Dysfunction of one or more cranial nerves causally related to a traumatic injury. Penetrating and nonpenetrating CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; NECK INJURIES; and trauma to the facial region are conditions associated with cranial nerve injuries.
Traumatic injuries to the HYPOGLOSSAL NERVE.
Traumatic injuries to the LARYNGEAL NERVE.
Twelve pairs of nerves that carry general afferent, visceral afferent, special afferent, somatic efferent, and autonomic efferent fibers.
Disorders of one or more of the twelve cranial nerves. With the exception of the optic and olfactory nerves, this includes disorders of the brain stem nuclei from which the cranial nerves originate or terminate.
The excision of the thickened, atheromatous tunica intima of a carotid artery.
Injuries to the PERIPHERAL NERVES.
Narrowing or stricture of any part of the CAROTID ARTERIES, most often due to atherosclerotic plaque formation. Ulcerations may form in atherosclerotic plaques and induce THROMBUS formation. Platelet or cholesterol emboli may arise from stenotic carotid lesions and induce a TRANSIENT ISCHEMIC ATTACK; CEREBROVASCULAR ACCIDENT; or temporary blindness (AMAUROSIS FUGAX). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp 822-3)
Benign and malignant neoplasms that arise from one or more of the twelve cranial nerves.
A nerve which originates in the lumbar and sacral spinal cord (L4 to S3) and supplies motor and sensory innervation to the lower extremity. The sciatic nerve, which is the main continuation of the sacral plexus, is the largest nerve in the body. It has two major branches, the TIBIAL NERVE and the PERONEAL NERVE.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
Traumatic injuries to the facial nerve. This may result in FACIAL PARALYSIS, decreased lacrimation and salivation, and loss of taste sensation in the anterior tongue. The nerve may regenerate and reform its original pattern of innervation, or regenerate aberrantly, resulting in inappropriate lacrimation in response to gustatory stimuli (e.g., "crocodile tears") and other syndromes.
Injuries to the optic nerve induced by a trauma to the face or head. These may occur with closed or penetrating injuries. Relatively minor compression of the superior aspect of orbit may also result in trauma to the optic nerve. Clinical manifestations may include visual loss, PAPILLEDEMA, and an afferent pupillary defect.
The 7th cranial nerve. The facial nerve has two parts, the larger motor root which may be called the facial nerve proper, and the smaller intermediate or sensory root. Together they provide efferent innervation to the muscles of facial expression and to the lacrimal and SALIVARY GLANDS, and convey afferent information for TASTE from the anterior two-thirds of the TONGUE and for TOUCH from the EXTERNAL EAR.
Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.
The nerves outside of the brain and spinal cord, including the autonomic, cranial, and spinal nerves. Peripheral nerves contain non-neuronal cells and connective tissue as well as axons. The connective tissue layers include, from the outside to the inside, the epineurium, the perineurium, and the endoneurium.
Diseases of the sixth cranial (abducens) nerve or its nucleus in the pons. The nerve may be injured along its course in the pons, intracranially as it travels along the base of the brain, in the cavernous sinus, or at the level of superior orbital fissure or orbit. Dysfunction of the nerve causes lateral rectus muscle weakness, resulting in horizontal diplopia that is maximal when the affected eye is abducted and ESOTROPIA. Common conditions associated with nerve injury include INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; ISCHEMIA; and INFRATENTORIAL NEOPLASMS.
The 31 paired peripheral nerves formed by the union of the dorsal and ventral spinal roots from each spinal cord segment. The spinal nerve plexuses and the spinal roots are also included.
Treatment of muscles and nerves under pressure as a result of crush injuries.
Renewal or physiological repair of damaged nerve tissue.
Surgical excision, performed under general anesthesia, of the atheromatous tunica intima of an artery. When reconstruction of an artery is performed as an endovascular procedure through a catheter, it is called ATHERECTOMY.
Neoplasms of the base of the skull specifically, differentiated from neoplasms of unspecified sites or bones of the skull (SKULL NEOPLASMS).
A radiological stereotactic technique developed for cutting or destroying tissue by high doses of radiation in place of surgical incisions. It was originally developed for neurosurgery on structures in the brain and its use gradually spread to radiation surgery on extracranial structures as well. The usual rigid needles or probes of stereotactic surgery are replaced with beams of ionizing radiation directed toward a target so as to achieve local tissue destruction.
A relatively common neoplasm of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that arises from arachnoidal cells. The majority are well differentiated vascular tumors which grow slowly and have a low potential to be invasive, although malignant subtypes occur. Meningiomas have a predilection to arise from the parasagittal region, cerebral convexity, sphenoidal ridge, olfactory groove, and SPINAL CANAL. (From DeVita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp2056-7)
Benign and malignant neoplastic processes that arise from or secondarily involve the meningeal coverings of the brain and spinal cord.
The inferior region of the skull consisting of an internal (cerebral), and an external (basilar) surface.
A benign SCHWANNOMA of the eighth cranial nerve (VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE), mostly arising from the vestibular branch (VESTIBULAR NERVE) during the fifth or sixth decade of life. Clinical manifestations include HEARING LOSS; HEADACHE; VERTIGO; TINNITUS; and FACIAL PAIN. Bilateral acoustic neuromas are associated with NEUROFIBROMATOSIS 2. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p673)
A benign brain tumor composed of neural elements which most often arise from the SEPTUM PELLUCIDUM and the walls of the lateral ventricles. Immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy evaluations may reveal expression of neuron specific enolase and synaptophysin and cells containing microtubuli, neurosecretory granules, and presynaptic vesicles. (From Acta Med Port 1994 Feb;7(2):113-9)
Process that is gone through in order for a device to receive approval by a government regulatory agency. This includes any required preclinical or clinical testing, review, submission, and evaluation of the applications and test results, and post-marketing surveillance. It is not restricted to FDA.
A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.
A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)
Pathological conditions involving the CAROTID ARTERIES, including the common, internal, and external carotid arteries. ATHEROSCLEROSIS and TRAUMA are relatively frequent causes of carotid artery pathology.
Either of the two principal arteries on both sides of the neck that supply blood to the head and neck; each divides into two branches, the internal carotid artery and the external carotid artery.
A system of categories to which morbid entries are assigned according to established criteria. Included is the entire range of conditions in a manageable number of categories, grouped to facilitate mortality reporting. It is produced by the World Health Organization (From ICD-10, p1). The Clinical Modifications, produced by the UNITED STATES DEPT. OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, are larger extensions used for morbidity and general epidemiological purposes, primarily in the U.S.
A group of malignant lymphomas thought to derive from peripheral T-lymphocytes in lymph nodes and other nonlymphoid sites. They include a broad spectrum of lymphocyte morphology, but in all instances express T-cell markers admixed with epithelioid histiocytes, plasma cells, and eosinophils. Although markedly similar to large-cell immunoblastic lymphoma (LYMPHOMA, LARGE-CELL, IMMUNOBLASTIC), this group's unique features warrant separate treatment.
Process of substituting a symbol or code for a term such as a diagnosis or procedure. (from Slee's Health Care Terms, 3d ed.)
A light and spongy (pneumatized) bone that lies between the orbital part of FRONTAL BONE and the anterior of SPHENOID BONE. Ethmoid bone separates the ORBIT from the ETHMOID SINUS. It consists of a horizontal plate, a perpendicular plate, and two lateral labyrinths.
The 1st cranial nerve. The olfactory nerve conveys the sense of smell. It is formed by the axons of OLFACTORY RECEPTOR NEURONS which project from the olfactory epithelium (in the nasal epithelium) to the OLFACTORY BULB.
Traumatic injuries to the OLFACTORY NERVE. It may result in various olfactory dysfunction including a complete loss of smell.
Ovoid body resting on the CRIBRIFORM PLATE of the ethmoid bone where the OLFACTORY NERVE terminates. The olfactory bulb contains several types of nerve cells including the mitral cells, on whose DENDRITES the olfactory nerve synapses, forming the olfactory glomeruli. The accessory olfactory bulb, which receives the projection from the VOMERONASAL ORGAN via the vomeronasal nerve, is also included here.
The ability to detect scents or odors, such as the function of OLFACTORY RECEPTOR NEURONS.
A system for classifying patient care by relating common characteristics such as diagnosis, treatment, and age to an expected consumption of hospital resources and length of stay. Its purpose is to provide a framework for specifying case mix and to reduce hospital costs and reimbursements and it forms the cornerstone of the prospective payment system.
Corneal and conjunctival dryness due to deficient tear production, predominantly in menopausal and post-menopausal women. Filamentary keratitis or erosion of the conjunctival and corneal epithelium may be caused by these disorders. Sensation of the presence of a foreign body in the eye and burning of the eyes may occur.
The fluid secreted by the lacrimal glands. This fluid moistens the CONJUNCTIVA and CORNEA.
A historical and cultural entity dispersed across a wide geographical area under the political domination and influence of ancient Rome, bringing to the conquered people the Roman civilization and culture from 753 B.C. to the beginning of the imperial rule under Augustus in 27 B.C. The early city built on seven hills grew to conquer Sicily, Sardinia, Carthage, Gaul, Spain, Britain, Greece, Asia Minor, etc., and extended ultimately from Mesopotamia to the Atlantic. Roman medicine was almost entirely in Greek hands, but Rome, with its superior water system, remains a model of sanitation and hygiene. (From A. Castiglioni, A History of Medicine, 2d ed pp196-99; from F. H. Garrison, An Introduction to the History of Medicine, 4th ed, pp107-120)
Conduct and synthesis of systematic research comparing interventions and strategies to prevent, diagnose, treat, and monitor health conditions. The purpose of this research is to inform patients, providers, and decision-makers, responding to their expressed needs, about which interventions are most effective for which patients under specific circumstances. (hhs.gov/recovery/programs/cer/draftdefinition.html accessed 6/12/2009)
A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.
Individuals or groups with no or inadequate health insurance coverage. Those falling into this category usually comprise three primary groups: the medically indigent (MEDICAL INDIGENCY); those whose clinical condition makes them medically uninsurable; and the working uninsured.
Devices which are very resistant to wear and may be used over a long period of time. They include items such as wheelchairs, hospital beds, artificial limbs, etc.
A surgical specialty concerned with the treatment of diseases and disorders of the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral and sympathetic nervous system.
The actual costs of providing services related to the delivery of health care, including the costs of procedures, therapies, and medications. It is differentiated from HEALTH EXPENDITURES, which refers to the amount of money paid for the services, and from fees, which refers to the amount charged, regardless of cost.
The prices a hospital sets for its services. HOSPITAL COSTS (the direct and indirect expenses incurred by the hospital in providing the services) are one factor in the determination of hospital charges. Other factors may include, for example, profits, competition, and the necessity of recouping the costs of uncompensated care.

Avulsion fracture of the anterior half of the foramen magnum involving the bilateral occipital condyles and the inferior clivus--case report. (1/45)

A 38-year-old male presented with an avulsion fracture of the anterior half of the foramen magnum due to a traffic accident. He had palsy of the bilateral VI, left IX, and left X cranial nerves, weakness of his left upper extremity, and crossed sensory loss. He was treated conservatively and placed in a halo brace for 16 weeks. After immobilization, swallowing, hoarseness, and left upper extremity weakness improved. Hyperextension with a rotatory component probably resulted in strain in the tectorial membrane and alar ligaments, resulting in avulsion fracture at the sites of attachment, the bilateral occipital condyles and the inferior portion of the clivus. Conservative treatment is probably optimum even for this unusual and severe type of occipital condyle fracture.  (+info)

Extracranial carotid artery aneurysms: Texas Heart Institute experience. (2/45)

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Aneurysms of the extracranial carotid artery (ECA) are rare. Large single-institution series are seldom reported and usually are not aneurysm type-specific. Thus, information about immediate and long-term results of surgical therapy is sparse. This review was conducted to elucidate etiology, presentation, and treatment for ECA aneurysms. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the case records of the Texas Heart Institute/St Luke's Episcopal Hospital, Houston, and found 67 cases of ECA aneurysms treated surgically (the largest series to date) between 1960 and 1995: 38 pseudoaneurysms after previous carotid surgery and 29 atherosclerotic or traumatic aneurysms. All aneurysms were surgically explored, and all were repaired except two: a traumatic distal internal carotid artery aneurysm and an infected pseudoaneurysm in which the carotid artery was ligated. RESULTS: Four deaths (three fatal strokes and one myocardial infarction) and two nonfatal strokes were directly attributed to a repaired ECA aneurysm (overall mortality/major stroke incidence, 9%); there was one minor stroke (incidence, 1.5%). The incidence of cranial nerve injury was 6% (four cases). During long-term follow-up (1.5 months-30 years; mean, 5.9 years), 19 patients died, mainly of cardiac causes (11 myocardial infarctions). CONCLUSION: The potential risks of cerebral ischemia and rupture as well as the satisfactory long-term results achieved with surgery strongly argue in favor of surgical treatment of ECA aneurysms.  (+info)

Cranial and cervical nerve injuries after repeat carotid endarterectomy. (3/45)

