Cranial Nerve Injuries: Dysfunction of one or more cranial nerves causally related to a traumatic injury. Penetrating and nonpenetrating CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; NECK INJURIES; and trauma to the facial region are conditions associated with cranial nerve injuries.Hypoglossal Nerve Injuries: Traumatic injuries to the HYPOGLOSSAL NERVE.Laryngeal Nerve Injuries: Traumatic injuries to the LARYNGEAL NERVE.Cranial Nerves: Twelve pairs of nerves that carry general afferent, visceral afferent, special afferent, somatic efferent, and autonomic efferent fibers.Cranial Nerve Diseases: Disorders of one or more of the twelve cranial nerves. With the exception of the optic and olfactory nerves, this includes disorders of the brain stem nuclei from which the cranial nerves originate or terminate.Endarterectomy, Carotid: The excision of the thickened, atheromatous tunica intima of a carotid artery.Peripheral Nerve Injuries: Injuries to the PERIPHERAL NERVES.Carotid Stenosis: Narrowing or stricture of any part of the CAROTID ARTERIES, most often due to atherosclerotic plaque formation. Ulcerations may form in atherosclerotic plaques and induce THROMBUS formation. Platelet or cholesterol emboli may arise from stenotic carotid lesions and induce a TRANSIENT ISCHEMIC ATTACK; CEREBROVASCULAR ACCIDENT; or temporary blindness (AMAUROSIS FUGAX). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp 822-3)Cranial Nerve Neoplasms: Benign and malignant neoplasms that arise from one or more of the twelve cranial nerves.Sciatic Nerve: A nerve which originates in the lumbar and sacral spinal cord (L4 to S3) and supplies motor and sensory innervation to the lower extremity. The sciatic nerve, which is the main continuation of the sacral plexus, is the largest nerve in the body. It has two major branches, the TIBIAL NERVE and the PERONEAL NERVE.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Facial Nerve Injuries: Traumatic injuries to the facial nerve. This may result in FACIAL PARALYSIS, decreased lacrimation and salivation, and loss of taste sensation in the anterior tongue. The nerve may regenerate and reform its original pattern of innervation, or regenerate aberrantly, resulting in inappropriate lacrimation in response to gustatory stimuli (e.g., "crocodile tears") and other syndromes.Optic Nerve Injuries: Injuries to the optic nerve induced by a trauma to the face or head. These may occur with closed or penetrating injuries. Relatively minor compression of the superior aspect of orbit may also result in trauma to the optic nerve. Clinical manifestations may include visual loss, PAPILLEDEMA, and an afferent pupillary defect.Facial Nerve: The 7th cranial nerve. The facial nerve has two parts, the larger motor root which may be called the facial nerve proper, and the smaller intermediate or sensory root. Together they provide efferent innervation to the muscles of facial expression and to the lacrimal and SALIVARY GLANDS, and convey afferent information for TASTE from the anterior two-thirds of the TONGUE and for TOUCH from the EXTERNAL EAR.Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Peripheral Nerves: The nerves outside of the brain and spinal cord, including the autonomic, cranial, and spinal nerves. Peripheral nerves contain non-neuronal cells and connective tissue as well as axons. The connective tissue layers include, from the outside to the inside, the epineurium, the perineurium, and the endoneurium.Abducens Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the sixth cranial (abducens) nerve or its nucleus in the pons. The nerve may be injured along its course in the pons, intracranially as it travels along the base of the brain, in the cavernous sinus, or at the level of superior orbital fissure or orbit. Dysfunction of the nerve causes lateral rectus muscle weakness, resulting in horizontal diplopia that is maximal when the affected eye is abducted and ESOTROPIA. Common conditions associated with nerve injury include INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; ISCHEMIA; and INFRATENTORIAL NEOPLASMS.Spinal Nerves: The 31 paired peripheral nerves formed by the union of the dorsal and ventral spinal roots from each spinal cord segment. The spinal nerve plexuses and the spinal roots are also included.Nerve Crush: Treatment of muscles and nerves under pressure as a result of crush injuries.Nerve Regeneration: Renewal or physiological repair of damaged nerve tissue.

Avulsion fracture of the anterior half of the foramen magnum involving the bilateral occipital condyles and the inferior clivus--case report. (1/45)

A 38-year-old male presented with an avulsion fracture of the anterior half of the foramen magnum due to a traffic accident. He had palsy of the bilateral VI, left IX, and left X cranial nerves, weakness of his left upper extremity, and crossed sensory loss. He was treated conservatively and placed in a halo brace for 16 weeks. After immobilization, swallowing, hoarseness, and left upper extremity weakness improved. Hyperextension with a rotatory component probably resulted in strain in the tectorial membrane and alar ligaments, resulting in avulsion fracture at the sites of attachment, the bilateral occipital condyles and the inferior portion of the clivus. Conservative treatment is probably optimum even for this unusual and severe type of occipital condyle fracture.  (+info)

Extracranial carotid artery aneurysms: Texas Heart Institute experience. (2/45)

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Aneurysms of the extracranial carotid artery (ECA) are rare. Large single-institution series are seldom reported and usually are not aneurysm type-specific. Thus, information about immediate and long-term results of surgical therapy is sparse. This review was conducted to elucidate etiology, presentation, and treatment for ECA aneurysms. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the case records of the Texas Heart Institute/St Luke's Episcopal Hospital, Houston, and found 67 cases of ECA aneurysms treated surgically (the largest series to date) between 1960 and 1995: 38 pseudoaneurysms after previous carotid surgery and 29 atherosclerotic or traumatic aneurysms. All aneurysms were surgically explored, and all were repaired except two: a traumatic distal internal carotid artery aneurysm and an infected pseudoaneurysm in which the carotid artery was ligated. RESULTS: Four deaths (three fatal strokes and one myocardial infarction) and two nonfatal strokes were directly attributed to a repaired ECA aneurysm (overall mortality/major stroke incidence, 9%); there was one minor stroke (incidence, 1.5%). The incidence of cranial nerve injury was 6% (four cases). During long-term follow-up (1.5 months-30 years; mean, 5.9 years), 19 patients died, mainly of cardiac causes (11 myocardial infarctions). CONCLUSION: The potential risks of cerebral ischemia and rupture as well as the satisfactory long-term results achieved with surgery strongly argue in favor of surgical treatment of ECA aneurysms.  (+info)

Cranial and cervical nerve injuries after repeat carotid endarterectomy. (3/45)

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The incidence of cranial and/or cervical nerve injuries after primary carotid endarterectomy (CEA) ranges from 3% to 48%; however, the clinical outcome of these injuries after repeat CEA has not been thoroughly analyzed in the English-language medical literature. This prospective study analyzes the incidence and outcome of cranial nerve injuries after repeat CEA. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This study includes 89 consecutive patients who had repeat CEAs. Preoperative and postoperative cranial nerve evaluations were performed, including clinical examinations (neurologic) and direct laryngoscopy. Patients with vagal or glossopharyngeal nerve injuries also underwent comprehensive speech evaluations, video stroboscopy, fluoroscopy, and methylene blue testing for aspiration. Patients with postoperative cranial nerve injuries were followed up for a long time to assess their recovery. RESULTS: Twenty-five cranial and/or cervical nerve injuries were identified in 19 patients (21%). They included 8 hypoglossal nerves (9%), 11 vagal nerves or branches (12%) (6 recurrent laryngeal nerves [7%], 3 superior laryngeal nerves [3%], and 2 complex vagal nerves [2%]), 3 marginal mandibular nerves (3%), 2 greater auricular nerves (2%), and 1 glossopharyngeal nerve (1%). Twenty-two (88%) of these injuries were transient with a complete healing time ranging from 2 weeks to 28 months (18 of 22 injuries healed within 12 months). The remaining three injuries (12%) were permanent (1 recurrent laryngeal nerve, 1 glossopharyngeal nerve, and 1 complex vagal nerve injury). The recurrent laryngeal nerve injury had a longer healing time than the other cranial nerve injuries. CONCLUSIONS: Repeat CEA is associated with a high incidence of cranial and/or cervical nerve injuries, most of which are transient. However, some of these have a long healing time, and a few can be permanent with significant disability.  (+info)

Neurological abnormalities associated with CDMA exposure. (4/45)

Dysaesthesiae of the scalp and neurological abnormality after mobile phone use have been reported previously, but the roles of the phone per se or the radiations in causing these findings have been questioned. We report finding a neurological abnormality in a patient after accidental exposure of the left side of the face to mobile phone radiation [code division multiple access (CDMA)] from a down-powered mobile phone base station antenna. He had headaches, unilateral left blurred vision and pupil constriction, unilateral altered sensation on the forehead, and abnormalities of current perception thresholds on testing the left trigeminal ophthalmic nerve. His nerve function recovered during 6 months follow-up. His exposure was 0.015-0.06 mW/cm(2) over 1-2 h. The implications regarding health effects of radiofrequency radiation are discussed.  (+info)

Redo carotid endarterectomy versus primary carotid endarterectomy. (5/45)

