single time what we have found one of the top bones in the upper neck has been misaligned to the point that it's actually putting pressure at the level of the brain stem where that nerve goes to the brain. (theneckjoint.com)
  • If that bone is out line and it's putting pressure on that nerve or on the brain stem where that nerve comes in, then it gives a sensation to the brain that there is a message coming through that nerve that creates the ringing in the ears, that creates the balance problems, and creates the alternating or fluctuations in hearing. (theneckjoint.com)
  • If the tumor presses on further increase in size not only to the adjacent cranial nerves, but also on the brain stem, which increases the intracranial pressure and results in vomiting, headache, and in extreme cases can even lead to unconsciousness. (cyber-knife.net)
  • The nerve may be injured by diseases affecting the lower brain stem, floor of the posterior fossa, jugular foramen, or the nerve's extracranial course. (harvard.edu)
  • She is also an author and editor, and was formerly a senior medical officer with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (livestrong.com)
  • According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, mild TBI (mTBI) (often referred to as a concussion) manifests initially as a brief change in mental status or unconsciousness, whereas severe TBI results in an extended period of unconsciousness or amnesia. (nap.edu)
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (cdc.gov)
  • It is important to check both guttural pouches because the disease can be bilateral (affecting both right and left sides). (acvs.org)
  • As the patient's condition continued to deteriorate, clinical signs of bilateral 10th and 12th cranial nerve paralysis appeared and lead to a focused workup for base of skull pathology. (bvsalud.org)