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The incidence of cranial and/or cervical nerve injuries after primary carotid endarterectomy (CEA) ranges from 3% to 48%; however, the clinical outcome of these injuries after repeat CEA has not been thoroughly analyzed in the English-language medical literature. This prospective study analyzes the incidence and outcome of cranial nerve injuries after repeat CEA. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This study includes 89 consecutive patients who had repeat CEAs. Preoperative and postoperative cranial nerve evaluations were performed, including clinical examinations (neurologic) and direct laryngoscopy. Patients with vagal or glossopharyngeal nerve injuries also underwent comprehensive speech evaluations, video stroboscopy, fluoroscopy, and methylene blue testing for aspiration. Patients with postoperative cranial nerve injuries were followed up for a long time to assess their recovery. RESULTS: Twenty-five cranial and/or cervical nerve injuries were identified in 19 patients (21%). They included 8 hypoglossal nerves (9%), 11 vagal nerves or branches (12%) (6 recurrent laryngeal nerves [7%], 3 superior laryngeal nerves [3%], and 2 complex vagal nerves [2%]), 3 marginal mandibular nerves (3%), 2 greater auricular nerves (2%), and 1 glossopharyngeal nerve (1%). Twenty-two (88%) of these injuries were transient with a complete healing time ranging from 2 weeks to 28 months (18 of 22 injuries healed within 12 months). The remaining three injuries (12%) were permanent (1 recurrent laryngeal nerve, 1 glossopharyngeal nerve, and 1 complex vagal nerve injury). The recurrent laryngeal nerve injury had a longer healing time than the other cranial nerve injuries. CONCLUSIONS: Repeat CEA is associated with a high incidence of cranial and/or cervical nerve injuries, most of which are transient. However, some of these have a long healing time, and a few can be permanent with significant disability.  (+info)

Neurological abnormalities associated with CDMA exposure. (4/45)

Dysaesthesiae of the scalp and neurological abnormality after mobile phone use have been reported previously, but the roles of the phone per se or the radiations in causing these findings have been questioned. We report finding a neurological abnormality in a patient after accidental exposure of the left side of the face to mobile phone radiation [code division multiple access (CDMA)] from a down-powered mobile phone base station antenna. He had headaches, unilateral left blurred vision and pupil constriction, unilateral altered sensation on the forehead, and abnormalities of current perception thresholds on testing the left trigeminal ophthalmic nerve. His nerve function recovered during 6 months follow-up. His exposure was 0.015-0.06 mW/cm(2) over 1-2 h. The implications regarding health effects of radiofrequency radiation are discussed.  (+info)

Redo carotid endarterectomy versus primary carotid endarterectomy. (5/45)

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Several authorities have recently advocated carotid stenting for recurrent carotid stenosis because of the perception that redo surgery has a higher complication rate than primary carotid endarterectomy (CEA). This study compares the early and late results of reoperations versus primary CEA. METHODS: All reoperations for recurrent carotid stenosis performed during a recent 7-year period by a single vascular surgeon were compared with primary CEA. Because all redo CEAs were done with polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) or vein patch closure, we only analyzed those primary CEAs that used the same patch closures. A Kaplan-Meier life-table analysis was used to estimate stroke-free survival rates and freedom from >/=50% recurrent stenosis. RESULTS: Of 547 primary CEAs, 265 had PTFE or saphenous vein patch closure, and 124 reoperations had PTFE or vein patch closure during the same period. Both groups had similar demographic characteristics. The indications for reoperation and primary CEA were symptomatic stenosis in 78% and 58% of cases and asymptomatic >/=80% stenosis in 22% and 42% of cases, respectively (P<0.001). The 30-day perioperative stroke and transient ischemic attack rates for reoperation and primary CEA were 4.8% versus 0.8% (P=0.015) and 4% versus 1.1%, respectively, with no perioperative deaths in either group. Cranial nerve injury was noted in 17% of reoperation patients versus 5.3% of primary CEA patients; however, most of these injuries were transient (P<0.001). Mean hospital stay was 1.8 days for reoperation versus 1.6 days for primary CEA. Cumulative rates of stroke-free survival and freedom from >/=50% recurrent stenosis for reoperation and primary CEA at 1, 3, and 5 years were 96%, 91%, and 82% and 98%, 96%, and 95% versus 94%, 92%, and 91% and 98%, 96%, and 96%, respectively (no significant differences). CONCLUSIONS: Reoperation carries higher perioperative stroke and cranial nerve injury rates than primary CEA. However, reoperations are durable and have stroke-free survival rates that are similar to primary CEA. These considerations should be kept in mind when carotid stenting is recommended instead of reoperation.  (+info)

Long-term outcome after severe head injury. (6/45)

From a consecutive series of 7000 patients with head injuries admitted to the regional accident service, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford between 10 and 24 years earlier, every patient was taken who had been amnesic or unconscious for one week or longer. Of these 479 patients, all but ten were traced, and either the cause of death was established or the survivors examined. Ten years after injury 4% were totally disabled, and 14% severely disabled to a degree precluding normal occupational or social life. Of the remainder, 49% had recovered, and the rest were dead. Additionally, a selected series of 64 patients whose unconsciousness had been prolonged for a month or more were studied. Forty of these had survived between three and 25 years after injury and were re-examined. On the basis of age at injury, the worst state of neurological responsiveness, and the duration of posttraumatic amnesia, the outcome of head injury can be predicted reliably in most cases. Patients and relatives need more reassurance and simple psychotherapeutic support, especially in the first few months after injury. Extrapolation from our figures suggests that each year in England and Wales 210 patients survive totally disabled and another 1500 are severely disabled.  (+info)

Tapia's syndrome following shoulder surgery. (7/45)

Multiple cranial palsy occurred after shoulder surgery in the sitting position. Compression by the tracheal tube, caused by displacement of the head, may have caused the injury.  (+info)

Perceptual and instrumental evaluation of voice and tongue function after carotid endarterectomy. (8/45)

OBJECTIVE: Laryngeal and tongue function was assessed in 28 patients to evaluate the presence, nature, and resolution of superior recurrent laryngeal and hypoglossal nerve damage resulting from standard open primary carotid endarterectomy (CEA). METHODS: The laryngeal and tongue function in 28 patients who underwent CEA were examined prospectively with various physiologic (Aerophone II, laryngograph, tongue transducer), acoustic (Multi-Dimensional Voice Program), and perceptual speech assessments. Measures were obtained from all participants preoperatively, and at 2 weeks and at 3 months postoperatively. RESULTS: The perceptual speech assessment indicated that the vocal quality of "roughness" was significantly more apparent at the 2-week postoperative assessment than preoperatively. However, by the 3-month postoperative assessment these values had returned to near preoperative levels, with no significant difference detected between preoperative and 3-month postoperative levels or between 2-week and 3-month postoperative levels. Both the instrumental assessments of laryngeal function and the acoustic assessment of vocal quality failed to identify any significant difference on any measure across the three assessment periods. Similarly, no significant impairment in tongue strength, endurance, or rate of repetitive tongue movements was detected at instrumental assessment of tongue function. CONCLUSIONS: No permanent changes to vocal or tongue function occurred in this group of participants after primary CEA. The lack of any significant long-term laryngeal or tongue dysfunction in this group suggests that the standard open CEA procedure is not associated with high rates of superior recurrent and hypoglossal nerve dysfunction, as previously believed.  (+info)

