Disorders of one or more of the twelve cranial nerves. With the exception of the optic and olfactory nerves, this includes disorders of the brain stem nuclei from which the cranial nerves originate or terminate.
Twelve pairs of nerves that carry general afferent, visceral afferent, special afferent, somatic efferent, and autonomic efferent fibers.
Conditions which produce injury or dysfunction of the second cranial or optic nerve, which is generally considered a component of the central nervous system. Damage to optic nerve fibers may occur at or near their origin in the retina, at the optic disk, or in the nerve, optic chiasm, optic tract, or lateral geniculate nuclei. Clinical manifestations may include decreased visual acuity and contrast sensitivity, impaired color vision, and an afferent pupillary defect.
Diseases of the first cranial (olfactory) nerve, which usually feature anosmia or other alterations in the sense of smell and taste. Anosmia may be associated with NEOPLASMS; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM INFECTIONS; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; inherited conditions; toxins; METABOLIC DISEASES; tobacco abuse; and other conditions. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp229-31)
Diseases of the tenth cranial nerve, including brain stem lesions involving its nuclei (solitary, ambiguus, and dorsal motor), nerve fascicles, and intracranial and extracranial course. Clinical manifestations may include dysphagia, vocal cord weakness, and alterations of parasympathetic tone in the thorax and abdomen.
Dysfunction of one or more cranial nerves causally related to a traumatic injury. Penetrating and nonpenetrating CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; NECK INJURIES; and trauma to the facial region are conditions associated with cranial nerve injuries.
Diseases of the sixth cranial (abducens) nerve or its nucleus in the pons. The nerve may be injured along its course in the pons, intracranially as it travels along the base of the brain, in the cavernous sinus, or at the level of superior orbital fissure or orbit. Dysfunction of the nerve causes lateral rectus muscle weakness, resulting in horizontal diplopia that is maximal when the affected eye is abducted and ESOTROPIA. Common conditions associated with nerve injury include INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; ISCHEMIA; and INFRATENTORIAL NEOPLASMS.
Pathological processes of the VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE, including the branches of COCHLEAR NERVE and VESTIBULAR NERVE. Common examples are VESTIBULAR NEURITIS, cochlear neuritis, and ACOUSTIC NEUROMA. Clinical signs are varying degree of HEARING LOSS; VERTIGO; and TINNITUS.
Diseases of the twelfth cranial (hypoglossal) nerve or nuclei. The nuclei and fascicles of the nerve are located in the medulla, and the nerve exits the skull via the hypoglossal foramen and innervates the muscles of the tongue. Lower brain stem diseases, including ischemia and MOTOR NEURON DISEASES may affect the nuclei or nerve fascicles. The nerve may also be injured by diseases of the posterior fossa or skull base. Clinical manifestations include unilateral weakness of tongue musculature and lingual dysarthria, with deviation of the tongue towards the side of weakness upon attempted protrusion.
Diseases of the ninth cranial (glossopharyngeal) nerve or its nuclei in the medulla. The nerve may be injured by diseases affecting the lower brain stem, floor of the posterior fossa, jugular foramen, or the nerve's extracranial course. Clinical manifestations include loss of sensation from the pharynx, decreased salivation, and syncope. Glossopharyngeal neuralgia refers to a condition that features recurrent unilateral sharp pain in the tongue, angle of the jaw, external auditory meatus and throat that may be associated with SYNCOPE. Episodes may be triggered by cough, sneeze, swallowing, or pressure on the tragus of the ear. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1390)
Diseases of the trigeminal nerve or its nuclei, which are located in the pons and medulla. The nerve is composed of three divisions: ophthalmic, maxillary, and mandibular, which provide sensory innervation to structures of the face, sinuses, and portions of the cranial vault. The mandibular nerve also innervates muscles of mastication. Clinical features include loss of facial and intra-oral sensation and weakness of jaw closure. Common conditions affecting the nerve include brain stem ischemia, INFRATENTORIAL NEOPLASMS, and TRIGEMINAL NEURALGIA.
Benign and malignant neoplasms that arise from one or more of the twelve cranial nerves.
Diseases of the oculomotor nerve or nucleus that result in weakness or paralysis of the superior rectus, inferior rectus, medial rectus, inferior oblique, or levator palpebrae muscles, or impaired parasympathetic innervation to the pupil. With a complete oculomotor palsy, the eyelid will be paralyzed, the eye will be in an abducted and inferior position, and the pupil will be markedly dilated. Commonly associated conditions include neoplasms, CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA, ischemia (especially in association with DIABETES MELLITUS), and aneurysmal compression. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p270)
Diseases of the facial nerve or nuclei. Pontine disorders may affect the facial nuclei or nerve fascicle. The nerve may be involved intracranially, along its course through the petrous portion of the temporal bone, or along its extracranial course. Clinical manifestations include facial muscle weakness, loss of taste from the anterior tongue, hyperacusis, and decreased lacrimation.
Filarial infection of the eyes transmitted from person to person by bites of Onchocerca volvulus-infected black flies. The microfilariae of Onchocerca are thus deposited beneath the skin. They migrate through various tissues including the eye. Those persons infected have impaired vision and up to 20% are blind. The incidence of eye lesions has been reported to be as high as 30% in Central America and parts of Africa.
Diseases of the eleventh cranial (spinal accessory) nerve. This nerve originates from motor neurons in the lower medulla (accessory portion of nerve) and upper spinal cord (spinal portion of nerve). The two components of the nerve join and exit the skull via the jugular foramen, innervating the sternocleidomastoid and trapezius muscles, which become weak or paralyzed if the nerve is injured. The nerve is commonly involved in MOTOR NEURON DISEASE, and may be injured by trauma to the posterior triangle of the neck.
Diseases of the fourth cranial (trochlear) nerve or its nucleus in the midbrain. The nerve crosses as it exits the midbrain dorsally and may be injured along its course through the intracranial space, cavernous sinus, superior orbital fissure, or orbit. Clinical manifestations include weakness of the superior oblique muscle which causes vertical DIPLOPIA that is maximal when the affected eye is adducted and directed inferiorly. Head tilt may be seen as a compensatory mechanism for diplopia and rotation of the visual axis. Common etiologies include CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA and INFRATENTORIAL NEOPLASMS.
The 7th cranial nerve. The facial nerve has two parts, the larger motor root which may be called the facial nerve proper, and the smaller intermediate or sensory root. Together they provide efferent innervation to the muscles of facial expression and to the lacrimal and SALIVARY GLANDS, and convey afferent information for TASTE from the anterior two-thirds of the TONGUE and for TOUCH from the EXTERNAL EAR.
Inflammation of the optic nerve. Commonly associated conditions include autoimmune disorders such as MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, infections, and granulomatous diseases. Clinical features include retro-orbital pain that is aggravated by eye movement, loss of color vision, and contrast sensitivity that may progress to severe visual loss, an afferent pupillary defect (Marcus-Gunn pupil), and in some instances optic disc hyperemia and swelling. Inflammation may occur in the portion of the nerve within the globe (neuropapillitis or anterior optic neuritis) or the portion behind the globe (retrobulbar neuritis or posterior optic neuritis).
A nerve which originates in the lumbar and sacral spinal cord (L4 to S3) and supplies motor and sensory innervation to the lower extremity. The sciatic nerve, which is the main continuation of the sacral plexus, is the largest nerve in the body. It has two major branches, the TIBIAL NERVE and the PERONEAL NERVE.
The 9th cranial nerve. The glossopharyngeal nerve is a mixed motor and sensory nerve; it conveys somatic and autonomic efferents as well as general, special, and visceral afferents. Among the connections are motor fibers to the stylopharyngeus muscle, parasympathetic fibers to the parotid glands, general and taste afferents from the posterior third of the tongue, the nasopharynx, and the palate, and afferents from baroreceptors and CHEMORECEPTOR CELLS of the carotid sinus.
The 3d cranial nerve. The oculomotor nerve sends motor fibers to the levator muscles of the eyelid and to the superior rectus, inferior rectus, and inferior oblique muscles of the eye. It also sends parasympathetic efferents (via the ciliary ganglion) to the muscles controlling pupillary constriction and accommodation. The motor fibers originate in the oculomotor nuclei of the midbrain.
The nerves outside of the brain and spinal cord, including the autonomic, cranial, and spinal nerves. Peripheral nerves contain non-neuronal cells and connective tissue as well as axons. The connective tissue layers include, from the outside to the inside, the epineurium, the perineurium, and the endoneurium.
Traumatic injuries to the HYPOGLOSSAL NERVE.
The 5th and largest cranial nerve. The trigeminal nerve is a mixed motor and sensory nerve. The larger sensory part forms the ophthalmic, mandibular, and maxillary nerves which carry afferents sensitive to external or internal stimuli from the skin, muscles, and joints of the face and mouth and from the teeth. Most of these fibers originate from cells of the TRIGEMINAL GANGLION and project to the TRIGEMINAL NUCLEUS of the brain stem. The smaller motor part arises from the brain stem trigeminal motor nucleus and innervates the muscles of mastication.
The 6th cranial nerve which originates in the ABDUCENS NUCLEUS of the PONS and sends motor fibers to the lateral rectus muscles of the EYE. Damage to the nerve or its nucleus disrupts horizontal eye movement control.
The 8th cranial nerve. The vestibulocochlear nerve has a cochlear part (COCHLEAR NERVE) which is concerned with hearing and a vestibular part (VESTIBULAR NERVE) which mediates the sense of balance and head position. The fibers of the cochlear nerve originate from neurons of the SPIRAL GANGLION and project to the cochlear nuclei (COCHLEAR NUCLEUS). The fibers of the vestibular nerve arise from neurons of Scarpa's ganglion and project to the VESTIBULAR NUCLEI.
The 2nd cranial nerve which conveys visual information from the RETINA to the brain. The nerve carries the axons of the RETINAL GANGLION CELLS which sort at the OPTIC CHIASM and continue via the OPTIC TRACTS to the brain. The largest projection is to the lateral geniculate nuclei; other targets include the SUPERIOR COLLICULI and the SUPRACHIASMATIC NUCLEI. Though known as the second cranial nerve, it is considered part of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.
Slender processes of NEURONS, including the AXONS and their glial envelopes (MYELIN SHEATH). Nerve fibers conduct nerve impulses to and from the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.
A syndrome of congenital facial paralysis, frequently associated with abducens palsy and other congenital abnormalities including lingual palsy, clubfeet, brachial disorders, cognitive deficits, and pectoral muscle defects. Pathologic findings are variable and include brain stem nuclear aplasia, facial nerve aplasia, and facial muscle aplasia, consistent with a multifactorial etiology. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1020)
Mechanical compression of nerves or nerve roots from internal or external causes. These may result in a conduction block to nerve impulses (due to MYELIN SHEATH dysfunction) or axonal loss. The nerve and nerve sheath injuries may be caused by ISCHEMIA; INFLAMMATION; or a direct mechanical effect.
The 11th cranial nerve which originates from NEURONS in the MEDULLA and in the CERVICAL SPINAL CORD. It has a cranial root, which joins the VAGUS NERVE (10th cranial) and sends motor fibers to the muscles of the LARYNX, and a spinal root, which sends motor fibers to the TRAPEZIUS and the sternocleidomastoid muscles.
Traumatic injuries to the LARYNGEAL NERVE.
Paralysis of one or more of the ocular muscles due to disorders of the eye muscles, neuromuscular junction, supporting soft tissue, tendons, or innervation to the muscles.
Severe or complete loss of facial muscle motor function. This condition may result from central or peripheral lesions. Damage to CNS motor pathways from the cerebral cortex to the facial nuclei in the pons leads to facial weakness that generally spares the forehead muscles. FACIAL NERVE DISEASES generally results in generalized hemifacial weakness. NEUROMUSCULAR JUNCTION DISEASES and MUSCULAR DISEASES may also cause facial paralysis or paresis.
Renewal or physiological repair of damaged nerve tissue.
The 4th cranial nerve. The trochlear nerve carries the motor innervation of the superior oblique muscles of the eye.
A syndrome characterized by recurrent episodes of excruciating pain lasting several seconds or longer in the sensory distribution of the TRIGEMINAL NERVE. Pain may be initiated by stimulation of trigger points on the face, lips, or gums or by movement of facial muscles or chewing. Associated conditions include MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, vascular anomalies, ANEURYSMS, and neoplasms. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p187)
A general term most often used to describe severe or complete loss of muscle strength due to motor system disease from the level of the cerebral cortex to the muscle fiber. This term may also occasionally refer to a loss of sensory function. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p45)
Junction between the cerebellum and the pons.
Neoplasms of the base of the skull specifically, differentiated from neoplasms of unspecified sites or bones of the skull (SKULL NEOPLASMS).
Traumatic injuries to the facial nerve. This may result in FACIAL PARALYSIS, decreased lacrimation and salivation, and loss of taste sensation in the anterior tongue. The nerve may regenerate and reform its original pattern of innervation, or regenerate aberrantly, resulting in inappropriate lacrimation in response to gustatory stimuli (e.g., "crocodile tears") and other syndromes.
Traumatic injuries to the TROCHLEAR NERVE.
The 12th cranial nerve. The hypoglossal nerve originates in the hypoglossal nucleus of the medulla and supplies motor innervation to all of the muscles of the tongue except the palatoglossus (which is supplied by the vagus). This nerve also contains proprioceptive afferents from the tongue muscles.
A paraganglioma involving the glomus jugulare, a microscopic collection of chemoreceptor tissue in the adventitia of the bulb of the jugular vein. It may cause paralysis of the vocal cords, attacks of dizziness, blackouts, and nystagmus. It is not resectable but radiation therapy is effective. It regresses slowly, but permanent control is regularly achieved. (From Dorland, 27th ed; Stedman, 25th ed; DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, pp1603-4)
Interruption of NEURAL CONDUCTION in peripheral nerves or nerve trunks by the injection of a local anesthetic agent (e.g., LIDOCAINE; PHENOL; BOTULINUM TOXINS) to manage or treat pain.
Branch-like terminations of NERVE FIBERS, sensory or motor NEURONS. Endings of sensory neurons are the beginnings of afferent pathway to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. Endings of motor neurons are the terminals of axons at the muscle cells. Nerve endings which release neurotransmitters are called PRESYNAPTIC TERMINALS.
The dense rock-like part of temporal bone that contains the INNER EAR. Petrous bone is located at the base of the skull. Sometimes it is combined with the MASTOID PROCESS and called petromastoid part of temporal bone.
A branch of the tibial nerve which supplies sensory innervation to parts of the lower leg and foot.
An irregularly shaped venous space in the dura mater at either side of the sphenoid bone.
A major nerve of the upper extremity. In humans, the fibers of the median nerve originate in the lower cervical and upper thoracic spinal cord (usually C6 to T1), travel via the brachial plexus, and supply sensory and motor innervation to parts of the forearm and hand.
Treatment of muscles and nerves under pressure as a result of crush injuries.
Injuries to the PERIPHERAL NERVES.
The medial terminal branch of the sciatic nerve. The tibial nerve fibers originate in lumbar and sacral spinal segments (L4 to S2). They supply motor and sensory innervation to parts of the calf and foot.
The inferior region of the skull consisting of an internal (cerebral), and an external (basilar) surface.
A major nerve of the upper extremity. In humans, the fibers of the ulnar nerve originate in the lower cervical and upper thoracic spinal cord (usually C7 to T1), travel via the medial cord of the brachial plexus, and supply sensory and motor innervation to parts of the hand and forearm.
A visual symptom in which a single object is perceived by the visual cortex as two objects rather than one. Disorders associated with this condition include REFRACTIVE ERRORS; STRABISMUS; OCULOMOTOR NERVE DISEASES; TROCHLEAR NERVE DISEASES; ABDUCENS NERVE DISEASES; and diseases of the BRAIN STEM and OCCIPITAL LOBE.
The infratentorial compartment that contains the CEREBELLUM and BRAIN STEM. It is formed by the posterior third of the superior surface of the body of the sphenoid (SPHENOID BONE), by the occipital, the petrous, and mastoid portions of the TEMPORAL BONE, and the posterior inferior angle of the PARIETAL BONE.
A nerve originating in the lumbar spinal cord (usually L2 to L4) and traveling through the lumbar plexus to provide motor innervation to extensors of the thigh and sensory innervation to parts of the thigh, lower leg, and foot, and to the hip and knee joints.
Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.
The 31 paired peripheral nerves formed by the union of the dorsal and ventral spinal roots from each spinal cord segment. The spinal nerve plexuses and the spinal roots are also included.