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Several authorities have recently advocated carotid stenting for recurrent carotid stenosis because of the perception that redo surgery has a higher complication rate than primary carotid endarterectomy (CEA). This study compares the early and late results of reoperations versus primary CEA. METHODS: All reoperations for recurrent carotid stenosis performed during a recent 7-year period by a single vascular surgeon were compared with primary CEA. Because all redo CEAs were done with polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) or vein patch closure, we only analyzed those primary CEAs that used the same patch closures. A Kaplan-Meier life-table analysis was used to estimate stroke-free survival rates and freedom from >/=50% recurrent stenosis. RESULTS: Of 547 primary CEAs, 265 had PTFE or saphenous vein patch closure, and 124 reoperations had PTFE or vein patch closure during the same period. Both groups had similar demographic characteristics. The indications for reoperation and primary CEA were symptomatic stenosis in 78% and 58% of cases and asymptomatic >/=80% stenosis in 22% and 42% of cases, respectively (P<0.001). The 30-day perioperative stroke and transient ischemic attack rates for reoperation and primary CEA were 4.8% versus 0.8% (P=0.015) and 4% versus 1.1%, respectively, with no perioperative deaths in either group. Cranial nerve injury was noted in 17% of reoperation patients versus 5.3% of primary CEA patients; however, most of these injuries were transient (P<0.001). Mean hospital stay was 1.8 days for reoperation versus 1.6 days for primary CEA. Cumulative rates of stroke-free survival and freedom from >/=50% recurrent stenosis for reoperation and primary CEA at 1, 3, and 5 years were 96%, 91%, and 82% and 98%, 96%, and 95% versus 94%, 92%, and 91% and 98%, 96%, and 96%, respectively (no significant differences). CONCLUSIONS: Reoperation carries higher perioperative stroke and cranial nerve injury rates than primary CEA. However, reoperations are durable and have stroke-free survival rates that are similar to primary CEA. These considerations should be kept in mind when carotid stenting is recommended instead of reoperation.  (+info)

Long-term outcome after severe head injury. (6/45)

From a consecutive series of 7000 patients with head injuries admitted to the regional accident service, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford between 10 and 24 years earlier, every patient was taken who had been amnesic or unconscious for one week or longer. Of these 479 patients, all but ten were traced, and either the cause of death was established or the survivors examined. Ten years after injury 4% were totally disabled, and 14% severely disabled to a degree precluding normal occupational or social life. Of the remainder, 49% had recovered, and the rest were dead. Additionally, a selected series of 64 patients whose unconsciousness had been prolonged for a month or more were studied. Forty of these had survived between three and 25 years after injury and were re-examined. On the basis of age at injury, the worst state of neurological responsiveness, and the duration of posttraumatic amnesia, the outcome of head injury can be predicted reliably in most cases. Patients and relatives need more reassurance and simple psychotherapeutic support, especially in the first few months after injury. Extrapolation from our figures suggests that each year in England and Wales 210 patients survive totally disabled and another 1500 are severely disabled.  (+info)

Tapia's syndrome following shoulder surgery. (7/45)

Multiple cranial palsy occurred after shoulder surgery in the sitting position. Compression by the tracheal tube, caused by displacement of the head, may have caused the injury.  (+info)

Perceptual and instrumental evaluation of voice and tongue function after carotid endarterectomy. (8/45)

OBJECTIVE: Laryngeal and tongue function was assessed in 28 patients to evaluate the presence, nature, and resolution of superior recurrent laryngeal and hypoglossal nerve damage resulting from standard open primary carotid endarterectomy (CEA). METHODS: The laryngeal and tongue function in 28 patients who underwent CEA were examined prospectively with various physiologic (Aerophone II, laryngograph, tongue transducer), acoustic (Multi-Dimensional Voice Program), and perceptual speech assessments. Measures were obtained from all participants preoperatively, and at 2 weeks and at 3 months postoperatively. RESULTS: The perceptual speech assessment indicated that the vocal quality of "roughness" was significantly more apparent at the 2-week postoperative assessment than preoperatively. However, by the 3-month postoperative assessment these values had returned to near preoperative levels, with no significant difference detected between preoperative and 3-month postoperative levels or between 2-week and 3-month postoperative levels. Both the instrumental assessments of laryngeal function and the acoustic assessment of vocal quality failed to identify any significant difference on any measure across the three assessment periods. Similarly, no significant impairment in tongue strength, endurance, or rate of repetitive tongue movements was detected at instrumental assessment of tongue function. CONCLUSIONS: No permanent changes to vocal or tongue function occurred in this group of participants after primary CEA. The lack of any significant long-term laryngeal or tongue dysfunction in this group suggests that the standard open CEA procedure is not associated with high rates of superior recurrent and hypoglossal nerve dysfunction, as previously believed.  (+info)

*Surgical Outcomes Analysis and Research

"Clinical Relevance of Cranial Nerve Injury following Carotid Endarterectomy." European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular ... "Clinical relevance of cranial nerve injury following carotid endarterectomy". Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 47 (1): 2-7. Fokkema M ... 2012). "The dangers of being a "weekend warrior": A new call for injury prevention efforts". The journal of trauma and acute ... April 2007). "The midterm results of stent graft treatment of thoracic aortic injuries". J. Surg. Res. 138 (2): 181-8. doi: ...

*Basilar skull fracture

Due to the proximity of the cranial nerves, injury to those nerves may occur. This can cause palsy of the facial nerve or ... Other complications include cranial nerve or blood vessel injury. They typically require a significant degree of trauma to ... Surgery may be done for a CSF leak that does not stop or an injury to a blood vessel or nerve. Preventative antibiotics are of ... oculomotor nerve or hearing loss due to damage of cranial nerve VIII. Evidence does not support the use of preventative ...

*Radiation therapy

... cranial nerve injury typically presents as a visual acuity loss 1-14 years post treatment.[25] In the PNS, injury to the plexus ... Nerve damage from ionizing radiation occurs in phases, the initial phase from microvascular injury, capillary damage and nerve ... Radiation treatments are vitally necessary but may damage nerves near the target area or within the delivery path as nerve ... Mahmood SS (2016). "Cardiovascular Complications of Cranial and Neck Radiation". Current Treatment Options in Cardiovascular ...

*Radiation therapy

... cranial nerve injury typically presents as a visual acuity loss 1-14 years post treatment.[29] In the PNS, injury to the plexus ... Nerve damage from ionizing radiation occurs in phases, the initial phase from microvascular injury, capillary damage and nerve ... Radiation treatments are vitally necessary but may damage nerves near the target area or within the delivery path as nerve ... Mahmood SS (2016). "Cardiovascular Complications of Cranial and Neck Radiation". Current Treatment Options in Cardiovascular ...

*Radiation therapy

... cranial nerve injury typically presents as a visual acuity loss 1-14 years post treatment.[25] In the PNS, injury to the plexus ... Nerve damage from ionizing radiation occurs in phases, the initial phase from microvascular injury, capillary damage and nerve ... Radiation treatments are vitally necessary but may damage nerves near the target area or within the delivery path as nerve ... Mahmood SS (2016). "Cardiovascular Complications of Cranial and Neck Radiation". Current Treatment Options in Cardiovascular ...

*Radiation therapy

... cranial nerve injury typically presents as a visual acuity loss 1-14 years post treatment.[25] In the PNS, injury to the plexus ... Nerve damage from ionizing radiation occurs in phases, the initial phase from microvascular injury, capillary damage and nerve ... Radiation treatments are vitally necessary but may damage nerves near the target area or within the delivery path as nerve ... Mahmood SS (2016). "Cardiovascular Complications of Cranial and Neck Radiation". Current Treatment Options in Cardiovascular ...

*Vestibular schwannoma

... acoustic and lower cranial nerves can reduce the risk of injury. In particular, following the 1991 NIH National institutes of ... and cranial nerve VII (controls facial expression and taste). Cranial nerve VIII, along with these two nerves, also passes ... Large tumors that compress the adjacent brainstem may affect other local cranial nerves. The glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves ... portion of the vestibulocochlear nerve (cranial nerve VIII). ARs are slow-growing local, benign and non-invasive. Progression ...

*Cadaveric spasm

In fatalities related to cranial or neural injury, nerve damage in the brain may inhibit the ability to release a weapon from ...

*Radiation therapy

... cranial nerve injury typically presents as a visual acuity loss 1-14 years post treatment.[29] In the PNS, injury to the plexus ... Nerve damage from ionizing radiation occurs in phases, the initial phase from microvascular injury, capillary damage and nerve ... Radiation treatments are vitally necessary but may damage nerves near the target area or within the delivery path as nerve ... Mahmood SS (2016). "Cardiovascular Complications of Cranial and Neck Radiation". Current Treatment Options in Cardiovascular ...

*Sixth nerve palsy

... palsy is identified through loss of lateral gaze after application of the orthosis and is the most common cranial nerve injury ... Sixth nerve palsy, or abducens nerve palsy, is a disorder associated with dysfunction of cranial nerve VI (the abducens nerve ... fibers of the seventh cranial nerve wrap around the VIth nerve nucleus, and, if this is also affected, a VIth nerve palsy with ... "Cranial Mononeuropathy VI", Medline Plus Medical Encyclopedia.[1]. *"Cranial Nerve VI Palsy", Handbook of Ocular Disease ...