OBJECT: Cranial nerve injuries, particularly motor nerve injuries, following carotid endarterectomy (CEA) can be disabling and therefore patients should be given reliable information about the risks of sustaining such injuries. The reported frequency of cranial nerve injury in the published literature ranges from 3 to 23%, and there have been few series in which patients were routinely examined before and after surgery by a neurologist. METHODS: The authors investigated the risk of cranial nerve injuries in patients who underwent CEA in the European Carotid Surgery Trial (ECST), the largest series of patients undergoing CEA in which neurological assessment was performed before and after surgery. Cranial nerve injury was assessed and recorded in every patient and persisting deficits were identified on follow-up examination at 4 months and 1 year after randomization. Risk factors for cranial nerve injury were examined by performing univariate and multivariate analyses. There were 88 motor cranial nerve
TY - JOUR. T1 - High rate of early restenosis after carotid eversion endarterectomy in homozygous carriers of the normal mannose-binding lectin genotype. AU - Rugonfalvi-Kiss, Szabolcs. AU - Dósa, Edit. AU - Madsen, Hans O.. AU - Endrész, Valéria. AU - Prohászka, Zoltán. AU - Laki, Judit. AU - Karádi, István. AU - Gönczöl, Éva. AU - Selmeci, László. AU - Romics, László. AU - Füst, George. AU - Entz, László. AU - Garred, Peter. PY - 2005/5/1. Y1 - 2005/5/1. N2 - Background and Purpose - Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is thought to influence the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease by decreasing the risk of advanced atherosclerosis and by contributing to enhanced ischemia reperfusion injury. Thus, we investigated the role of MBL in restenosis after eversion endarterectomy in patients with severe carotid atherosclerosis. Methods - In a prospective study, 123 patients who underwent carotid endarterectomy were followed-up by carotid duplex scan (CDS) sonography for 14 months. In a ...
This prospective study shows that patients undergoing eversion endarterectomy for carotid stenosis are at higher risk for experiencing restenosis provided they are homozygous for the normal MBL A/A genotype than those carrying 1 or 2 variant MBL alleles (A/O or O/O). As has been shown in other studies a higher rate of restenosis after carotid eversion endarterectomy was seen in females than in males in the prospective study.28 However, significant differences between male and female patients in the restenosis rate were seen only in those who carried the A/A genotype (Figure 3). The findings were corroborated by the analysis of the relationship between MBL serum concentration and restenosis. The observation in the prospective study was substantiated in a retrospective study performed ,2.5 years after surgery. In the latter matched case-control study, the gender effect could not be tested. The mechanisms behind the gender effect are at present unknown but suggest a complicated interplay between ...
article{2e878c2a-51d3-4494-a405-97db421b5733, author = {Forssell, Claes and Takolander, Rabbe and Bergqvist, David and Bergentz, Sven-Erik and Gramming, Patricia and Kitzing, Peter}, keyword = {carotid endarterectomy,cranial nerve,injuries}, language = {eng}, pages = {595--598}, series = {Acta Chir Scand}, title = {Cranial nerve injuries associated with carotid endarterectomy}, volume = {151}, year = {1985 ...
No study on ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (US-FNA) for the diagnosis of retrojugular lymph node has been reported. The present study aimed to introduce US-FNA techniques for retrojugular lymph node and to evaluate their efficacy. Of the 788 patients who underwent US-FNA of the cervical lymph node, 41 patients underwent US-FNAs of retrojugular lymph node and were included in this study. The adequacy and efficacy of US-FNA of retrojugular lymph node and related complications during or after the procedure were assessed. Of the 41 patients, 35 (85.4%) were adequately diagnosed in cytological analysis; four predominantly cystic lymph nodes were identified. Based on cytohistopathology results, thyroglobulin measurement, tuberculosis polymerase chain reaction, and sonographic follow-up, malignant (n = 26) and benign (n = 15) lymph nodes were confirmed. When six lymph nodes with inadequate cytology were classified as benign and malignant, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive
RESULTS: Thirty-day operative mortality was 3.3% and completely stroke related. Besides two fatal strokes one additional was registered making total number of 3 (4.8%) postoperative strokes. Only one (1.6%) early graft thrombosis has been found. The 30-day-patency rate was 98.4%. During the same period seven local complications were found: three (4.8%) hemorrhage and four (6.4%) cranial nerves injuries. In all cases of hemorrhage successful re-intervention was performed without any consequences. Cranial nerves injuries included transient contusions of hypoglossal (2) and superior laryngeal nerve (2 ...
Because of our large brains our babies need to be born relatively immature. To enable passage through their mothers pelvis the upper bones of the skull develop seperately and can move over each other (moulding) during the birth process to navigate through the pelvis.. As baby travels through the pelvis it moves under its mothers pubic arch, and at this point there is potential for the nerves to be compressed or overstretched. This is more likely in instrumental births like forceps, ventouse and caesareans where traction is applied to the head to pull the baby out. There is also a possibility of this if the baby is pulled out by the head during a so called normal birth. (Note from Joy: in the normal birth process there should be no pulling on the babys head!).. If these nerves are dammaged the baby can suffer feeding problems, pain from the injury, impaired hearing and facial expressions. Cranial nerve injury can also affect arousal of the vagus nerve with increased heartrate, inability to ...
Depending on the point of view of either the physician or patient, the most important outcome may be long-term survival, prevention of cardiac events or the avoidance of short- or long-term stroke. On the other hand, a trumpet player or opera singer may be more concerned about a career-ending cranial nerve injury. Further, there still is considerable debate about the treatment of asymptomatic carotid stenosis.. I do not want to trivialize this important issue, but if we are to follow Dr. Nashs directive, perhaps the following scenario could be an example of my future office consultations.. 8 a.m.: Mrs. Jones, our duplex scan has shown that you have an 80% stenosis of your carotid artery and we are concerned this may lead to a stroke. Oh, you want to know how we can tell its showing an 80% stenosis that can cause a stroke. Well, thats complicated. Its all about blood flow and the Circle of Willis. No, thats not the roundabout where you had that traffic accident. Its an anatomical structure ...
Background Cavernous carotid arteriovenous fistulas (CCFs) are a relatively rare but fairly well documented intracranial vascular pathology. The most frequently utilized approach to treatment is endovascular embolization, via either transvenous or transarterial approaches, in order to close the venous outflow or limit the arterial inflow. The adopted standard algorithm to these options is to first attempt mapping a venous tract for catheterization. Frequently, the morphology of the venous drainage is in-sufficient for catheterization. Trans-arterial embolization is typically reserved for these instances given the well documented risks, including cranial nerve injury which approaches a 10% overall risk of complication. A third and less commonly used alternative for treating these difficult CCFs involves direct percutaneous access to the fistula. There are few published case reports documenting this direct access method, including our previous work describing a case in which we treated a clival ...
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Results: Among the 27 patients 63% were women, 83% were asymptomatic, and the mean age was 50 years (range 21-79). None of the tumors were hormonally active, mean size was 3.2 centimeters (range 1.6 - 5.0 cm), and the Shamblin class distribution was: 9% type I, 48% type II, and 43% type III. Men were found to have significantly larger tumors on presentation (4.1 cm vs 2.8 cm, p=0.001), though this did not correlate to an increased complication rate. Preoperative embolization was performed in 8 patients, which did not correlate with tumor size. All tumors were completely resected with a mean estimated blood loss of 217 mL (range 5 1000 mL) and no evidence of metastatic disease. The 30-day death, stroke, and cranial nerve injury rates were 0%, 9%, and 27%, respectively. Cranial nerve injuries included 18% vagus, 4.5% hypoglossal, 4.5% facial, and 4.5% glossopharyngeal, but no permanent injuries. Mean length of stay was 2.7 days (range 1-7 days). At a mean follow-up of 12 months (range 1-63 ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Surgical and medical management of extracranial carotid artery aneurysms. AU - Fankhauser, Grant T.. AU - Stone, William M.. AU - Fowl, Richard J.. AU - ODonnell, Mark E.. AU - Bower, Thomas C.. AU - Meyer, Fredric B.. AU - Money, Samuel R.. PY - 2015/2/1. Y1 - 2015/2/1. N2 - Objective Extracranial carotid artery aneurysms (ECCAs) are extremely rare with limited information about management options. Our purpose was to review our institutions experience with ECCAs during 15 years and to discuss the presentation and treatment of these aneurysms. Methods A retrospective review of patients diagnosed with ECCAs from 1998 to 2012 was performed. Symptoms, risk factors, etiology, diagnostic methods, treatments, and outcomes were reviewed. Results During the study period, 141 aneurysms were diagnosed in 132 patients (mean age, 61 years; 69 men). There were 116 (82%) pseudoaneurysms and 25 (18%) true aneurysms; 69 (49%) aneurysms were asymptomatic, whereas 72 (52%) had symptoms (28 ...
Extracranial carotid artery aneurysms are uncommon and occur in a broad range of patients due to many etiologies. True aneurysms involving all layers of the carotid arterial wall and false aneurysms both occur. Overall, extracranial carotid artery an
Brain injury or cranial nerve injuries due to any cause can cause ptosis by affecting the nerve supply to the muscles of the eyes and eyelids. Stroke, brain tumor, aneurysm, or long-term diabetes may also be involved.. Horners syndrome is a rare disorder that occurs due to damage of the sympathetic nerves (which control circulation and perspiration) supplying the face and eyes. The typical symptoms usually occur on one side and are ptosis (drooping of the upper eyelid), constricted pupil (decreased pupil size), and anhydrosis (absent or decreased sweating of the face) on the affected side.. Horners syndrome may occur as a result of stroke, tumor, or injury to the spinal cord, but in some cases no cause may be found. There is no definite treatment for Horners syndrome except treatment and management of the underlying cause.. Bell palsy is usually accompanied by a facial droop due to a one-sided (unilateral) partial or complete paralyis of the facial muscles. Refer to Facial Droop Causes for ...
Myths In The Interpretation Of The CREST Trial: Does An MI Have A Worse Effect On Late Mortality Than A Stroke: Is A Cranial Nerve Deficit Equivalent To A Stroke: Gender Has No Effect On ...
Pre-specified endpoints are the following:stroke-free survival AND intended positioning of the original implant AND No additional surgical or interventional procedures AND intended performance of the device (no migration, embolization, fracture, thrombosis, etc AND reduction of MR by at least one grade and reduction of combined mitral annular diameters by at least 20%) AND no device-related complications (erosion, migration, etc.) at 30-days and all subsequent follow-up time points ...
Although the cranial nerves and their sensory and. of the brainstem showing the cranial nerves.Which cranial nerve carries sensory fibers from taste receptors of.This is an article introducing the 12 cranial nerves. this nerve governs the ocular and sensory functions.. The Cranial Nerves (Organization of the Central Nervous. motor neuron lesion of this cranial nerve (described in the following.The patient complains of decreased sense of taste (3 cranial nerves).Nerve - Cranial Nerve 9,10 The functions of the. 2004 - 08 Cranial Nerves.The olfactory nerve is a special sensory cranial nerve that ...
Heres Everything You Need To Know About The Cranial Nerves - How Many Cranial Nerves Are There And The Cranial Nerves Function. How To Remember Cranial Nerves, In Order And Labeled. Learn About Brainstem
The mean follow-up duration was 84 months (median 75.5 months, range 24-216 months). In 118 patients (86%), the tumor volume was unchanged or had decreased at last follow-up. Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated radiographic progression-free survival at 5 and 10 years to be 95.4% and 69%, respectively. Fourteen patients (10%) developed new cranial nerve palsies following GKS. Factors associated with tumor control included younger age, a higher isodose, and smaller tumor volume. A longer follow-up duration was associated with either a decrease or increase in tumor volume. Fourteen patients (10%) experienced new or worsening cranial nerve deficits after treatment. Factors associated with this occurrence were larger pretreatment tumor volume, lower peripheral radiation dose, lower maximum dose, tumor progression, and longer follow-up. ...
Brainstem cavernous malformations (CMs) pose significant challenges to neurosurgeons because of their deep locations and high surgical risks. Most patients with brainstem CMs present with sudden-onset cranial nerve deficits or ataxia, but uncommonly patients can present in extremis from an acute hemorrhage, requiring surgical intervention. However, the timing of surgery for brainstem CMs has been a controversial topic. Although many authors propose delaying surgery into the subacute phase, some patients may not tolerate waiting until surgery. To the best of the authors knowledge, emergency surgery after a brainstem CM hemorrhage has not been described. In cases of rapidly progressive neurological deterioration, emergency resection may often be the only option. In this retrospectively reviewed small series of patients, the authors report favorable outcomes after emergency surgery for resection of brainstem CMs. ...
List of causes of Cranial nerve dysfunction and Ear bleeding and Energy symptoms, alternative diagnoses, rare causes, misdiagnoses, patient stories, and much more.
The next time youre trying to remember the locations and functions of the cranial nerves, picture this drawing. All twelve cranial nerves are represented, though some may be a little harder to spot than others. For example, the shoulders are formed by the number 11 because cranial nerve XI controls neck and shoulder movement. If you immediately recognize that the sides of the face and the top of the head are formed by the number 7, youre well on your way to using this memory device.. Tags: nerfs craniensneurologieneurology. ...
Do You Have Cranial Nerve Vii Diseases? Join friendly people sharing true stories in the I Have Cranial Nerve VII Diseases group. Find support forums, advice and chat with groups who share this life experience. Cranial Nerve VII Diseases anonymous su...
Cranial nerve damage can cause sensory, motor function and parasympathetic abnormalities, depending on which of the 12 cranial nerves are affected. Read this informative article to learn about damage results and treatment options.
The cranial nerves originate in the brain and have power over some of the most important neurological functions of the body. Cranial nerves relay information between the brain and parts of the body, primarily to and from regions of the head and neck.