Hypoglossal nerve injury as a complication of anterior surgery to the upper cervical spine. (1/228)

Injury to the hypoglossal nerve is a recognised complication after soft tissue surgery in the upper part of the anterior aspect of the neck, e.g. branchial cyst or carotid body tumour excision. However, this complication has been rarely reported following surgery of the upper cervical spine. We report the case of a 35-year-old woman with tuberculosis of C2-3. She underwent corpectomy and fusion from C2 to C5 using iliac crest bone graft, through a left anterior oblique incision. She developed hypoglossal nerve palsy in the immediate postoperative period, with dysphagia and dysarthria. It was thought to be due to traction neurapraxia with possible spontaneous recovery. At 18 months' follow-up, she had a solid fusion and tuberculosis was controlled. The hypoglossal palsy persisted, although with minimal functional disability. The only other reported case of hypoglossal lesion after anterior cervical spine surgery in the literature also failed to recover. It is concluded that hypoglossal nerve palsy following anterior cervical spine surgery is unlikely to recover spontaneously and it should be carefully identified.  (+info)

MR of CNS sarcoidosis: correlation of imaging features to clinical symptoms and response to treatment. (2/228)

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Sarcoidosis is an idiopathic systemic granulomatous disease, recognized in a patient when clinical and radiologic findings are confirmed by histopathologic analysis. The objective was to identify a relationship between MR imaging and clinical findings in CNS sarcoidosis. METHODS: The clinical charts of 461 patients with biopsy-proved sarcoidosis were reviewed retrospectively. Criteria for including patients in the study included those with symptoms referable to the CNS, excluding those with another explanation for their symptoms, those with headaches or other subjective complaints without accompanying objective findings, and those with peripheral neuropathy other than cranial nerve involvement or myopathy without CNS manifestations. Thirty-four of 38 patients whose conditions met the criteria for CNS sarcoidosis underwent a total of 82 MR examinations. The positive imaging findings were divided into categories as follows: pachymeningeal, leptomeningeal, nonenhancing brain parenchymal, enhancing brain parenchymal, cranial nerve, and spinal cord and nerve root involvement. Treatment response, clinical symptomatology, and any available histopathologic studies were analyzed with respect to imaging manifestations in each of the categories. RESULTS: Eighty-two percent of the patients with sarcoidosis with neurologic symptoms referable to the CNS had findings revealed by MR imaging. However, eight (40%) of 20 cranial nerve deficits seen at clinical examination of 13 patients were not seen at contrast-enhanced MR imaging, and 50% of the patients with symptoms referable to the pituitary axis had no abnormal findings on routine contrast-enhanced MR images. In contradistinction, 44% of 18 cranial nerves in nine patients with MR evidence of involvement had no symptoms referable to the involved cranial nerve. Clinical and radiologic deterioration occurred more commonly with leptomeningeal and enhancing brain parenchymal lesions. CONCLUSION: MR imaging can be used to confirm clinical suspicion and to show subclinical disease and the response of pathologic lesions to treatment.  (+info)

Clinical and MRI study of brain stem and cerebellar involvement in Japanese patients with multiple sclerosis. (3/228)

OBJECTIVES: To investigate the clinical and MRI features of brain stem and cerebellar lesions in Japanese patients with multiple sclerosis. METHODS: A retrospective study of 66 consecutive Japanese patients with multiple sclerosis (42 women and 24 men) was done by reviewing the medical records and MRI films. Forty nine patients were diagnosed as having clinically definite multiple sclerosis and 17 patients as having clinically probable multiple sclerosis according to Poser's criteria. Prevalence rates of each brain stem and cerebellar manifestation and frequency and distribution of MRI lesions in these patients were studied. RESULTS: Forty three patients (65%) had one or more infratentorial manifestations. Cranial nerves were clinically involved in 28 patients (42%), and most of the lesions were identified by MRI. Among them, manifestations of facial, trigeminal, and abducens nerves were relatively common. Cerebellar ataxia was found in 20 patients (30%). The MRI study showed that the lesions responsible for ataxia in these patients were mainly found in the cerebellar peduncles, but cerebellar hemispheric lesions were detected in only four patients (6.4%). CONCLUSION: The low frequency (6.4%) of the cerebellar MRI lesions in these patients is in sharp contrast with the figures reported for white patients with multiple sclerosis (50%-90%). Racial and genetic differences may have an influence on the susceptibility of each part of the CNS to demyelination in multiple sclerosis.  (+info)

CNS involvement in children with newly diagnosed non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. (4/228)

PURPOSE: To determine the frequency of CNS involvement at diagnosis of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), to characterize its pattern of presentation, and to determine its prognostic significance. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We reviewed the records of 445 children (1975 through 1995) diagnosed with NHL (small noncleaved cell NHL/B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia [SNCC NHL/B-ALL], 201 patients; lymphoblastic, 113; large cell, 119; other, 12). Tumor burden was estimated by serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) measurement and reclassification of disease stage irrespective of CNS involvement (modified stage). RESULTS: Thirty-six of 445 children with newly diagnosed NHL had CNS involvement (lymphoma cells in the CSF [n = 23], cranial nerve palsy [n = 9], both features [n = 4]), representing 13%, 7%, and 1% of small noncleaved cell lymphoma, lymphoblastic lymphoma, and large-cell cases, respectively. By univariate analysis, CNS disease at diagnosis did not significantly impact event-free survival (P =. 095), whereas stage and LDH did; however, children with CNS disease at diagnosis were at 2.0 times greater risk of death than those without CNS disease at diagnosis. In a multivariate analysis, CNS disease was not significantly associated with either overall or event-free survival, whereas both serum LDH and stage influenced both overall and event-free survival. Among cases of SNCC NHL/B-ALL, CNS disease was significantly associated with event-free and overall survival (univariate analysis); however, in multivariate analysis, only LDH had independent prognostic significance. Elevated serum LDH or higher modified stage were associated with a trend toward poorer overall survival among children with CNS disease. CONCLUSION: A greater tumor burden at diagnosis adversely influences the treatment outcome of children with NHL and CNS disease at diagnosis, suggesting a need for ongoing improvement in both systemic and CNS-directed therapy.  (+info)

Corneal structure and sensitivity in type 1 diabetes mellitus. (5/228)

PURPOSE: Corneal wound healing is impaired in diabetic cornea. The purpose of this study was to examine patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus for changes in corneal morphology and to correlate corneal sensitivity, subbasal nerve morphology, and degree of polyneuropathy with each other. METHODS: Forty-four eyes of 23 patients with diabetes and nine control eyes were included. Corneal sensitivity was tested with a Cochet-Bonnet esthesiometer (Luneau, Paris, France), and corneal morphology and epithelial and corneal thickness were determined by in vivo confocal microscopy. The density of subbasal nerves was evaluated by calculating the number of long subbasal nerve fiber bundles per confocal microscopic field. The degree of polyneuropathy was evaluated using the clinical part of the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument (MNSI) classification, and retinopathy was evaluated using fundus photographs. RESULTS: A reduction of long nerve fiber bundles per image was noted to have occurred already in patients with mild to moderate neuropathy, but corneal mechanical sensitivity was reduced only in patients with severe neuropathy. Compared with control subjects the corneal thickness was increased in patients with diabetes without neuropathy. The epithelium of patients with diabetes with severe neuropathy was significantly thinner than that of patients with diabetes without neuropathy. CONCLUSIONS: Confocal microscopy appears to allow early detection of beginning neuropathy, because decreases in nerve fiber bundle counts precede impairment of corneal sensitivity. Apparently, the cornea becomes thicker in a relatively early stage of diabetes but does not further change with the degree of neuropathy. A reduction in neurotrophic stimuli in severe neuropathy may induce a thin epithelium that may lead to recurrent erosions.  (+info)

An unusual case of multiple cranial nerve palsies in Wegener's granulomatosis. (6/228)

We describe an unusual case of Wegener's granulomatosis, which initially caused fulminant palsies affecting cranial nerves II, V, VI, VII, and VIII during a brief episode of the disease. The patient was successfully treated with immunosuppressive therapy. Wegener's granulomatosis should be suspected when multiple cranial nerves are initially affected.  (+info)

Corneal morphology and sensitivity in lattice dystrophy type II (familial amyloidosis, Finnish type). (7/228)

PURPOSE: To describe the corneal abnormalities and to measure different modalities of corneal sensitivity in corneal lattice dystrophy type II (familial amyloidosis, Finnish type, also known as gelsolin-related amyloidosis and originally as Meretoja syndrome). METHODS: Twenty eyes of 20 patients were examined by in vivo confocal microscopy and noncontact gas esthesiometry. RESULTS: Pleomorphism of, and dense deposits between or posterior to, the basal epithelial cells were frequently observed, as well as a reduction of long nerve fiber bundles in the subbasal nerve plexus. The anterior stroma was altered in most cases, with fibrosis and abnormal extracellular matrix. In 15 corneas, thick anterior and midstromal filaments, corresponding to lattice lines, and in 11 corneas, thin undulated structures were observed. The average mechanical sensitivity threshold of 12 subjects was increased, and in the remaining 8 subjects there was no response, even to the highest intensity of stimuli used. Three patients did not respond to CO(2), 11 to heat, and 2 to cold, but those patients who responded had normal thresholds. Patients with more long nerve fiber bundles per confocal microscopic image had better mechanical and cold sensitivity than patients with fewer nerve fiber bundles. CONCLUSIONS: Lattice lines seem to be related to amyloid material and not to corneal nerves. However, the subbasal nerve density appears reduced, which results mainly in a decrease in mechanical and, to a lesser extent, thermal sensitivity. The location of stromal filaments and undulated structures changes with increasing age.  (+info)

Parapharyngeal second branchial cyst manifesting as cranial nerve palsies: MR findings. (8/228)

SUMMARY: We report the MR findings of parapharyngeal branchial cleft cyst manifesting as multiple, lower cranial nerve palsies in a 35-year-old woman. On MR images, a well-marginated cystic mass was detected in the right parapharyngeal space, with displacement of both the right internal carotid artery and the right internal jugular vein on the posterolateral side. The cyst contained a whitish fluid that was slightly hyperintense on T1-weighted images and slightly hypointense to CSF on T2-weighted images. No enhancement on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images was present. The right side of the tongue showed high signal intensity on T2-weighted images, suggesting denervation.  (+info)