*Esotropia

Examples of conditions giving rise to an esotropia might include a VIth cranial nerve (or Abducens) palsy, Duane's syndrome or ... orbital injury. The prognosis for each patient with esotropia will depend upon the origin and classification of their condition ... and may also result from conditions affecting the nerve or blood supply to these muscles or the bony orbital structures ...

*Fourth nerve palsy

... is a condition affecting Cranial Nerve 4 (IV), the Trochlear Nerve, which is one of the Cranial Cranial Nerves that causes ... it is particularly vulnerable to traumatic injury. To compensate for the double-vision resulting from the weakness of the ... Because the fourth cranial nerve is the thinnest and has the longest intracranial course of the cranial nerves, ... Fourth cranial nerve palsy also known as Trochlear nerve palsy, ... When present at birth, it is known as congenital fourth nerve ...

*Head injury

This broad classification includes neuronal injuries, hemorrhages, vascular injuries, cranial nerve injuries, and subdural ... A head injury is any injury that results in trauma to the skull or brain. The terms traumatic brain injury and head injury are ... "Head Injury (Brain Injury)". eMedicinehealth. Archived from the original on 2013-04-19. Retrieved 2013-05-04. "Head Injury: ... brain injury Canadian CT Head Injury/Trauma Rule New Orleans/Charity Head Trauma/Injury Rule PECARN Pediatric Head Injury/ ...

*Brain injury

The blood vessels in the brain may stretch, and cranial nerves may be damaged. A penetrating injury occurs when a sharp object ... A brain injury is an injury to the brain of a living organism, and can be categorized by many properties. Primary and secondary ... Penetrating injuries caused by bullets have a 91 percent mortality rate. A coup-contrecoup injury occurs when the force ... Hypoxic brain injury happens when the brain receives insufficient oxygen. A hypoxic brain injury, also called stagnant hypoxia ...

*Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome

Pathological descriptions of BVVL include injury and depletion of 3rd-7th cranial nerves, loss of the spinal anterior horn ... including those of the motor components involving the 7th and 9th-12th cranial nerves, spinal motor nerves, and upper motor ... Nathalie syndrome does not involve lower cranial nerve symptoms, so it can be excluded if those are present. If there is ... BVVL is marked by a number of cranial nerve palsies, ... and this time is usually marked by cranial nerve degeneration. ...

*Marcus Gunn phenomenon

It has been postulated that the synkinesis is due to damage to cranial nerve nuclei, caused by peripheral nerve injury and the ... There are also several abnormal cranial nerve synkineses, both acquired and congenital. Marcus Gunn jaw-winking is an example ... The stimulation of the trigeminal nerve by contraction of the pterygoid muscles of jaw results in the excitation of the branch ... of the oculomotor nerve that innervates the levator palpebrae superioris ipsilaterally (on the same side of the face), so the ...

*Cranial nerve disease

Recovery rate also depends on the cause of the facial nerve palsy (e.g. infections, perinatal injury, congenital dysplastic). ... The facial nerve is the seventh of 12 cranial nerves. This cranial nerve controls the muscles in the face. Facial nerve palsy ... Eyes Oculomotor nerve palsy - Oculomotor nerve (III) Fourth nerve palsy - Trochlear nerve (IV) Sixth nerve palsy - Abducens ... Cranial nerve disease is an impaired functioning of one of the twelve cranial nerves. Although it could theoretically be ...

*List of MeSH codes (C21)

... cranial nerve injuries MeSH C21.866.260.237.162 --- abducens nerve injury MeSH C21.866.260.237.325 --- facial nerve injuries ... post-head injury MeSH C21.866.915.300.400 --- cranial nerve injuries MeSH C21.866.915.300.400.100 --- abducens nerve injury ... facial nerve injuries MeSH C21.866.915.300.400.650 --- optic nerve injuries MeSH C21.866.915.300.450 --- head injuries, closed ... optic nerve injuries MeSH C21.866.260.275 --- facial injuries MeSH C21.866.260.275.250 --- eye injuries MeSH C21.866.260.275. ...

*Complications of traumatic brain injury

Injuries to the base of the skull can damage nerves that emerge directly from the brain (cranial nerves). Cranial nerve damage ... "Traumatic brain injury Complications - Mayo Clinic". Mayo Clinic. Retrieved 2017-01-31. "Brain Injury: Complications and ... Different behavioral problems are characteristic of the location of injury; for instance, frontal lobe injuries often result in ... Most of these injuries develop within a few weeks of the initial trauma and result from skull fractures or penetrating injuries ...

*Fourth nerve palsy

Fourth cranial nerve palsy, is a condition affecting cranial nerve 4 (IV),[1] the trochlear nerve, which is one of the cranial ... it is particularly vulnerable to traumatic injury. ... Fourth Cranial Nerve Palsy. Other names. Trochlear nerve palsy ... Because the trochlear nerve is the thinnest and has the longest intracranial course of the cranial nerves, ... "Fourth Nerve Palsy". www.aao.org. Retrieved 25 June 2019.. .mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output ...

*Abducens nerve

Iatrogenic injury is also known to occur, with the abducens nerve being the most commonly injured cranial nerve in halo ... It is also known as the abducent nerve, the sixth cranial nerve, sixth nerve, or simply CNVI. It is a somatic efferent nerve. ... of people with tuberculosis have some resulting cranial nerve deficit. The sixth nerve is the most commonly affected cranial ... Cranial Nerves: Anatomy and Clinical Comments. Decker, 1998. Books editor-in-chief, Susan Standring ; section editors, Neil R. ...

*ICD-10 Chapter XIX: Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes

Injury of accessory nerve (S04.8) Injury of other cranial nerves (S04.9) Injury of unspecified cranial nerve (S05) Injury of ... Injury of cranial nerves (S04.0) Injury of optic nerve and pathways (S04.1) Injury of oculomotor nerve (S04.2) Injury of ... Injury of trigeminal nerve (S04.4) Injury of abducent nerve (S04.5) Injury of facial nerve (S04.6) Injury of acoustic nerve ( ... Injury of ulnar nerve at upper arm level (S44.1) Injury of median nerve at upper arm level (S44.2) Injury of radial nerve at ...

*Transcranial magnetic stimulation

... and injuries and other disorders affecting the facial and other cranial nerves and the spinal cord. Evidence suggests it is ... motor neuron disease and injuries and other disorders affecting the facial and other cranial nerves and the spinal cord. TMS ... Functional connectivity between the cerebellum and other areas of the brain Traumatic brain injury Stroke It is difficult to ... Cortical stimulation mapping Cranial electrotherapy stimulation Electrical brain stimulation Electroconvulsive therapy Low ...

*Facial nerve paralysis

Cranial nerve crossover, this is most commonly seen following nerve sacrifice. Regional muscle transposition using temporalis ... In patients with severe injury, progress is followed with nerve conduction studies. If nerve conduction studies show a large (> ... Primary neuropathy of facial nerve at the time of injury. Interpositional graft by using sural or greater auricular nerve ... Moebius syndrome is a bilateral facial paralysis resulting from the underdevelopment of the VII cranial nerve (facial nerve), ...

*Neurological disorder

... injury, inflammation) Peripheral neuropathy and other Peripheral nervous system disorders Cranial nerve disorder such as ... and brain injury, spinal cord injury or nerve injury. The problem may start in another body system that interacts with the ... Nerves tend to lie deep under the skin but can still become exposed to damage. Individual neurons, and the neural networks and ... Neuroregeneration may occur in the peripheral nervous system and thus overcome or work around injuries to some extent, but it ...

*List of ICD-9 codes 800-999: injury and poisoning

Injury to other cranial nerve(s) (952) Spinal cord injury without evidence of spinal bone injury (953) Injury to nerve roots ... Injury to axillary nerve (955.1) Injury to median nerve (955.2) Injury to ulnar nerve (955.3) Injury to radial nerve (955.4) ... Injury to cervical nerve root (953.1) Injury to dorsal nerve root (953.2) Injury to lumbar nerve root (953.3) Injury to sacral ... Injury to cutaneous sensory nerve upper limb (955.6) Injury to digital nerve upper limb (955.7) Injury to other specified nerve ...

*Substance P

In turn, a fairly complex reflex is triggered involving cranial nerves sub-serving respiration, retroperistalsis, and general ... Donkin JJ, Turner RJ, Hassan I, Vink R (2007). "Substance P in traumatic brain injury". Progress in Brain Research. 161: 97-109 ... with an amidation at the C-terminus.[4] Substance P is released from the terminals of specific sensory nerves. It is found in ... When the innervation to substance P nerve terminals is lost, post-synaptic cells compensate for the loss of adequate ...