There are many cranial nerve mnemonics that can be memorable and rude/lewd. Either way, they can be helpful for remembering the names of the twelve cranial nerves, as well as remembering which nerves are sensory, motor, or both. Remembering cran...
Cranial Nerve Examination - Free download as Word Doc (.doc), PDF File (.pdf), Text File (.txt) or read online for free. Guide to cranial nerve examination
Free pdf of cranial nerves, with emphasis on those that relate to voice & swallowing. Patients dysphagia need a full exam of their cranial nerves.
Can you find the cranial nerves in this puzzle? Print out this page, then circle all cranial nerve names that you find. The words can be up, down or backwards. There are also a few cranial nerves MISSING from this puzzle. Do you know which ones are missing? For more information of the cranial nerves, go the Cranial Nerve Page. Here is the puzzle: ...
S04.891 is a non-billable code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of injury of other cranial nerves, right side.
S04.9 is a non-billable code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of injury of unspecified cranial nerve.
We wouldnt be able to talk, taste, chew, or swallow without the cranial nerves of our face and mouth. Find out how these nerves help us move our...
The cranial nerves are a set of twelve nerves that originate in the brain. Each has a different function for sense or movement. Learn more here.
13 The Brain, Cranial Nerves, and Sensory and Motor Pathways Lecture Presentation by Lori Garrett Note to the Instructor: For the third edition of Visual Anatomy & Physiology, we have updated our PowerPoints
Start studying The Brain and the Cranial Nerves. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools.
The mnemonic is 2 2 4 4. The number of Cranial Nerves leaving or exiting from each Brain segments (namely and respectively Cerebrum, Mid brain, Pons and, Medulla) are denominated in each of these numbers ...
This useful table summarising the anatomy and function of the cranial nerves was compiled by James Barber, ST8, Salford Royal Hospital, Manchester. ...
Can you name the Can you name the CRANIAL EXITS of the cranial nerves?? Test your knowledge on this science quiz to see how you do and compare your score to others. Quiz by dashloose
Can you name the Cranial Nerves By number? Test your knowledge on this science quiz to see how you do and compare your score to others. Quiz by san88diego
Video created by Université Duke for the course Neurosciences médicales. We now begin in earnest our lessons on neuroanatomy with the surface of the human brain, including a brief run through the cranial nerves and the blood supply to the CNS. ...
Study Flashcards On cranial nerves at Cram.com. Quickly memorize the terms, phrases and much more. Cram.com makes it easy to get the grade you want!
In the video below, NAIOMT Faculty Karen Walz, PT, DPT, OCS, COMT, FAAOMPT takes you through a clinical cranial nerve screening post-MVA. Let us know if you have questions, and for more MVA-related education, join Karen for Cervicothoracic MVA Regional Interdependence, our new online course.
Free flashcards to help memorize facts about cranial nerves. Other activities to help include hangman, crossword, word scramble, games, matching, quizes, and tests.
Free flashcards to help memorize facts about Cranial Nerves. Other activities to help include hangman, crossword, word scramble, games, matching, quizes, and tests.
Cranial examinations are administered by confrontation.The patient is checked for different cranial nerves both sensory and motor.
201969-Its been over a year since my first cranial nerve exam rp so I felt like I needed to do a new one for you guys(: Enjoy! Make sure to give ...
Video shows the examination of an infant cranial nerves by an expert doctor. Infant is of 6 months and a careful examination is shown here.
Study Flashcards On 12 Cranial Nerves & testing at Cram.com. Quickly memorize the terms, phrases and much more. Cram.com makes it easy to get the grade you want!
The ICD-10 Code D43.3 is the code used for Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of cranial nerves .An alternative description for this code is Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of cranial ...
Learn Cranial Nerve Chart facts using a simple interactive process (flashcard, matching, or multiple choice). Finally a format that helps you memorize and understand. Browse or search in thousands of pages or create your own page using a simple wizard. No signup required!
ICD-10 C72.5 is malignant neoplasm of other and unspecified cranial nerves (C725). This code is grouped under diagnosis codes for neoplasms.
How to Remember Cranial Nerves. #1 source of information for nurses all over the world. NurseReview.Org - Free Online Review for Nurses
The next time youre trying to remember the locations and functions of the cranial nerves, picture this drawing. All twelve cranial nerves are represented, though some may be a little harder to spot than others. For example, the shoulders are formed by the number 11» because cranial nerve XI controls…. ...
The type and extent of treatment for traumatic nerve injuries always depend on the location, extent, and type of nerve injury sustained by the patient.
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If your institution has not yet licensed the Strahlenschutzkurs or if you want to test the Strahlenschutzkurs, please contact us ...
"Clinical Relevance of Cranial Nerve Injury following Carotid Endarterectomy." European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular ... "Clinical relevance of cranial nerve injury following carotid endarterectomy". Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 47 (1): 2-7. doi: ... 2012). "The dangers of being a "weekend warrior": A new call for injury prevention efforts". The Journal of Trauma and Acute ... April 2007). "The midterm results of stent graft treatment of thoracic aortic injuries". J. Surg. Res. 138 (2): 181-8. doi: ...
... and cranial nerve injuries. Caput Succeedaneum is seen as edema in the scalp due to squeezing of the veins from increase ... It is also crucial to distinguish between "birth trauma" and "birth injury". Birth injuries encompass any systemic damages ... Birth injury occupies a unique area of concern and study in the medical canon. In ICD-10 "birth trauma" occupied 49 individual ... In the West injury occurs in 1.1% of C-sections. Cephalo-pelvic disproportion, the quick and rapid delivery, delayed and ...
... cranial nerve dysfunction, and traumatic brain injuries. The original medical report stated that neuropathologist Dr. Lucy ...
Iatrogenic injury is also known to occur, with the abducens nerve being the most commonly injured cranial nerve in halo ... The abducens nerve (or abducent nerve) is the sixth cranial nerve (CNVI), in humans, that controls the movement of the lateral ... of people with tuberculosis have some resulting cranial nerve deficit. The sixth nerve is the most commonly affected cranial ... Cranial Nerves: Anatomy and Clinical Comments. Decker, 1998. Books Susan Standring; Neil R. Borley; et al., eds. (2008). Gray's ...
Fourth cranial nerve palsy or trochlear nerve palsy, is a condition affecting cranial nerve 4 (IV), the trochlear nerve, which ... it is particularly vulnerable to traumatic injury. To compensate for the double-vision resulting from the weakness of the ... Because the trochlear nerve is the thinnest and has the longest intracranial course of the cranial nerves, ... When present at birth, it is known as congenital fourth nerve palsy. Harada-Ito procedure "Fourth Nerve Palsy". www.aao.org. ...
Injury to cranial nerve XI will cause weakness in abducting the shoulder above 90 degrees. ... Nerve. accessory nerve (motor). cervical spinal nerves C3 and C4 (motor and sensation)[3]. ... Nerve supply[edit]. Motor function is supplied by the accessory nerve. Sensation, including pain and the sense of joint ... Wiater JM, Bigliani LU (1999). "Spinal accessory nerve injury". Clinical Orthopaedics & Related Research. 368 (1): 5-16. doi: ...
In some extreme cases, this could cause temporary or permanent facial nerve injury. Furthermore, if the forceps' handler were ... Increased risk of damage to cranial nerve VI, resulting in strabismus. Increased risk of perineal lacerations, pelvic organ ... Increased risk of facial nerve injury (usually temporary). Increased risk of clavicle fracture (rare). Increased risk of ... include nerve damage, Descemet's membrane rupture, skull fractures, and cervical cord injury. Maternal factors for use of ...
... cranial nerve injury typically presents as a visual acuity loss 1-14 years post treatment.[25] In the PNS, injury to the plexus ... Nerve damage from ionizing radiation occurs in phases, the initial phase from microvascular injury, capillary damage and nerve ... Radiation treatments are vitally necessary but may damage nerves near the target area or within the delivery path as nerve ... Mahmood SS (2016). "Cardiovascular Complications of Cranial and Neck Radiation". Current Treatment Options in Cardiovascular ...
... cranial nerve injury typically presents as a visual acuity loss 1-14 years post treatment.[32] In the PNS, injury to the plexus ... Nerve damage from ionizing radiation occurs in phases, the initial phase from microvascular injury, capillary damage and nerve ... Radiation treatments may damage nerves near the target area or within the delivery path as nerve tissue is also radiosensitive. ... Mahmood SS, Nohria A (July 2016). "Cardiovascular Complications of Cranial and Neck Radiation". Current Treatment Options in ...
... unspecified 950 Injury to optic nerve and pathways 951 Injury to other cranial nerve(s) 952 Spinal cord injury without evidence ... Injury to axillary nerve 955.1 Injury to median nerve 955.2 Injury to ulnar nerve 955.3 Injury to radial nerve 955.4 Injury to ... Injury to cervical nerve root 953.1 Injury to dorsal nerve root 953.2 Injury to lumbar nerve root 953.3 Injury to sacral nerve ... musculocutaneous nerve 955.5 Injury to cutaneous sensory nerve upper limb 955.6 Injury to digital nerve upper limb 955.7 Injury ...
... and Other Cranial Nerve Disorders Chapter 434: Diseases of the Spinal Cord Chapter 435: Concussion and Other Traumatic Brain ... Injuries Chapter 436: Multiple Sclerosis Chapter 437: Neuromyelitis Optica Section 3: Nerve and Muscle Disorders Chapter 438: ... Acute Kidney Injury Chapter 305: Chronic Kidney Disease Chapter 306: Dialysis in the Treatment of Renal Failure Chapter 307: ... Vascular Injury to the Kidney Chapter 312: Nephrolithiasis Chapter 313: Urinary Tract Obstruction Part 10: Disorders of the ...
... palsy is identified through loss of lateral gaze after application of the orthosis and is the most common cranial nerve injury ... Sixth nerve palsy, or abducens nerve palsy, is a disorder associated with dysfunction of cranial nerve VI (the abducens nerve ... fibers of the seventh cranial nerve wrap around the VIth nerve nucleus, and, if this is also affected, a VIth nerve palsy with ... "Cranial Mononeuropathy VI", Medline Plus Medical Encyclopedia.[1]. *"Cranial Nerve VI Palsy", Handbook of Ocular Disease ...
Causes of optic nerve lesions include optic atrophy, optic neuropathy, head injury etc. Lesions involving the whole optic nerve ... also known as cranial nerve II, extends from the optic disc to the optic chiasma. Lesions in optic nerve causes visual field ... Stroke, head injury or gunshot injuries, infection, eclampsia, encephalitis, meningitis, medications, and hyperammonemia can ... The optic chiasm, or optic chiasma is the part of the brain where both optic nerves cross. It is located at the bottom of the ...
He assigned a numerical order to the cranial nerves from the optic to the hypoglossal nerves. He classified the spinal nerves ... into 8 cervical, 12 thoracic, 5 lumbar, 3 sacral, and 3 coccygeal nerves. He used this to link clinical signs of injury to the ... In the nervous system, Rhazes stated that nerves had motor or sensory functions, describing 7 cranial and 31 spinal cord nerves ...
Fourth cranial nerve palsy, is a condition affecting cranial nerve 4 (IV),[1] the trochlear nerve, which is one of the cranial ... it is particularly vulnerable to traumatic injury. ... Fourth Cranial Nerve Palsy. Other names. Trochlear nerve palsy ... Because the trochlear nerve is the thinnest and has the longest intracranial course of the cranial nerves, ... "Fourth Nerve Palsy". www.aao.org. Retrieved 25 June 2019.. .mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output ...
Trauma to the skull, disease of bone, such as Paget's disease, and injury to nerves during surgery are other causes of nerve ... Cranial nerve mnemonics Standring, Susan; Borley, Neil R. (2008). "Overview of cranial nerves and cranial nerve nuclei". Gray's ... Some considered there to be thirteen pairs of cranial nerves, including cranial nerve zero. The numbering of the cranial nerves ... The nerves are: the olfactory nerve (I), the optic nerve (II), oculomotor nerve (III), trochlear nerve (IV), trigeminal nerve ( ...
... including oral motor deficits Cranial nerve damage Hearing loss Craniofacial anomalies that adversely affect speech, language ... 2013). Brain injury medicine principles and practice (2nd ed.). New York: Demos Medical. pp. 1086-1104, 1111-1117. ISBN ... Infants with injuries due to complications at birth, feeding and swallowing difficulties, including dysphagia Children with ... Speech, language, and swallowing disorders result from a variety of causes, such as a stroke, brain injury, hearing loss, ...
This injury does not pin point specific ages or genders because it could happen to anybody. People who dislocate their jaw do ... This can result in a fracture of the glenoid fossa and displacement of the condyle into the middle cranial fossa, potentially ... injuring the facial and vestibulocochlear nerves and the temporal lobe. Lateral dislocations move the mandibular condyle away ... The symptoms can be numerous depending on the severity of the dislocation injury and how long the person is inflicted with the ...
The outcome of nerve repair is dependent on the degree of the nerve injury and the circumstances at the site of injury. Since ... Lange, Dale J., Werner Trojaborg (1995). "Peripheral and Cranial Nerve Lesions". In Lewis P. Rowland (ed.). Merritt's Textbook ... There are three distinct classifications and degrees of nerve injury: Neurotmesis is the most serious degree of nerve injury. ... Neurapraxia is least serious form of nerve injury. There are two different forms of mechanical nerve injury involving ...
The trochlear nerve (/ˈtrɒklɪər/), also called the fourth cranial nerve or CN IV, is a motor nerve (a somatic efferent nerve) ... Isolated injury to the fourth nerve can be caused by any process that stretches or compresses the nerve. A generalized increase ... The nuclei of other cranial nerves generally affect ipsilateral structures (for example, the optic nerves - cranial nerves II ... The trochlear nerve is unique among the cranial nerves in several respects: It is the smallest nerve in terms of the number of ...
... like injury to bone, muscle and skin, can make nerve recovery more difficult. The level of injury: After a nerve is repaired, ... which consists of cranial and spinal nerves along with their associated ganglia. While the peripheral nervous system has an ... The injured nerve is identified and exposed so that normal nerve tissue can be examined above and below the level of injury, ... The mechanism of injury: Sharp injuries, such as a knife wound, damage only a very short segment of the nerve, availing for ...
... cranial nerve VII) or glossopharyngeal nerve (cranial nerve IX): Tonsillitis: infection/inflammation of the tonsils Post- ... This type of injury is particularly common in contact sports such as wrestling and boxing. Environmental injuries include ... Many different nerves provide sensation to the various parts of the ear, including cranial nerves V (trigeminal), VII (facial ... Irritation of the trigeminal nerve (cranial nerve V) is the most common cause of referred ear pain. While some disorders may ...