Dive into the research topics of An autopsy case of rhino-orbito-cerebral mucormycosis associated with multiple cranial nerve palsy and subsequent subarachnoid hemorrhage. Together they form a unique fingerprint. ...
Humans; Carcinoma, Squamous Cell; Brain Neoplasms; Cranial Nerve Neoplasms; Neoplasm Invasiveness; Cranial Nerve Diseases; Facial Nerve Diseases; Trigeminal Nerve Diseases; Aged; ...
Contributors SG contributed to the diagnosis and management of the case and in writing the first draft of the manuscript. AE contributed to diagnosis, management, the conceptualisation of the report and in writing and critique of the manuscript. SK contributed to the diagnosis and management of the case and in writing the first draft of the manuscript. MM was involved in the discussion of the clinicopathological conference (CPC), writing and critique of the manuscript. MCS was involved in histopathological diagnosis, discussion of the pathology part of the CPC and in writing and critique of the manuscript. KK was involved in histopathological diagnosis, discussion of the pathology part of the CPC and in writing and critique of the manuscript. AG was involved in radiological diagnosis and discussion and writing and critique of the manuscript. Madhavi Tripathi was involved in positron emission tomography-CT interpretation and writing and critique of the manuscript. AK was involved in performing ...
Cranial Neuropathies What are cranial neuropathies? Nerves power your entire body, but those nerves can be damaged by injury or an illness such as diabetes. Neuropathy is a disorder that causes nerve damage and affects your ability to feel and move. Exactly how your body and your movement are affected depends on where in the body the damaged nerves are located. When nerves in the brain or brainstem are affected, it is called cranial neuropathy. The cranial nerves are those that arise directly from your ...
Cranial Nerve Involvement, Large Ears, Otalgia Symptom Checker: Possible causes include Otitis Externa, Mastoiditis, Acoustic Neuroma. Check the full list of possible causes and conditions now! Talk to our Chatbot to narrow down your search.
article{9a3fcc76-7ff7-4e06-9659-b11bead8e138, abstract = {A 52-year-old man developed diplopia, a nasal voice, dysphagia, hoarseness and slight bilateral facial palsies. There was no ataxia, areflexia, limb weakness or sensory involvement. Serum anti-GQ1b IgG antibody was present. Treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin started, and the patient responded with a rapid resolution of symptoms. The diagnosis is consistent with polyneuritis cranialis which is considered to be a Guillain-Barre syndrome variant, a forme fruste, but very rare. The diagnosis can be difficult and a thorough investigation is required. Electrophysiological examination, laboratory evaluations, imaging and cerebrospinal fluid examination are often required in the investigations. Cranial neuropathy can be the presentation of many disorders. Determination of anti-ganglioside antibodies as anti-GQ1b is valuable to the diagnosis, and shows the association with the Guillain-Barre syndrome.}, author = {Edvardsson, Bengt and ...
FINAL DIAGNOSIS:. CMV ventriculo-encephalitis, polyradiculitis, and multiple cranial neuritis. DISCUSSION. CMV has been associated with a variety of central (CNS) and peripheral (PNS) nervous system syndromes in AIDS patients. Among the PNS syndromes, a rapidly progressive lumbosacral polyradiculopathy is the most frequent, occurring in about 1% of AIDS patients (1-6). Cranial nerve involvement in this PNS CMV syndrome has been mentioned only rarely and only in occasional nerves (7,8). Our case is unique in the presence of multiple cranial neuropathies resulting from direct infection of each with CMV. The manifestations of CMV ventricular encephalitis are consistent with this previously described distinct clinical-pathological entity known to occur in HIV-infected patients (9). Another unique aspect in this case is the discrepancy between the minimal MRI findings in the periventricular regions in the presence of diffuse necrotizing ventriculo-encephalitis. A possible explanation for this is the ...
In a prospective study of 271 new patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma, 36 (13.3%) were found to have cranial nerve involvement. Serous otitis media (SOM) was found in 98 (41.4%) of 237 patients who had undergone complete otologic assessment. The local control of tumor and actuarial survival of three subgroups of patients, namely, 80 patients with SOM only, 11 patients with cranial nerve palsy only, and 18 patients with both SOM and cranial nerve palsy, were analyzed. The local control of tumor was better in patients with SOM alone than in those with cranial nerve palsy alone; those patients with both SOM and cranial nerve involvement had worse local control as well as survival. As SOM is not uncommon in the diagnosis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and adult-onset SOM is otherwise distinctly uncommon, this provides a good opportunity for early recognition and, perhaps, better control of nasopharyngeal carcinoma ...
These authors contributed equally to this work DOI : 10.5137/1019-5149.JTN.7876-13.3 Cranial neuropathy is usually idiopathic and familial cases are uncommon. We describe a family with 5 members with cranial neuropathy over 3 generations. All affected patients were women, indicating an X-linked dominant or an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. Our cases and a review of the literature suggest that familial idiopathic cranial neuropathy is a rare condition which may be related to autosomal dominant vascular disorders (e.g. vascular tortuosity, sclerosis, elongation or extension), small posterior cranial fossas, anatomical variations of the posterior circulation, hypersensitivity of cranial nerves and other abnormalities. Moreover, microvascular decompression is the treatment of choice because vascular compression is the main factor in the pathogenesis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of familial cranial neuropathy in China. Keywords : Cranial nerves, Familial, ...
We observed that most CN palsies had 1 or more MRI findings of intracranial or orbital CN involvement; this may be a reason for the adverse prognostic significance of CN palsies, and patients with CN palsies are determined to be at stage T4.3. Several investigators have reported that the perineural tumor spread in patients with non-nasopharyngeal carcinoma of the head and neck is associated with an increased incidence of recurrence.18-21 However, in our series, MRI-detected CN involvement was not associated with the 3-year LRFS rate in NPC patients with local advanced disease. The primary treatment modality for NPC was radiation therapy, whereas that of other carcinomas of the head and neck was surgery. Lawrence and Cottel reported that postoperative radiotherapy of squamous cell carcinoma with perineural invasion resulted in a much improved survival probability when compared with that observed after conventional surgical excision.20 Radiation therapy (relatively large treatment volume) provided ...
Cranial nerve palsy is a type of muscle malfunction involving at least one of the cranial nerves. Those with cranial nerve palsy...
OBJECTIVES: Functional reorganisation of the motor or sensory cortex has been demonstrated in animals after section of mixed peripheral nerves. Here functional changes in the motor cortex specifically after peripheral motor denervation in humans are investigated. METHODS: Functional MRI (fMRI) was used to study brain activation during a finger flexion-extension task in patients with a late onset, acquired pure motor neuropathy (n=6), contrasting results with those from patients with pure sensory neuropathies (n=4) or healthy controls (n=7). RESULTS: Increases in the extent of activation in the motor cortex both ipsilateral and contralateral to the hand moved were found in the patients with motor neuropathy. The neuroanatomical localisation of the mixed contralateral sensorimotor cortex activation volume was more posterior for the patients with motor neuropathy than for the healthy controls (mean difference, 12 mm, p|0.05). The pure sensory neuropathy group by contrast showed no change in the extent of
The second cranial nerve is called the optic nerve. It sends visual information from the eye to the brain. The third cranial nerve is called the oculomotor nerve. It is involved with eye movement, eyelid movement, and the function of the pupil and lens. The fourth cranial nerve is called the trochlear nerve and the sixth cranial nerve is called the abducens nerve. They each innervate an eye muscle involved in eye movement. The fifth cranial nerve is called the trigeminal nerve. It provides facial sensation (including corneal sensation).. ...
S04.891 is a non-billable code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of injury of other cranial nerves, right side.
Anisocoria in the absence of orbital trauma. Abnormalities in a cranial nerve reflex indicate injury to the brainstem or the neural pathway connecting to the brainstem. Multiple cranial nerve deficits is highly suggestive of brainstem injury. The two most useful cranial nerve reflexes for rapid assessment of brainstem function are the gag reflex and the presence of physiologic nystagmus, otherwise known as the oculocephalic reflex. If these two reflexes are absent it strongly indicates significant brainstem injury and a guarded prognosis.. The segmental spinal reflexes should be evaluated when possible, without excessive manipulation of the patient. Abnormalities in thoracic and/or pelvic limb reflexes will help identify spinal trauma. Cases of brain injury without spinal injury tend to have normal or possibly exaggerated spinal reflexes.. Decerebrate posture: patient has opisthotonos and extensor rigidity of all four limbs. The animal is unresponsive and does not detect deep pain sensation. ...
List of 38 causes for 7th cranial nerve palsy and Arthritis in multiple joints in children and Respiratory muscle paralysis, alternative diagnoses, rare causes, misdiagnoses, patient stories, and much more.
List of causes of 7th cranial nerve palsy and Arthritis in multiple joints in children and Sensations, alternative diagnoses, rare causes, misdiagnoses, patient stories, and much more.
Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of Do patients with neurologically isolated ocular motor cranial nerve palsies require prompt neuroimaging?. Together they form a unique fingerprint. ...
List of causes of Abnormal patellar reflex and Cranial nerve palsy and Face symptoms and Focal seizure and Hyperreflexia and Paraplegia, alternative diagnoses, rare causes, misdiagnoses, patient stories, and much more.
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Publication Year and Month: 1997 05. Abstract: Here we report a case of a 56-year-old male with post-poliomyelitis muscular atrophy (PPMA), who presented with cranial nerve signs and widespread atrophy of the extremities. He had suffered from poliomyelitis at the age of 2 years. After recovery from the acute stage, the paralysis remained in his left arm. He noticed muscle weakness of the right upper and lower extremities at the age of 45 years and the muscle atrophy progressed to his arms, hip and thigh at the age of 55 years. Neurological examination revealed muscle atrophy of the neck and disturbance of left V, VIII, IX, X and bilateral XI cranial nerves. We diagnosed this case as PPMA from his history and electromyographic and muscle biopsy findings which suggested chronic denervation. Among the 21 PPMA cases in the past in which the acute poliomyelitis had resulted in paralysis of the only one limb, ours was the only case that had muscle atrophy of all the limbs. Cranial nerve involvement is ...
The present invention provides a composition for preventing, alleviating, or treating cranial nerve diseases caused by dopamine deficiency, the composition containing triiodidethyronine and tyroxine, or a salt thereof. According to the present invention, the triiodidethyronine and tyroxine, or a salt thereof significantly promote the expression and proliferation of dopamine neurons, thereby exhibiting excellent effects in the prevention and treatment of cranial nerve diseases caused by dopamine deficiency, such as Parkinson´s disease.
Rare: Occurs in only 5% of sarcoidosis Usually presents in pt with known sarcoid Usually other neuro manifestations also: Optic neuropathy / other cranial nerve deficits Encephalopathy Aseptic meningitis Motor weakness Peripheral neuropathy Consider as cause of isolated CN7 Palsy if: Recurrent palsies No improvement at all in facial weakness after 3 mos. Send to…
The MR changes that accompany cranial and peripheral motor denervation are well described and include asymmetrical decrease in affected muscle volume, fatty infiltration of the involved muscle group, and variable signal intensity changes, including both T2 prolongation and postcontrast enhancement (2, 3, 5, 7-9). While CT is able to demonstrate only the chronic changes of atrophy and fatty replacement (1), the superior soft tissue contrast of MR facilitates the depiction of the progressive evolution from an acute phase to a subacute and then to a chronic phase that denervated muscle may undergo. In some patients with peripheral neuropathy and either spontaneous resolution of paralysis or surgical nerve grafting, acute or subacute changes have been shown to be reversible on MR imaging, corroborating clinical evidence of reinnervation (7, 9). To our knowledge, this reversibility has not been demonstrated in the setting of cranial neuropathy, presumably because the processes that lead to MR ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Response of extra-axial tumors to stereotactically implanted high-activity 125l seeds. AU - Patil, Arun Angelo. AU - Kumar, Pradeep. AU - Leibrocka, Lyal G.. PY - 1995/1/1. Y1 - 1995/1/1. N2 - 125I seeds can deliver a very high dose of radiation (100-500 Gy) to a well-circumscribed area over their average life of 87 days, which enable them to destroy slow-growing extra-axial tumors after permanent implantation. Stereotactic implantation of 125I seeds was performed in 26 patients with extra-axial tumors, with a median follow-up of 32 months. No acute morbidity or mortality resulted from the procedure. Cranial nerve involvement in 5 patients was the only delayed complication. One patient developed radionecrosis outside the range of 125I dose distribution, which was felt to be due to the hyperfractionated external radiation the patient had received prior to 125I seed placement. All 26 patients showed tumor regression. The results indicate that this form of treatment is relatively ...
The act of swallowing is complex. Approximately 40 oral and pharyngeal (mouth and throat) muscles and multiple cranial nerves work together to accomplish two critical, life sustaining actions: breathing and swallowing. Weak oropharyngeal muscles can prevent effective and efficient transport of food, liquids and medication causing them to flow into an unprotected airway, also known as aspiration. Swallowing disorders, also known as dysphagia, are highly prevalent in stroke patients and are associated with increased mortality and morbidity, dehydration, pulmonary complications, and reduced rehabilitation potential. Therefore, it is critical to ensure Medicare patients have access to safe, effective therapies to improve their swallowing function, prevent further complications and continue to advance their rehabilitation ...
Diagnosis Code S04.891D information, including descriptions, synonyms, code edits, diagnostic related groups, ICD-9 conversion and references to the diseases index.
A Canadian non-profit registered charitable organization for those who suffer from TN or any other facial pain. Find disease info, a newsletter and links. ...
Germinomas typically arise in regions adjacent to the third ventricle, such as the pineal body and neurohypophysis, but they may be present also in the basal ganglia. Germinomas originating in the cerebellum are quite rare [5-11] (see Additional file 2: Table S1); in one study, only three of 153 intracranial GCTs were located in the cerebellum [12]. It is not difficult to diagnose intracranial GCTs when they have a typical location and radiographic features. However, an intracranial GCT located in the basal ganglia often is difficult to detect because enhancement is usually slight or absent [2]. Recent reports have emphasized the effectiveness of SWI in early detection of basal ganglia GCTs [13]. SWI can be used to detect blood products and accumulation of biologic metal, thereby providing additional information in evaluation of brain tumors. SWI may be useful also in the detection of intracranial GCTs, because this type of tumor is characterized by a high incidence of intra-tumor micro bleeds. ...
Viewed posteriorly the right kidney has its upper edge opposite the 11th dorsal spine and the lower edge of the 11th rib. Its lower edge is ...
21-year-old female with an acute onset of a unilateral sixth cranial nerve deficit. Brain MRI showed at least a dozen white matter lesions, one of them contrast-enhancing. Sensory evoked potentials showed a bilateral increase in latency. Multiple sclerosis was diagnosed, and the patient was treated by corticosteroids, followed by improvement of symptoms. The first follow-up revealed no focal neurological signs with a history of a transitory unilateral lower limb hyposthenia. On the second visit, a horizonto-rotatory nystagmus and irregular paraesthesia in the right toes are documented. ...
Lower cranial nerve (IX-XII) palsy is a rare condition with numerous causes, usually non-traumatic. In the literature it has been described only a few times after trauma, mostly accompanied by a fracture of the occipital condyle. Although these types of fractures have rarely been reported one could suspect they have been under-diagnosed. During the past decade they have been seen more frequently, most probably due to increased use of CT- and MRI-scanning. The purpose of this review is to increase the awareness of complications following injuries in the craniocervical region. We based this article on a retrospective review of the medical record of a 24-year old woman admitted to our trauma center after being involved in a car accident and a review of the literature on occipital condyle fractures associated with lower cranial nerve palsy. The multitraumatized patient had suffered a dislocated occipital condyle fracture. Months later she was diagnosed with palsy to cranial nerve IX-XII. Literature review
저자들은 경정맥공의 종양에 대해서 종전(2000년 이전)에는 종양의 크기와 상관없이 CWD 방법으로 수술하였으나, 최근(2000년 이후) 수술한 예들에서는 종양의 크기 및 위치, 종류에 따라 유양돌기 절제술의 방법과 안면 신경 전위의 위치를 다양하게 하여 가능한 한 기능적 보존을 시도하였다. 종전에 수술한 예는 JFS가 4예, 후두개저의 뇌수막종이 1예로서 종양의 평균 크기는 23.2 mm로 비교적 작은 크기의 종양이었지만 모두 CWD-1G 방법을 사용하여 종양에 접근하였다. 2000년 이후에 시행된 최근 증례로는 JFS가 5예, 경정맥 사구종이 2예, 연골육종이 1예가 있다. JFS 5예 중 3예는 CWU-2G를 시행하였고 종양의 평균 크기는 20.0 mm였으며, CWD-1G를 시행한 2예는 평균 크기 43.9 mm로 작은 크기의 종양에 대해서는 외이도 후벽을 보전하고 안면 신경의 조작을 최소화하려고 ...
We describe a rare neurological presentation of internal jugular vein thrombosis induced by central venous catheter placement in a patient with cancer. A 71-year-old man gave a 3-week history of dysphagia and dysarthria with left-sided neck pain and headache. He was receiving chemotherapy for appendiceal adenocarcinoma. On examination, he had left 9th-12th cranial neuropathies, manifesting as voice hoarseness, decreased palatal movement, absent gag reflex, weakness of scapular elevation and left-sided tongue wasting. CT scan of neck showed the left subclavian central venous catheter tip was in the left internal jugular vein. Skull base MRI showed thrombus within the left jugular foramen extending intracranially. We diagnosed Collet-Sicard syndrome secondary to thrombosis in the sigmoid-jugular venous complex. His headache and neck pain resolved 2 days after removing the catheter and starting anticoagulation. Collet-Sicard syndrome is an unusual syndrome of lower cranial nerve palsies, often ...
Although the cranial nerves and their sensory and. of the brainstem showing the cranial nerves.Which cranial nerve carries sensory fibers from taste receptors of.This is an article introducing the 12 cranial nerves. this nerve governs the ocular and sensory functions.. The Cranial Nerves (Organization of the Central Nervous. motor neuron lesion of this cranial nerve (described in the following.The patient complains of decreased sense of taste (3 cranial nerves).Nerve - Cranial Nerve 9,10 The functions of the. 2004 - 08 Cranial Nerves.The olfactory nerve is a special sensory cranial nerve that ...
MalaCards based summary : Schwannoma of Twelfth Cranial Nerve, also known as schwannoma of the twelfth cranial nerve, is related to neurilemmoma and plexiform schwannoma. An important gene associated with Schwannoma of Twelfth Cranial Nerve is NF2 (Neurofibromin 2). Affiliated tissues include 12th cranial nerve, tongue and thymus, and related phenotypes are Decreased cell migration and Increased cell migration ...