*Obstetrical forceps

Increased risk of damage to cranial nerve VI, resulting in strabismus.. Mother[edit]. *Increased risk of perineal lacerations, ... In some extreme cases, this could cause temporary or permanent facial nerve injury. Furthermore, if the forceps' handler were ... include nerve damage, Descemet's membrane rupture,[2] skull fractures, and cervical cord injury. ... this would twist the baby's neck and cause damage to a cranial nerve, resulting in strabismus. In rare cases, a clavicle ...
This prospective study shows that patients undergoing eversion endarterectomy for carotid stenosis are at higher risk for experiencing restenosis provided they are homozygous for the normal MBL A/A genotype than those carrying 1 or 2 variant MBL alleles (A/O or O/O). As has been shown in other studies a higher rate of restenosis after carotid eversion endarterectomy was seen in females than in males in the prospective study.28 However, significant differences between male and female patients in the restenosis rate were seen only in those who carried the A/A genotype (Figure 3). The findings were corroborated by the analysis of the relationship between MBL serum concentration and restenosis. The observation in the prospective study was substantiated in a retrospective study performed ,2.5 years after surgery. In the latter matched case-control study, the gender effect could not be tested. The mechanisms behind the gender effect are at present unknown but suggest a complicated interplay between ...
article{2e878c2a-51d3-4494-a405-97db421b5733, author = {Forssell, Claes and Takolander, Rabbe and Bergqvist, David and Bergentz, Sven-Erik and Gramming, Patricia and Kitzing, Peter}, keyword = {carotid endarterectomy,cranial nerve,injuries}, language = {eng}, pages = {595--598}, series = {Acta Chir Scand}, title = {Cranial nerve injuries associated with carotid endarterectomy}, volume = {151}, year = {1985 ...
RESULTS: Thirty-day operative mortality was 3.3% and completely stroke related. Besides two fatal strokes one additional was registered making total number of 3 (4.8%) postoperative strokes. Only one (1.6%) early graft thrombosis has been found. The 30-day-patency rate was 98.4%. During the same period seven local complications were found: three (4.8%) hemorrhage and four (6.4%) cranial nerves injuries. In all cases of hemorrhage successful re-intervention was performed without any consequences. Cranial nerves injuries included transient contusions of hypoglossal (2) and superior laryngeal nerve (2 ...
Because of our large brains our babies need to be born relatively immature. To enable passage through their mothers pelvis the upper bones of the skull develop seperately and can move over each other (moulding) during the birth process to navigate through the pelvis.. As baby travels through the pelvis it moves under its mothers pubic arch, and at this point there is potential for the nerves to be compressed or overstretched. This is more likely in instrumental births like forceps, ventouse and caesareans where traction is applied to the head to pull the baby out. There is also a possibility of this if the baby is pulled out by the head during a so called normal birth. (Note from Joy: in the normal birth process there should be no pulling on the babys head!).. If these nerves are dammaged the baby can suffer feeding problems, pain from the injury, impaired hearing and facial expressions. Cranial nerve injury can also affect arousal of the vagus nerve with increased heartrate, inability to ...
Background Cavernous carotid arteriovenous fistulas (CCFs) are a relatively rare but fairly well documented intracranial vascular pathology. The most frequently utilized approach to treatment is endovascular embolization, via either transvenous or transarterial approaches, in order to close the venous outflow or limit the arterial inflow. The adopted standard algorithm to these options is to first attempt mapping a venous tract for catheterization. Frequently, the morphology of the venous drainage is in-sufficient for catheterization. Trans-arterial embolization is typically reserved for these instances given the well documented risks, including cranial nerve injury which approaches a 10% overall risk of complication. A third and less commonly used alternative for treating these difficult CCFs involves direct percutaneous access to the fistula. There are few published case reports documenting this direct access method, including our previous work describing a case in which we treated a clival ...
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... s are uncommon and occur in a broad range of patients due to many etiologies. True aneurysms involving all layers of the carotid arterial wall and false aneurysms both occur. Overall, extracranial carotid artery an
Brain injury or cranial nerve injuries due to any cause can cause ptosis by affecting the nerve supply to the muscles of the eyes and eyelids. Stroke, brain tumor, aneurysm, or long-term diabetes may also be involved.. Horners syndrome is a rare disorder that occurs due to damage of the sympathetic nerves (which control circulation and perspiration) supplying the face and eyes. The typical symptoms usually occur on one side and are ptosis (drooping of the upper eyelid), constricted pupil (decreased pupil size), and anhydrosis (absent or decreased sweating of the face) on the affected side.. Horners syndrome may occur as a result of stroke, tumor, or injury to the spinal cord, but in some cases no cause may be found. There is no definite treatment for Horners syndrome except treatment and management of the underlying cause.. Bell palsy is usually accompanied by a facial droop due to a one-sided (unilateral) partial or complete paralyis of the facial muscles. Refer to Facial Droop Causes for ...
Pre-specified endpoints are the following:stroke-free survival AND intended positioning of the original implant AND No additional surgical or interventional procedures AND intended performance of the device (no migration, embolization, fracture, thrombosis, etc AND reduction of MR by at least one grade and reduction of combined mitral annular diameters by at least 20%) AND no device-related complications (erosion, migration, etc.) at 30-days and all subsequent follow-up time points ...
Although the cranial nerves and their sensory and. of the brainstem showing the cranial nerves.Which cranial nerve carries sensory fibers from taste receptors of.This is an article introducing the 12 cranial nerves. this nerve governs the ocular and sensory functions.. The Cranial Nerves (Organization of the Central Nervous. motor neuron lesion of this cranial nerve (described in the following.The patient complains of decreased sense of taste (3 cranial nerves).Nerve - Cranial Nerve 9,10 The functions of the. 2004 - 08 Cranial Nerves.The olfactory nerve is a special sensory cranial nerve that ...
Heres Everything You Need To Know About The Cranial Nerves - How Many Cranial Nerves Are There And The Cranial Nerves Function. How To Remember Cranial Nerves, In Order And Labeled. Learn About Brainstem
The mean follow-up duration was 84 months (median 75.5 months, range 24-216 months). In 118 patients (86%), the tumor volume was unchanged or had decreased at last follow-up. Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated radiographic progression-free survival at 5 and 10 years to be 95.4% and 69%, respectively. Fourteen patients (10%) developed new cranial nerve palsies following GKS. Factors associated with tumor control included younger age, a higher isodose, and smaller tumor volume. A longer follow-up duration was associated with either a decrease or increase in tumor volume. Fourteen patients (10%) experienced new or worsening cranial nerve deficits after treatment. Factors associated with this occurrence were larger pretreatment tumor volume, lower peripheral radiation dose, lower maximum dose, tumor progression, and longer follow-up. ...
List of causes of Cranial nerve dysfunction and Ear bleeding and Energy symptoms, alternative diagnoses, rare causes, misdiagnoses, patient stories, and much more.
The next time youre trying to remember the locations and functions of the cranial nerves, picture this drawing. All twelve cranial nerves are represented, though some may be a little harder to spot than others. For example, the shoulders are formed by the number 11" because cranial nerve XI controls neck and shoulder movement. If you immediately recognize that the sides of the face and the top of the head are formed by the number 7," youre well on your way to using this memory device.. Tags: nerfs craniensneurologieneurology. ...
Do You Have Cranial Nerve Vii Diseases? Join friendly people sharing true stories in the I Have Cranial Nerve VII Diseases group. Find support forums, advice and chat with groups who share this life experience. Cranial Nerve VII Diseases anonymous su...
Cranial nerve damage can cause sensory, motor function and parasympathetic abnormalities, depending on which of the 12 cranial nerves are affected. Read this informative article to learn about damage results and treatment options.
The cranial nerves originate in the brain and have power over some of the most important neurological functions of the body. Cranial nerves relay information between the brain and parts of the body, primarily to and from regions of the head and neck.
There are many cranial nerve mnemonics that can be memorable and rude/lewd. Either way, they can be helpful for remembering the names of the twelve cranial nerves, as well as remembering which nerves are sensory, motor, or both. Remembering cran...
Cranial Nerve Examination - Free download as Word Doc (.doc), PDF File (.pdf), Text File (.txt) or read online for free. Guide to cranial nerve examination
Free pdf of cranial nerves, with emphasis on those that relate to voice & swallowing. Patients dysphagia need a full exam of their cranial nerves.
Can you find the cranial nerves in this puzzle? Print out this page, then circle all cranial nerve names that you find. The words can be up, down or backwards. There are also a few cranial nerves MISSING from this puzzle. Do you know which ones are missing? For more information of the cranial nerves, go the Cranial Nerve Page. Here is the puzzle: ...
S04.891 is a non-billable code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of injury of other cranial nerves, right side.
S04.9 is a non-billable code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of injury of unspecified cranial nerve.
The cranial nerves are a set of twelve nerves that originate in the brain. Each has a different function for sense or movement. Learn more here.
13 The Brain, Cranial Nerves, and Sensory and Motor Pathways Lecture Presentation by Lori Garrett Note to the Instructor: For the third edition of Visual Anatomy & Physiology, we have updated our PowerPoints
Start studying The Brain and the Cranial Nerves. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools.
The mnemonic is 2 2 4 4. The number of Cranial Nerves leaving or exiting from each Brain segments (namely and respectively Cerebrum, Mid brain, Pons and, Medulla) are denominated in each of these numbers ...
This useful table summarising the anatomy and function of the cranial nerves was compiled by James Barber, ST8, Salford Royal Hospital, Manchester. ...
Can you name the Cranial Nerves? Test your knowledge on this science quiz to see how you do and compare your score to others. Quiz by san88diego
Can you name the Can you name the CRANIAL EXITS of the cranial nerves?? Test your knowledge on this science quiz to see how you do and compare your score to others. Quiz by dashloose
The ICD-10 Code D43.3 is the code used for Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of cranial nerves .An alternative description for this code is Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of cranial ...
Study Flashcards On 12 Cranial Nerves & testing at Cram.com. Quickly memorize the terms, phrases and much more. Cram.com makes it easy to get the grade you want!
Study Flashcards On cranial nerves at Cram.com. Quickly memorize the terms, phrases and much more. Cram.com makes it easy to get the grade you want!
Free flashcards to help memorize facts about cranial nerves. Other activities to help include hangman, crossword, word scramble, games, matching, quizes, and tests.
In the video below, NAIOMT Faculty Karen Walz, PT, DPT, OCS, COMT, FAAOMPT takes you through a clinical cranial nerve screening post-MVA. Let us know if you have questions, and for more MVA-related education, join Karen for Cervicothoracic MVA Regional Interdependence, our new online course.
Free flashcards to help memorize facts about Cranial Nerves. Other activities to help include hangman, crossword, word scramble, games, matching, quizes, and tests.
Video shows the examination of an infant cranial nerves by an expert doctor. Infant is of 6 months and a careful examination is shown here.
201969-Its been over a year since my first cranial nerve exam rp so I felt like I needed to do a new one for you guys(: Enjoy! Make sure to give ...
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ICD-10 C72.5 is malignant neoplasm of other and unspecified cranial nerves (C725). This code is grouped under diagnosis codes for neoplasms.
Learn Cranial Nerve Chart facts using a simple interactive process (flashcard, matching, or multiple choice). Finally a format that helps you memorize and understand. Browse or search in thousands of pages or create your own page using a simple wizard. No signup required!
The next time youre trying to remember the locations and functions of the cranial nerves, picture this drawing. All twelve cranial nerves are represented, though some may be a little harder to spot than others. For example, the shoulders are formed by the number 11" because cranial nerve XI controls…. ...
The type and extent of treatment for traumatic nerve injuries always depend on the location, extent, and type of nerve injury sustained by the patient.
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Recite: Cover the note-taking column with a sheet of paper. Then, looking at the questions or cue-words in the question and cue column only, say aloud, in your own words, the answers to the questions, facts, or ideas indicated by the cue-words ...
If your institution has not yet licensed the Strahlenschutzkurs or if you want to test the Strahlenschutzkurs, please contact us ...
Description of disease Ulnar nerve dysfunction. Treatment Ulnar nerve dysfunction. Symptoms and causes Ulnar nerve dysfunction Prophylaxis Ulnar nerve dysfunction
Definition of Cranial nerve nucleus in the Legal Dictionary - by Free online English dictionary and encyclopedia. What is Cranial nerve nucleus? Meaning of Cranial nerve nucleus as a legal term. What does Cranial nerve nucleus mean in law?
List of causes of Cranial nerve dysfunction and Dementia and Emotional lability and Genital paresthesia/ tingling and Movement symptoms and Pain, alternative diagnoses, rare causes, misdiagnoses, patient stories, and much more.
Cranial Nerves and Swallowing: Speech-Language Pathologists need to know how cranial nerves impact swallowing. Patients need cranial nerve examinations.