List of nerves of the human body Nerve injury Nervous system Neuropathy Peripheral nerve injury Peripheral nerve injury ... Nerves that exit from the cranium are called cranial nerves while those exiting from the spinal cord are called spinal nerves. ... In addition, cranial nerves have descriptive names. Specific terms are used to describe nerves and their actions. A nerve that ... A pinched nerve occurs when pressure is placed on a nerve, usually from swelling due to an injury, or pregnancy and can result ...
Conversely, a lower motor neuron lesion affects nerve fibers traveling from the anterior horn of the spinal cord or the cranial ... traumatic brain injury, cerebral palsy, atypical parkinsonisms, multiple system atrophy, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. ... occurs in the neural pathway above the anterior horn cell of the spinal cord or motor nuclei of the cranial nerves. ... and vision Memory and concentration Nerve conduction study Spinal tap or lumbar puncture Nerve biopsy stimulation Physiotherapy ...
... because they cause damage to cranial nerve X, the vagus nerve, which plays an important role in blood circulation and breathing ... Chapter 5, "Pathology of Brain Damage After Head Injury" Cooper P and Golfinos G. 2000. Head Injury, 4th Ed. Morgan Hill, New ... The risk of death from an intraparenchymal bleed in traumatic brain injury is especially high when the injury occurs in the ... "Overview of Adult Traumatic Brain Injuries." Archived 2008-02-27 at the Wayback Machine Retrieved on 2008-01-16. ...
In addition, there is the optic canal, which contains the optic nerve, or cranial nerve II, and is formed entirely by the ... Injury to any one of these structures by infection, trauma or neoplasm can cause temporary or permanent visual dysfunction, and ... and the ophthalmic branches of cranial nerve V, or V1. The second division of the trigeminal nerve enters the skull base at the ... The optic canal contains the (cranial nerve II) and the ophthalmic artery, and sits at the junction of the sphenoid sinus with ...
Microscopic Morphology and Ultrastructure of Human Peripheral Nerves", Nerves and Nerve Injuries, San Diego: Academic Press, pp ... Manual Therapy for the Cranial Nerves, Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone, pp. 1-5, doi:10.1016/b978-0-7020-3100-7.50004-5, ISBN ... thereby assisting in locating injuries to peripheral nerves. The endoneurium runs longitudinally along the nerve fiber, but ... Peripheral nerve injuries commonly release increased amounts of endoneurial fluid into surrounding tissues; these can be ...
The vagus nerve is the tenth cranial nerve. It regulates heart rate, broncho-constriction, digestion, and the innate immune ... Tumor necrosis factors (TNF) (and other cytokines) are produced by cells of the innate immune system during local injury and ... The vagus nerve innervates the celiac ganglion, the site of origin of the splenic nerve. Stimulation of the efferent vagus ... De Couck M, Caers R, Spiegel D, Gidron Y (July 2018). "The Role of the Vagus Nerve in Cancer Prognosis: A Systematic and a ...
In turn, a fairly complex reflex is triggered involving cranial nerves sub-serving respiration, retroperistalsis, and general ... Donkin JJ, Turner RJ, Hassan I, Vink R (2007). "Substance P in traumatic brain injury". Progress in Brain Research. 161: 97-109 ... with an amidation at the C-terminus.[4] Substance P is released from the terminals of specific sensory nerves. It is found in ... When the innervation to substance P nerve terminals is lost, post-synaptic cells compensate for the loss of adequate ...
Neurological (consciousness, awareness, brain, vision, cranial nerves, spinal cord and peripheral nerves) ... Physical medicine and rehabilitation (or physiatry) is concerned with functional improvement after injury, illness, or ... Sports medicine deals with the treatment and prevention and rehabilitation of sports/exercise injuries such as muscle spasms, ... Urgent care focuses on delivery of unscheduled, walk-in care outside of the hospital emergency department for injuries and ...
"Physiologists divide nerve-fibers, which form the nerves, into two classes, afferent and efferent. Impressions are made on the ... Ndetan HT, Rupert RL, Bae S, Singh KP (February 2009). "Prevalence of musculoskeletal injuries sustained by students while ... and cranial.[75] Chiropractic biophysics technique uses inverse functions of rotations during spinal manipulation.[76] Koren ... Thus, nerves carry impulses outward and sensations inward. The activity of these nerves, or rather their fibers, may become ...
The examination is warranted in cases where urethral injury or penetrating rectal injury is suspected;[11][12] ... Cranial nerve examination. *Upper limb neurological examination. Neonatal. *Apgar score. *Ballard Maturational Assessment ... However, the sensitivity of the DRE for injuries of the spinal cord, pelvis, and bowel is poor, and false positive and negative ...
There are twelve pairs of cranial nerves.[108] Due to their short cochlea, reptiles use electrical tuning to expand their range ... Traumatic injuries on the other hand, form scars that will not allow new scales to form and disrupt the process of ecdysis.[94] ... NervesEdit. The reptilian nervous system contains the same basic part of the amphibian brain, but the reptile cerebrum and ... Graciela Piñeiro, Jorge Ferigolo, Alejandro Ramos and Michel Laurin (2012). "Cranial morphology of the Early Permian mesosaurid ...
Sensory cranial and spinal nerves. *Optic (II). *Vestibulocochlear (VIII). *Olfactory (I). *Facial (VII) ... Type IV: (very small) High threshold pain receptors that communicate injury. Type II and Type III mechanoreceptors in ... The Merkel nerve endings (also known as Merkel discs) detect sustained pressure. The lamellar corpuscles (also known as ... Mechanosensory free nerve endings detect touch, pressure, stretching, as well as the tickle and itch sensations. Itch ...
Following is a list of sensory cranial nerves:. *V1 (1st division of the Trigeminal nerve) - associated with Herpes zoster ... American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA). June 2008. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2016-03-04.. ... 12 thoracic nerves, 5 lumbar nerves and 5 sacral nerves. Each of these nerves relays sensation (including pain) from a ... A dermatome is an area of skin that is mainly supplied by a single spinal nerve.[1] There are 8 cervical nerves (C1 being an ...
"Neural plasticity after peripheral nerve injury and regeneration". Group of Neuroplasticity and Regeneration, Institute of ... "Penggunaan Trans Cranial Doppler untuk Deteksi Perubahan Hemodinamik Serebral pada Pasien Kritis". Diakses tanggal 3 April 2015 ... "Peripheral nerve regeneration". Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Eastern Virginia Medical School; Liuzzi FJ, Tedeschi B ... Intra-cranial stenting yang diterapkan pada gejala penyumbatan intracranial arterial stenosis, boleh dikatakan sukses ...
... fourth cranial nerve), which controls the action of the superior oblique muscle in the eye.[2] By 1998, there had been only one ... The interposition of a Teflon pad between the trochlear nerve and a compressing artery and vein at the nerve's exit from the ... In 1983, Bringewald postulated that superior oblique myokymia resulted from vascular compression of the trochlear nerve ( ... magnetic resonance imaging experiments have shown that neurovascular compression at the root exit zone of the trochlear nerve ...
1.Optic nerve sheath diameter.[edit]. The use of optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) for the assessment of ICP dates back to ... and can be used to identify patients who are at risk of developing cerebral ischemia in early phases of traumatic brain injury ... of ICP are based on an assumption that changes in ICP affect the physical dimensions and/or acoustic properties of the cranial ... 8.1 1.Optic nerve sheath diameter.. *8.2 2. Ophthalmodynamometry or the measurement of the retinal venous outflow pressure (VOP ...
Primary and secondary brain injury). In children with uncomplicated minor head injuries the risk of intra cranial bleeding over ... an eye that cannot move or is deviated to one side can indicate that a broken facial bone is pinching a nerve that innervates ... A head injury is any injury that results in trauma to the skull or brain. The terms traumatic brain injury and head injury are ... "TBI , Traumatic Brain Injury , Traumatic Brain Injury Resources , Brain Injury Support , Brain Injury Information". www. ...
Ingram LC, Fairclough DL, Furman WL, Sandlund JT, Kun LE, Rivera GK, Pui CH (May 1991). "Cranial nerve palsy in childhood acute ... "Global, regional, and national incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability for 310 diseases and injuries, 1990-2015 ... Headache, vomiting, lethargy, neck stiffness,[18] or cranial nerve palsies[19] (CNS involvement) ... Central nervous system (CNS) symptoms such as cranial neuropathies due to meningeal infiltration are identified in less than 10 ...
Cranial and paraspinal nerves: Neurofibroma *Neurofibromatosis. *Neurilemmoma/Schwannoma *Acoustic neuroma. *Malignant ... The tumor, though benign, may cause neurological injury including abnormal movements. MICROSCOPY(lhermitte-duclos disease) 1, ...
Ocular paralysis (cranial nerve palsy). *Impaired muscle coordination. *Weakness (muscle). *Loss of sensation ... key aspects of promoting axon growth and remyelination after injury or disease.[25] ... can also result in nerve demyelination.[2] Chronic neuroleptic exposure may cause demyelination.[3] Vitamin B12 deficiency may ... because the demyelinating inflammation can affect the optic nerve or spinal cord. Many are idiopathic. Both myelinoclastic and ...
... but other cranial nerves can also be affected.[18][21] Cephalic tetanus may progress to a more generalized form of the disease. ... eye injury,[16] dental extraction,[18] and otitis media,[19] but it has been observed from injuries to other parts of the body. ... Cephalic tetanus is the rarest form of the disease (0.9-3% of cases)[15] and is limited to muscles and nerves in the head.[16] ... There it becomes rapidly fixed to gangliosides at the presynaptic inhibitory motor nerve endings, and is taken up into the axon ...
... occurs due to a malfunction of the facial nerve (cranial nerve VII), which controls the muscles of the face. ... and care must be taken to protect the eye from injury. ... Facial nerve: the facial nerve's nuclei are in the brainstem ( ... It results from a dysfunction of cranial nerve VII (the facial nerve).[1] Many believe that this is due to a viral infection ... The nerve can be thought of as a bundle of smaller individual nerve connections that branch out to their proper destinations. ...
Nerves *cranial. *trigeminal. *cervical. *brachial. *lumbosacral plexus. *somatosensory. *spinal. *autonomic. *Physiology * ...
... or whiplash injury.[7] 1-2% of those with major trauma may have an injury to the carotid or vertebral arteries.[2] In many ... The brainstem harbors a number of vital functions (such as respiration) and controls the nerves of the face and neck. The ... The vertebral artery supplies a number of vital structures in the posterior cranial fossa, such as the brainstem, the ... "The anatomy and biomechanics of acute and chronic whiplash injury". Traffic Injury Prevention. 10 (2): 101-12. doi:10.1080/ ...
Nerve. Pudendal nerve. Pelvic splanchnic nerves. Inferior hypogastric plexus. Lymph. Internal iliac lymph nodes. Deep inguinal ... The first of these is the cranial portion which is continuous with the allantois and forms the bladder proper. In the male the ... Foreign bodies in the urethra are uncommon, but there have been medical case reports of self-inflicted injuries, a result of ... Somatic (conscious) innervation of the external urethral sphincter is supplied by the pudendal nerve. ...
Spinal cord injury. *Spinal cord tumors. *Spinal muscular atrophy. *Spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type 1 - ... Cranial arteritis. *Craniosynostosis. *Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. *Cumulative trauma disorders. *Cushing's syndrome. *Cyclic ...
report on injuries to the nerve trunk from gunshot wounds to the extremities.[51] ... arising from an abdominal gunshot wound might propagate through the vena cavae and jugular venous system into the cranial ... 1993). "The mechanisms of the injuries to the nerve trunk in gunshot wounds of the extremities: Experimental research". Voen ... Distant injuries away from the main track in high velocity missile injuries are very important and almost always present in all ...
This includes no response to pain and no cranial nerve reflexes. Reflexes include pupillary response (fixed pupils), ... whether induced medically or caused by injury and/or illness, even if it is very deep, as long as some brain and bodily ... traumatic brain injury, intracranial haemorrhage, hypoxic encephalopathy) consistent with the irreversible loss of neurological ... "Difficulty in brainstem death testing in the presence of high spinal cord injury". British Journal of Anaesthesia. 92 (5): 762 ...
... some of which contain the cell bodies of neurons belonging to the cranial nerves. Not all cranial nerve nuclei contain α-MNs; ... Injury to α-MNs is the most common type of lower motor neuron lesion. Damage may be caused by trauma, ischemia, and infection, ... The corticonuclear tract is so named because it connects the cerebral cortex to cranial nerve nuclei. (The corticonuclear tract ... These α-MNs provide the motor component of the spinal nerves that innervate muscles of the body. ...
cranial root of accessory nerves(英语:cranial root of accessory nerves) ... 周围神经损伤分類(英语:Peripheral nerve injury classification) ... 闭孔内肌神经(英语:Obturator internus nerve). *梨状肌神经(英语:Piriformis nerve)). 皮神经(英语:Cutaneous nerve): 股后皮神经(英语:Posterior cutaneous nerve ... superior laryngeal nerve(英语:superior laryngeal
Then the brain's connection to the cranial nerves and spinal cord are severed, and the brain is lifted out of the skull for ... mode and manner of death or to evaluate any disease or injury that may be present for research or educational purposes. (The ...
The insula was first described by Johann Christian Reil while describing cranial and spinal nerves and plexi.[86] Henry Gray in ... of addiction was evidenced by self-reported behavior changes such as quitting smoking less than one day after the brain injury ...
Intractable pain of cancer or trauma patients and cranial/peripheral nerve pain ... Al-Zahrawi performed surgical treatments of head injuries, skull fractures, spinal injuries, hydrocephalus, subdural effusions ... Intractable pain of cancer or trauma patients and cranial/peripheral nerve pain ... "The Nerve Center of Pathology". Stanford University.. [not in citation given]. *^ "Chapter 9: Degenerative diseases". www. ...
Prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) is a type of radiotherapy to the brain, used to reduce the risk of metastasis. PCI is ... Invasion into the chest wall, diaphragm, phrenic nerve, mediastinal pleura or parietal pericardium. ... GBD 2015 Disease and Injury Incidence and Prevalence, Collaborators. (8 October 2016). "Global, regional, and national ... Paumier, A; Cuenca X; Le Péchoux C (June 2011). "Prophylactic cranial irradiation in lung cancer". Cancer Treatment Reviews. 37 ...
... cranial nerve,injuries}, language = {eng}, pages = {595--598}, series = {Acta Chir Scand}, title = {Cranial nerve injuries ... carotid endarterectomy, cranial nerve, injuries. in Acta Chir Scand. volume. 151. pages. 595 - 598. external identifiers. * ... Cranial nerve injuries associated with carotid endarterectomy. Forssell, Claes; Takolander, Rabbe; Bergqvist, David; Bergentz, ...
... with a residual cranial nerve injury: 27 hypoglossal, 17 marginal mandibular, 17 recurrent laryngeal, one accessory nerve, and ... Cranial nerve injury was assessed and recorded in every patient and persisting deficits were identified on follow-up ... Risk factors for cranial nerve injury were examined by performing univariate and multivariate analyses. There were 88 motor ... The reported frequency of cranial nerve injury in the published literature ranges from 3 to 23%, and there have been few series ...