We report a 55-year-old man who presented with a moderately severe community acquired pneumonia due to Chlamydia psittaci, probably acquired from budgerigars. One of his presenting symptoms was diplopia, secondary to bilateral 4th cranial nerve palsies, which persisted for some months. The literature on neurological complications of pneumonia is reviewed.
List of 28 causes for 7th cranial nerve palsy and Beaus lines in children and Beaus lines in children - toenail and Paraesthesia of the lower extremity, alternative diagnoses, rare causes, misdiagnoses, patient stories, and much more.
Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of Cranial neuropathy and severe pain due to early disseminated Borrelia burgdorferi infection. Together they form a unique fingerprint. ...
Heres Everything You Need To Know About The Cranial Nerves - How Many Cranial Nerves Are There And The Cranial Nerves Function. How To Remember Cranial Nerves, In Order And Labeled. Learn About Brainstem
Definition of Cranial nerve nucleus in the Legal Dictionary - by Free online English dictionary and encyclopedia. What is Cranial nerve nucleus? Meaning of Cranial nerve nucleus as a legal term. What does Cranial nerve nucleus mean in law?
Nerve conduction defects (weakness/paralysis of limbs, loss of reflexes, tingling sensations in the extremities); severe headaches; stiff neck; meningitis; dizziness; fainting; cranial nerve involvement (change in smell/taste; difficulty chewing, swallowing, or speaking; hoarseness or vocal cord problems; facial paralysis known as Bells palsy; drooping shoulders; inability to turn head; double vision); abnormal brain waves or seizures; sleep disorders; cognitive changes (memory problems, confusion, disorientation, decreased concentration); behavioral changes (depression, personality changes, panic attacks); mental illness (sudden onset with no previous history of mental illness).. Heart and Blood Vessels ...
Onset of first symptom has been reported between 1-12 years, with a mean age of onset at 8 years. Clinical course can be divided into early (, 6 yrs age, predominance of respiratory symptoms) and late course (6-20 years of age, predominance of motor symptoms on superior limbs). Progression to involve other cranial nerve muscles occurs over a period of months or years. In the Gomez review facial nerve was affected in all cases while hypoglossal nerve was involved in all except one case. Other cranial nerves involved were vagus, trigeminal, spinal accessory nerve, abducent, occulomotor and glossopharyngeal in this order. Corticospinal tract signs were found in 2 of the 14 patients. The disease may progress to patients death in a period as short as 9 months or may have a slow evolution or may show plateaus. Post mortem examination of cases have found depletion of nerve cells in the nuclei of cranial nerves. The histologic alterations found in patient with Fazio-Londe disease were identical to ...
RESULTS: Primary CNSL was typically localized supratentorially (63%), with multiple (59%) or infiltrative (36%) lesions showing diffusion restriction (98%), often (87%) reaching the brain surface. In approximately 50% of patients, meningeal, ependymal or cranial nerve involvement was found. We detected significant differences in enhancement patterns between immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients; non-homogenous enhancement present in 50% of immunocompromised patients. We did not find any significant differences in MRI appearance between primary and secondary CNSL. Regression was evident after corticosteroid treatment in 52% of patients; however, in 16% of cases overall progression was observed ...
The mean follow-up duration was 84 months (median 75.5 months, range 24-216 months). In 118 patients (86%), the tumor volume was unchanged or had decreased at last follow-up. Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated radiographic progression-free survival at 5 and 10 years to be 95.4% and 69%, respectively. Fourteen patients (10%) developed new cranial nerve palsies following GKS. Factors associated with tumor control included younger age, a higher isodose, and smaller tumor volume. A longer follow-up duration was associated with either a decrease or increase in tumor volume. Fourteen patients (10%) experienced new or worsening cranial nerve deficits after treatment. Factors associated with this occurrence were larger pretreatment tumor volume, lower peripheral radiation dose, lower maximum dose, tumor progression, and longer follow-up. ...
Case Reports in Infectious Diseases is a peer-reviewed, Open Access journal that publishes case reports related to infectious diseases of bacterial, viral and parasitic origin.
Cranial Nerve 1- Olfaction This patient has difficulty identifying the smells presented. Loss of smell is anosmia. The most common cause is a cold (as in this patient) or nasal allergies. Other causes include trauma or a meningioma affecting the olfactory tracts. Anosmia is also seen in Kallman syndrome because of agenesis of the olfactory bulbs. Cranial Nerve 2- Visual acuity This patientâs visual acuity is being tested with a Rosenbaum chart. First the left eye is tested, then the right eye. He is tested with his glasses on so this represents corrected visual acuity. He has 20/70 vision in the left eye and 20/40 in the right. His decreased visual acuity is from optic nerve damage. Cranial Nerve II- Visual field The patients visual fields are being tested with gross confrontation. A right sided visual field deficit for both eyes is shown. This is a right hemianopia from a lesion behind the optic chiasm involving the left optic tract, radiation or striate cortex. Cranial Nerve II- Fundoscopy ...
Multiple cranial nerves may be involved (nerves V, VI, VII, IX, X, and XII can all be affected) and lead to orofacial malformations, abnormalities of tongue coordination, swallowing (bulbar muscle weakness), and drooling. Speech abnormalities are common. High risk for corneal abrasions. Usually the affected individuals are mentally normal. However, there is a 10% incidence of mild mental retardation. Occasionally peripheral neuropathy and pectoral muscle deficiency. Abnormalities of ventilation (central hypoventilation and idiopathic tachypnea) presumably result from brainstem abnormalities. Craniofacial features include micrognathia ...
The problem of diagnosing vasculitic neuropathy is discussed based on case reports of two patients with Wegeners granulomatosis. One patient developed de novo 6(th) nerve palsy as an isolated relapse manifestation and the second patient a sequence o
Overall tumor control was achieved in 93.4% of patients at last follow-up; actuarial tumor control was 98%, 95%, 91%, and 85% at 3, 5, 8, and 10 years postradiosurgery, respectively. Smaller adenoma volume (OR 1.08 [95% CI 1.02-1.13], p = 0.006) and absence of suprasellar extension (OR 2.10 [95% CI 0.96-4.61], p = 0.064) were associated with progression-free tumor survival. New or worsened hypopituitarism after radiosurgery was noted in 21% of patients, with thyroid and cortisol deficiencies reported as the most common postradiosurgery endocrinopathies. History of prior radiation therapy and greater tumor margin doses were predictive of new or worsening endocrinopathy after GKS. New or progressive cranial nerve deficits were noted in 9% of patients; 6.6% had worsening or new onset optic nerve dysfunction. In multivariate analysis, decreasing age, increasing volume, history of prior radiation therapy, and history of prior pituitary axis deficiency were predictive of new or worsening cranial nerve ...
Aims and Objective: To evaluate the clinical and pathological characteristics of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients seen in the Radiotherapy and Oncology department, Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Nigeria. Materials and Methods: Between January 2006 and December 2010, 45 patients with histologically confirmed NPC were seen and evaluated irrespective of age, co-morbidity and performance status. Patients folders were reviewed retrospectively with a structured pro forma. Data were analyzed using Epi Info software and results presented in simple tables. Results: A total of 45 patients had NPC accounting for 2%. The mean age was 42 years (range 15-75 years). The sex ratio was M:F = 2.2:1. 21 of the patients were from North-West geopolitical zone. Hausa-Fulani was the predominant ethnic group in 23 patients. At presentation, 41 had neck mass followed by nasal blockage in 34, cranial nerve deficits in 27 and epistaxis in 25 (55.6%) patients. The commonest cranial nerves affected were ...
Introduction Examination of the cranial nerves allows one to view the brainstem all the way from its rostral to caudal extent. The brainstem can be divided into three levels, the midbrain, the pons and the medulla. The cranial nerves for each of these are: 2 for the midbrain (CN 3 & 4), 4 for the pons (CN 5-8), and 4 for the medulla (CN 9-12). It is important to remember that cranial nerves never cross (except for one exception, the 4th CN) and clinical findings are always on the same side as the cranial nerve involved. Cranial nerve findings when combined with long tract findings (corticospinal and somatosensory) are powerful for localizing lesions in the brainstem. Cranial Nerve 1 Olfaction is the only sensory modality with direct access to cerebral cortex without going through the thalamus. The olfactory tracts project mainly to the uncus of the temporal lobes. Cranial Nerve 2 This cranial nerve has important localizing value because of its x axis course from the eye to the occipital ...
Do You Have Cranial Nerve Vii Diseases? Join friendly people sharing true stories in the I Have Cranial Nerve VII Diseases group. Find support forums, advice and chat with groups who share this life experience. Cranial Nerve VII Diseases anonymous su...
The next time youre trying to remember the locations and functions of the cranial nerves, picture this drawing. All twelve cranial nerves are represented, though some may be a little harder to spot than others. For example, the shoulders are formed by the number 11 because cranial nerve XI controls neck and shoulder movement. If you immediately recognize that the sides of the face and the top of the head are formed by the number 7, youre well on your way to using this memory device.. Tags: nerfs craniensneurologieneurology. ...
Diabetes accounts for approximately one-third of cases of neovascular glaucoma. Neovascular glaucoma is a rare type of glaucoma that often results in visual loss. Neovascular glaucoma can occur when new blood vessels grow on the iris, closing off fluid flow in the eye and raising the eye pressure. It can be very difficult to treat, which is why those with diabetes should get their eyes examined on a regular basis.. In addition, people with diabetes are 60 percent more likely to develop cataracts, which is a serious condition that causes the eyes lens to cloud and interfere with normal vision. Cataracts is a condition that tends to develop at an earlier age in people with diabetes.. Those with diabetes are also more at risk for developing microvascular cranial nerve palsies. Microvascular cranial nerve palsies involve the small bloods vessels that affect the muscles that move the eyes. Symptoms of this condition include not being about to move the eyes in different directions, causing double ...
Brainstem cavernous malformations (CMs) pose significant challenges to neurosurgeons because of their deep locations and high surgical risks. Most patients with brainstem CMs present with sudden-onset cranial nerve deficits or ataxia, but uncommonly patients can present in extremis from an acute hemorrhage, requiring surgical intervention. However, the timing of surgery for brainstem CMs has been a controversial topic. Although many authors propose delaying surgery into the subacute phase, some patients may not tolerate waiting until surgery. To the best of the authors knowledge, emergency surgery after a brainstem CM hemorrhage has not been described. In cases of rapidly progressive neurological deterioration, emergency resection may often be the only option. In this retrospectively reviewed small series of patients, the authors report favorable outcomes after emergency surgery for resection of brainstem CMs. ...
EHV-1 usually manifests as a respiratory disease, but can occasionally mutate to a form that affects the nervous system. Infected horses may develop symptoms such as weakness or paralysis of the hind legs giving rise to the dog-sitting position, loss of tail and anal tone, inability to urinate or defecate, urine dribbling, cranial nerve deficits, recumbency, and death. No specific treatment is available for EHV-1, but general supportive therapy and care can aid recovery of affected horses. Anti-inflammatory agents may be helpful in minimizing damage to the spinal cord. The human drug acyclovir was used in a recent EHV-1 outbreak in Ohio, and efficacy of this treatment seems promising. ...
The disease in these patients may be newly acquired or a reactivation. It may be characterized as follows: CNS toxoplasmosis occurs in 50% of patients - Seizure, dysequilibrium, cranial nerve deficit... more
The tumour is slow growing and symptoms are often present for some time prior to diagnosis. Symptoms relate to the site; sacral tumours present with pain and sacral neuropathy; clival tumours with headache and cranial neuropathies (usually ocular), and spine tumours with pain and neuropathy.. ...
Clinic staff had diluted a 100-?g vial of pure neurotoxin with diluent and drew up the resulting solution into syringes for clinical use. The physician working at the clinic administered 4 case-patients (including himself) 4 to 6 injections of this toxin solution in the facial area. All the patients eventually reported symptoms of progressive weakness and cranial neuropathies (abnormality of the nerves that control a number of functions, including movement of the facial muscles and swallowing), with two patients experiencing shortness of breath.. The researchers report the patients may have received doses 2,857 times the estimated human lethal dose by injection. Pretreatment serum toxin levels in 3 of the 4 case-patients were equivalent to 21 to 43 times the estimated human lethal dose; pretreatment serum from the fourth epidemiologically linked case-patient was not available. A 100-?g vial of toxin taken from the same manufacturers lot as toxin administered to the case-patients contained a ...
NEURONAL NUCLEAR ANTIBODIES. Antineuronal Nuclear Antibody-Type 1 (ANNA-1). ,1:240. Antineuronal Nuclear Antibody-Type 2 (ANNA-2). ,1:240. Antineuronal Nuclear Antibody-Type 3 (ANNA-3). ,1:240. Anti-Glial/Neuronal Nuclear Antibody-Type 1 (AGNA-1). ,1:240. NEURONAL AND MUSCLE CYTOPLASMIC ANTIBODIES. Purkinje Cell Cytoplasmic Antibody, Type 1 (PCA-1). ,1:240. Purkinje Cell Cytoplasmic Antibody, Type 2 (PCA-2). ,1:240. Purkinje Cell Cytoplasmic Antibody, Type Tr (PCA-Tr). ,1:240. Amphiphysin Antibody. ,1:240. CRMP-5-IgG. ,1:240. Note: Titers lower than 1:240 are detectable by recombinant CRMP-5 Western blot analysis. CRMP-5 Western blot analysis will be done on request on stored serum (held 4 weeks). This supplemental testing is recommended in cases of chorea, vision loss, cranial neuropathy, and myelopathy. Call the Neuroimmunology Laboratory at 800-533-1710 or 507-266-5700 to request CRMP-5 Western blot.. Neuron-restricted patterns of IgG staining that do not fulfill criteria for amphiphysin, ...
Since the pre-IMRT era, re-irradiation has been shown to be effective in non-metastatic, recurrent NPC (rNPC) patients after primary RT.45 46 47 With its introduction, IMRT has quickly emerged as the radiation modality of choice for rNPC as well, with or without the use of chemotherapy. Its efficacy has been established in various studies, with documented long-term OS rates ranging from 45% to 65%.48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 Yet, most of the patients in those studies were treated with conventional 2D-RT in the pre-IMRT era. In a recent study conducted by Kong et al,56 77 patients received salvage IMRT for rNPC after a definitive course of primary IMRT. While the median OS and PFS were 37.0 and 20.5 months, respectively, of particular note is the re-irradiation toxicity. Of 34 patients, 18 died from treatment-induced severe adverse effects without evidence of disease progression during the study, including mucosal necrosis, temporal lobe necrosis, and cranial neuropathy,56 reflecting the ...
Now, take a look at what I call cranial nerve maps. These are icons of cranial nerves, their branches, what they supply and what foramina they use. Sensory is yellow and motor is red. Solid red is for skeletal muscle. Dashed red is for parasympathetic fibers. You sort of have to memorize which nerves have motor or sensory or both modalities, then consider what part of the head and neck is involved with each nerve. For example, when you look at the olfactory road map, you will see that it is yellow which means it is purely sensory. Then you consider what kind of sensation of picked up in the periphery which, in this case, is smell. The smell impulses then go back to the central nervous system. If there is red included in the map, that means that something will receive efferent fibers and will either contract or secrete. The impulse starts out in the central nervous system and passes out to a muscle or gland. ...
Ok then. Lets get back to our slide and make sure that you are comfortable and familiar with what we see here in this slide and that you know what the 12 cranial nerves are and the 10 that connect to the brain stem in particular for this lesson. Now notice that in this figure theres a color code and the color code is meant. To help you understand which nerves are purely sensory. Which are purely motor. And then, which nerves. Like, most of our spinal nerves have a mixture of sensory and motor axons within them. Well, that may seem, perhaps, surprising that there would be nerves that are mixed for sensation, and. Motor output but that is the case for our spinal nerves and it is the case, as you can see by the abundance of green nerves here, for several of the cranial nerves. So that suggests that there must be some complex relationship between the brain stem and the nerves. And often that is the case. So what I want to help you with next is to understand, how do these nerves connect up with the ...
Ok then. Lets get back to our slide and make sure that you are comfortable and familiar with what we see here in this slide and that you know what the 12 cranial nerves are and the 10 that connect to the brain stem in particular for this lesson. Now notice that in this figure theres a color code and the color code is meant. To help you understand which nerves are purely sensory. Which are purely motor. And then, which nerves. Like, most of our spinal nerves have a mixture of sensory and motor axons within them. Well, that may seem, perhaps, surprising that there would be nerves that are mixed for sensation, and. Motor output but that is the case for our spinal nerves and it is the case, as you can see by the abundance of green nerves here, for several of the cranial nerves. So that suggests that there must be some complex relationship between the brain stem and the nerves. And often that is the case. So what I want to help you with next is to understand, how do these nerves connect up with the ...
Free pdf of cranial nerves, with emphasis on those that relate to voice & swallowing. Patients dysphagia need a full exam of their cranial nerves.
Cranial Nerve Examination - Free download as Word Doc (.doc), PDF File (.pdf), Text File (.txt) or read online for free. Guide to cranial nerve examination
Cranial nerve damage can cause sensory, motor function and parasympathetic abnormalities, depending on which of the 12 cranial nerves are affected. Read this informative article to learn about damage results and treatment options.
The cranial nerves originate in the brain and have power over some of the most important neurological functions of the body. Cranial nerves relay information between the brain and parts of the body, primarily to and from regions of the head and neck.
The cranial nerves are a set of 12 nerves which emerge directly from the brain. The names of the cranial nerves relate to their function and they are also numerically identified in roman numerals I-XII by their specific location of the brain and by the order in which they exit the cranium.
There are many cranial nerve mnemonics that can be memorable and rude/lewd. Either way, they can be helpful for remembering the names of the twelve cranial nerves, as well as remembering which nerves are sensory, motor, or both. Remembering cran...