Now, take a look at what I call cranial nerve maps. These are icons of cranial nerves, their branches, what they supply and what foramina they use. Sensory is yellow and motor is red. Solid red is for skeletal muscle. Dashed red is for parasympathetic fibers. You sort of have to memorize which nerves have motor or sensory or both modalities, then consider what part of the head and neck is involved with each nerve. For example, when you look at the olfactory road map, you will see that it is yellow which means it is purely sensory. Then you consider what kind of sensation of picked up in the periphery which, in this case, is smell. The smell impulses then go back to the central nervous system. If there is red included in the map, that means that something will receive efferent fibers and will either contract or secrete. The impulse starts out in the central nervous system and passes out to a muscle or gland. ...
The cranial nerves are a set of 12 nerves which emerge directly from the brain. The names of the cranial nerves relate to their function and they are also numerically identified in roman numerals I-XII by their specific location of the brain and by the order in which they exit the cranium.
When performing a cranial nerve examination, always ask to perform fundoscopy. This may provide valuable information regarding ocular or cranial nerve pathology, and reveals signs of diabetic or hypertensive nephropathy.
French antique anatomy of BRAIN CRANIAL NERVES print poster between and These beautyfull illustration come from a series of hand colored lithographs from J M Bourgery They make elegant Medical
In this presentation, CST instructor Karen Axelrod, Cst-D discusses the anatomical pathways of the 12 pairs of cranial nerves and also begins discussing ways to treat them using manual therapy techniques based on CST principles. Presenter: Karen Axelrod Cst-D *** Cost: $25 for recording. (Included in membership)
Video explaining Cranial Nerves for Anatomy & Physiology. This is one of many videos provided by Clutch Prep to prepare you to succeed in your college
Study cranial nerves flashcards from Carmina Mislang's University of Santo Tomas class online, or in Brainscape's iPhone or Android app. ✓ Learn faster with spaced repetition.
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Test your knowledge of the names and functions of various cranial nerves leading to the mouth and face using an interactive quiz and printable...
Colorado spine surgeon, Dr. Corenman discusses how muscles recover from nerve injuries. Muscles have different ways to recover or adapt to nerve injuries.
Anisocoria in the absence of orbital trauma. Abnormalities in a cranial nerve reflex indicate injury to the brainstem or the neural pathway connecting to the brainstem. Multiple cranial nerve deficits is highly suggestive of brainstem injury. The two most useful cranial nerve reflexes for rapid assessment of brainstem function are the gag reflex and the presence of physiologic nystagmus, otherwise known as the oculocephalic reflex. If these two reflexes are absent it strongly indicates significant brainstem injury and a guarded prognosis.. The segmental spinal reflexes should be evaluated when possible, without excessive manipulation of the patient. Abnormalities in thoracic and/or pelvic limb reflexes will help identify spinal trauma. Cases of brain injury without spinal injury tend to have normal or possibly exaggerated spinal reflexes.. Decerebrate posture: patient has opisthotonos and extensor rigidity of all four limbs. The animal is unresponsive and does not detect deep pain sensation. ...
Cranial nerve palsy is a type of muscle malfunction involving at least one of the cranial nerves. Those with cranial nerve palsy...
EHV-1 usually manifests as a respiratory disease, but can occasionally mutate to a form that affects the nervous system. Infected horses may develop symptoms such as weakness or paralysis of the hind legs giving rise to the dog-sitting position, loss of tail and anal tone, inability to urinate or defecate, urine dribbling, cranial nerve deficits, recumbency, and death. No specific treatment is available for EHV-1, but general supportive therapy and care can aid recovery of affected horses. Anti-inflammatory agents may be helpful in minimizing damage to the spinal cord. The human drug acyclovir was used in a recent EHV-1 outbreak in Ohio, and efficacy of this treatment seems promising. ...
The ninth cranial nerve is the glossopharyngeal nerve. The 12 cranial nerves, the glossopharyngeal nerve included, emerge from or enter the skull (the cranium), as opposed to the spinal nerves which emerge from the vertebral column. The…
Cranial nerve palsy was found in 5-Minute Clinical Consult. 5-Minute Clinical Consult (5MCC) app and website powered by Unbound Medicine helps you diagnose and manage 900+ medical conditions. Exclusive bonus features include Diagnosaurus DDx, 200 pediatrics topics, and medical news feeds.
The present invention provides a composition for preventing, alleviating, or treating cranial nerve diseases caused by dopamine deficiency, the composition containing triiodidethyronine and tyroxine, or a salt thereof. According to the present invention, the triiodidethyronine and tyroxine, or a salt thereof significantly promote the expression and proliferation of dopamine neurons, thereby exhibiting excellent effects in the prevention and treatment of cranial nerve diseases caused by dopamine deficiency, such as Parkinson´s disease.
Symptoms of femoral nerve dysfunction include tingling, pain, numbness, burning and decreased sensation in the knee, thigh or leg, reports MedlinePlus. Additional symptoms are weakness in the leg and...
the first two cranial nerves olfactory nerve i that transmits signals make up your sense of smell and optic ii responsible brain diagram brains.. ...
This presentation is the second part of the cranial nerve examination. Thiscourse will look at sensory based treatments after you have completed thecranial nerve exam. This will involve a look at evidence-based sensorytreatments. Live Webinar
... ContinuedSkull Part of Axial Skeleton Cranial bones = cranium Enclose and protect brain Attachment for
Ten pairs of cranial nerves arise from the brain at different locations to supply the anterior region of the body. In addition to them a pair of termi...
Study Cranial Nerves flashcards from Faith Hislop's class online, or in Brainscape's iPhone or Android app. ✓ Learn faster with spaced repetition.
Stimulate your cranial nerves with face reflexology ❉ Les nerfs crâniens en réflexologie faciale ❉ Los nervios craneales en Facioterapia - Dien Chan.
ASMR - Cranial Nerve Exam Hey there, wolf pack! Here\s my version of an ASMR classic. Hope you guys like it. (PS: I just launched my Patreon! I will be making an announcement video about that within
Phone numbers, addresses and other contact information for the Center for Cranial Nerve and Brainstem Disorders at the University of Pittsburgh.
Learn Cranial Nerves - Anatomy - USMLE Step 1 - Picmonic for Medicine faster and easier with Picmonics unforgettable images and stories! Picmonic is research proven to increase your memory retention and test scores. Start learning today for free!
The optic nerve is located in the back of the eye. It is also called the second cranial nerve or cranial nerve II. It is the second of several pairs of cranial nerves.
App: Cranial Nerves: Pocket Clinical Resource Price: $2.99 What it is: An incredibly simple app to use to learn and look up information on cranial nerves. System: iOS (iPhone and iPad) Version: 1.2.4 Let me start off by saying: I LOVE THIS APP! I was referenced to a cranial nerve app which was $60. I [...]. ...
60 yo w/ hx insulin dependent diabetes, HTN, HLD, presents to the ED complaining of double vision and drooping eyelid for 3 days. POC glucose 359. CTH w/o and CTA head negative. Whats the likely diagnosis?. ...
Use the "Printable HTML" button to get a clean page, in either HTML or PDF, that you can use your browsers print button to print. This page wont have buttons or ads, just your puzzle. The PDF format allows the web site to know how large a printer page is, and the fonts are scaled to fill the page. The PDF takes awhile to generate. Dont panic! ...
Looking for online definition of cranial nerve IX in the Medical Dictionary? cranial nerve IX explanation free. What is cranial nerve IX? Meaning of cranial nerve IX medical term. What does cranial nerve IX mean?
Palliative RT has been the standard treatment for skull base malignancies providing excellent relief of pain and improvement of cranial nerve dysfunction in up to 78% of patients [4-9]. More recently, SRS has been employed as a less invasive option for the treatment of skull base metastases with the aim to deliver a high dose to the target with dose sparing of critical structures such as the optic nerves and chiasm. The efficacy of single-fraction SRS for skull base metastases has been reported in few studies that include either nasopharyngeal carcinomas or skull base metastases [14-17]. Iwai et al. [15] treated 21 patients with cavernous sinus cancers, including 12 patients with metastases from systemic cancer. At a median follow-up of 13 months, the 1-year and 2-year tumor control rates were 68% and 47%, respectively, with no significant differences between nasopharyngeal carcinoma and metastases. After SRS, there was a resolution or improvement of preoperative cranial nerve deficits in 47% of ...
MalaCards based summary : Schwannoma of Twelfth Cranial Nerve, also known as schwannoma of the twelfth cranial nerve, is related to neurilemmoma and plexiform schwannoma. An important gene associated with Schwannoma of Twelfth Cranial Nerve is NF2 (Neurofibromin 2). Affiliated tissues include 12th cranial nerve, tongue and thymus, and related phenotypes are Decreased cell migration and Increased cell migration ...
The disease in these patients may be newly acquired or a reactivation. It may be characterized as follows: CNS toxoplasmosis occurs in 50% of patients - Seizure, dysequilibrium, cranial nerve deficit... more
List of causes of Cranial nerve dysfunction and Falls and Focal seizure and Weakness, alternative diagnoses, rare causes, misdiagnoses, patient stories, and much more.
List of 40 causes for Ankle weakness and Cranial nerve dysfunction and Ear burning sensation, alternative diagnoses, rare causes, misdiagnoses, patient stories, and much more.
Ok then. Lets get back to our slide and make sure that you are comfortable and familiar with what we see here in this slide and that you know what the 12 cranial nerves are and the 10 that connect to the brain stem in particular for this lesson. Now notice that in this figure theres a color code and the color code is meant. To help you understand which nerves are purely sensory. Which are purely motor. And then, which nerves. Like, most of our spinal nerves have a mixture of sensory and motor axons within them. Well, that may seem, perhaps, surprising that there would be nerves that are mixed for sensation, and. Motor output but that is the case for our spinal nerves and it is the case, as you can see by the abundance of green nerves here, for several of the cranial nerves. So that suggests that there must be some complex relationship between the brain stem and the nerves. And often that is the case. So what I want to help you with next is to understand, how do these nerves connect up with the ...
Ok then. Lets get back to our slide and make sure that you are comfortable and familiar with what we see here in this slide and that you know what the 12 cranial nerves are and the 10 that connect to the brain stem in particular for this lesson. Now notice that in this figure theres a color code and the color code is meant. To help you understand which nerves are purely sensory. Which are purely motor. And then, which nerves. Like, most of our spinal nerves have a mixture of sensory and motor axons within them. Well, that may seem, perhaps, surprising that there would be nerves that are mixed for sensation, and. Motor output but that is the case for our spinal nerves and it is the case, as you can see by the abundance of green nerves here, for several of the cranial nerves. So that suggests that there must be some complex relationship between the brain stem and the nerves. And often that is the case. So what I want to help you with next is to understand, how do these nerves connect up with the ...
This page includes the following topics and synonyms: Cranial Nerve 12, Cranial Nerve XII, Hypoglossal Nerve, CN 12, Hypoglossal Nucleus.
The cranial nerve V, the trigeminal maxillary nerve, is one of the divisions of the cranial nerve. It is one of three such branches of the trigeminal nerve. This maxillary division carries impulses from the upper teeth, upper gum, upper lip, and the mucous lining of the palate and the skin of the face.. ...
This page includes the following topics and synonyms: Cranial Nerve 11, Cranial Nerve XI, Accessory Nerve, Spinal Accessory nerve, CN 11.
Ninth cranial nerve definition at Dictionary.com, a free online dictionary with pronunciation, synonyms and translation. Look it up now!
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The cervical nerves consist of eight paired nerves that are a part of the peripheral nervous system. They emerge from the spinal cord through the seven cervical vertebrae. The cervical vertebrae are the spinal bones located just below the skull. Below the cervical vertebrae are the thoracic vertebrae, which are
In bilateral cranial nerve IV palsy, the patient will manifest a hyper-deviation which . In the case of complicated fourth nerve palsies, (i.e., those that present with . undergo neuroradiological studies dictated by the accompanying signs and ...
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V pair of cranial nerves, trigeminal nerve, n.trigeminus and sensitive system of the face and head, symptoms of its damage Short anatomical data....
Contact and referral information for University of Pittsburgh Department of Neurological Surgery Cranial Nerve Disorder Program faculty.
Cranial Nerves Different From Spinal Nerves - See more about Cranial Nerves Different From Spinal Nerves, cranial nerve different than spinal nerve, cranial nerves + spinal nerves + ganglia, cranial nerves different spinal nerves, cranial nerves spinal nerves
Carotid Endarterectomy with Iatrogenic (Physician-related) Cranial Nerve Damage. This custom medical exhibit features a lateral view of the left neck revealing the anatomy in the region of a carotid endarterectomy surgery. Additional images show the location of the cranial nerves, and the function of CN XII (hypoglossal nerve) which was damaged in this particular case.
The second cranial nerve is called the optic nerve. It sends visual information from the eye to the brain. The third cranial nerve is called the oculomotor nerve. It is involved with eye movement, eyelid movement, and the function of the pupil and lens. The fourth cranial nerve is called the trochlear nerve and the sixth cranial nerve is called the abducens nerve. They each innervate an eye muscle involved in eye movement. The fifth cranial nerve is called the trigeminal nerve. It provides facial sensation (including corneal sensation).. ...
Foreign bodies that penetrate the esophagus and migrate extraluminally are unusual. If they are left untreated, serious complications arise from mediastinitis, and damage to the major structures in the neck can occur. We report a case of a patient who presented with chest pain on inspiration that was found to be caused by a foreign body in the parapharyngeal space and middle mediastinum. Preoperative imaging is critical in obtaining landmarks for safe surgical exploration and is essential to the successful management of penetrating and migrating foreign bodies. This case highlights the importance of localizing the foreign body preoperatively to aid in its surgical removal via a transcervical approach.. ...