Cranial nerves injuries included transient contusions of hypoglossal (2) and superior laryngeal nerve (2).. CONCLUSIONS: The ... cranial nerves injuries. In all cases of hemorrhage successful re-intervention was performed without any consequences. ... BACKGROUND: The aim of this paper was to present single centre experience in the treatment of extra cranial carotid artery ...
... pain from the injury, impaired hearing and facial expressions. Cranial nerve injury can also affect arousal of the vagus nerve ... cranial nerves. Taunton Birth Forum 4th September 2012 October 8, 2012. study days attendedBabies, baby, Birth, cranial nerves ... One branch of the cranial nerves, the vagus nerve, supplies the heart and lungs. it modulates the heartrate, enabling enough ... The cranial nerves develop in the folds of the embryonic face and make up what is known as "the social nervous system". The ...
On the other hand, a trumpet player or opera singer may be more concerned about a career-ending cranial nerve injury. Further, ...
... including cranial nerve injury which approaches a 10% overall risk of complication. A third and less commonly used alternative ...
To establish the incidence of cranial and cervical nerve injuries during CEA and their relationship to different surgical ... Role of surgical techniques and operative findings in cranial and cervical nerve injuries during carotid endarterectomy.. ... The incidence of single cranial nerve injuries was higher in patch (OR = 2.7) and eversion (OR = 1.9) procedures than in ... and plaque extension on the onset of nerve injuries.. RESULTS: Postoperatively, nerve lesions were identified in 51 CEAs (27%) ...
Cranial-nerve Non-invasive Neuromodulation (CN-NINM) for Balance Deficits After Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (Full Trial) (CN- ... Cranial-nerve Non-invasive Neuromodulation (CN-NINM) for Balance Deficits After Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (Full Trial) ... Cranial-nerve Non-invasive Neuromodulation (CN-NINM) for Balance Deficits After Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: A Randomized, ... Sham CN-NINM PoNS - Sham cranial-nerve non-invasive neuromodulation (CN-NINM) using the Portable Neuromodulation Stimulator ( ...
Urie MM, , Fullerton B, & Tatsuzaki H, et al: A dose response analysis of injury to cranial nerves and/or nuclei following ... A dose response analysis of injury to cranial nerves and/or nuclei following proton beam radiation therapy.. Int J Radiat Oncol ... Risk of injury to cranial nerves after gamma knife radiosurgery for skull base meningiomas: experience in 88 patients. ... Urie MM, Fullerton B, Tatsuzaki H, et al: A dose response analysis of injury to cranial nerves and/or nuclei following proton ...
... cranial nerve injury (CNI), and to evaluate the risk factors associated with increased CNI risk.The ... Meta-analysis revealed that the vagus nerve was the most frequently injured cranial nerve (pooled injury rate 3.99%, 95% CI ... Clinical relevance of cranial nerve injury following carotid endarterectomy.. Research paper. by M M Fokkema, G J GJ de Borst, ... Risk of persistent cranial nerve injury after carotid endarterectomy.. Research paper. by Edwin J EJ Cunningham, Rick R Bond, ...
Cranial Nerve Injury. Cranial nerve injury is a complication of CEA that tends to resolve in the first few months after surgery ... 19,20 The most common cranial nerves affected are V, VII, IX, X, and XII. The symptoms of cranial nerve injury can include ... There were no cranial nerve injuries experienced in the CAS arm of CREST in the per-protocol population (online-only Data ... postoperative incidence of cranial nerve injury, which was reduced to 2.1% at 6 months. Of note, the majority of these (80%) ...
... consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of injury of unspecified cranial nerve. ... Injury - See Also: specified injury type; - T14.90 * - nerve NEC - T14.8 * - cranial - S04.9* - contusion - S04.9 ... Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes (S00-T98) * Injuries to the head (S00-S09) * Injury of ... There are more than 100 kinds of peripheral nerve disorders. They can affect one nerve or many nerves. Some are the result of ...
"Clinical Relevance of Cranial Nerve Injury following Carotid Endarterectomy." European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular ... "Clinical relevance of cranial nerve injury following carotid endarterectomy". Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 47 (1): 2-7. doi: ... 2012). "The dangers of being a "weekend warrior": A new call for injury prevention efforts". The Journal of Trauma and Acute ... April 2007). "The midterm results of stent graft treatment of thoracic aortic injuries". J. Surg. Res. 138 (2): 181-8. doi: ...
Damage to cranial nerves affects many important functions throughout the body including vision, smell and taste, facial ... Cranial Nerve Injury. Cranial nerves are part of the central nervous system and emerge directly from the brain, in contrast to ... Traumatic and non-traumatic brain injuries can cause injury to these nerves through the same mechanisms which cause damage to ... The cranial nerves are comprised of twelve pairs.. The first and second pairs emerge from the cerebellum; the remaining ten ...
Cranial Nerve I). Graphically depicts a violent blow to the back of the head as it strikes the pavement, resulting in tearing ... of the fibers of the olfactory nerve bulb (C.N. I) in the cribriform plate of the ethmoid bone in the skull. This injury ... Shear Injury to the Olfactory Nerves (Cranial Nerve I). Graphically depicts a violent blow to the back of the head as it ... injuries, injury, lack, nasal, nerve, nerves, nose, noses, olfactory, plate, plates, shear, smell, taste ...
Birth injury to other cranial nerves BILLABLE Billable Code Billable codes are sufficient justification for admission to an ... P11.4 is a billable ICD code used to specify a diagnosis of birth injury to other cranial nerves. A billable code is detailed ... ICD-10-CM Alphabetical Index References for P11.4 - Birth injury to other cranial nerves The ICD-10-CM Alphabetical Index ... Other cranial and peripheral nerve injuries due to birth trauma (approximate match) ...
... consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of injury of other cranial nerves, right side. ... Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes (S00-T98) * Injuries to the head (S00-S09) * Injury of ... There are more than 100 kinds of peripheral nerve disorders. They can affect one nerve or many nerves. Some are the result of ... consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of injury of other cranial nerves, right side. The ...
Injury of unspecified cranial nerve, subsequent encounter Long Description: Injury of unspecified cranial nerve, subsequent ... Injuries of brain and cranial nerves with injuries of nerves and spinal cord at neck level ... Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes (S00-T98) * Injuries to the head (S00-S09) *Injury of ... There are more than 100 kinds of peripheral nerve disorders. They can affect one nerve or many nerves. Some are the result of ...
Third, Fourth, and Sixth Cranial Nerve Palsies Following Closed Head Injury. Dhaliwal, Avninder; West, Adrienne L; Trobe, ... Avoiding Clinical Misinterpretation and Artifacts of Optical Coherence Tomography Analysis of the Optic Nerve, Retinal Nerve ... Optic Nerve Cupping and the Neuro-Ophthalmologist. Fraser, Clare L.; White, Andrew J. R.; Plant, Gordon T.; More ... Peripapillary Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness Corresponds to Drusen Location and Extent of Visual Field Defects in ...
Management: Cranial Nerve Injuries. Addressing the problem. Injury to the facial nerve (CN VII), the glossopharyngeal nerve (CN ... Problem: Cranial Nerve Injuries. Although CN injuries are rarely considered in discussions of postoperative complications after ... Risk factors for cranial nerve injury after carotid endarterectomy. J Vasc Surg. 2015 Aug. 62 (2):363-8. [Medline]. ... Cranial and cervical nerve injuries after carotid endarterectomy: a prospective study. Surgery. 1999 Jan. 125 (1):85-91. [ ...
... brain injury, mental health, consciousness, cranial nerves, phobias, tumors, etc. ... Cranial Nerves (I-XII). Deatils of all cranial nerves (I-XII). Depression Related Terms. Words and terms related to depression. ... Brain Injury Terms. Terms related to Brain Injuries.. Consciousness Levels. Various stages and response of Consciousness Levels ... Various terms for Neuro-Psych - Alzheimers disease, Glasgow coma scale, sleep terms, brain injury, mental health, ...
Cranial Nerve I). Graphically depicts a violent blow to the back of the head as it strikes the pavement, resulting in tearing ... of the fibers of the olfactory nerve bulb (C.N. I) in the cribriform plate of the ethmoid bone in the skull. This injury ... Shear Injury to the Olfactory Nerves (Cranial Nerve I). Graphically depicts a violent blow to the back of the head as it ... Shear Injury to the Olfactory Nerves (Cranial Nerve I) - Medical Illustration, Human Anatomy Drawing. ...
The names of the cranial nerves relate to their function and they are also numerically identified in roman numerals I-XII by ... The cranial nerves are a set of 12 nerves which emerge directly from the brain. ... Structure and Function of the Cranial Nerves in El Paso, TX. The cranial nerves are the nerves which come out straight from the ... and the hypoglossal nerve (XII). There may be a thirteenth cranial nerve, known as the terminal nerve, or nerve N or O, which ...
Optic Nerve Injuries. Neuromuscular Diseases. Nervous System Diseases. Cranial Nerve Diseases. Eye Diseases. Cranial Nerve ... Such injury leads to ischemic injury to the axons of the retinal ganglion cells within the optic canal. At present, no studies ... Wounds and Injuries. Methylprednisolone. Epoetin Alfa. Anti-Inflammatory Agents. Antiemetics. Autonomic Agents. Peripheral ... The tight adherence of the optic nerves dural sheath to the periosteum within the optic canal is also thought to contribute to ...
Risk of persistent cranial motor nerve injury after carotid endarterectomy: Absolute risk and risk factors ... Risk of persistent cranial motor nerve injury after carotid endarterectomy: Absolute risk and risk factors ... Risk of persistent cranial motor nerve injury after carotid endarterectomy: Absolute risk and risk factors ...
Condition: Cranial nerve injuries are common complications of traumatic brain injury due to trauma or other conditions. Injury ... The 12 pairs of cranial nerves that emerge from the brain provide motor and sensory nerves to the head and neck. Injury to ... History and Symptoms: Most cranial nerve lesions are present at the time of traumatic brain injury, although some can develop ... Risk Factors: Head trauma and stroke are major risk factors for cranial nerve injury. ...
List of 32 causes for 7th cranial nerve palsy and Beaus lines and Chronic finger pain related to sporting injuries and ... Cranial nerve *Cranial nerve diseases *Cranial nerve disorder *Cranial *Cranial pain (10 causes) *Nerve *Nerve symptoms (9132 ... 7th cranial nerve palsy:*Causes: 7th cranial nerve palsy *Introduction: 7th cranial nerve palsy *7th cranial nerve palsy: Add a ... More Searches: 7th cranial nerve palsy. *7th cranial nerve palsy: Add a 5th symptom *7th cranial nerve palsy: Remove a symptom ...
Physiotherapy in postinfection injury to cranial nerves III, IV, and VI: a case study. Rongies, Witold; Bojakowski, Jacek; ... Diagnostic approach to traumatic axonal injury of the optic radiation in mild traumatic brain injury: A case report. Jang, Sung ... Diffuse traumatic axonal injuries of the neural tracts following a head trauma by a golf ball: a case report. Jang, Sung Ho; Do ... Isolated Teres Minor Injury in a Dragon Boat Racer. Algazwi, Diyaa Abdul Rauf; Teng, Victor Sheng Yeow; Singbal, Salil Babla; ...
... and cranial nerve injuries. Caput Succeedaneum is seen as edema in the scalp due to squeezing of the veins from increase ... It is also crucial to distinguish between "birth trauma" and "birth injury". Birth injuries encompass any systemic damages ... Birth injury occupies a unique area of concern and study in the medical canon. In ICD-10 "birth trauma" occupied 49 individual ... In the West injury occurs in 1.1% of C-sections. Cephalo-pelvic disproportion, the quick and rapid delivery, delayed and ...
... and major nerves (including cranial nerves IX-XII), traverse this zone. Injuries in zone III can prove difficult to access ... Neural structures at risk include the spinal cord, phrenic nerve, brachial plexus, recurrent laryngeal nerve, cranial nerves ( ... Spinal accessory nerve (cranial nerve XI): Inability to shrug a shoulder and to laterally rotate the chin to the opposite ... Major nerve injury occurs in 3-8% of patients sustaining penetrating neck trauma. Spinal cord injury occurs infrequently and ...
Injury of abducent nerve. 2016 2017 2018 Non-Billable/Non-Specific Code Applicable To*Injury of 6th cranial nerve ... Left abducens nerve injury. ICD-10-CM S04.42XA is grouped within Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v35.0): *073 Cranial and ... Injury of cranial nerve. 2016 2017 2018 Non-Billable/Non-Specific Code Applicable To*The selection of side should be based on ... Injury of abducent nerve, left side, initial encounter. 2016 2017 2018 Billable/Specific Code *S04.42XA is a billable/specific ...
Recent studies have pointed to dysfunction of several cranial nerves associated with taste sensation as a possible cause of ... Cranial nerve injury. Variable pattern Usually bilateral Decreased discomfort with eating. Central pain control: benzodiazepine ... each of which is surrounded by a basket-like collection of the pain neurons of the trigeminal nerve (cranial nerve V).20 This ... cranial nerve VII) results in intensification of taste sensations from the area innervated by the glossopharyngeal nerve ( ...
17.Acute Soft Tissue Injuries and Repair. 18.Cranial Nerve Injuries. 19.Salivary Gland and Duct Injuries ... 6.Demographics of Head and Neck Injuries in Iraq and Afghanistan. 7.Impact of Body Armor on Head and Neck Injuries: Preventive ... 9.Weapons and Mechanism of Injury in Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom ...
They showed that, over the short term, CEA was associated with a higher rate of MI and cranial nerve injury, whereas CAS was ... or cranial nerve injury). Our stroke example can be expressed as an expected value decision tree,22 in which each branch ... Maas AIMenon DKLingsma HFPineda JASandel MEManley GT: Re-orientation of clinical research in traumatic brain injury: report of ... Maas AIMenon DKLingsma HFPineda JASandel MEManley GT: Re-orientation of clinical research in traumatic brain injury: report of ...
  • In 23 patients, the deficit had resolved by hospital discharge, leaving 3.7% of patients (95% CI 2.9-4.7) with a residual cranial nerve injury: 27 hypoglossal, 17 marginal mandibular, 17 recurrent laryngeal, one accessory nerve, and three Homer syndrome. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Cranial nerves injuries included transient contusions of hypoglossal (2) and superior laryngeal nerve (2). (minervamedica.it)
  • BACKGROUND: The aim of this paper was to present single centre experience in the treatment of extra cranial carotid artery aneurysms (ECCA) and to analyze results discussing different treatment modalities. (minervamedica.it)
  • OBJECT: Cranial nerve injuries, particularly motor nerve injuries, following carotid endarterectomy (CEA) can be disabling and therefore patients should be given reliable information about the risks of sustaining such injuries. (ox.ac.uk)
  • METHODS: The authors investigated the risk of cranial nerve injuries in patients who underwent CEA in the European Carotid Surgery Trial (ECST), the largest series of patients undergoing CEA in which neurological assessment was performed before and after surgery. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Cranial nerve injury was assessed and recorded in every patient and persisting deficits were identified on follow-up examination at 4 months and 1 year after randomization. (ox.ac.uk)