Upledger Institute UK Cranial Nerves Wallchart [cnchart] - This beautiful wall-sized chart designed by Jean-Pierre Barral, D.O. and Alain Croibier, D.O. allows you to see the cranial nerves you can access in treatment in vivid detail. The full-color illustration highlights the nerves, their exit points through the
Can you find the cranial nerves in this puzzle? Print out this page, then circle all cranial nerve names that you find. The words can be up, down or backwards. There are also a few cranial nerves MISSING from this puzzle. Do you know which ones are missing? For more information of the cranial nerves, go the Cranial Nerve Page. Here is the puzzle: ...
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by [email protected] , Sep 1, 2017 , cranial nerves, dysphagia, patient care, Podcast. Todays Swallow Your Pride guest is Tiffani Wallace! Tiffani is one of my most favorite people in this world, shes board certified in swallowing, a blogger, author, presenter, and speaker. She created the Dysphagia Ramblings blog, DysphagiaTherapy Group ...
Study Flashcards On [visual] Cranial Nerves & Brainstem at Cram.com. Quickly memorize the terms, phrases and much more. Cram.com makes it easy to get the grade you want!
Study Flashcards On Cranial Nerves, Brainstem Location and Nuclei at Cram.com. Quickly memorize the terms, phrases and much more. Cram.com makes it easy to get the grade you want!
We wouldnt be able to talk, taste, chew, or swallow without the cranial nerves of our face and mouth. Find out how these nerves help us move our...
Diseases of the Seventh Cranial Nerve". In Dyck PJ, Thomas PK (eds.). Peripheral Neuropathy (Fourth ed.). Philadelphia: W.B. ... Facial nerve". In Barral JP, Croibier A (eds.). Manual Therapy for the Cranial Nerves. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone. pp. ... The facial nerve passes close to the mastoid process. The inner surface of the mastoid portion presents a deep, curved groove, ...
Another condition that produces similar symptoms is a cranial nerve disease. Treatment depends on the type of strabismus and ... The extraocular muscles are controlled by cranial nerves III, IV, and VI. An impairment of cranial nerve III causes the ... Impairment of cranial nerve IV, which can be congenital, causes the eye to drift up and perhaps slightly inward. Sixth nerve ... Increased cranial pressure can compress the nerve as it runs between the clivus and brain stem.[page needed] Also, if the ...
"Simultaneous involvement of third and sixth cranial nerve in a patient with Lyme disease". Neuroradiology. 45 (2): 85-7. doi: ... Magnetic resonance imaging allows direct visualization of the cranial nerves. Furthermore, it provides significant information ... Damage to the peripheral nerves, along with injury to the chorda tympani branch of the facial nerve, also cause dysgeusia. A ... For example, the blink reflex may be used to evaluate the integrity of the trigeminal nerve-pontine brainstem-facial nerve ...
... fourth cranial nerve), which controls the action of the superior oblique muscle in the eye.[2] By 1998, there had been only one ... Diagnosis is most often made by the elimination of other conditions, disorders or diseases. Onset usually occurs in adulthood, ... The interposition of a Teflon pad between the trochlear nerve and a compressing artery and vein at the nerve's exit from the ... In 1983, Bringewald postulated that superior oblique myokymia resulted from vascular compression of the trochlear nerve ( ...
"Lyme Disease Data and surveillance". Lyme Disease. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2019-02-05. Retrieved April 12, ... Radiculopathy, also commonly referred to as pinched nerve, refers to a set of conditions in which one or more nerves are ... "Lyme Disease risk areas map". Risk of Lyme disease to Canadians. Government of Canada. 2015-01-27. Retrieved May 8, 2019.. ... However, the pain or other symptoms often radiate to the part of the body served by that nerve. For example, a nerve root ...
"Cranial nerve involvement in CMT disease type 1 due to early growth response 2 gene mutation". Neurology. 54 (8): 1696-8. doi: ... partial fusion of the trigeminal nerve (V) with the facial (VII) and auditory (VII) nerves, the proximal nerve roots coming off ... Mutations in this gene are associated with the autosomal dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, type 1D, Dejerine-Sottas disease ... It is later expressed in the neural crest derived cells of the cranial ganglion. The protein encoded by Krox20 contains two ...
"Histopathology of eighth cranial nerve of mass stranded dolphins at Goto Islands, Japan". Journal of Wildlife Diseases. 28 (4 ... one case report of strandings in Japan's Goto Islands has been associated with parasitic neuropathy of the eighth cranial nerve ...
Disease of the VIIIth cranial nerve the N. Vestibulocochlearis through trauma, infection, inflammation or neoplasia ... The main innervation to these muscles is from cranial nerve XI (the accessory nerve) but the second, third and fourth cervical ... Torticollis may be unrelated to the sternocleidomastoid muscle, instead caused by damage to the trochlear nerve (fourth cranial ... IV cranial nerve palsy, nystagmus-associated "null position," etc.). ...
... head trauma and inflammatory diseases of the cranial nerves (sarcoidosis, brucellosis, etc.). In these conditions, the ... Bell's palsy occurs due to a malfunction of the facial nerve (VII cranial nerve), which controls the muscles of the face. ... Facial nerve: the facial nerve's nuclei are in the brainstem (they are represented in the diagram as a „θ"). Orange: nerves ... It results from a dysfunction of cranial nerve VII (the facial nerve).[1] Many believe that this is due to a viral infection ...
In Australia, however, it is a more severe disease with cranial nerve effects, and death can occur in 1 to 2 days. Toxic ... It can cause Horner's syndrome, facial nerve paralysis, and femoral nerve, tibial nerve, radial nerve, trigeminal nerve, or ... "Diseases of the Peripheral Nerve and Neuromuscular Junction: Degenerative Diseases". The Merck Veterinary Manual. 2006. ... "Diseases of the Peripheral Nerve and Neuromuscular Junction: Metabolic Disorders". The Merck Veterinary Manual. 2006. Retrieved ...
... silvery-blonde scalp hair Cranial nerve paralysis, moyamoya disease, stroke, intellectual disability Treatment of Roberts ... John Bingham Roberts (1852-1924) of Philadelphia, who reported the disease characteristics in 1919. Roberts reported a disease ... Carriers for the disorder are heterozygotes due to the autosomal recessive nature of the disease. Carriers are also not at risk ... The prognosis of the disease depends on the malformations, as the severity of the malformations correlates with survival. The ...
... infection in rabbits Inner ear infection Hypothyroidism in dogs Disease of the VIIIth cranial nerve the N. Vestibulocochlearis ... The main innervation to these muscles is from cranial nerve XI (the accessory nerve) but the second, third and fourth cervical ... instead caused by damage to the trochlear nerve (fourth cranial nerve), which supplies the superior oblique muscle of the eye. ... IV cranial nerve palsy, nystagmus-associated "null position," etc.). Differential diagnosis for torticollis includes Cranial ...
In general, these diseases affect other cranial nerves as well. Isolated damage to the fourth nerve is uncommon in these ... The trochlear nerve (/ˈtrɒklɪər/), also called the fourth cranial nerve or CN IV, is a motor nerve (a somatic efferent nerve) ... The nuclei of other cranial nerves generally affect ipsilateral structures (for example, the optic nerves - cranial nerves II ... The trochlear nerve is unique among the cranial nerves in several respects: It is the smallest nerve in terms of the number of ...
Sowka JW, Gurwood AS, Kabat AG (2000-2001). "Cranial Nerve VI Palsy". Handbook of Ocular Disease Management. Jobson Publishing ... Sixth nerve palsy, or abducens nerve palsy, is a disorder associated with dysfunction of cranial nerve VI (the abducens nerve ... fibers of the seventh cranial nerve wrap around the VIth nerve nucleus, and, if this is also affected, a VIth nerve palsy with ... The unilateral abducens nerve palsy is the most common of the isolated ocular motor nerve palsies. The nerve dysfunction ...
Trauma to the skull, disease of bone, such as Paget's disease, and injury to nerves during surgery are other causes of nerve ... Cranial nerve mnemonics Standring, Susan; Borley, Neil R. (2008). "Overview of cranial nerves and cranial nerve nuclei". Gray's ... Some considered there to be thirteen pairs of cranial nerves, including cranial nerve zero. The numbering of the cranial nerves ... The nerves are: the olfactory nerve (I), the optic nerve (II), oculomotor nerve (III), trochlear nerve (IV), trigeminal nerve ( ...
The facial nerve is the seventh of 12 cranial nerves. This cranial nerve controls the muscles in the face. Facial nerve palsy ... Cranial nerve disease is an impaired functioning of one of the twelve cranial nerves. Although it could theoretically be ... Eyes Oculomotor nerve palsy - Oculomotor nerve (III) Fourth nerve palsy - Trochlear nerve (IV) Sixth nerve palsy - Abducens ... Facial nerve (VII) (More on facial nerve palsy below) Accessory nerve disorder - Accessory nerve (XI) Pavlou, E., Gkampeta, A ...
... and Other Cranial Nerve Disorders Chapter 434: Diseases of the Spinal Cord Chapter 435: Concussion and Other Traumatic Brain ... Pulmonic Valve Disease Chapter 263: Multiple and Mixed Valvular Heart Disease Chapter 264: Congenital Heart Disease in the ... Diseases of the Aorta Chapter 275: Arterial Diseases of the Extremities Chapter 276: Chronic Venous Disease and Lymphedema ... Diseases of the Esophagus Chapter 317: Peptic Ulcer Disease and Related Disorders Chapter 318: Disorders of Absorption Chapter ...
Symptoms: Fever, arthritis, neuroborreliosis, erythema migrans, cranial nerve palsy, carditis, fatigue, and influenza-like ... Diseases and Conditions. Mayo Clinic.. *^ Mayo Clinic Staff. "Lyme disease: Treatments and drugs". MayoClinic.com. Diseases and ... Tickborne Diseases-National Center for Infectious Diseases (CDC). *Tickborne Disease Website-Massachusetts Department of Public ... Major tick-borne diseases include: Bacterial[edit]. *Lyme disease or borreliosis *Organism: Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato ( ...
Other neurological complications from cranial nerve involvement are reported as ataxia, facial palsy, and sensorineural hearing ... "Kawasaki disease". Stanford Children's Health. Kawasaki disease research program Kawasaki disease foundation "Kawasaki disease ... Children with Kawasaki disease should be hospitalized and cared for by a physician who has experience with this disease. In an ... Wright H, Waddington C, Geddes J, Newburger JW, Burgner D (September 2008). "Facial nerve palsy complicating Kawasaki disease ...
... cranial nerve palsies associated with an enlarging skull, and malignant transformation of a tumor of the radius which ... About 15 percent of people with Paget's disease also have a family member with the disease. In cases where the disease is ... Paget's disease affecting the skull may lead to loss of hearing in one or both ears due to compression of the nerves in the ... Rarely, skull involvement may lead to compression of the nerves that supply the eye, leading to vision loss. Paget's disease is ...
... cranial nerve V), sensorineural hearing loss, and headaches observed in patients with MCTD. [citation needed] ... Renal disease: The absence of severe renal disease is a marker of MCTD. Membranous nephropathy can be observed in some cases.[ ... Mixed connective tissue disease commonly abbreviated as MCTD, is an autoimmune disease characterized by the presence of ... Absence of severe renal or CNS disease.. Several criteria have been described to standardize the diagnosis of the disease, some ...
... head trauma and inflammatory diseases of the cranial nerves (sarcoidosis, brucellosis, etc.). In these conditions, the ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved April 12, 2019.. *^ "Lyme disease rashes and look-alikes". Lyme Disease. ... Bell's palsy is the result of a malfunction of the facial nerve (cranial nerve VII), which controls the muscles of the face. ... Facial nerve: the facial nerve's nuclei are in the brainstem (represented in the diagram by "θ"). Orange: nerves coming from ...
Other cranial nerves involved were vagus, trigeminal, spinal accessory nerve, abducent, occulomotor and glossopharyngeal in ... Post mortem examination of cases have found depletion of nerve cells in the nuclei of cranial nerves. The histologic ... Progression to involve other cranial nerve muscles occurs over a period of months or years. In the Gomez review facial nerve ... disease of children and young adults and is characterized by progressive paralysis of muscles innervated by cranial nerves. ...
Diseases include bifid uvula, cleft palate and carcinoma. If cranial nerve 10 is injured, the soft palate does not rise when ... Diseases of the teeth include baby-bottle tooth decay, epulis, meth mouth and Hutchinson's teeth. To assess the gums, a tongue ... Diseases include mucocele, aphthous ulcer, angular stomatitis, carcinoma, cleft lip, leukoplakia, herpes simplex and chelitis. ... Diseases include scrotal or fissured tongue, migratory glossitis (geographic tongue), atrophic glossitis, black hairy tongue, ...
... chewing and swallowing caused by dysfunction of several cranial nerve nuclei. Motor neuron disease is the most common disease ... The hypoglossal nerve is one of twelve cranial nerves found in amniotes including reptiles, mammals and birds. As with humans, ... The hypoglossal nerve is the twelfth cranial nerve, and innervates all the extrinsic and intrinsic muscles of the tongue, ... The hypoglossal nerve may be connected (anastomosed) to the facial nerve to attempt to restore function when the facial nerve ...
... from which the cranial nerves originate), or the neuromuscular junction (in diseases such as myasthenia gravis) which block the ... the facial nerve (VII), the glossopharyngeal nerve (IX), the vagus nerve (X), and the hypoglossal nerve (XII). Dysarthria does ... Cranial nerves that control the muscles relevant to dysarthria include the trigeminal nerve's motor branch (V), ... Tay-Sachs disease, and late-onset Tay-Sachs disease (LOTS) Dysarthrias are classified in multiple ways based on the ...
IBNC is marked by the degeneration of neurons and axons within the brainstem and cranial nerves. The disease also has a ... Nuclei of cranial nerves, arcuate nuclei, and posterior horn cells were also affected. Studies examining patients with ... Alzheimer's disease is a major neurodegenerative disease that involves the dying off of neurons and synapses. Chromatolysis has ... Chromatolytic cells have also been observed in a pathologically similar disease known as Pick's disease. Most recent studies ...
Adaszewski S1, Dukart J, Kherif F, Frackowiak R, Draganski B; Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (2013). "How early ... "A quantitative description of membrane current and its application to conduction and excitation in nerve". J. Physiol. 117 (4 ... can we predict Alzheimer's disease using computational anatomy?". Neurobiol Aging. 34 (12): 2815-26. doi:10.1016/j. ... sciences and computational modeling to quantitatively define and investigate problems in neurological and psychiatric diseases ...
In turn, a fairly complex reflex is triggered involving cranial nerves sub-serving respiration, retroperistalsis, and general ... SP concentrations cannot yet be used to diagnose disease clinically or gauge disease severity. It is not yet known whether ... Microbial Toxins and Diarrhoeal Disease. Ciba Found. Symp. 112. pp. 139-54. doi:10.1002/9780470720936.ch8. PMID 2861068.. ... Quantification in diseaseEdit. Elevation of serum, plasma, or tissue SP and/or its receptor (NK1R) has been associated with ...
Neurological (consciousness, awareness, brain, vision, cranial nerves, spinal cord and peripheral nerves) ... listen)) is the science and practice of the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disease.[4][5] The word "medicine" is ... Preventive medicine is the branch of medicine concerned with preventing disease. *Community health or public health is an ... Pathology as a medical specialty is the branch of medicine that deals with the study of diseases and the morphologic, ...
Cranial neuritis is an inflammation of cranial nerves. When due to Lyme, it most typically causes facial palsy impairing ... "Lyme disease rashes and look-alikes". Lyme Disease. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 21 December 2018. Archived from ... "Lyme Disease Data and surveillance". Lyme Disease. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 5 February 2019. Archived from ... Treatment regimens for Lyme disease range from 14 days in early localized disease, to 14-21 days in early disseminated disease ...
"Physiologists divide nerve-fibers, which form the nerves, into two classes, afferent and efferent. Impressions are made on the ... subluxation is the sole cause of disease and manipulation is the cure for all diseases of the human race.[4][41] A 2003 ... and cranial.[75] Chiropractic biophysics technique uses inverse functions of rotations during spinal manipulation.[76] Koren ... Thus, nerves carry impulses outward and sensations inward. The activity of these nerves, or rather their fibers, may become ...
Colorectal Disease. 10 (8): 789-792. doi:10.1111/j.1463-1318.2007.01381.x. PMID 17868406.. ... Cranial nerve examination. *Upper limb neurological examination. Neonatal. *Apgar score. *Ballard Maturational Assessment ... which may be useful in case of fecal incontinence or neurologic diseases, including traumatic spinal cord injuries; ... acute abdominal symptoms indicating a serious underlying disease). Although a Journal of Emergency Medicine paper concludes: " ...
There are twelve pairs of cranial nerves.[108] Due to their short cochlea, reptiles use electrical tuning to expand their range ... Paterson, Sue (December 17, 2007). Skin Diseases of Exotic Pets. Blackwell Science, Ltd. pp. 74-79. ISBN 9780470752432. .. ... NervesEdit. The reptilian nervous system contains the same basic part of the amphibian brain, but the reptile cerebrum and ... Hellebuyck, Tom; Pasmans, Frank; Haesbrouck, Freddy; Martel, An (July 2012). "Dermatological Diseases in Lizards". The ...
Cranial nerve palsies. *Arthritis. *Fatigue. *Headache. *Myalgias (muscle pain) and arthralgias (joint pain) ... Lyme disease or borreliosis, is an infectious disease. It is caused by bacteria of the genus Borrelia. The disease is carried ... Although Allen Steere realized in 1978 that Lyme disease was a tick-borne disease, the cause of the disease remained a mystery ... In other words, ticks are the vector which transmits the disease. It is the most common tick-borne infection in the United ...
Cranial nerve palsies occur in some unusual cases.[6] In the bestselling 1996 non-fiction book Into Thin Air: A Personal ... Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases. 52 (6): 467-484. doi:10.1016/j.pcad.2010.02.003. PMID 20417340.. ... but the increase in brain volume from edema does not likely cause cranial vault impingement.[16] The presence of large sulci ...
Sensory cranial and spinal nerves. *Optic (II). *Vestibulocochlear (VIII). *Olfactory (I). *Facial (VII) ... The Merkel nerve endings (also known as Merkel discs) detect sustained pressure. The lamellar corpuscles (also known as ... Mechanosensory free nerve endings detect touch, pressure, stretching, as well as the tickle and itch sensations. Itch ... They are all innervated by Aβ fibers, except the mechanorecepting free nerve endings, which are innervated by Aδ fibers. ...
Sensory cranial and spinal nerves. *Optic (II). *Vestibulocochlear (VIII). *Olfactory (I). *Facial (VII) ... or neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. These conditions can cause anosmia. In ... These diseases have more moderate effects on the olfactory system than Alzheimer's or Parkinson's diseases.[39] Furthermore, ... Other neurodegenerative diseases that affect olfactory dysfunction include Huntington's disease, multi-infarct dementia, ...
Early views on the function of the brain regarded it to be a "cranial stuffing" of sorts. In Egypt, from the late Middle ... Neurology works with diseases of the central and peripheral nervous systems, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and ... specialized to conduct nerve impulses called action potentials) - and somas (the cell bodies of the neurons containing the ... The scientific study of the biological mechanisms that underlie the disorders and diseases of the nervous system. ...