Cranial nerve injuries associated with carotid endarterectomyCranial nerve injuries associated with carotid endarterectomy

... cranial nerve,injuries}, language = {eng}, pages = {595--598}, series = {Acta Chir Scand}, title = {Cranial nerve injuries ... carotid endarterectomy, cranial nerve, injuries. in Acta Chir Scand. volume. 151. pages. 595 - 598. external identifiers. * ... Cranial nerve injuries associated with carotid endarterectomy. Forssell, Claes; Takolander, Rabbe; Bergqvist, David; Bergentz, ...
more infohttps://lup.lub.lu.se/search/publication/3632606

Traumatic Optic Neuropathy Treatment Trial (TONTT) - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.govTraumatic Optic Neuropathy Treatment Trial (TONTT) - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov

Optic Nerve Injuries. Neuromuscular Diseases. Nervous System Diseases. Cranial Nerve Diseases. Eye Diseases. Cranial Nerve ... Such injury leads to ischemic injury to the axons of the retinal ganglion cells within the optic canal. At present, no studies ... Wounds and Injuries. Methylprednisolone. Epoetin Alfa. Anti-Inflammatory Agents. Antiemetics. Autonomic Agents. Peripheral ... The tight adherence of the optic nerves dural sheath to the periosteum within the optic canal is also thought to contribute to ...
more infohttps://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01783847?term=Stroke&lup_s=01%2F28%2F2013&lup_d=14&show_rss=Y&sel_rss=mod14

A Multicenter Review of Superior Laryngeal Nerve Injury Following Anterior Cervical Spine SurgeryA Multicenter Review of Superior Laryngeal Nerve Injury Following Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery

Cranial and cervical nerve injuries after carotid endarterectomy: a prospective study. Surgery. 1999;125:85-91. [PubMed] ... recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy, superior laryngeal nerve palsy, hypoglossal or glossopharyngeal nerve palsy, dural tear, ... Cranial/cervical nerve dysfunction after carotid endarterectomy. J Vasc Surg. 1997;25:481-487. [PubMed] ... carotid artery injury or cerebrovascular accident, vertebral artery injuries, Horners syndrome, thoracic duct injury, ...
more infohttp://pubmedcentralcanada.ca/pmcc/articles/PMC5400181/

Treatment strategies for carotid artery aneurysms - The Journal of Cardiovascular Surgery 2016 December;57(6):872-80 - Minerva...Treatment strategies for carotid artery aneurysms - The Journal of Cardiovascular Surgery 2016 December;57(6):872-80 - Minerva...