  • The reported frequency of cranial nerve injury in the published literature ranges from 3 to 23%, and there have been few series in which patients were routinely examined before and after surgery by a neurologist. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Nevertheless, the risk of cranial nerve injury should be communicated to patients before they undergo surgery. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Thirteen (7%) nerve lesions were permanent, but none were disabling. (nih.gov)
  • Cranial and cervical nerve lesions during CEA are common. (nih.gov)
  • Carotid plaque extension and neck haematoma appear to increase the incidence of cranial and cervical nerve lesions during CEA. (nih.gov)
  • Most cranial nerve lesions are present at the time of traumatic brain injury, although some can develop later due to complications that arise following the injury. (aapmr.org)
  • Safety of intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring (TES and EMG) for spinal and cranial lesions. (nih.gov)
  • There are lesions, injuries and artefacts that resemble gunshot wounds , and Prahlow and McClain (1997 pp. 121-125, 2001 pp. 206-213) have described some of these in detail. (forensicmed.co.uk)
  • There are numerous causes for cranial nerve injury that include head trauma or other lesions. (ebscohost.com)
  • Recent studies have pointed to dysfunction of several cranial nerves associated with taste sensation as a possible cause of burning mouth syndrome. (aafp.org)
  • Injury of the nerves that affect the eyes and ears can cause dysfunction in vision and hearing. (aapmr.org)
  • Dysfunction of one or more cranial nerves causally related to a traumatic injury. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Denervation of the tongue can be secondary to radiation therapy due to formation of fibrotic tissue around the nerve, infection, lymphadenopathy, tumor entrapping or infiltrating the nerve, neurogenic tumors arising within the nerve, or trauma, with iatrogenic trauma resulting from carotid endarterectomy, neck dissection, or tonsillectomy being among the more common causes of hypoglossal nerve dysfunction. (ajnr.org)
  • Diagnoses depends on symptoms and signs of nerve dysfunction consistent with those seen in patients with diabetes. (healthcentral.com)
  • An electromyogram is used to diagnose muscle problems caused by nerve dysfunction. (healthcommunities.com)
  • Unilateral cranial VI palsy (91%) was the most common ocular motor dysfunction in these patients. (hindawi.com)
  • The proximity of nasopharyngeal carcinoma to the skull base and cavernous sinus could cause nearby cranial nerve damage, among which cranial nerve III, IV, or VI dysfunction would result in limited ocular movement leading to diplopia. (hindawi.com)
  • METHODS: The authors investigated the risk of cranial nerve injuries in patients who underwent CEA in the European Carotid Surgery Trial (ECST), the largest series of patients undergoing CEA in which neurological assessment was performed before and after surgery. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Nevertheless, the risk of cranial nerve injury should be communicated to patients before they undergo surgery. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Subtotal resection or staged resection should be considered to minimize the risk of cranial nerve and/or other neural injury in complex cases. (springer.com)
  • Clinical improvement (in vision, trigeminal pain, or other cranial nerve symptoms) occurred in 15 patients. (thejns.org)
  • Furthermore, seemingly innocuous wounds may not manifest clear signs or symptoms, and potentially lethal injuries could be easily overlooked or discounted. (medscape.com)
  • A physical exam will be utilized to evaluate the patient's symptoms and to identify the specific cranial nerve injury. (aapmr.org)
  • Depending on the type of hematoma injury, the victim may experience minor to life-threatening symptoms. (bestattorney.com)
  • Brachial plexus triggers nerve symptoms but nerves not injured. (healthtap.com)
  • As nerve damage worsens, symptoms spread up the legs and begin in the hands. (healthcentral.com)
  • Special tests of nerve function are also helpful to establish that the symptoms and findings on examination are due to neuropathy. (healthcentral.com)
  • Occasionally, nerve conduction studies can identify other problems with nerves that may cause symptoms similar to diabetic neuropathy (such as pinched nerves in the back). (healthcentral.com)
  • Tumors anywhere along the path of the facial nerve may also cause the symptoms of facial nerve paralysis. (news-medical.net)
  • 7th cranial nerve injury / inflammation may cause such symptoms. (healthtap.com)
  • However, diplopic symptoms in NPC patients raise suspicion of not only tumor recurrence but also radiation-related cranial neuropathy. (hindawi.com)
  • Meta-analysis revealed that the vagus nerve was the most frequently injured cranial nerve (pooled injury rate 3.99%, 95% CI 2.56-5.70), followed by the hypoglossal nerve (3.79%, 95% CI 2.73-4.99). (sparrho.com)
  • A statistically significant influence of publication year on the vagus and hypoglossal nerve injury rate was found, with the injury rate having decreased from about 8% to 2% and 1%, respectively, over the last 35 years. (sparrho.com)
  • p = .002) were associated with an increased risk of CNI, whereas no statistically significant association was found between CNIs and the type of anaesthesia, the use of a patch, redo operation, and the use of a shunt.The vagus nerve appears to be the most frequently injured cranial nerve after CEA, followed by the hypoglossal nerve, with only a small proportion of these injuries being permanent. (sparrho.com)
  • The trigeminal nerve (V) is named based on its three components (Latin: trigeminus meaning triplets), and the vagus nerve (X) is known because of its wandering course (Latin: vagus). (personalinjurydoctorgroup.com)
  • One such option is a treatment called vagus nerve stimulation (VNS), in which short bursts of electrical energy are directed into the brain by way of the vagus nerve . (tripdatabase.com)
  • Vagus Nerve Stimulation for Treating Adults With Severe Fibromyalgia Vagus Nerve Stimulation for Treating Adults With Severe Fibromyalgia - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. (tripdatabase.com)
  • The abducens nerve also helps control eye movements. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The abducens nerve starts in the pons of the brainstem, enters an area called Dorello's canal, travels through the cavernous sinus, and ends at the lateral rectus muscle within the bony orbit. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Like static on a telephone line, peripheral nerve disorders distort or interrupt the messages between the brain and the rest of the body. (icdlist.com)
  • There are more than 100 kinds of peripheral nerve disorders. (icdlist.com)
  • Some people are born with peripheral nerve disorders. (icdlist.com)
  • Proper control of eye movements is critical to vision, but relatively little is known about the molecular mechanisms that regulate development and axon guidance in the ocular motor system or cause the abnormal innervation patterns (oculomotor synkinesis) seen in developmental disorders and after oculomotor nerve palsy. (arvojournals.org)
  • Penn's research laboratories focus on key topics in the neurosciences including spinal biomechanics, neurotrauma, neurodegenerative disorders, brain tumors and traumatic brain injury. (pennmedicine.org)
  • Penn Neurosurgery's renowned research centers offer hope to those with neurological conditions ranging from the full spectrum of movement disorders to traumatic brain injury. (pennmedicine.org)
  • You will also learn about cranial nerve disorders and head injuries, generally categorized as direct and indirect. (alison.com)
  • Time-resolved computed tomography angiography (4D-CTA) using a 320-row area detector CT scanner has recently been applied in the evaluation of cranial vascular disorders. (ebscohost.com)
  • Logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate the influence of surgical technique, type of anaesthesia, neck haematoma, and plaque extension on the onset of nerve injuries. (nih.gov)
  • [ 7 , 2 ] In addition to perioperative stroke, serious complications that may develop after CEA include myocardial ischemia and infarction , hemodynamic instability, cranial nerve (CN) injuries, and bleeding resulting in neck hematomas and airway compromise. (medscape.com)
  • Cranial nerves transfer information between the brain and parts of the human body, particularly to and from areas of the head and neck. (personalinjurydoctorgroup.com)
  • Neck injury may result in the laceration of major vessels, potentially leading to hemorrhagic shock. (medscape.com)
  • From the time when Ambroise Pare successfully treated a neck injury in 1552, debate has continued about the best approach for particular neck wounds. (medscape.com)
  • Awareness of the various presentations of neck injuries and the establishment of a well-conceived multidisciplinary plan prior to the traumatic event is critical for improving patient outcome. (medscape.com)
  • The neck is divided into anatomic zones or regions to assist in the evaluation of neck injuries. (medscape.com)
  • The hypoglossal nerve, providing motor innervation for the tongue, can be affected in many diseases of the neck and skull base, leading to dysarthria, dysphagia, and ultimately atrophy of the tongue. (ajnr.org)
  • We determined the feasibility of direct visualization of the hypoglossal nerve in the neck with ultrasound, testing this technique on healthy volunteers and evaluating it in clinical practice. (ajnr.org)
  • Can a brachial plexus injury affect your breathing and swallowing ability in addition to arm, shoulder, and neck pain? (healthtap.com)
  • For example, ants can cause superficial linear marks, sometimes associated with considerable haemorrhage, whilst cockroaches can produce deeper injuries with a deep brown colour, well demarcated edges and may be confused with abrasions on the neck made during manual strangulation attempts. (forensicmed.co.uk)
  • 1 SLN injury is best characterized in the head and neck surgery literature, where its prevalence has been reported to occur in up to 60% of conventional procedures such as total thyroidectomy. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • This intentionally inflicted injury causes trauma to the head and neck region, including cranial, cerebral, and spinal injuries. (brightkite.com)
  • Motor cranial nerves help control muscle movements in the head and neck. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Considering the risks to cranial nerves associated with open surgery for comparable tumors, the authors believe that gamma knife radiosurgery is a useful method for the management of properly selected recurrent, residual, or newly diagnosed skull base meningiomas. (thejns.org)
  • Inadvertent injury to the facial nerve may occur during the removal of tumors, resulting in facial paralysis. (news-medical.net)
  • Very recently it has been shown the cytokine hormone erythropoietin (EPO) that had been long known and used as a valuable agent to promote hematopoiesis has been protective in experimental models of mechanical trauma, neuroinflammation, cerebral and retinal ischemia, and even in a human stroke trial, and most notably in optic nerve transection. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Cranial nerve injuries are common complications of traumatic brain injury due to trauma or other conditions. (aapmr.org)
  • Head trauma and stroke are major risk factors for cranial nerve injury. (aapmr.org)
  • Birth injuries encompass any systemic damages incurred during delivery (hypoxic, toxic, biochemical, infection factors, etc.), but "birth trauma" focuses largely on mechanical damage. (wikipedia.org)
  • Birth trauma, on the other hand, encompasses the enduring side effects of physical birth injuries, including the ensuing compensatory and adaptive mechanisms and the development of pathological processes (pathogenesis) after the damage. (wikipedia.org)
  • Trauma to the head of the infant can manifest as Caput Succedaneum, skull fractures, extracranial and intracranial hemorrhages, and cranial nerve injuries. (wikipedia.org)
  • A retrospective morbidity and mortality study, using routinely collected data, investigating the epidemiology of patients with conflict-related injuries presenting to a dedicated trauma ho. (bioportfolio.com)
  • and trauma to the facial region are conditions associated with cranial nerve injuries. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Our Brain Injury Attorneys have years of experience handling head trauma cases. (bestattorney.com)
  • Specific concentration is given to the fate of axons, nerve fibers in the brain that appear exquisitely vulnerable to trauma. (pennmedicine.org)
  • They lived in an area with a level one trauma center but not a rehabilitation center for traumatic brain injuries. (riskandinsurance.com)
  • Patients with head trauma may also sustain spinal trauma and should be handled cautiously until these injuries have been evaluated. (vin.com)
  • Pediatric abusive head trauma patients may experience cervical spinal cord injury, fractures of the skull or ribs, dislocated joints, contusions, or death. (brightkite.com)
  • Isolated Third Nerve Palsy from Mild Closed Head Trauma. (ebscohost.com)
  • Few studies regarding cranial nerve injury following mild head trauma (GCS: 14-15) exist in the literature.1 The oculomotor nerve is a. (ebscohost.com)
  • Pubmed ID: 21301911 Oculomotor nerve injury is a common complication of cranial trauma and craniotomy. (jove.com)
  • We developed an ex vivo slice assay that allows for live imaging and molecular manipulation of the growing oculomotor nerve, which we used to identify axon guidance cues that affect the oculomotor nerve. (arvojournals.org)
  • Loss of Cxcr4 or Cxcl12 in vivo caused misrouting of the oculomotor nerve dorsally and motor axons from the trigeminal motor nerve, which normally innervate the muscles of mastication, aberrantly innervated extraocular muscles in the orbit. (arvojournals.org)
  • Failure of the oculomotor nerve to innervate its extraocular muscle targets leads to aberrant innervation by other motor neurons, indicating that muscles lacking innervation may secrete cues that attract motor axons. (arvojournals.org)
  • The Differentiation of the Newborn Nerve Cells in Oculomotor Nuclear After Oculomotor Nerve Injury Neurological Sciences : Official Journal of the Italian Neurological Society and of the Italian Society of Clinical Neurophysiology. (jove.com)
  • For a long time, it has been generally considered that the oculomotor nerve is unable to regenerate and recover functionally after injury. (jove.com)
  • With the development of neuroradiology, microsurgery and neurohistology, it has been reported that the injured oculomotor nerve could be repaired by operation. (jove.com)
  • However, the mechanisms of neural regeneration of the injured oculomotor nerve remain obscure. (jove.com)
  • Therefore, by investigating the differentiation of the newborn nerve cells in oculomotor nuclear after oculomotor nerve injury, the mechanisms of the neural regeneration of the injured oculomotor nerve was studied in the present paper. (jove.com)
  • After animal model establishment, we found that the function of the injured oculomotor nerve could recover at some degree without treatment, at fourth week after the nerve injury. (jove.com)
  • This result confirms that the injured oculomotor nerve per se has the potential to regenerate and repair. (jove.com)