In the CNS for example, cranial nerve injury typically presents as a visual acuity loss 1-14 years post treatment.[25] In the ... Radiation therapy is used to treat early stage Dupuytren's disease and Ledderhose disease. When Dupuytren's disease is at the ... valvular heart disease, coronary artery disease, heart arrhythmia and peripheral artery disease. Radiation-induced fibrosis, ... Cardiovascular disease. Radiation can increase the risk of heart disease and death as observed in previous breast cancer RT ...
... and the glossopharyngeal nerve. Taste messages are sent via these cranial nerves to the brain. The brain can distinguish ... Mouth diseases include tongue diseases and salivary gland diseases. A common gum disease in the mouth is gingivitis which is ... It can also arise as a result of other gastrointestinal diseases such as coeliac disease. Coeliac disease is an autoimmune ... Crohn's disease is a common chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which can affect any part of the GI tract,[45] but it ...
Demyelinating disease, hipoglisemia, hiperglisemia, primary ocular disease-glaucoma, vitreal hemorrhage. floaters and the like ... "Peripheral nerve regeneration". Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Eastern Virginia Medical School; Liuzzi FJ, Tedeschi B ... "Penggunaan Trans Cranial Doppler untuk Deteksi Perubahan Hemodinamik Serebral pada Pasien Kritis". Diakses tanggal 3 April 2015 ... "Cerebrovascular Disease Service, Palmer 127, West Campus, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center; Caplan LR. Diakses tanggal 2011 ...
Such diseases are caused by an error in a single DNA gene. Because the disease is autosomal, the defective gene is found on an ... Proper myelination is critical for carrying electrical signals, or data, from one nerve cell to the next. When myelin becomes ... Cranial computed topography, magnetic resonance imaging, and flurodeoxyglucose positron emission topography are just some of ... More than 47 disease-causing mutations have been identified for the disorder, all of which lead to absence of functional ...
After cranial reconstructive surgery, a child may be required to wear a molding helmet or some other form of head protection ... Decreased space may also lead to abnormal or missing tear ducts and nerve damage. Reconstructive surgery is usually required in ... Furthermore, this is only possible if the mutation causing the disease has already been identified within the family genome. ... The cranial sutures eventually close within the first couple of years following birth, after the brain has finished growing. In ...
The initial diagnostic impression can be a broad term describing a category of diseases instead of a specific disease or ... Cranial nerve examination. *Upper limb neurological examination. Neonatal. *Apgar score. *Ballard Maturational Assessment ... Medical diagnosis (abbreviated Dx[1] or DS) is the process of determining which disease or condition explains a person's ... When making a medical diagnosis, a lag time is a delay in time until a step towards diagnosis of a disease or condition is made ...
Disease Control Priorities. 1 (3rd ed.). Washington, DC: World Bank. doi:10.1596/978-1-4648-0346-8. hdl:10986/21568. ISBN 978-1 ... an eye that cannot move or is deviated to one side can indicate that a broken facial bone is pinching a nerve that innervates ... CT scans can show brain bleeds, fractures of the skull, fluid build up in the brain that will lead to increased cranial ... Alzheimer's disease, for example, is much more likely to develop in a person who has experienced a head injury.[4] ...
"What is Ebola Virus Disease?". Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 5 November 2019. Retrieved 13 April 2020. Scientists ... The Eocene bats Icaronycteris (52 million years ago) and Palaeochiropteryx had cranial adaptations suggesting an ability to ... This skin membrane consists of connective tissue, elastic fibres, nerves, muscles, and blood vessels. The muscles keep the ... "Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 14 April 2014.. *^ Eaton, Bryan T.; Broder, Christopher C.; Middleton, Deborah; ...
Inner ear, cranial nerve VIII, or central processing centers Middle ear (ossicular chain), tympanic membrane, or external ear ... trauma or upper respiratory tract infection or may have an insidious onset related to chronic middle ear disease, otosclerosis ...
... identification of seven pairs of cranial nerves, the difference between sensory and motor nerves, and the discovery of the ... A simple autopsy of a cadaver can help determine origins of deadly diseases or disorders. Autopsies also can provide ... identify disease sites, determine causes of death, and provide tissue to repair a defect in a living human being. Students in ... optic nerves and the spine but unfortunately his later discovered notes were disorganized and difficult to decipher due to his ...
Japanese Journal of Infectious Diseases. 57: 184-186.. *^ a b c "MEMORANDUM FOR 18 MDG/SGPM" (PDF). "Land snail infection rates ... and coma and in the long term to permanent nerve damage, mental retardation, nerve damage, permanent brain damage, or death.[35 ... The diagnosis of eosinophilic meningitis can be arrived at through detection of elevated cranial pressure and increased numbers ... "PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases. 3 (9): e520. doi:10.1371/journal.pntd.0000520. PMC 2739427. PMID 19771154.. ...
Ingram LC, Fairclough DL, Furman WL, Sandlund JT, Kun LE, Rivera GK, Pui CH (May 1991). "Cranial nerve palsy in childhood acute ... relapse of malignant disease and incidence of acute and chronic graft-versus-host diseases if they are used for prophylactic ... Headache, vomiting, lethargy, neck stiffness,[18] or cranial nerve palsies[19] (CNS involvement) ... Cytogenetic testing on the marrow samples can help classify disease and predict how aggressive the disease course will be. ...
"Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment. 11: 2975-87. doi:10.2147/NDT.S91126. PMC 4670017. PMID 26664122.. ... The magnetic field can then be directed to induce an inverted electric current in the brain that activates nearby nerve cells ... "Clinical Policy Bulletin: Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Cranial Electrical Stimulation". Number 0469. Aetna. Archived ... In the European Economic Area, various versions of Deep TMS H-coils have CE marking for Alzheimer's disease,[74] autism,[74] ...
顱神經和脊柱神經(英语:WHO classification of the tumors of the central nervous system#2. Tumours of cranial and paraspinal nerves): 神經纖維瘤 ... 神經組織的贅生物(息肉/腫瘤) (ICD-O(英语:International Classification of Diseases for Oncology) 9350-9589) (C70-C72, D32-D33, 191-192/225) ... 周圍神經系統:神經鞘瘤(英语:nerve
Cranial and paraspinal nerves: Neurofibroma *Neurofibromatosis. *Neurilemmoma/Schwannoma *Acoustic neuroma. *Malignant ... Lhermitte-Duclos disease (LDD) (English: /ˌlɛərˈmiːtˌduːˈkloʊ/), also called dysplastic gangliocytoma of the cerebellum, is a ... Robinson S, Cohen AR (2006). "Cowden disease and Lhermitte-Duclos disease: an update. Case report and review of the literature ... Lhermitte-Duclos disease is a rare entity; approximately 222 cases of LDD have been reported in medical literature.[3] Symptoms ...
Ocular paralysis (cranial nerve palsy). *Impaired muscle coordination. *Weakness (muscle). *Loss of sensation ... A demyelinating disease is any disease of the nervous system in which the myelin sheath of neurons is damaged.[1] This damage ... Demyelinating diseases are traditionally classified in two kinds: demyelinating myelinoclastic diseases and demyelinating ... Alzheimer's disease, depression, and other diseases affecting the brain. It has also been used to study the metabolism of other ...
The facial nerve is the seventh of 12 cranial nerves. This cranial nerve controls the muscles in the face. Facial nerve palsy ... Cranial nerve disease is an impaired functioning of one of the twelve cranial nerves. Although it could theoretically be ... Eyes Oculomotor nerve palsy - Oculomotor nerve (III) Fourth nerve palsy - Trochlear nerve (IV) Sixth nerve palsy - Abducens ... Facial nerve (VII) (More on facial nerve palsy below) Accessory nerve disorder - Accessory nerve (XI) Pavlou, E., Gkampeta, A ...
Disease Ontology Definition:n_a Synonyms: Oculomotor nerve disorder, Third cranial nerve disease, Third cranial nerve disease ( ... In Mondo Disease Ontology: MONDO:0003546 - third cranial nerve disease Human Disease Resources: Disease Ontology, EMBL-EBI, ... DOID:562 - third cranial nerve disease. ...
ICD-10 code G53 for Cranial nerve disorders in diseases classified elsewhere is a medical classification as listed by WHO under ... ICD-10-CM Code for Cranial nerve disorders in diseases classified elsewhere G53 ICD-10 code G53 for Cranial nerve disorders in ... Excludes1: multiple cranial nerve palsy in sarcoidosis (D86.82). multiple cranial nerve palsy in syphilis (A52.15). ... She said it wasnt a nerve block. Knee surgery. Someone coded as 64999 unlisted SAB block. Could this however, be code... [ ...
Join friendly people sharing true stories in the I Have Cranial Nerve VII Diseases group. Find support forums, advice and chat ... I Have Cranial Nerve VII Diseases does not have any stories yet. Be a superstar and share yours. ... Cranial Nerve VII Diseases anonymous support group with information on diagnosis, treatment, symptoms, along with personal ... stories and experiences with Cranial Nerve VII Diseases. Youre not alone. Report Group. ...
"Cranial Nerve Diseases" by people in this website by year, and whether "Cranial Nerve Diseases" was a major or minor topic of ... "Cranial Nerve Diseases" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicines controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical ... Below are the most recent publications written about "Cranial Nerve Diseases" by people in Profiles. ... Below are MeSH descriptors whose meaning is more general than "Cranial Nerve Diseases". ...
As with CMT, cranial nerve involvement in the other types of HMSN (such as Déjérine-Sottas disease [type III] or Refsum disease ... neoplastic disease (metastatic disease and lymphoma), amyloid neuropathy, and neurosyphilis. The degree of cranial nerve ... Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease: Extensive Cranial Nerve Involvement on CT and MR Imaging. Todd R. Aho, Robert C. Wallace, Alan M. ... Cranial nerve enlargement (arrows) is most pronounced involving the mastoid or descending segments of cranial nerve VII (A), ...
Find out information about Cranial nerve diseases. the 12 pairs of nerves that branch off from the anterior surface of the ... brain stem in succession from front to back through special openings in the skull.... Explanation of Cranial nerve diseases ... Cranial Nerves. (redirected from Cranial nerve diseases). Also found in: Dictionary, Medical. Cranial Nerves. the 12 pairs of ... Cranial nerve diseases , Article about Cranial nerve diseases by The Free Dictionary https://encyclopedia2.thefreedictionary. ...
Cranial Nerve Function, Testing and Disease Symptoms. Posted by Dr. Chris. The Cranial Nerves. The brain is the central ... Functions of Cranial Nerves. In order to understand that nature of the symptoms in cranial nerve damage or disease, it is ... Names of the Cranial Nerves. Each pair of cranial nerves is numbered from one to twelve Roman numerals) and designated as CN. ... However, there are 12 pairs of nerves that emerge directly from the brain and are therefore known as cranial nerves. Some of ...
Enhancement of cranial nerves, conus medullaris, and nerve roots in POLG mitochondrial disease. I: Neurology. Genetics. 2019 ; ... Enhancement of cranial nerves, conus medullaris, and nerve roots in POLG mitochondrial disease. / Bayat, Michael; Yavarian, ... title = "Enhancement of cranial nerves, conus medullaris, and nerve roots in POLG mitochondrial disease", ... T1 - Enhancement of cranial nerves, conus medullaris, and nerve roots in POLG mitochondrial disease ...
Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease: Extensive Cranial Nerve Involvement on CT and MR Imaging. Todd R. Aho, Robert C. Wallace, Alan M. ... Cranial nerve enlargement (arrows) is most pronounced involving the mastoid or descending segments of cranial nerve VII (A), ... Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease: Extensive Cranial Nerve Involvement on CT and MR Imaging ... Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease: Extensive Cranial Nerve Involvement on CT and MR Imaging ...
... disease of cerebral arteries; cicatrices of liver and spleen in a case of congenital syphilis / by Thomas Barlow. ... Meningitis, arteritis and choroiditis in a child the subject of congenital syphilis : gummata on cranial nerves; disease of ... gummata on cranial nerves; disease of cerebral arteries; cicatrices of liver and spleen in a case of congenital syphilis / by ...
... thereby exhibiting excellent effects in the prevention and treatment of cranial nerve diseases caused by dopamine deficiency, ... or treating cranial nerve diseases caused by dopamine deficiency, the composition containing triiodidethyronine and tyroxine, ... The present invention provides a composition for preventing, alleviating, or treating cranial nerve diseases caused by dopamine ... thereby exhibiting excellent effects in the prevention and treatment of cranial nerve diseases caused by dopamine deficiency, ...
... of a disease or condition and Disease InfoSearch will locate quality information from a database of more than 13,000 diseases ... Are you looking for disease information or support? Simply type in the name ... Familial Congenital Fourth Cranial Nerve Palsy. Get Update Overview. Type of Disease: Rare conditions Genetic, autosomal ... Genetic & Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) GARD provides the public with access to current, reliable, and easy-to- ...
12th Cranial Nerve MalaCards organs/tissues related to Schwannoma of Twelfth Cranial Nerve:. 40 Tongue, Thymus, Spinal Cord, ... MalaCards integrated aliases for Schwannoma of Twelfth Cranial Nerve:. Name: Schwannoma of Twelfth Cranial Nerve 12 15 ... MalaCards based summary : Schwannoma of Twelfth Cranial Nerve, also known as schwannoma of the twelfth cranial nerve, is ... Disease Ontology : 12 A neurilemmoma that is located in the 12th cranial nerve. ...
Synonyms: cranial nerve disease, DOID:5656, cranial nerve disorder, cranial nerve syndrome, cranial nerve diseases ... ... A neuropathy that is located_in one of the twelve cranial nerves. ... Human genes for cranial nerve disease. Cranial nerve disease [ ... The disease-gene associations are derived from automatic text mining of the biomedical literature, manually curated database ...
Cranial Nerve IX Diseases; Glossopharyngeal Neuralgia; Ninth Cranial Nerve Diseases. On-line free medical diagnosis assistant. ... Ranked list of possible diseases from either several symptoms or a full patient history. A similarity measure between symptoms ... Glossopharyngeal Nerve Diseases (Cranial Nerve IX Diseases; Glossopharyngeal Neuralgia; Ninth Cranial Nerve Diseases). Diseases ... "Glossopharyngeal Nerve Diseases"Drugs, active principles and "Glossopharyngeal Nerve Diseases"Medicinal plantsQuestions and ...
Enhancement of cranial nerves, conus medullaris, and nerve roots in POLG mitochondrial disease. Michael Bayat, Yousef Yavarian ... Enhancement of cranial nerves, conus medullaris, and nerve roots in POLG mitochondrial disease ... Cranial nerve and cervical root enhancement in an infant with polymerase gamma mutation mitochondrial disease. Pediatr Neurol ... involving the cranial nerves, conus medullaris, and cauda equine nerve roots) is rare and usually not associated with ...
Cranial Nerve Injuries. Cranial Nerve Diseases. Nervous System Diseases. Craniocerebral Trauma. Trauma, Nervous System. Wounds ... Functions of cranial nerves [ Time Frame: 0~1 week after the drug administration ]. Physical examination of cranial nerves ... Effectiveness for cranial nerve imaging [ Time Frame: Intraoperative period with cranial nerve exposure ]. Sensitivity, ... DTI sequences and 3D-CISS sequences confirm that the tumor is adjacent to the cranial nerve or the cranial nerve will be ...
Cranial Nerve XII Diseases; Twelfth Cranial Nerve Diseases. On-line free medical diagnosis assistant. Ranked list of possible ... diseases from either several symptoms or a full patient history. A similarity measure between symptoms and diseases is provided ... Hypoglossal Nerve Diseases (Cranial Nerve XII Diseases; Twelfth Cranial Nerve Diseases). Diseases of the twelfth cranial ( ... Ranked list of diseases related to "Hypoglossal Nerve Diseases"Drugs, active principles and "Hypoglossal Nerve Diseases" ...
Cranial nerves in health and disease. CD-ROM included, 2nd edition PDF. This second edition presents a thorough revision of ... Numerous graphics are animated to show cellular processes associated with cranial nerves.• The CD-ROM includes a cranial nerves ... Cranial nerves in health and disease. CD-ROM included, 2nd edition.pdf. ... and developed clinical testing scenarios of each nerve. Cranial Nerves has a number of unique features that enhance the text.• ...
... in Childhood Onset Metabolic Storage Diseases? (a) Olfactory (I) (b) Optic (II) (c) Trigeminal ... Which Cranial Nerve is Most Frequently Involved (or damaged) ... Answer: Optic nerve (II). The optic nerve, unlike other cranial ... Re: Q: Which cranial nerve frequently impaired in childhood onset metabolic storage diseases. Admin on Sat Apr 20, 2013 6:33 pm ... Q: Which cranial nerve frequently impaired in childhood onset metabolic storage diseases. Admin on Thu Apr 18, 2013 6:40 pm ...
A 74-year-old man who had suffered from right herpes zoster ophthalmicus developed ipsilateral multiple cranial nerve ... A case of herpes zoster associated with multiple cranial nerve involvement] Rinsho Shinkeigaku. 1992 Mar;32(3):314-6. ... Cranial Nerve Diseases / microbiology* * Herpes Zoster / microbiology* * Humans * Male * Meningitis, Viral / microbiology ... A 74-year-old man who had suffered from right herpes zoster ophthalmicus developed ipsilateral multiple cranial nerve ...
Find details on Cranial nerve neuropathy in cats including diagnosis and symptoms, pathogenesis, prevention, treatment, ... Cranial nerve IX and X disease. *Disease of cranial nerves IX and X result primarily in dysphagia and laryngeal/pharyngeal ... Central causes are rarer, but disease involving these cranial nerve nuclei may result in dysphagia or pain when swallowing. ... Surgical treatment can result in long-term resolution of the disease.. Facial nerve. *Rarely, primary tumor of VII (nerve ...
Alzheimers disease, Glasgow coma scale, sleep terms, brain injury, mental health, consciousness, cranial nerves, phobias, ... Cranial Nerves (I-XII). Deatils of all cranial nerves (I-XII). Depression Related Terms. Words and terms related to depression. ... Alzheimer s Disease Terms. Words and terms related to Alzheimer s Disease.. Brain Injury Terms. Terms related to Brain Injuries ... Various terms for Neuro-Psych - Alzheimers disease, Glasgow coma scale, sleep terms, brain injury, mental health, ...
... and questions answered by our Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Specialists for Tumor of cranial and spinal nerves ... Diseases expand submenu for Diseases * Browse A-Z * Find Diseases By Category expand submenu for Find Diseases By Category * ... Find Diseases By Category expand submenu for Find Diseases By Category *Autoimmune / Autoinflammatory diseases ... contact gard Office of Rare Disease Research Facebook Page Office of Rare Disease Research on Twitter ...
Ocular paralysis (cranial nerve palsy). *Impaired muscle coordination. *Weakness (muscle). *Loss of sensation ... A demyelinating disease is any disease of the nervous system in which the myelin sheath of neurons is damaged.[1] This damage ... Demyelinating diseases are traditionally classified in two kinds: demyelinating myelinoclastic diseases and demyelinating ... Alzheimers disease, depression, and other diseases affecting the brain. It has also been used to study the metabolism of other ...
Stomatognathic Diseases. Herpesviridae Infections. DNA Virus Infections. Virus Diseases. Facial Nerve Diseases. Cranial Nerve ... Nervous System Diseases. Signs and Symptoms. Disease Attributes. Pathologic Processes. Mouth Diseases. ... Facial palsy after surgical removal of cranial base tumors adherent to the nerve can partly be explained by inflammation. ... Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center resources: Bell's Palsy Acoustic Neuroma Schwannoma ...
One patient developed de novo 6(th) nerve palsy as an isolated relapse manifestation and the second patient a sequence o ... Cranial Nerve Diseases / diagnosis*, etiology*, pathology, therapy. Diagnosis, Differential. Female. Humans. Magnetic Resonance ... nerve palsy as an isolated relapse manifestation and the second patient a sequence of multiple cranial nerve palsies. Brain ... Cranial neuropathy may be the first obvious vasculitic manifestation preceding other organ disease, and since single reliable ...