Cranial nerves injuries included transient contusions of hypoglossal (2) and superior laryngeal nerve (2).. CONCLUSIONS: The ... cranial nerves injuries. In all cases of hemorrhage successful re-intervention was performed without any consequences. ... BACKGROUND: The aim of this paper was to present single centre experience in the treatment of extra cranial carotid artery ...
more infohttps://www.minervamedica.it/en/journals/cardiovascular-surgery/article.php?cod=R37Y2016N06A0872

Cranial Neuropathies | StayWell Health Library | MainCranial Neuropathies | StayWell Health Library | Main

Cranial Neuropathies What are cranial neuropathies? Nerves power your entire body, but those nerves can be damaged by injury or ... When nerves in the brain or brainstem are affected, it is called cranial neuropathy. The cranial nerves are those that arise ... Neuropathy is a disorder that causes nerve damage and affects your ability to feel and move. Exactly how your body and your ... movement are affected depends on where in the body the damaged nerves are located. ...
more infohttp://www.lifebridgehealth.org/Main/HealthLibrary.aspx?iid=134_48

Facial Nerve Damage: Symptoms, Repair Treatment for Facial Nerve DamageFacial Nerve Damage: Symptoms, Repair Treatment for Facial Nerve Damage

Symptoms of facial nerve damage are facial palsy and partial loss of sensation of taste. ... Causes of facial nerve damage are injury to the seventh cranial nerve. ... Facial nerve damage may occur due to injury to the seventh cranial nerve also referred to as the Facial Nerve. The facial nerve ... Trauma and head injury are the common causes of damage to the facial nerve. In addition, severe infections of the middle ear ...
more infohttps://www.tandurust.com/health-faq-3/facial-nerve-damage.html

Cranial nerve nucleus legal definition of Cranial nerve nucleusCranial nerve nucleus legal definition of Cranial nerve nucleus

What is Cranial nerve nucleus? Meaning of Cranial nerve nucleus as a legal term. What does Cranial nerve nucleus mean in law? ... Definition of Cranial nerve nucleus in the Legal Dictionary - by Free online English dictionary and encyclopedia. ... cranial nerve III. *Cranial nerve injuries. *Cranial nerve injuries. *Cranial nerve injuries ... Cranial nerve nucleus legal definition of Cranial nerve nucleus https://legal-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/Cranial+nerve+ ...
more infohttp://legal-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/Cranial+nerve+nucleus

D:Facial Nerve Injuries - wiki-painD:Facial Nerve Injuries - wiki-pain

Avulsions Facial Nerve, CRANIAL NERVE VII INJURIES, Facial Nerve Avulsion, Facial Nerve Avulsions, Facial Nerve Injury, Facial ... Nerve Trauma, FACIAL NERVE TRAUMAS, FACIAL NEUROPATHIES TRAUMATIC, FACIAL NEUROPATHY TRAUMATIC, Injuries Cranial Nerve Vii ... They are ordered first by their pain relevance and then by number of times they were reported in Facial Nerve Injuries. Please ... They are ordered first by their relevance to Facial Nerve Injuries and then by their general relevance to pain. Please click on ...
more infohttp://gnteam.cs.manchester.ac.uk/demos/wiki-pain/vhosts/wikipaints/mediawiki-1.19.1/index.php?title=D:Facial_Nerve_Injuries&printable=yes

Lose 10 Pounds Fast THIS WEEK with  Which of the following cranial nerves functions as a sensory nerve for taste?Lose 10 Pounds Fast THIS WEEK with Which of the following cranial nerves functions as a sensory nerve for taste?

Cranial nerves. Following injury to a nerve the axon distal to the injury degenerates.Cranial nerve examination. Cranial. as ... cranial nerves, cranial nerve nuclei,.. 12 Cranial Nerves and Assessment , Taste , Human Eye. Cranial Nerves - Springer. A ... 3 cranial nerves).Nerve - Cranial Nerve 9,10 The functions of the. 2004 - 08 Cranial Nerves.The olfactory nerve is a special ... just a selection of cranial nerves.. 12 Cranial Nerves , The 12 Pairs of Nerves That Emerge. Only three pairs of cranial nerves ...
more infohttp://opzegdienst.eu/kycad/which-of-the-following-cranial-nerves-functions-as-a-sensory-nerve-for-taste-229.php

Cranial Nerve Nuclei, part 2 - Neuroanatomy: Internal Anatomy of the Human CNS | CourseraCranial Nerve Nuclei, part 2 - Neuroanatomy: Internal Anatomy of the Human CNS | Coursera

... action and cognition that accompany injury, disease or dysfunction in the central nervous system. The course will build upon ... as you can see by the abundance of green nerves here, for several of the cranial nerves. So that suggests that there must be ... With the cranial nerve nuclei that I want you to become familiar with. Illustrated. So this is something of a phantom view of ... Cranial Nerve Nuclei, part 2. 이 비디오를 보려면 JavaScript를 활성화하고 HTML5 비디오를 지원하는 ...
more infohttps://ko.coursera.org/lecture/medical-neuroscience/cranial-nerve-nuclei-part-2-lp9vn

Sixth Cranial NerveSixth Cranial Nerve

The primary action is to help the eye move outward, towards the ear - this action is called ABDUCTION - hence, ABducens nerve. ... The long pathway, location, and anatomical structures that this nerve courses over make it uniquely susceptible to damage from ... is also named the abducens nerve. It only controls eye movement from the lateral rectus muscle of the eye. ... Sixth Cranial Nerve. The sixth cranial nerve (CNVI) is also named the abducens nerve. It only controls eye movement from the ...
more infohttps://www.seevividly.com/info/Physiology_of_Vision/The_Brain/Visual_System/Sixth_Cranial_Nerve

How Does Neck Pain Cause Headaches?How Does Neck Pain Cause Headaches?

These nerves also share a pain nucleus with the trigeminal nerve (cranial nerve V), which can route pain signals to the brain. ... A partial list includes stress, lack of sleep, allergies, neck trauma (particularly sports injuries and car accidents), and ... From there, it can communicate with another nerve (cranial nerve V or the trigeminal nerve), which can refer pain to the ... Depending on which nerve is most irritated, the location of the headache can vary. For example, C2-the greater occipital nerve- ...
more infohttp://oakspringschiropracticblog.com/1222/how-does-neck-pain-cause-headaches-/

How Does Neck Pain Cause Headaches?How Does Neck Pain Cause Headaches?

These nerves also share a pain nucleus with the trigeminal nerve (cranial nerve V), which can route pain signals to the brain. ... A partial list includes stress, lack of sleep, allergies, neck trauma (particularly sports injuries and car accidents), and ... From there, it can communicate with another nerve (cranial nerve V or the trigeminal nerve), which can refer pain to the ... Depending on which nerve is most irritated, the location of the headache can vary. For example, C2-the greater occipital nerve- ...
more infohttps://chiro-trust.org/neck-pain/neck-pain-cause-headaches/

Differential Diagnosis of Cranial Nerve V Lesion  - Medical ZoneDifferential Diagnosis of Cranial Nerve V Lesion - Medical Zone

... causes of cranial nerve lesion are : -neoplastic infiltration of the base of the skull -cerebellopontine angle tumor -acoustic ... CranIal Nerve V lesion The differential diagnosis of cranial nerve V lesions / ... Surgery Definition - What intracranial lesions are identified with closed head injury? * Surgery Definition - What are the ... Differential Diagnosis of Cranial Nerve V Lesion CranIal Nerve V lesion. The differential diagnosis of cranial nerve V lesions ...
more infohttp://www.medicalzone.net/differential-diagnosis-of-cranial-nerve-v-lesion.html

Role of surgical techniques and operative findings in cranial and cervical nerve injuries during carotid endarterectomy.  -...Role of surgical techniques and operative findings in cranial and cervical nerve injuries during carotid endarterectomy. -...