  • The oculomotor nerve helps control muscle movements of the eyes. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The oculomotor nerve provides movement to most of the muscles that move the eyeball and upper eyelid, known as extraocular muscles. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The trochlear nerve, like the oculomotor nerve, originates in the midbrain. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The perioperative complications (perioperative stroke, myocardial infarction/death, cranial nerve injury) and 3-year end points were analyzed. (mendeley.com)
  • TCAR continues to show a low stroke and death rate equivalent to CEA with lower rates of myocardial infarction and cranial nerve injury. (einpresswire.com)
  • Recent studies show that those who suffer more than one concussion, especially as a result of sports injuries, may face long-term consequences such as victims of more severe traumatic brain injuries. (bestattorney.com)
  • Facial nerve paralysis: A three year retrospective study Of all the cranial nerves , the facial nerve is the one which is most commonly involved in disease. (tripdatabase.com)
  • Facial nerve paralysis - An injury caused when improper pressure is put on the face, or improper forceps are used. (sidgilreath.com)
  • It may be blunted in infants or adults with a hearing disorder or facial nerve paralysis. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • People suffering from traumatic brain injuries, strokes, cranial nerve damage and multiple sclerosis. (cbc.ca)
  • Traumatic and non-traumatic brain injuries can cause injury to these nerves through the same mechanisms which cause damage to brain tissue. (brain-injury-law-firm-of-new-mexico.com)
  • Incidence of Combat Sport-Related Mild Traumatic Brain Injuries Presenting to the Emergency Department From 2012 to 2016. (bioportfolio.com)
  • We sought to investigate the incidence and characteristics of traumatic brain injuries [mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI)] presenting to the emergency department as a result of boxing, wrestling, and. (bioportfolio.com)
  • There are also reports of carotid and vertebral artery dissections leading to hypoglossal nerve injury. (ajnr.org)
  • To establish the incidence of cranial and cervical nerve injuries during CEA and their relationship to different surgical techniques and operative findings. (nih.gov)
  • The incidence of single cranial nerve injuries was higher in patch (OR = 2.7) and eversion (OR = 1.9) procedures than in primary closure. (nih.gov)
  • Cranial Nerve Injury After Carotid Endarterectomy: Incidence, Risk Factors, and Time Trends. (sparrho.com)
  • Τo review the incidence of post-carotid endarterectomy (CEA) cranial nerve injury (CNI), and to evaluate the risk factors associated with increased CNI risk.The study was a meta-analysis. (sparrho.com)
  • Incidence, outcomes, and effect on quality of life of cranial nerve injury in the Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy versus Stenting Trial. (medscape.com)
  • The pathophysiology of Traumatic Optic Neuropathy (TON) is thought to be multifactorial, and some researchers have also postulated a primary and secondary mechanism of injury.TON is categorized as direct or indirect.In indirect TON cases, the injury to the axons is thought to be induced by shearing forces that are transmitted to the fibers or to the vascular supply of the nerve. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Evidence of vascular injury, CSF leak or cranial nerve injury were recorded. (bmj.com)
  • Vascular injury was the commonest complication (n=87), followed by CSF leak (n=38). (bmj.com)
  • Conclusions There is little reported literature on the long term outcomes of patients who sustain CSF leak, vascular injury or cranial nerve deficit following a base of skull fracture. (bmj.com)
  • In some cases, like complex regional pain syndrome and brachial plexus injuries, the problem begins after an injury. (icdlist.com)
  • Restoration of shoulder function with nerve transfers in traumatic brachial plexus palsy patients. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Early restoration of suprascapular and axillary nerve function through timely brachial plexus reconstruction offers a good opportunity to restore shoulder-joint stability, adequate shoulder abduction, and external rotation function. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Can a brachial plexus injury also affect your breathing? (healthtap.com)
  • Not uncommon is an injury to the brachial plexus from shoulder strap, with eventual scarring , called thoracic outlet syndrome . (healthtap.com)
  • A brachial plexus injury should not affect your breathing or swallowing as the nerves that control those functions are higher up. (healthtap.com)
  • Lost motor function and sensation in 1 hand due to brachial plexus injury. (healthtap.com)
  • Confirmed first rib injury with brachial plexus involvement. (healthtap.com)
  • Nerve root C5 and C6 injured at brachial plexus near first rib. (healthtap.com)
  • Known as Erb's Palsy, this type of birth injury occurs when the brachial plexus (nerves that control the arms and hands) become injured, and often leaves an infant unable to flex and rotate their arm. (sidgilreath.com)
  • Individual efforts cover neuro-oncology, stroke, peripheral nerve, spinal cord injury and cranial base surgery. (pennmedicine.org)
  • You need a full work-up including an MRI or ct scan to rule out tumor and identify if cranial nerves are being compressed inside the brain, inside the skull bone or outside. (healthtap.com)
  • Patients with tumor recurrence and skull base osteoradionecrosis tended to present a rapid progression of the nerve palsy or severe ocular duction deficit. (hindawi.com)
  • In particular, the diagnosis of radiation-induced cranial neuropathy is usually by exclusion, and a 3-6-month observation is often required to exclude tumor recurrence as the cause of nerve palsy. (hindawi.com)
  • Cranial nerve injury was assessed and recorded in every patient and persisting deficits were identified on follow-up examination at 4 months and 1 year after randomization. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Extracranial arterial injuries to the brachiocephalic, common carotid, and vertebral arteries can result in major neurologic deficits. (medscape.com)
  • The injury left the patient with permanent left-side facial paralysis and cranial nerve deficits. (riskandinsurance.com)
  • Multiple cranial nerve deficits is highly suggestive of brainstem injury. (vin.com)
  • OBJECT: Cranial nerve injuries, particularly motor nerve injuries, following carotid endarterectomy (CEA) can be disabling and therefore patients should be given reliable information about the risks of sustaining such injuries. (ox.ac.uk)
  • The facial nerve nuclei in the brainstem are called the motor nerve nucleus, the superior salivary nucleus, and the nucleus of the tractus solitarius. (verywellhealth.com)
  • Each of the motor nerve branches signals a different set of muscles to move. (verywellhealth.com)
  • any spinal injury can cause major changes, and regulation of circulation is one of them. (healthtap.com)
  • An injury, of any severity, is a condition in which a person has damage to any part of his body. (healthtap.com)
  • A traumatic birth injury can range from a mild injury that can resolve itself over time to more severe injuries that can result in permanent physical and mental damage. (sidgilreath.com)
  • The injury will resolve itself most of the time, but a torn nerve can result in permanent damage. (sidgilreath.com)
  • Luckily, these types of birth injuries are uncommon, but when they do occur, hemorrhaging causes the most damage, with the liver being the most common organ affected. (sidgilreath.com)
  • Attention is also given to spinal cord and peripheral nerve injuries, specifically the repair strategies and development of novel mechanisms of 'stretch-induced' axon growth that can be exploited to produce transplant materials to bridge extensive damage in the nervous system. (pennmedicine.org)
  • Carrion birds and scavengers can result in unusual patterns of damage post mortem, with beak marks being misinterpreted as stab-like injuries or shotgun wounds, for example. (forensicmed.co.uk)
  • Traumatic brain injury causes primary structural damage as a result of contusion, laceration, compression and/or haemorrhage of the parenchyma. (vin.com)
  • Diabetic neuropathy refers to several types of nerve damage associated with diabetes . (healthcentral.com)
  • The authors retrieved 2 Osseotite implants after 6 months to repair damage to the inferior alveolar nerve. (nih.gov)
  • When pressure inside the eye causes damage, the optic nerve can be healed by using heat shock proteins induced by magnetic nanoparticles. (sc.edu)
  • Assess for cranial nerve injuries, major blood vessel damage, and injury to the aerodigestive tract (breathing and swallowing systems). (ucsd.edu)
  • Terms related to Brain Injuries. (mt911.com)
  • With more serious brain injuries, however, the process of recovery is more nebulous, and this can cause misunderstandings and frustration for both the head-injury patient and those closest to him, who may expect the healing process to continue to full function and a return to normalcy. (bestattorney.com)
  • My role was to provide them with knowledge on brain injuries and get the right care to the patient. (riskandinsurance.com)
  • The clinician cannot alter the extent of the primary injury and instead must focus on preventing or minimising the occurrence of secondary brain injuries. (vin.com)
  • 2 , 4 - 8 Thus unrecognized SLN injury may be an underappreciated cause of persistent dysphonia following anterior cervical spine surgery. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Penetrating orbital injuries pose a serious threat to vision, ocular motility, and in some cases, life. (bmj.com)
  • The authors present two cases of penetrating orbital injuries by stiletto objects, both entering via small eyelid wounds. (bmj.com)
  • Deep orbital injuries must be excluded in patients presenting with small eyelid wounds caused by sharp penetrating objects. (bmj.com)
  • The trigeminal nerve is the largest cranial nerve and has both motor and sensory functions. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Trigeminal neuralgia is a common disorder of the trigeminal nerve that can cause intense pain and facial tics. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Pre- and postoperative cranial and cervical nerve assessments were carried out by a single otolaryngologist, blinded to the operative technique and findings. (nih.gov)
  • The cervical nerve controls the platysma, and the posterior auricular nerve controls the occipitalis muscle. (verywellhealth.com)
  • Concomitant neurotization of the axillary nerve yields improved outcomes in shoulder abduction and external rotation function. (biomedsearch.com)
  • The mechanism of injury, length of follow up, interventions and outcomes were documented. (bmj.com)
  • A multicenter study was performed to better delineate the risk factors, prevalence, and outcomes of SLN injury. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • To assess the survival and the predictors of mortality in patients with severe cervical spinal cord injuries DESIGN: Retrospective study PARTICIPANTS: From January 1, 2010 to May 31, 2018, 222 patient. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Sensation, including pain and the sense of joint position ( proprioception ), travel via the ventral rami of the third (C3) and fourth (C4) cervical nerves . (wikipedia.org)
  • The most common type of diabetic neuropathy, peripheral polyneuropathy affects nerves that transmit sensation, control muscle movement, and control bodily functions. (healthcentral.com)
  • However, SLN injury may also produce vocal cord paralysis in addition to reduced laryngeal sensation, dysphagia, and decreased laryngeal cough reflex predisposing to aspiration and impaired vocal quality. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Bell's palsy is a common disorder of the facial nerve, which causes paralysis on one side of the face and possibly loss of taste sensation. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Still others are from nerve compression, like carpal tunnel syndrome or thoracic outlet syndrome. (icdlist.com)
  • Can Thoracic Outlet Syndrome affect breathing or the Phrenic Nerve? (healthtap.com)
  • Thoracic Outlet Syndrome involves the nerves traveling through the shoulder at the level of the 1st rib. (healthtap.com)
  • Patients with radiation neuropathy were often manifested by incomplete nerve palsy with insidious onset and slow progression. (hindawi.com)
  • In 23 patients, the deficit had resolved by hospital discharge, leaving 3.7% of patients (95% CI 2.9-4.7) with a residual cranial nerve injury: 27 hypoglossal, 17 marginal mandibular, 17 recurrent laryngeal, one accessory nerve, and three Homer syndrome. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Vocal cord paralysis following ACDF is traditionally attributed to recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) traction. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • All non-neurological injuries were transient and 98% disappeared within 1 month of surgery. (nih.gov)
  • The radiosurgical dosage to the optic nerve, the cavernous sinus, and Meckel's cave was calculated and correlated with clinical outcome. (thejns.org)
  • Shear Injury to the Olfactory Nerves (Cranial Nerve I). Graphically depicts a violent blow to the back of the head as it strikes the pavement, resulting in tearing of the fibers of the olfactory nerve bulb (C.N. I) in the cribriform plate of the ethmoid bone in the skull. (photoshelter.com)
  • Spinal nerves exit from the spinal cord with the spinal nerve closest to the head (C1) exiting in the space above the first cervical vertebra. (personalinjurydoctorgroup.com)
  • In 2005, the results of the Corticosteroid Randomization after Significant Head Injury (CRASH) trial raised concerns regarding the use of mega dose steroids in traumatic brain injury. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • In such instances goals and plans must be realigned in consideration of what the head-injury patient is capable of achieving post-TBI. (bestattorney.com)
  • Funded research opportunities at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia include projects in molecular neuro-oncology, fetal surgery and biomechanics of head injury. (pennmedicine.org)
  • Occasionally, diabetic neuropathy appears suddenly and affects specific nerves, most often in the torso, leg or head. (healthcentral.com)
  • Head injury is a common occurrence in motor vehicle accidents. (ebscohost.com)
  • The cranial nerves are considered components of the peripheral nervous system (PNS), though on a structural level, the olfactory, the optic and the trigeminal nerves are more accurately considered a portion of the central nervous system (CNS). (personalinjurydoctorgroup.com)
  • For instance, the olfactory nerve (I) supplies smell, and the facial nerve (VII) supplies motor innervation to the face. (personalinjurydoctorgroup.com)
  • To determine whether a structured and quantitative assessment of differential olfactory performance-recognized between a blast-injured traumatic brain injury (TBI) group and a demographically comparable blast-injured control group-can serve as a reliable antecedent marker for preclinical detection of intracranial neurotrauma. (neurology.org)
  • The olfactory nerve transmits information to the brain regarding a person's sense of smell. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • When a person inhales fragrant molecules, olfactory receptors within the nasal passage send the impulses to the cranial cavity, which then travel to the olfactory bulb. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Specialized olfactory neurons and nerve fibers meet with other nerves, which pass into the olfactory tract. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Thalidomide causes phocomelia (i.e. underdeveloped or absent limbs), in addition to failure of development of the ear, and of the abducent and facial nerves. (news-medical.net)
  • Functioning optic nerves received a median dose of 10 Gy (range 1-16 Gy), and no treatment-induced visual loss occurred. (thejns.org)