... fourth cranial nerve), which controls the action of the superior oblique muscle in the eye.[2] By 1998, there had been only one ... Diagnosis is most often made by the elimination of other conditions, disorders or diseases. Onset usually occurs in adulthood, ... The interposition of a Teflon pad between the trochlear nerve and a compressing artery and vein at the nerves exit from the ... In 1983, Bringewald postulated that superior oblique myokymia resulted from vascular compression of the trochlear nerve ( ...
Cranial Nerve Diseases. Nervous System Diseases. Eye Diseases. To Top. *For Patients and Families ... Pediatric Eye Disease Investigator Group, Cotter SA, Mohney BG, Chandler DL, Holmes JM, Repka MX, Melia M, Wallace DK, Beck RW ... Pediatric Eye Disease Investigator Group, Mohney BG, Cotter SA, Chandler DL, Holmes JM, Chen AM, Melia M, Donahue SP, Wallace ... Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center resources: Ocular Motility Disorders Motor Neuro-ophthalmic Disorders ...
  • Facial nerve palsy is more abundant in older adults than in children and is said to affect 15-40 out of 100,000 people per year. (wikipedia.org)
  • The most common cause of this cranial nerve damage is Bell's palsy (idiopathic facial palsy) which is a paralysis of the facial nerve. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bell's Palsy is thought to occur by an infection of the herpes virus which may cause demyelination and has been found in patients with facial nerve palsy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Recovery rate also depends on the cause of the facial nerve palsy (e.g. infections, perinatal injury, congenital dysplastic). (wikipedia.org)
  • Facial nerve palsy may be the indication of a severe condition and when diagnosed a full clinical history and examination are recommended. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although rare, facial nerve palsy has also been found in patients with HIV seroconversion. (wikipedia.org)
  • Few cases of bilateral facial nerve palsy have been reported and is said to only effect 1 in every 5 million per year. (wikipedia.org)
  • Eyes Oculomotor nerve palsy - Oculomotor nerve (III) Fourth nerve palsy - Trochlear nerve (IV) Sixth nerve palsy - Abducens nerve (VI) Other Trigeminal neuralgia - Trigeminal nerve (V) Facial nerve paralysis, Bell's palsy, Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome, Central seven - Facial nerve (VII) (More on facial nerve palsy below) Accessory nerve disorder - Accessory nerve (XI) Pavlou, E., Gkampeta, A., & Arampatzi, M. (2011). (wikipedia.org)
  • Facial nerve palsy in childhood. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bilateral lower motor neuron facial nerve palsy due to HIV seroconversion. (wikipedia.org)
  • Presentation of Bilateral Peripheral Seventh Cranial Nerve Palsy in an HIV Patient. (wikipedia.org)
  • Facial palsy after surgical removal of cranial base tumors adherent to the nerve can partly be explained by inflammation. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Cranial nerve palsy in Wegener's granulomatosis--lessons from clinical cases. (biomedsearch.com)
  • One patient developed de novo 6(th) nerve palsy as an isolated relapse manifestation and the second patient a sequence of multiple cranial nerve palsies. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Masked pseudomonal skull base osteomyelitis presenting with a bilateral Xth cranial nerve palsy. (lookfordiagnosis.com)
  • We report the case of a 77-year-old diabetic patient who presented with dysphonia and dysphagia and had a bilateral Xth cranial nerve palsy. (lookfordiagnosis.com)
  • Initial interest in studying the anatomy of the abducent nerve arose from the occurrence of abducent palsy in clinical practice. (medscape.com)
  • When the cranial nerves are affected, facial palsy (droop) can occur on one or both sides of the face. (cdc.gov)
  • Neurological complications most often occur in early disseminated Lyme disease, with numbness, pain, weakness, facial palsy/droop (paralysis of the facial muscles), visual disturbances, and meningitis symptoms such as fever, stiff neck, and severe headache. (cdc.gov)
  • In most cases of Bell's palsy, the nerve that controls muscles on one side of the face is damaged by inflammation . (nkch.org)
  • Neurologic examination confirmed a reduction in bilateral visual acuity along with grade 4 right sided facial nerve palsy. (omicsonline.org)
  • Some of the notable symptoms of this disease are localized headache, cranial nerve palsy, and double vision. (prnewswire.co.uk)
  • Disorders of one or more of the twelve cranial nerves. (umassmed.edu)
  • With the exception of the optic and olfactory nerves, this includes disorders of the brain stem nuclei from which the cranial nerves originate or terminate. (umassmed.edu)
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is one of the hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN) disorders, a group of genetically based disorders characterized by progressive motor weakness, decreased nerve conduction velocities, and nerve root enlargement ( 1 ). (ajnr.org)
  • CMT disease represents type I HMSN, a heterogeneous group of disorders of autosomal dominant inheritance characterized by distal muscle weakness, hypoactive or absent tendon reflexes, significantly decreased motor nerve conduction velocities, and hypertrophic onion-bulb changes on nerve biopsy. (ajnr.org)
  • Diagnosis is most often made by the elimination of other conditions, disorders or diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Unlike other primates, humans exhibit a unique pattern of postpubertal myelination, which may contribute to the development of psychiatric disorders and neurodegenerative diseases that present in early adulthood and beyond. (wikipedia.org)
  • Disorders of cranial nerves IX and X. Semin Neurol. (harvard.edu)
  • These specialties manage diseases and disorders of hearing, balance, cranial nerves, and the skull base. (medtronic.com)
  • Neurochemical or structural pathologic conditions affecting the basal ganglia result in diseases of motor control, classified as movement disorders. (aafp.org)
  • Genetic and epigenetic diseases and disorders are treated with FDA approved dietary compositions in the form of dietary supplements and nutraceuticals. (patents.com)
  • A 74-year-old man who had suffered from right herpes zoster ophthalmicus developed ipsilateral multiple cranial nerve involvement two weeks later. (nih.gov)
  • In this case, we speculate that localized leptomeningitis caused multiple cranial nerve involvement. (nih.gov)
  • Bernal OG, Lenn N. Multiple cranial nerve enhancement in early infantile Krabbe's disease. (bu.edu)
  • The clinical signs of botulism typically consist of bilateral, symmetric cranial nerve palsies and descending, symmetric, flaccid paralysis ( 2 , 3 ). (cdc.gov)
  • However, her symptoms rapidly evolved into cranial nerve palsies affecting IX-XII, not initially diagnosed. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Cranial nerve palsies due to metastases to the skull base are rare, and the authors would advise clinicians to adopt a high-index of suspicion in ruling out cranial nerve pathology at the skull base when encountering unusual signs and symptoms in the head and neck region. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Ear, nose, and throat (ENT) surgery, infectious diseases (ID), neurosurgery, and neurology were consulted and the patient was started on empirical antibiotic (vancomycin and ceftriaxone). (hindawi.com)
  • When the peripheral nerves are affected, patients can develop radiculoneuropathy which can cause numbness, tingling, "shooting" pain, or weakness in the arms or legs. (cdc.gov)
  • The disease affects peripheral nerves, nerve roots, and cranial nerves. (emedicinehealth.com)
  • Evaluation of the peripheral nerves reveals sections of the nerve with demyelination . (emedicinehealth.com)
  • Diseases of the Peripheral Nerves -- 47. (princeton.edu)
  • Pathologically, there is segmental demyelination of the peripheral nerves. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Nerve sheath tumors may arise within the trigeminal nerve. (vetstream.com)
  • He has specific expertise in the treatment of spinal cord tumors as well as metastatic disease of the spine. (swedish.org)
  • [ 7 , 22 ] In particular, petroclival tumors tend to grow along a lateral to medial trajectory and can therefore displace the abducent nerve medially. (medscape.com)
  • The pituitary tumors in Cushing's disease are usually microadenomas, which, by definition, are 10 mm or less in diameter. (aafp.org)
  • It is possible for a disorder of more than one cranial nerve to occur at the same time, if a trauma occurs at a location where many cranial nerves run together, such as the jugular fossa. (wikipedia.org)
  • The bulk of the imaging literature of this disorder concerns the identification of nerve root enlargement, often massive, within the lumbosacral spine in patients with nerve compression syndromes ( 2 - 5 ). (ajnr.org)
  • Case reports describing the imaging appearance of nerve hypertrophy in this disorder can be found from the mid-1970s with myelography, in the mid-1980s with CT, and to the current time with MR ( 2 - 5 ). (ajnr.org)
  • Guillain-Barre syndrome is a nerve disorder. (emedicinehealth.com)
  • Currently, no proven medical treatment exists to reverse or slow the natural disease process for the underlying disorder. (medscape.com)
  • Another name for Optic nerve disorder (or close medical condition association). (rightdiagnosis.com)
  • Eighth cranial nerve disease - A disorder affecting the eighth cranial nerve, characterized by a loss of hearing and/or balance. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Kidney disease - Any disorder which impairs the kidney's ability to remove waste and toxins from the body. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Parkinson's disease - A neurological disorder caused by deficiency of dopamine, a neurotransmitter, that is a chemical that assists in transmitting messages between the nerves within the brain. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Parkinson's disease is a progressive degenerative disorder of the central nervous system. (aafp.org)
  • Parkinson's disease, a progressive disorder of the central nervous system (CNS), is caused by the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra of the midbrain. (aafp.org)
  • serum neuropathy a neurologic disorder, usually involving the cervical nerves or brachial plexus, occurring two to eight days after the injection of foreign protein, as in immunization or serotherapy for tetanus, diphtheria, or scarlet fever, and characterized by local pain followed by sensory disturbances and paralysis. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The present invention provides a composition for preventing, alleviating, or treating cranial nerve diseases caused by dopamine deficiency, the composition containing triiodidethyronine and tyroxine, or a salt thereof. (sumobrain.com)
  • Cranial Nerve VII Diseases anonymous support group with information on diagnosis, treatment, symptoms, along with personal stories and experiences with Cranial Nerve VII Diseases. (experienceproject.com)
  • Summary: We report a case of genetically verified Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease in which the patient had cranial nerve symptoms. (ajnr.org)
  • In order to understand that nature of the symptoms in cranial nerve damage or disease, it is important to first know its functions. (healthhype.com)
  • Monarch's tools are designed to make it easier to compare the signs and symptoms (phenotypes) of different diseases and discover common features. (cdc.gov)
  • Symptoms and signs that present in demyelinating diseases are different for each condition. (wikipedia.org)
  • The nerve is especially sensitive to mechanical irritation here, which provokes the clinical symptoms of nerve compression. (aerzteblatt.de)
  • Neurologic symptoms of Lyme disease occur when the Lyme disease bacteria affect the peripheral or central nervous systems. (cdc.gov)
  • Neurologic symptoms do not necessarily indicate central nervous system infection in a patient with Lyme disease. (cdc.gov)
  • Additionally the diagnostic tools and investigations used in neuromuscular disease are explained and a practical guide is given how to advance from symptoms to syndromes. (apress.com)
  • Parkinson's disease has been reported to affect approximately 1 percent of Americans over 50 years of age, 1 but unrecognized early symptoms of the disease may be present in as many as 10 percent of those over 60 years of age. (aafp.org)
  • The most common compression syndrome affects the trigeminal nerve and leads to trigeminal neuralgia, followed by hemifacial spasm, which is caused by vascular compression of the facial nerve. (aerzteblatt.de)
  • A literature search was carried out in PubMed with the following search terms: neurovascular compression syndrome, cranial neuralgia, trigeminal neuralgia, hemifacial spasm, glossopharyngeal neuralgia, vestibular nerve compression, vestibular paroxysmia, intermedius neuralgia and microvascular decompression. (aerzteblatt.de)
  • He explored the cerebellopontine angle in patients who underwent a microvascular decompression (MVD) for a trigeminal neuralgia (TN), a hemifacial spasm (HFS) or eigth nerve dysfunction. (springer.com)
  • The 12th pair, the hypoglossal nerves, is unusual in that it arose in amniotes as a result of fusion of the muscular branches of the spinal nerves. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The cranial nerves, unlike the spinal nerves, are not segmented and are highly specialized. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Most of these nerves emerge pass through the spinal cord and are known as the spinal nerves. (healthhype.com)
  • A neurological examination can test the functioning of individual cranial nerves, and detect specific impairments. (wikipedia.org)
  • Neurovascular compression syndromes are clinically characterized by functional disturbances of individual cranial nerves. (aerzteblatt.de)
  • Enhanced brain MRI with or without cranial CT confirms a diagnosis of tumor in the anterior skull base, the middle cranial fossa, or the posterior cranial fossa. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Differential diagnosis of peripheral vestibular disease include otitis interna Otitis interna , middle ear polyps and neoplasia (squamous cell carcinoma Squamous cell carcinoma of the middle ear). (vetstream.com)
  • Cranial neuropathy may be the first obvious vasculitic manifestation preceding other organ disease, and since single reliable tests for its diagnosis are lacking, a multidisciplinary approach is advocated here to detect vasculitic manifestations in other organs. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Halperin J. Nervous system Lyme disease: diagnosis and treatment external icon . (cdc.gov)
  • We present one such case, where both above factors played a key role in enabling us to guide our clinical counterparts towards the diagnosis and a posttherapy confirmation of disease resolution. (omicsonline.org)
  • Electrophysiologic and Laboratory Aids in the Diagnosis of Neuromuscular Disease -- 46. (princeton.edu)
  • Principles of Clinical Myology: Diagnosis and Classification of Diseases of Muscle and Neuromuscular Junction -- 49. (princeton.edu)
  • The first and second pairs of the cranial nerves are the olfactory and optic nerves, which, unlike the other cranial nerves, originate in the brain and serve as conducting pathways for the olfactory and visual analyzers. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Olfactory Nerve (CN I or 1) Bipolar cells in the nasal mucosa give rise to axons that enter the cranial cavity through foramina in the cribriform plate of the ethmoid bone. (amelia-alliance.fr)
  • This Phase I/II clinical trial is aimed to investigate the safety and validity of FAM-NP41 for the fluorescence imaging of cranial nerves. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • They have revised the original text and visual material, created case history scenarios with guiding questions, and developed clinical testing scenarios of each nerve. (amelia-alliance.fr)
  • The major clinical syndromes of pneumococcal disease are pneumonia , bacteremia , and meningitis . (cdc.gov)
  • Pneumococcal pneumonia is the most common clinical presentation of pneumococcal disease among adults. (cdc.gov)
  • Bacteremia without a known site of infection is the most common invasive clinical presentation of pneumococcal infection among children 2 years old or younger, accounting for approximately 70% of invasive disease in this age group. (cdc.gov)
  • Diseases of the ninth cranial (glossopharyngeal) nerve or its nuclei in the medulla. (lookfordiagnosis.com)
  • Diseases of the twelfth cranial (hypoglossal) nerve or nuclei. (lookfordiagnosis.com)
  • The nuclei and fascicles of the nerve are located in the medulla, and the nerve exits the skull via the hypoglossal foramen and innervates the muscles of the tongue . (lookfordiagnosis.com)
  • Lower brain stem diseases, including ischemia and MOTOR NEURON DISEASES may affect the nuclei or nerve fascicles. (lookfordiagnosis.com)
  • Central causes are rarer, but disease involving these cranial nerve nuclei may result in dysphagia or pain when swallowing. (vetstream.com)
  • Damage to optic nerve fibers may occur at or near their origin in the retina, at the optic disk, or in the nerve, optic chiasm, optic tract, or lateral geniculate nuclei. (rightdiagnosis.com)
  • The nerve may be injured by diseases affecting the lower brain stem , floor of the posterior fossa, jugular foramen, or the nerve's extracranial course. (lookfordiagnosis.com)
  • The nerve may also be injured by diseases of the posterior fossa or skull base . (lookfordiagnosis.com)
  • Nerve compression syndromes in the posterior cranial fossa can severely impair patients quality of life. (aerzteblatt.de)
  • Nerve compression syndromes in the posterior cranial fossa can generally be treated nonsurgically at first. (aerzteblatt.de)
  • Whenever a nerve compression syndrome is suspected, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain should be performed, with particular attention to the posterior fossa. (aerzteblatt.de)
  • The second curve extends over the petrous apex after which the nerve angles inferiorly and laterally to reach the posterior bend of the cavernous ICA. (medscape.com)
  • [ 7 ] In the posterior cavernous sinus, the abducent nerve runs parallel to the V1 segment of the trigeminal nerve, and therefore, dissection in the approach via the Meckel cave should not proceed above the V2 segment. (medscape.com)
  • Hemorrhage in the posterior cranial fossa in newborn children often ends tragically, statistics show that the lethal outcome with this pathology occurs in most cases. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Level V contains the lymph nodes located along the lower half of the spinal accessory nerve and the transverse cervical artery, posterior to the SCM. (redorbit.com)
  • progressive hypertrophic neuropathy a slowly progressive familial disease beginning in early life, marked by hyperplasia of interstitial connective tissue, causing thickening of peripheral nerve trunks and posterior roots, and by sclerosis of the posterior columns of the spinal cord, with atrophy of distal parts of the legs and diminution of tendon reflexes and sensation. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • the 12 pairs of nerves that branch off from the anterior (lower) surface of the brain stem in succession from front to back through special openings in the skull. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • However, there are 12 pairs of nerves that emerge directly from the brain and are therefore known as cranial nerves . (healthhype.com)
  • Twelve pairs of nerves that carry general afferent, visceral afferent, special afferent, somatic efferent, and autonomic efferent fibers. (jove.com)
  • A demyelinating disease is any disease of the nervous system in which the myelin sheath of neurons is damaged. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cardioviruses can cause severe infections of the myocardium and central nervous system in animals, but SAFV has not yet been convincingly associated with disease in humans. (cdc.gov)
  • Varying degrees of permanent nervous system damage may develop in people who do not receive treatment in the early stages of illness and who develop late-stage Lyme disease. (cdc.gov)
  • Conditions which produce injury or dysfunction of the second cranial or optic nerve, which is generally considered a component of the central nervous system. (rightdiagnosis.com)