To establish the incidence of cranial and cervical nerve injuries during CEA and their relationship to different surgical ... Role of surgical techniques and operative findings in cranial and cervical nerve injuries during carotid endarterectomy.. ... The incidence of single cranial nerve injuries was higher in patch (OR = 2.7) and eversion (OR = 1.9) procedures than in ... and plaque extension on the onset of nerve injuries.. RESULTS: Postoperatively, nerve lesions were identified in 51 CEAs (27%) ...
more infohttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9659889

Sparrho | Cranial Nerve Injury After Carotid Endarterectomy: IncidencSparrho | Cranial Nerve Injury After Carotid Endarterectomy: Incidenc

... cranial nerve injury (CNI), and to evaluate the risk factors associated with increased CNI risk.The ... Meta-analysis revealed that the vagus nerve was the most frequently injured cranial nerve (pooled injury rate 3.99%, 95% CI ... Clinical relevance of cranial nerve injury following carotid endarterectomy.. Research paper. by M M Fokkema, G J GJ de Borst, ... Risk of persistent cranial nerve injury after carotid endarterectomy.. Research paper. by Edwin J EJ Cunningham, Rick R Bond, ...
more infohttps://www.sparrho.com/item/cranial-nerve-injury-after-carotid-endarterectomy-incidence-risk-factors-and-time-trends/bca9b6/

Overview of the 2011 Food and Drug Administration Circulatory System Devices Panel Meeting on the ACCULINK and ACCUNET Carotid...Overview of the 2011 Food and Drug Administration Circulatory System Devices Panel Meeting on the ACCULINK and ACCUNET Carotid...

Cranial Nerve Injury. Cranial nerve injury is a complication of CEA that tends to resolve in the first few months after surgery ... 19,20 The most common cranial nerves affected are V, VII, IX, X, and XII. The symptoms of cranial nerve injury can include ... There were no cranial nerve injuries experienced in the CAS arm of CREST in the per-protocol population (online-only Data ... postoperative incidence of cranial nerve injury, which was reduced to 2.1% at 6 months. Of note, the majority of these (80%) ...
more infohttp://circ.ahajournals.org/content/125/18/2256

ICD-10-CM Code S04.9 - Injury of unspecified cranial nerveICD-10-CM Code S04.9 - Injury of unspecified cranial nerve

... consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of injury of unspecified cranial nerve. ... Injury - See Also: specified injury type; - T14.90 * - nerve NEC - T14.8 * - cranial - S04.9* - contusion - S04.9 ... Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes (S00-T98) * Injuries to the head (S00-S09) * Injury of ... There are more than 100 kinds of peripheral nerve disorders. They can affect one nerve or many nerves. Some are the result of ...
more infohttps://icdlist.com/icd-10/S04.9

Shear Injury to the Olfactory Nerves (Cranial Nerve I) | Doctor StockShear Injury to the Olfactory Nerves (Cranial Nerve I) | Doctor Stock

Cranial Nerve I). Graphically depicts a violent blow to the back of the head as it strikes the pavement, resulting in tearing ... of the fibers of the olfactory nerve bulb (C.N. I) in the cribriform plate of the ethmoid bone in the skull. This injury ... Shear Injury to the Olfactory Nerves (Cranial Nerve I). Graphically depicts a violent blow to the back of the head as it ... injuries, injury, lack, nasal, nerve, nerves, nose, noses, olfactory, plate, plates, shear, smell, taste ...
more infohttps://doctorstock.photoshelter.com/img-show?_bqG=3&_bqH=eJwLzAiqCg0J9NFNzMl3LcxM8q1I9iw19C8o8DawMrEyMrUyNAACK894l2Bn2.SizKSizLT8olw1sEC8o5.LbQmQHRrsGhTv6WIbClJcbm6QUlpekZzuW64W7.gcYlucmliUnAEAD5kh8w--&GI_ID=

ICD-10-CM Code P11.4 - Birth injury to other cranial nervesICD-10-CM Code P11.4 - Birth injury to other cranial nerves

Birth injury to other cranial nerves BILLABLE Billable Code Billable codes are sufficient justification for admission to an ... P11.4 is a billable ICD code used to specify a diagnosis of birth injury to other cranial nerves. A billable code is detailed ... ICD-10-CM Alphabetical Index References for P11.4 - Birth injury to other cranial nerves The ICD-10-CM Alphabetical Index ... Other cranial and peripheral nerve injuries due to birth trauma (approximate match) ...
more infohttps://icd.codes/icd10cm/P114

Shear Injury to the Olfactory Nerves (Cranial Nerve I) | Doctor StockShear Injury to the Olfactory Nerves (Cranial Nerve I) | Doctor Stock

Cranial Nerve I). Graphically depicts a violent blow to the back of the head as it strikes the pavement, resulting in tearing ... of the fibers of the olfactory nerve bulb (C.N. I) in the cribriform plate of the ethmoid bone in the skull. This injury ... Shear Injury to the Olfactory Nerves (Cranial Nerve I). Graphically depicts a violent blow to the back of the head as it ... injuries, injury, lack, nasal, nerve, nerves, nose, noses, olfactory, plate, plates, shear, smell, taste ...
more infohttps://doctorstock.photoshelter.com/image?_bqG=14&_bqH=eJzTTU_OC_Utq0rSTQpwD8v3zQ3KjsoOLM6v8DOxMgIiUytDAyCw8ox3CXa2zUssTsxRA7PjHf1cbEuA7NBg16B4TxfbUJC6cnODlNLyiuR033K1eEfnENvi1MSi5AwAdtMgPA--&GI_ID=

ICD-10-CM Code S04.891 - Injury of other cranial nerves, right sideICD-10-CM Code S04.891 - Injury of other cranial nerves, right side

... consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of injury of other cranial nerves, right side. ... Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes (S00-T98) * Injuries to the head (S00-S09) * Injury of ... There are more than 100 kinds of peripheral nerve disorders. They can affect one nerve or many nerves. Some are the result of ... consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of injury of other cranial nerves, right side. The ...
more infohttps://icdlist.com/icd-10/S04.891

ICD-10 Diagnosis Code S04.9XXD Injury of unspecified cranial nerve, subsequent encounterICD-10 Diagnosis Code S04.9XXD Injury of unspecified cranial nerve, subsequent encounter

Injury of unspecified cranial nerve, subsequent encounter Long Description: Injury of unspecified cranial nerve, subsequent ... Injuries of brain and cranial nerves with injuries of nerves and spinal cord at neck level ... Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes (S00-T98) * Injuries to the head (S00-S09) *Injury of ... There are more than 100 kinds of peripheral nerve disorders. They can affect one nerve or many nerves. Some are the result of ...
more infohttps://icdlist.com/icd-10/s049xxd

Most Popular Articles : Journal of Neuro-OphthalmologyMost Popular Articles : Journal of Neuro-Ophthalmology

Third, Fourth, and Sixth Cranial Nerve Palsies Following Closed Head Injury. Dhaliwal, Avninder; West, Adrienne L; Trobe, ... Avoiding Clinical Misinterpretation and Artifacts of Optical Coherence Tomography Analysis of the Optic Nerve, Retinal Nerve ... Optic Nerve Cupping and the Neuro-Ophthalmologist. Fraser, Clare L.; White, Andrew J. R.; Plant, Gordon T.; More ... Peripapillary Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness Corresponds to Drusen Location and Extent of Visual Field Defects in ...
more infohttps://journals.lww.com/jneuro-ophthalmology/pages/viewallmostpopulararticles.aspx?WT.mc_id=HPxADx20100319xMP

Neuro-Psych - Alzheimers disease, Glasgow Coma Scale, Brain Injury, Mental Health, Cranial Nerves, Phobias, Tumors, etc.Neuro-Psych - Alzheimer's disease, Glasgow Coma Scale, Brain Injury, Mental Health, Cranial Nerves, Phobias, Tumors, etc.

... brain injury, mental health, consciousness, cranial nerves, phobias, tumors, etc. ... Cranial Nerves (I-XII). Deatils of all cranial nerves (I-XII). Depression Related Terms. Words and terms related to depression. ... Brain Injury Terms. Terms related to Brain Injuries.. Consciousness Levels. Various stages and response of Consciousness Levels ... Various terms for Neuro-Psych - Alzheimers disease, Glasgow coma scale, sleep terms, brain injury, mental health, ...
more infohttp://www.mt911.com/site/main/medical_transcription_nav.asp?pid=29
  • The primary action is to help the eye move outward, towards the ear - this action is called ABDUCTION - hence, ABducens nerve. (seevividly.com)
  • The tight adherence of the optic nerve's dural sheath to the periosteum within the optic canal is also thought to contribute to this segment of the nerve being extremely susceptible to the deformative stresses of the skull bones. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Very recently it has been shown the cytokine hormone erythropoietin (EPO) that had been long known and used as a valuable agent to promote hematopoiesis has been protective in experimental models of mechanical trauma, neuroinflammation, cerebral and retinal ischemia, and even in a human stroke trial, and most notably in optic nerve transection. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The pathophysiology of Traumatic Optic Neuropathy (TON) is thought to be multifactorial, and some researchers have also postulated a primary and secondary mechanism of injury.TON is categorized as direct or indirect.In indirect TON cases, the injury to the axons is thought to be induced by shearing forces that are transmitted to the fibers or to the vascular supply of the nerve. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • BACKGROUND: The aim of this paper was to present single centre experience in the treatment of extra cranial carotid artery aneurysms (ECCA) and to analyze results discussing different treatment modalities. (minervamedica.it)
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