  • Viral Infections of the Nervous System, Chronic Meningitis, and Prion Diseases -- 34. (princeton.edu)
  • Inherited Metabolic Diseases of the Nervous System -- 38. (princeton.edu)
  • Developmental Diseases of the Nervous System -- 39. (princeton.edu)
  • Degenerative Diseases of the Nervous System -- 40. (princeton.edu)
  • Diseases of the Nervous System Caused by Nutritional Deficiency -- 42. (princeton.edu)
  • 2. In contemporary usage, a disease involving the cranial nerves or the peripheral or autonomic nervous system. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Organophosphate poisoning by commercial insecticides such as sheep dip , weed killers , and flea treatment preparations for pets, can also result in nerve demyelination. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cranial nerve demyelination was found during autopsy. (cdc.gov)
  • Demyelination of cranial nerves might be underrecognized during autopsy of botulism patients. (cdc.gov)
  • We report atypical type F botulism associated with demyelination of cranial nerves. (cdc.gov)
  • The eighth pair, the vestibulocochlear nerves, evolved from the facial nerves. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Vestibulocochlear nerve - sensation of hearing. (healthhype.com)
  • Less well-known nerve compression syndromes affect the glossopharyngeal nerve, the nervus intermedius and the vestibulocochlear nerve. (aerzteblatt.de)
  • This nerve, a division of the very short vestibulocochlear nerve, enters the base of the modiolus from the brainstem through an opening in the petrous portion of the temporal bone called the internal meatus. (britannica.com)
  • where do the vestibulocochlear and hypoglossal nerves exit the medulla? (brainscape.com)
  • Involvement of cranial nerves, both clinically and radiographically, is thought to be quite rare. (ajnr.org)
  • The following case illustrates involvement of several cranial nerves in a patient with CMT disease. (ajnr.org)
  • Cranial nerve deficits may be indicative of peripheral involvement of individual nerves or of central lesions. (vetstream.com)
  • Brainstem involvement in demyelinating diseases. (indigo.ca)
  • The syndrome has most frequently been confused with hereditary congenital facial paresis (see 601471), which is restricted to involvement of the facial nerve and no other abnormalities. (malacards.org)
  • Idiopathic hypertrophic pachymeningitis (IHP) is one of the rare entities that usually present with cranial nerve involvement in various numbers and combinations. (omicsonline.org)
  • The lesion further extended along bilateral superior orbital fissure to encase the intracranial and intraorbital optic nerves. (omicsonline.org)
  • The facial nerve is the seventh of 12 cranial nerves. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hence, disturbance of nerve conduction, as in paralysis of the facial nerve, cannot be compensated by adjacent nerves. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Facial nerve - muscles that control facial expressions, scalp and stapedius muscle of middle ear. (healthhype.com)
  • Rarely, primary tumor of VII (nerve sheath tumor, lymphosarcoma Lymphoma , or meningiomas involving the facial nerve are found. (vetstream.com)
  • The opposite of a facial paresis, hemifacial spasm is suspected to be due to hypersensitivity of the facial nerve. (vetstream.com)
  • The ear on this side is often directed caudally and the palpebral fissure is smaller due to contraction of the muscles innervated by the facial nerve. (vetstream.com)
  • If Horner's syndrome or facial nerve paresis are found concurrently, other differentials should be considered. (vetstream.com)
  • Diseases associated with MARVELD1 include Facial Nerve Disease and Facial Paralysis . (genecards.org)
  • The facial nerve passes close to the mastoid process. (wikipedia.org)
  • Facial nerve paralysis: A three year retrospective study Of all the cranial nerves , the facial nerve is the one which is most commonly involved in disease. (tripdatabase.com)
  • Surgical decompression of the facial nerve traditionally advocated have been questioned. (tripdatabase.com)
  • Damage to the facial nerve that controls muscles on one side of the face causes that side of your face to droop . (nkch.org)
  • He or she will also give you a physical and neurological exam to check facial nerve function. (nkch.org)
  • The facial nerve (cranial nerve VII) and abducens nerve (CN VI) are most frequently involved, but other cranial nerves may be involved as well. (malacards.org)
  • The facial nerve and other cranial nerves are often at risk during otologic and skull base surgery. (medtronic.com)
  • Hypoglossal nerve - muscles of the tongue - swallowing and articulation (speech). (healthhype.com)
  • The hypoglossal nerve innervates certain muscles that control movement of the tongue. (britannica.com)
  • tongue muscles supplied by the hypoglossal nerve can be assessed by measuring the deviation of the tongue when extended toward the weak side. (britannica.com)
  • Structural images, DTI sequences and 3D-CISS sequences confirm that the tumor is adjacent to the cranial nerve or the cranial nerve will be exposed during the neurological surgery. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Dyck et al ( 7 ) classified hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies into two main groups based on the presence or absence of decreased nerve conduction velocities and neuronal hypertrophy. (ajnr.org)
  • the nerves are the chief sensory nerves of the face and serve as the motor nerves of the muscles of mastication. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The facial nerves also contain secretory fibers to the lacrimal and salivary glands and sensory fibers to the mucous membrane of the tongue. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • These nerves are purely sensory: They are responsible for linking the organs of hearing and equilibrium with the brain. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Some of these nerves are sensory or motor only while others are mixed containing a combination of sensory and motor fibers. (healthhype.com)
  • It maintains the first editions approach of blending the neuro- and gross anatomy of the cranial nerves as seen through color-coded functional drawings of the pathways from the periphery of the body to the brain (sensory input), and from the brain to the periphery (motor output).Joining original authors, Dr. Linda Wilson-Pauwels, Prof. Elizabeth Akesson, and Dr. Patricia Stewart, is neurologist Dr. Siân Spacey. (amelia-alliance.fr)
  • It summarizes the books unique component of color-coded nerve modalities, which comprise three sensory tracts and three motor tracts. (amelia-alliance.fr)
  • A syndrome characterized by recurrent episodes of excruciating pain lasting several seconds or longer in the sensory distribution of the trigeminal nerve. (curehunter.com)
  • Cranial nerves are made up of motor neurons , sensory neurons , or both. (biology-online.org)
  • diabetic neuropathy a complication of diabetes mellitus consisting of chronic symmetrical sensory polyneuropathy affecting first the nerves of the lower limbs and often affecting autonomic nerves. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy (HSAN) any of several inherited neuropathies that involve slow ascendance of lesions of the sensory nerves, resulting in pain, distal trophic ulcers, and a variety of autonomic disturbances. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • A brainstem lesion could also cause impaired functioning of multiple cranial nerves, but this condition would likely also be accompanied by distal motor impairment. (wikipedia.org)
  • These syndromes are caused by compression of a cranial nerve by an artery or vein at the zone of the nerve s entry to or exit from the brainstem. (aerzteblatt.de)
  • In the area of the root entry zone or root exit zone (REZ) of the relevant cranial nerve at the brainstem, the nerve comes into contact with a blood vessel usually an artery, less commonly a vein. (aerzteblatt.de)
  • Rare Findings/Symptomes.Part IV: Diseases: Vascular brainstem diseases. (indigo.ca)
  • In cases of intracranial hypotension with brainstem sag or cervical trauma resulting in parenchymal movement within the cranium, this may be a point at which the cisternal segment of the nerve suffers stretch injury. (medscape.com)
  • what is the only cranial nerve that exits on the dorsal brainstem? (brainscape.com)
  • Nerves are like the electrical wiring that carry signals to and from the brain. (healthhype.com)
  • The optic nerve, unlike other cranial nerves, are actual myelin coated projection of the brain, which makes them part of CNS. (forumotion.com)
  • One such option is a treatment called vagus nerve stimulation (VNS), in which short bursts of electrical energy are directed into the brain by way of the vagus nerve . (tripdatabase.com)
  • Other causes include Meniere disease, "vestibular schwannoma on the eighth cranial nerve," and brain injury. (ehow.co.uk)
  • Coronal section of the brain showing the normal motor control connections that are involved in Parkinson's disease. (aafp.org)
  • As peripheral nerve neuritides they resemble the peripheral neuropathies in pathology and etiology Peripheral nerve: trauma . (vetstream.com)
  • The related ninth, tenth, and 11th pairs-the glossopharyngeal, vagus, and accessory nerves-are unequal in fiber composition and extent of spread. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Glossopharyngeal nerve - muscles that assist with swallowing. (healthhype.com)
  • This graph shows the total number of publications written about "Glossopharyngeal Nerve Diseases" by people in Harvard Catalyst Profiles by year, and whether "Glossopharyngeal Nerve Diseases" was a major or minor topic of these publication. (harvard.edu)
  • Below are the most recent publications written about "Glossopharyngeal Nerve Diseases" by people in Profiles. (harvard.edu)
  • Glossopharyngeal Postherpetic Neuralgia Palliated With Fluoroscopic-Guided Nerve Block: A Case Report. (harvard.edu)
  • Entrapment of the glossopharyngeal nerve in patients with Eagle syndrome: surgical technique and outcomes in a series of 5 patients. (harvard.edu)
  • To examine glossopharyngeal and vagus nerve function, the physician tests for the presence of touch sensation on the soft palate and the back of the throat (the latter usually eliciting a gagging reflex), the elevation of the palate on phonation (which should be symmetrical but rises to the stronger side in the presence of weakness on one. (biology-online.org)
  • Oculomotor nerve - eyelid movements, most eyeball movements, constricts pupils and changes the shape of lens (accommodation for visual acuity). (healthhype.com)
  • Very rarely, the oculomotor nerve or the abducens nerve is involved. (aerzteblatt.de)
  • MRI showed enhancement of the oculomotor nerves, the conus medullaris, the adjacent leptomeninges, and the cauda equina nerves. (neurology.org)
  • Most of the large envelope-bearing viruses that figured prominently in older series of ADEM, of which measles was a particularly virulent example, no longer figure importantly in the etiology of ADEM because these diseases are prevented by vaccination. (medscape.com)
  • Dysphagia may be seen with myopathy, peripheral neuropathy, and neuromuscular junction disease. (vetstream.com)
  • 12 A neurilemmoma that is located in the 12th cranial nerve. (malacards.org)
  • Cranial Nerve Diseases" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicine's controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) . (umassmed.edu)
  • Cranial nerve disease is an impaired functioning of one of the twelve cranial nerves. (wikipedia.org)
  • Each pair of cranial nerves is numbered from one to twelve Roman numerals) and designated as CN. (healthhype.com)
  • A neuropathy that is located_in one of the twelve cranial nerves. (jensenlab.org)
  • Intra-axial cranial nerve lesions. (indigo.ca)
  • This was initially attributed to local disease, and a biopsy showed the patient was suffering from Necrotizing Sialometaplasia. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Consult an infectious disease specialist regarding individual patient treatment decisions. (cdc.gov)
  • Multiple wide striae on the abdomen of a patient with Cushing's disease. (aafp.org)
  • The patient was referred for cranial MR imaging which was performed on a 1.5T superconducting magnet (Magnetom Avanto, Seimens Medical System, Erlangen, Germany) with actively shielded whole body gradients, using a 4 channel birdcage type qudrature head coil. (omicsonline.org)
  • Approach to the Patient with Neurologic Disease -- 2. (princeton.edu)
  • This cranial nerve controls the muscles in the face. (wikipedia.org)
  • The seventh pair, the facial nerves, innervates the organs of the lateral line and the musculature of the hyoid arch in fish, the superficial musculature of the neck and the muscle that lowers the lower jaw in terrestrial vertebrates, and the facial muscles in humans and simians. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The accessory nerve is motor to the sternocleidomastoid and trapezius muscles. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Accessory nerve - muscles for head and shoulder movements. (healthhype.com)
  • Muscles that are controlled by nerves in the head may be involved. (emedicinehealth.com)
  • There may be weakness in muscles controlled by cranial nerves. (emedicinehealth.com)
  • As the nerve in your face begins to work again, doing simple exercises-such as tightening and relaxing your facial muscles-may make those muscles stronger and help you recover more quickly. (nkch.org)
  • It is an acute and rapidly progressive inflammation of nerves that causes loss of sensation and muscle weakness. (emedicinehealth.com)
  • Muscle weakness near the involved nerves can be the most prominent sign. (emedicinehealth.com)
  • Myasthenis gravis - A neuromuscular disease characterized by muscle weakness in the limbs and face. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Pre-existing medical conditions-such as kidney disease, eighth cranial nerve disease, myasthenia gravis , and Parkinson's disease-should be discussed prior to taking any aminoglycosides. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Emerging Infectious Diseases , 18 (1), 1-6. (cdc.gov)
  • To receive news and publication updates for Case Reports in Infectious Diseases, enter your email address in the box below. (hindawi.com)
  • Fluorescently labeled NP41 is effective for the intraoperative visualization of cranial nerves during neurosurgery. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The root of the nerve exits the cranial cavity via the jugular foramen. (biology-online.org)
  • Level I nodes often indicate disease in the anterior oral cavity. (redorbit.com)
  • Some text is set in gray boxes and provides additional relevant information that enhances understanding of the basics of cranial nerve anatomy and function. (amelia-alliance.fr)
  • Knowledge of the detailed anatomy of the abducent nerve is of utmost importance to minimize risk of injury in surgical approaches to the petroclival region. (medscape.com)
  • The fibres of the cochlear nerve originate from an aggregation of nerve cell bodies, the spiral ganglion, located in the modiolus of the cochlea. (britannica.com)
  • Abducens nerve - moves eyeball to the outer side (laterally). (healthhype.com)
  • CT and MR imaging demonstrated enlargement of several cranial nerves, as well as their skull-base foramina, with faint contrast material enhancement identified. (ajnr.org)
  • CT images demonstrated enlargement of multiple skull-base foramina ( Fig 2 ), whereas the MR images better demonstrated enlargement of the cranial nerves themselves ( Fig 3 ). (ajnr.org)
  • A-C , Thin-section (1-mm) coronal and axial CT images of the skull base obtained with an edge-enhancing bone algorithm show enlargement (arrows) of the mastoid canals of cranial nerve VII ( A ), the foramina of ovale ( B ), and rotundum (C) bilaterally. (ajnr.org)
  • Some of the pathologies presenting clinically with symptomatology, referable to cranial nerves, primarily involve them, while most others cause extraneous compression of these fine structures that traverse through a unique environment of meninges, subarachnoid space, the skull, and its foramina [ 1 ]. (omicsonline.org)
  • Our intraoperative NIM ® Nerve Monitoring Systems enable surgeons to identify and confirm motor nerve function and monitor major motor nerves during otology, neurotology, and skull base surgeries, as well as other procedures. (medtronic.com)
  • The cranial nerves innervate the organs and tissues of the head and neck, with the exception of the vagus nerve, which descends into the thoracic and abdominal cavities. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • In mammals the 11th pair arises from the vagus nerve. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Vagus nerve - feedback on aortic blood pressure. (healthhype.com)
  • Vagus Nerve Stimulation for Treating Adults With Severe Fibromyalgia Vagus Nerve Stimulation for Treating Adults With Severe Fibromyalgia - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. (tripdatabase.com)
  • He said that the vagus nerve was being pinched and that is the nerve that controls the stomach acids and the calmness before bed. (biology-online.org)
  • maybe the Vagus nerve was damaged somehow. (biology-online.org)
  • The vagus nerve has the most extensive distribution in the body of all the cranial nerves, innervating structures as diverse as the external surface of the eardrum and internal abdominal organs. (biology-online.org)
  • Nervous control of the heart is maintained by the parasympathetic fibres in the vagus nerve (parasympathetic) and by the sympathetic nerves. (biology-online.org)
  • The vagus nerve is the cardiac inhibitor, and the sympathetic nerves are the cardiac excitors. (biology-online.org)
  • Stimulation of the vagus nerve depresses the rate of impulse formation and atrial contractility and thereby reduces cardiac output and slows the rate of the. (biology-online.org)
  • Animals with systemic hematological neoplasia that develop cranial nerve abnormalities should be evaluated for extension of the tumor to these sites. (vetstream.com)
  • 1 The term "Cushing's disease" is reserved for Cushing's syndrome that is caused by excessive secretion of adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH) by a pituitary tumor, usually an adenoma. (aafp.org)
  • With the NIM-Neuro ® system, surgeons can monitor up to 8 channels of nerve-muscle combinations during complex and delicate surgeries, such as glomus or acoustic tumor removals. (medtronic.com)
  • There was no family history of neurologic disease. (neurology.org)
  • Two-step serologic testing for Lyme disease is the recommended diagnostic test for neurologic Lyme disease. (cdc.gov)
  • 2. Cardinal Manifestations of Neurologic Disease -- Sect. (princeton.edu)
  • 4. Major Categories of Neurologic Disease -- 30. (princeton.edu)
  • Disease of cranial nerves IX and X result primarily in dysphagia and laryngeal/pharyngeal problems. (vetstream.com)
  • A similar, poorly defined idiopathic neuropathy involving the vestibular nerve has been described. (vetstream.com)
  • Idiopathic Parkinson's disease is caused by the progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and nigrostriatal pathway of the midbrain. (aafp.org)
  • Neurotomy of Optic Nerve in Non-Arthritic Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy Neurotomy of Optic Nerve in Non-Arthritic Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. (tripdatabase.com)
  • This is a natural weak point of the nerve, the site of transition between central and peripheral myelin. (aerzteblatt.de)
  • This syndrome causes the destruction, removal, or loss of the myelin sheath of a nerve. (emedicinehealth.com)
  • The myelin sheath serves as an electrical insulator to nerve fibers. (emedicinehealth.com)
  • Objective To understand the predictors and prognostic significance of cranial nerve impairment in non- acquired immune deficiency syndrome ( AIDS ) patients with cryptococcal meningitis . (bvsalud.org)
  • Objective To investigate the risk factors associated with cranial nerve impairment in patients with tuberculous meningitis . (bvsalud.org)
  • Guillain-Barre syndrome is also known as a polyneuropathy, which is a disease that involves several nerves. (emedicinehealth.com)
  • and functionally distinct parts: the cochlear nerve, which innervates the organ of hearing, and the vestibular nerve, which innervates the organs of equilibrium. (britannica.com)
  • and functionally distinct parts: the cochlear nerve, distributed to the hearing organ, and the vestibular nerve, distributed to the organ of equilibrium. (britannica.com)